The Department of Occupational Therapy Education is one of eight departments of the KU School of Health Professions and is located on the KU Medical Center campus in Kansas City, Kan.

  • Vision statement: Preparing professionals for innovative and reasoned practice and leadership

  • Mission statement: To provide exemplary education that prepares occupational therapy leaders supporting people to participate in everyday life.

KU's occupational therapy programs are nationally recognized for excellence in producing leaders in education and research.

The department offers the following degree programs:

Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT)

Students interested in the profession of occupational therapy enter this 3-year graduate degree program after acquiring a bachelor's degree at KU or another institution. Graduates are eligible to take the national certification examination to obtain OT licensure.

Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD)

This clinically-focused doctoral program is designed for practicing occupational therapists wanting to pursue the highest level of advanced practice. A degree in occupational therapy from an accredited program, a master’s degree, and current license to practice as an occupational therapist are required for admission.

Therapeutic Science (Ph.D.)

Administered through the Department of Occupational Therapy Education, this research-focused doctoral program benefits from faculty expertise in many different departments and schools across the University of Kansas. It is designed to support interdisciplinary study of wellness and disability related to individuals and support systems. 

Occupational Therapy (MS) Courses

OTMS 699. Special Projects. 1-6 Hours.

(1-6) An elective course to allow student investigation of special issues or problems relevant to applied research and/or practice, under the direction of a faculty member chosen by the student. Systematic coverage of current issues may include a research investigation or study related to pertinent sociocultural trends, practice factors, or emerging issues in service provision. Students will complete special projects such as oral presentations, written papers, or case analysis as negotiate with the faculty mentor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Enrollment as a non-degree seeking student and permission of the instructor. IND.

OTMS 701. Professional Development. 3 Hours.

With an emphasis on leadership skills and professionalism, this course will include mentoring, supervising, managing, organizing presentations, and teaching, writing, and contributing through professional organizations (interdisciplinary and occupational therapy). Students professionalism on issues of concern to administrators, staff therapists, educators, or those in private practice. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. LEC.

OTMS 705. Multidisciplinary Theoretical Perspectives. 3 Hours.

Students will identify and explore the key theories in occupational therapy and those more specific to their emphasis area with an emphasis on those currently influencing clinical reasoning. Students will demonstrate an understanding of contemporary theories and be able to compare and contrast key theories. Students will develop rationales for theory guided interventions. Furthermore, they will develop an impact summary in their identified area of emphasis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. LEC.

OTMS 735. Practice Models for Applied Science. 3 Hours.

Issues and trends relative to advanced application of theory, assessment and intervention with emphasis on pediatrics will be presented in lecture and discussion. Special projects will emphasize the student's special interests. Although faculty directed, student presentation will be emphasized. LEC.

OTMS 799. Special Topics in Occupational Therapy. 1-6 Hours.

An elective course to allow student investigation of special issues or problems relevant to applied research and/or practice, under the direction of a faculty member chosen by the student. Systematic coverage of current issues may include a research investigation or study related to pertinent sociocultural trends, practice factors, or emerging issues in service provision. Students will complete special projects such as oral presentations, written papers, or case analyses as negotiate with the faculty mentor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. IND.

OTMS 800. Research Proseminar. 1 Hour.

A proseminar conducted by the core graduate faculty in Occupational Therapy and Therapeutic Science. Twice-monthly meeting will involve student and faculty presentations of their current research, as well as provide more opportunities to obtain feedback on research proposals. May be taken more than once for a total of fours credits. (Same as TS 800.) RSH.

OTMS 801. Applied Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

The course will address the major functions of the systems within the central nervous system and how they interact to produce responses to environmental demands. Sensory input, central processing, and output mechanisms will be analyzed. The student will then appraise human behavior in relation to function and dysfunction of the nervous system, both in formulating potential behavioral signs when a specific neurological site is presented, and in hypothesizing about neurological involvement when analyzing a particular individuals problems. Prerequisite: Undergraduate neuroscience course or permission of instructor. LEC.

OTMS 835. Interpreting Research for Applied Science. 3 Hours.

