Why study classics?

Because knowledge of Greek and Roman antiquity is fundamental to understanding the ancient and modern world.

Undergraduate Scholarships and Awards

The department offers several scholarships and awards, such as the Mildred Lord Greef award for best paper or essay, the Albert O. Greef award for literary translation, the Tenney Frank scholarships for undergraduate study, and the Tenney Frank awards for foreign study of the classics. For information, contact the department.

All graduate students who wish to be considered for KU scholarships and financial aid must complete applications with Financial Aid and Scholarships.

KU Financial Aid

All undergraduates who wish to be considered for KU scholarships and financial aid must complete applications with Financial Aid and Scholarships.

Undergraduate Programs

Classics is the integrated study of Greek and Roman civilization through its languages, its literature, and its artistic and archaeological remains. The Department of Classics offers 2 majors. Both provide students of diverse career goals a broad humane education and afford a solid foundation for those who wish to pursue graduate work in classics. The Classical Antiquity major provides inclusive, interdisciplinary training in ancient Greek and Roman cultures and prepares you for graduate study in Greek and Roman archaeology, art history, or history. The Classical Languages major trains you to read the great authors of classical antiquity (e.g., Homer, Plato, Vergil, Sappho, Saint Augustine) in the original language and prepares you for graduate study in classics and for teaching in some private schools. You might also combine your classical language interest with a degree in the School of Education. A degree in education with a Latin major allows you to teach Latin in public high schools.

Language Proficiency

The CLAS language requirement may be fulfilled by taking either Latin or Greek. To meet the language requirement in Latin, a student should complete LAT 104, LAT 108, and LAT 112 followed by LAT 200 (or their equivalents). To meet the language requirement in Greek, a student should complete GRK 104, GRK 108 or their equivalents, and 2 more courses (6 hours) at the GRK 300 level. The number of hours required may be reduced if a student has high school or transfer hours.

Placement in Latin

Students who wish to enroll in Latin after studying Latin in high school or elsewhere should seek advice from the classics faculty about appropriate placement in Latin courses at KU. Whenever possible, make an advising appointment in advance by calling the Department of Classics at 785-864-3153 or by contacting an advisor.

Retroactive Credit in Latin

In cooperation with the University Registrar, the Department of Classics awards retroactive university credit for work in Latin at the high school level. To qualify for retroactive credit, the student’s initial university-level enrollment in Latin must be in a KU course. The student qualifies for retroactive credit only after completing the KU Latin course with a grade of C or higher.

After completing such a course with a qualifying grade, the student must bring his or her high school transcript to the Department of Classics office for verification. The department then notifies the Office of the University Registrar of the number of credit hours to be awarded. The student’s transcript shows the number of hours awarded but no letter grade. The hours count toward graduation. Guidelines are as follows:

  • 2 Years of High School Latin: A student must enroll initially at KU in LAT 112 or LAT 113 and receive a grade of C or higher. 