This on-line course examines selected research studies, analysis methods and results employed, and applies research findings to practical problems. Students will design their own research project reflecting their area of interest. RSH.

OTMS 890. Graduate Research. 1-6 Hours.

Students investigate an empirical question relevant to occupational therapy and write a literature review and a research proposal under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Pending approval of the proposal, the student will carry out initial phases of the project, including materials preparation and data collection. RSH.

OTMS 899. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Course requires data analyses, interpretation, and scholarly writing based on individual original research carried out under the guidance of the student's adviser. These activities, along with an oral presentation of research, must meet with approval of the student's advisory committee to complete thesis requirements. Prerequisite: OTMS 890. THE.

Occupational Therapy Courses

OCTH 101. Introduction to Occupational Therapy. 1 Hour.

Survey of the profession of occupational therapy. Includes information on academic and professional requirements, career opportunities, general description, and history of the profession. Open to all students. LEC.

OCTH 601. Human Anatomy. 6 Hours.

In OCTH 601, the study of gross anatomy and neuroanatomy in relation to human function and behavior will introduce students to how occupational therapists use anatomical knowledge to gather information about clients. Learning opportunities include lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT graduate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 602. Orientation to the Occupational Therapy Profession. 3 Hours.

In OCTH 602, we will examine occupation, explore the underlying philosophy and history of the occupational therapy profession, and implications for current practice and future directions. We will establish expectations for professionalism and practice application of ethical and professional behaviors within the context of occupational therapy practice. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT graduate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 605. Theory and Practice in Occupational Therapy. 2 Hours.

In OCTH 605, we will present established and emerging conceptual models of occupational therapy to guide students in exploration and discussion of assessment and intervention practices. Emerging professional reasoning skills and strategies will support individuals and small groups in synthesis and integration of theoretical concepts applied to diverse practice settings. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT graduate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 622. Analysis and Adaptations of Occupations - I. 4 Hours.

In OCTH 622, we will study the role of occupations and factors influencing occupational performance using the "top-down/bottom-up" analytic approach recommended by the WHO and reinforced by the OT Practice Framework. This course will use service learning as the context for synthesizing an understanding of occupation, the occupational therapy process, and person-centered practice. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT graduate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 630. Practicum - I. 2 Hours.

In OCTH 630, we will support students to experience and demonstrate person-centered and strength-based approaches when engaging individuals in their natural context, and to use observation, interview, and documentation skills to guide OT practice with children and families. Students will explore individual leadership strengths and styles to better understand individual roles within a complex system. Students as individuals and in small groups will undertake leadership assessment, reflection and application. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT graduate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 635. Lifespan Development from an Occupational Perspective. 4 Hours.

In OCTH 635, we will examine in detail developmental theories and how they intersect with changes in occupations across the lifespan. We will promote an advanced understanding of participation in meaningful activities by practical experiences with real people in authentic settings. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of the qualitative differences between typical and atypical occupational performance across the lifespan. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT graduate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 645. Contexts of Occupation. 2 Hours.

In OCTH 645, contextual supports and features of physical, social, and other environments will be explored as potential tools to facilitate maintaining or enhancing occupational performance irrespective of disability status. The interaction of person, context, and environment will be explored through guided discussion, reflection, and extra-mural exploratory assignments. A culminating activity inspires teams of students to assemble course elements to develop a cohesive summary project with practical application. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT graduate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 655. Neuroscience Analysis of Occupational Performance. 3 Hours.

In OCTH 655, we will build upon prior knowledge of neuroanatomy gained through OCTH 601. Principles of neuroscience will be interpreted in clinical application using a strength-based approach to advance understanding of nervous system function. The integration and function of neural systems will be considered in relation to specific challenges and capacity of the nervous system as a whole to support behavior. A practical application and problem-based perspective will be encouraged throughout the course, with students invited to consider consumer perspective and availability of potential supports. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT gradate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 662. Physical Considerations in Facilitating Occupational Performance. 4 Hours.

In OCTH 662, we will appraise the impact of select medical conditions on person factors and occupational performance in everyday life using scientific reasoning. Students will implement occupational therapy assessment and intervention strategies integrated with knowledge of injury and disease processes to facilitate an understanding of occupational performance outcomes. Particular consideration will be given to addressing complex comborbidities within the context occupational performance. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT graduate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 670. Practicum - II. 2 Hours.

In OCTH 670, we will employ the occupational therapy process, to participate in service provision to individuals through level I fieldwork experiences. We will build upon skills from OCTH 630 to advance leadership development and effective communication. This course will use both classroom and community-based practicum experiences. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT graduate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 672. Psychiatric Considerations in Facilitating Occupational Performance. 3 Hours.

In OCTH 672, we will examine in detail occupational performance as influenced by psychological conditions using evidence-based practices and principles of mental health. We will emphasize the importance of considering individuals, groups and organizations with the context of occupational performance. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT graduate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 680. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

An elective course to allow students to pursue areas of special interest under direction of faculty of his or her choice. Investigation of special issues relevant to an aspect of occupational therapy practice will include study of pertinent practice factors. Student will complete special projects relevant to the practice areas, such as oral presentation, written paper or case analyses. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of department and instructor (offered Spring, Summer and Fall). IND.

OCTH 682. Analysis and Adaptation of Occupations - II. 2 Hours.

In OCTH 682, we will support students in service learning settings to expand OCTH 622 task analysis outcomes to include the occupational therapy practice framework to further analyze and apply the occupational therapy process using person-centered practice. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT graduate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 690. Evaluation and Assessment of Occupational Performance. 2 Hours.

In OCTH 690, we will examine in detail principles of the evaluation process to analyze occupational performance across the lifespan. We will differentiate, select, interpret, and document both formal and informal measures within a person-centered and contextually relevant approach. Prerequisite: Open to students enrolled in the MOT graduate program or those with permission from the OTEd department. LEC.

OCTH 704. Planning and Intervention in Occupational Therapy. 2 Hours.

This course will use professional reasoning to analyze cases across the lifespan. We will work in small groups using a problem-based format with faculty mentors as we develop an occupational profile, occupational analysis and evidence-based intervention plans for each case. LEC.

OCTH 710. Service Management: Delivery Systems. 1 Hour.

This course will explore how service delivery systems influence pragmatic reasoning and occupational therapy practice. We will examine American and global health care systems along with occupational therapy health care delivery settings with a focus on quality, cost, and access related to service delivery. Teaching and learning experiences occur through lecture, on-line materials, class discussion and small group activities. LEC.

OCTH 715. Supervision, Team Relations, and Management Communication. 1 Hour.

This course emphasizes entry level skills related to supervision, teamwork, and communication within practice environments. LEC.

OCTH 720. Occupational Therapy Practice Models. 7 Hours.

This course will use practice models to guide evaluation and intervention in occupational therapy practice. Students will gain an understanding of historical and contemporary models, learn the evidence underlying each model and conduct assessments with a consumer from each of the contemporary models. LEC.

OCTH 725. The Research Process. 1 Hour.

This course will transition from understanding and appraising research (OCTH 783) to generating research (OCTH 790). The purpose of this course is to guide students through planning research by introducing the components of research and describing ways in which research may be conducted. The course reviews research ethics, writing research questions and hypotheses, sampling, measurement and data collection, components of quantitative and qualitative research, and information about disseminating research. LEC.

OCTH 730. Practicum III. 2 Hours.

This course will build upon practicum and level I fieldwork experiences to continue developing necessary skills for level II fieldwork experiences. We will determine the relevant variables for intervention, work collaboratively with others within each setting, analyze, and reflect upon the experience. We will analyze principles of evidence-based practice and occupation-based intervention. LEC.

OCTH 738. Special Topics in Practice. 1-2 Hours.

Focused study of theory application, professional topics and skills, and emerging practice questions. Learning experiences may be in the form of guided readings and discussion, directed projects, seminars, or community/clinical experience with focus on advanced supplemental or exploratory learning. Specific topics and formats will vary as they are generated by student interest and faculty expertise. LEC.

OCTH 750. Case-Based Clinical Reasoning. 2 Hours.

This course will apply the professional reasoning process to understand individuals' occupational performance and analyze services provided based on cases from level II fieldwork experiences. We will participate in small group discussion using a problem-based format to conduct case analysis and develop evidence-based intervention plans. LEC.

OCTH 755. Issues and Trends Seminar. 1 Hour.

This course will analyze key professional, political, and cultural issues and trends that impact service provision and the populations served by occupational therapists. This seminar format incorporates student-driven service experiences, discussion forums, and small group work to examine issues/trends and recognize opportunties to shape the future of the occupational therapy profession. LEC.

OCTH 760. Professional Development and Leadership in Service Management. 3 Hours.

This course will discuss professional responsibilities and career development opportunities as they relate to leadership, administration, and management of occupational therapy services. We will use reflective assessments to identify professional leadership strengths and career paths. Students working in small work groups will apply management principles to develop and propose community-based health promotion programs. LEC.

OCTH 765. Family and Community Service Systems. 2 Hours.

This course will use professional reasoning to examine occupational practice within various delivery systems. We will use lecture and small group seminars to analyze systems from level II fieldwork experiences and develop a program evaluation plan based on collaborations between students and fieldwork supervisors. LEC.

OCTH 770. Level II Fieldwork, Part 1. 6 Hours.

A required full-time, three-month supervised experience in a facility meeting specified criteria. Qualified occupational therapists supervise the experience. Students will be exposed to a variety of age ranges and disabilities within different service delivery systems. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required academic coursework. LEC.

OCTH 775. Level II Fieldwork, Part 2. 6 Hours.

A required full-time, three-month supervised experience in a facility meeting specified criteria. Qualified occupational therapists will supervise this experience. Students will be exposed to a variety of age ranges and disabilities within different service delivery systems. Ages, disabilities, and service provision systems for this course will differ from the student's prior fieldwork experience. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required academic coursework. LEC.

OCTH 776. Population-Based Clinical Reasoning. 3 Hours.

This course will consider population-based concepts and theories to identify, prioritize and meet the health and life participation needs of populations. Within an interprofessional online learning context, students collaborate to develop community-based assessment and intervention emphasizing promotion, maintenance and restoration of health and wellness and disease prevention for specific populations. LEC.

OCTH 780. Elective Level II Fieldwork. 3-6 Hours.

An elective (optional) supervised experience in a facility meeting specific criteria. Qualified occupational therapist will supervise this experience. This fieldwork would allow students to pursue areas of special interest. Length and time commitment of experience will be commensurate with credit hours (e.g. each credit requires 80 hours of fieldwork contact at specified site). Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required academic coursework and OCTH 770.. LEC.

OCTH 783. Evidence-Based Practice. 2 Hours.

This course will review, appraise, and integrate various levels of evidence to inform occupational therapy practice. Students will learn where and how to find relevant evidence as well as what factors should be considered in the assessment of evidence. We will review statistics and their use in interpreting outcome data. Students will also learn to synthesize and translate evidence into useful information for practice. LEC.

OCTH 790. Research Practicum and Professional Writing. 3 Hours.

This course will explore how the process of conducting a faculty-mentored research project becomes a platform for developing occupational therapy principles and for guiding practice, and how conveying meaning through professional writing is essential for communicating outcomes, interpretations, and instructions. Prerequisite: OCTH 725. Students from programs outside the MS in Occupational Therapy or PHD in Therapeutic Science need to contact the Occupational Therapy Department for permission to enroll. LEC.

OccupationalTherapy(Doctorate) Courses

OTD 750. Clinical Reasoning and Problem Based Learning. 3 Hours.

Students will apply a clinical reasoning process to individuals with occupational performance needs. Cases will be presented from students' clinical experiences. In a problem solving format, students will evaluate models of service delivery, evaluation and intervention delivery and dissemination of information received by the individual. Students will identify and discuss alternatives given a variety of situations and environments. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department. LEC.

OTD 770. Knowledge For Specialty Practice Area. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to support and correspond with OTD 780. Students will be matched with a faculty mentor as they develop a literature review in an area of clinical interest. This experience is designed to supplement students' ongoing clinical practice as they develop a library of pertinent empirical readings. Students will be mentored as they develop skills in analytical reading and identification of information that informs best practice. PREREQUISITE: Admission to OTD Program or Permission of Instructor. LEC.

OTD 776. Population Based Health Care. 3 Hours.

This course will coordinate with OCTH 776. The purpose of this course is to introduce concepts and theories related to providing health care to complex systems and aggregates in the community, state and nation. Emphasis is placed on the promotion, maintenance and restoration of health and wellness and the prevention of disease. Internal and external environmental components which include historical, political, social, cultural and economic factors are presented. The role of the health care provider in identifying, prioritizing and meeting the health and life participation needs of aggregates is discussed. PREREQUISITE: Permission of department. LEC LEC.

OTD 780. Practicum in Specialty Practice Area. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to support and correspond with OTD 770. Students will complete this course as they work in a clinical environment. They will meet with a faculty mentor to support the analysis and dissemination of their empirical information gathered during OTD 770. They will present their empirical literature findings to their professional colleagues via a clinical research forum. Students will be expected to create three forms of information dissemination and critically review the professional feedback they receive. PREREQUISITE: Permission of department. LAB.

OTD 783. Evidence Based Practice. 3 Hours.

This course will coordinate with OTCH 783. Students will address the parameters and criteria for evidence-based practice. They will build a library of information that facilitates their evaluation of the status, beliefs, and practice of Occupational Therapy. They will develop skill in the synthesis of empirical evidence and explore dissemination options to service recipients. Students' work will culminate in the formulation of a decision-making paradigm for their future practice decisions. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department. LEC.

OTD 799. Practice and Research. 3 Hours.

This is an elective course that allows students to pursue areas of special interest under the direction of a faculty member of his or her choice. This course is designed to support students' learning as they complete their pre-doctoral studies. Investigation of special issues relevant to an aspect of occupational therapy practice will include study of pertinent practice factors. Students will complete special projects relevant to the practice areas of interest, such as an oral presentation, written paper, or case analysis. May be repeated for credit. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department. LEC.

OTD 825. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to qualitative research techniques. Students will have several opportunities to gain hands-on experience using fundamental qualitative research techniques to sharpen their data collection, analysis and write-up skills. The goals of this course are to better understand the role qualitative techniques play in research, identify various ethical issues, sharpen interview and observation skills, and develop foundation skills for collecting, analyzing and interpreting qualitative data. Prerequisite: Permission of Department. Lecture course. LEC.

OTD 835. Quantitative Research for Applied Science. 3 Hours.

Research relevant to therapeutic intervention comes from a variety of disciplines involving varied research designs and analysis strategies. Students in this course will examine selected research studies and gain skill in analyzing methods and results as well as in applying research findings to practical problems. Students will conduct a systematic review on a specific area of occupational therapy practice. LEC.

OTD 850. Teaching Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide practical learning whereby students receive individual mentorship for the development, implementation and evaluation of a teaching experience. Students will be responsible for developing the material, instructing students, grading assignments and evaluating the teaching experience. The teaching experience is expected to include at least 12 hours of face to face instruction (or the equivalent in on-line teaching or written materials). Teaching experiences can include MOT program lectures or labs, continuing education workshops, patient education programs, or staff inservices or another experience that meets the time and competency requirements. Prerequisite: A graduate level teaching methods course such as NSG 873, NSG 874, C & T 740, C& T 840 PRA.

OTD 860. Theory and Practice in Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

This course will cover major theoretical frameworks and practice models in occupational therapy. The history of occupational therapy will be included to provide a basis for understanding the evolution of the profession as well as past and current issues and trends. Students will learn how to critically analyze theories, evaluate research evidence related to specific theories and practice models, and assess pragmatic issues in applying practice models to specific settings and populations. LEC.

OTD 865. Occupation-Based Practice. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to critically review Occupational Therapy theories, research, practice models and frameworks using the tenets of occupation based practice. Students will analyze seminal literature from occupational science and relate theory and evidence to practice. Students will review their specified area of practice to develop a proposed method of practice that incorporates empirical evidence and practice methods. Finally, students will select a mentor from their practice area to review their proposal. Critical feedback will be incorporated into a final presentation and paper. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department. LEC.

OTD 875. Professional Development. 3 Hours.

This course will explore professional development from an advanced practice perspective. Students will examine aspects of advanced practice such as leadership (both work and professional), management, group and system communication and change agency. They will explore these topics within their current practice settings and select an area of advanced skills to explore in more depth. Students will develop an understanding of how they can impact systems and contribute to the development of the occupational therapy profession. LEC.

OTD 880. Program Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Leadership in areas of specialty practice will require our graduates to critically evaluate their practice programs. In this course, students will explore the traditional and innovative ways to evaluate professional services and systems, and they will develop skills to conduct program evaluations. Students will examine the purpose and process of program evaluations in a variety of clinical settings. Through lecture, discussion and a project they will develop and execute a program evaluation in their area of practice. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department. LEC.

OTD 885. Advanced Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

This practicum is designed to span 400 hours. Students will identify an area of practice through which they want to develop clinical initiatives and leadership. Selected field experiences will provide opportunities for program development, leadership, and information dissemination. Upon completion, the students will provide his or her clinical team with a program, or research based initiative, along with specified program evaluation methods. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department and continuous enrollment until completion of competencies. LAB.

OTD 890. Capstone Project. 1-3 Hours.

The capstone project will comprise a written report that involves both literature and field research activity. A capstone project report represents the application of knowledge as well as the search for it, and differs from a thesis such that student opinion and experience is involved. The student must negotiate capstone objectives, evaluation standards and any potential approvals prior to his or her practicum. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department and continuous enrollment until competencies totaling 6 credit hours are completed. IND.

OTD 899. Special Projects. 1-3 Hours.

This is an elective course that allows students to pursue areas of special interest under the direction of a doctoral faculty member of his or her choice. This course is designed to support doctoral training. Academic options range from research based studies and/or activities to critical analysis of clinical practice methods. Students will complete special projects relevant to their designated practice area of interest. Students must negotiate learning objectives, academic projects and evaluation standards with their mentor. May be repeated for credit. PREREQUISITE: Permission of department. LEC RSH.

Therapeutic Science Courses

TS 800. Research Proseminar. 1 Hour.

A proseminar conducted by the core graduate faculty in Occupational Therapy and Therapeutic Science. Twice-monthly meetings will involve student and faculty presentations of their current research, as well as provide more opportunities to obtain feedback on research proposals. May be taken more than once for a total of four credits. (Same as OTMS 800.) LEC.

TS 805. Multidisciplinary Theoretical Perspectives. 3 Hours.

Students will identify and explore key theories in behavioral and social science with an emphasis on those currently influencing clinical reasoning. Students will demonstrate an understanding of contemporary theories and be able to compare and contrast key theories, while also developing knowledge about theory guided research and interventions. LEC.

TS 850. From Beliefs to Evidence. 1 Hour.

Analysis of the role of beliefs about practice in professional culture and how beliefs are affected by the accumulation of research evidence. Topics include the nature of science and beliefs, the nature of evidence, and the debate over evidence-based practice. Students will use topics from their own professional interests for class presentations and written assignments. A minimum of two credits over two successive terms (Fall then Spring) is required (i.e., 1 credit each semester). Note this course alternates in succession with TS900 and TS950, and is offered in the Fall & Spring every 3rd year. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. LEC.

TS 880. Special Projects. 1-6 Hours.

An elective course to allow student investigation of special issues or problems relevant to applied research and/or practice, under the direction of a faculty member chosen by the student. Systematic coverage of current issues may include a research investigation or study related to pertinent sociocultural trends, practice factors, or emerging issues in service provision. Students will complete special projects such as oral presentations, written papers, or case analysis as negotiate with the faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. IND.

TS 900. Evolving Interdisciplinary Views of Disablement. 1 Hour.

Assessment of how our social and cultural context defines notions of disability and disablement in our society. Topics include historical constructs of disability, public policy related to disability, and social paradigms of disability. Students will evaluate views of disablement from the perspective of their own discipline. A minimum of two credits over two successive terms (Fall then Spring) is required (i.e., 1 credit each semester). Note this course alternates in succession with TS850 and TS950, and is offered in the Fall & Spring every 3rd year. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor. LEC.

TS 950. Designing Effective Knowledge Transfer. 1 Hour.

Examination of the principles of knowledge transfer and diffusion of innovation as they relate to practices in therapeutic professions. Topics include the diffusion process, change agents, innovation adoption, and current diffusion methods. Students will evaluate diffusion processes that have occurred within their own professions. A minimum of two credits over two successive terms (Fall then Spring) is required (i.e., 1 credit each semester). Note this course alternates in succession with TS850 and TS900, and is offered in the Fall & Spring every 3rd year. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. LEC.

TS 980. Advanced Study in Therapeutic Science. 1-9 Hours.

Students engage in advanced study of a topic of their interest, guided by an appropriate mentor. Options for engaging in learning include directed readings, interpretation of evidence, discussions, and written syntheses of existing literature. Students typically enroll in offerings of this course several times over a series of successive terms, with the course sequence culminating in a written proposal for original research and an oral defense of that proposal (oral comprehensive examination). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. SEM.

TS 990. Dissertation in Therapeutic Science. 1-9 Hours.

Research experience leading to dissertation for doctoral students in Therapeutic Science. Students enroll in offerings of this course over a series of successive terms, culminating in a written dissertation describing original research and an oral defense of the dissertation research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. THE.

Occupational Therapy Doctorate Early Entry Courses

OTDE 700. Professionalism in Occupational Therapy I. 2 Hours.

This foundational course will support transition to the graduate program and the occupational therapy profession. Students will understand occupation as the foundation of the discipline and discuss the philosophy, history, current practice parameters and future directions of the occupational therapy profession. This course introduces students to constructs of professionalism including ethics and professional behaviors, professional communication/relationships, and professional responsibilities within context of occupational therapy. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the entry-level professional OTD program of study. LEC.

OTDE 705. Foundations in Occupational Therapy Practice I. 6 Hours.

This course addresses foundational elements of occupational therapy practice across contexts (e.g., medical, community, education). Students will use OT practice concepts to gain knowledge of underlying neurological, physiological, psychosocial, and biomechanical considerations impacting occupational performance across the lifespan. Students will participate in self-guided preparation, active learning opportunities, and dynamic interactive discussion to prepare for interprofessional and service learning opportunities. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the entry-level doctoral program in Occupational Therapy. LEC.

OTDE 710. Interprofessional Education in Context. 3 Hours.

This course includes interprofessional opportunities for students to apply professional reasoning through simulations, problem-based learning, service-learning, and fieldwork experiences. Students will gain understanding regarding occupational performance in medical, community, and educational contexts across the lifespan. Students will participate in reflections through small group discussions, apply knowledge from fieldwork experiences, conduct assessments, and develop evidence-based interventions. Students complete two, 8-week rotations in 2 of the 3 context areas. Students will also participate in 30 hours of service learning experiences. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the entry-level professional OTD program. LEC.

OTDE 715. Introduction to Health Professions Scholarship I. 3 Hours.

This course provides a beginning structure for the development of foundational scholarship skills to inform occupational therapy practice. Topics include: university resources for scholarship, finding evidence related to assessment, conditions, populations, patient experiences and understanding evidence provided by books, web resources, practice journals and program evaluation. Students will complete writing assignments, identify key elements of scientific reasoning, and plan program evaluation for a service learning site. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the entry-level professional OTD program. LEC.

OTDE 725. Introduction to Policy for Occupational Therapy. 1 Hour.

This foundational course will introduce health professions policies and their impact on occupational therapy practice across systems. Students will understand what policy is, why policy matters, and how laws, payment/reimbursement policy, practice acts and regulatory agencies shape our view of health, ability/disability, and OT practice. Prerequisite: Acceptance to the entry-level professional OTD program. LEC.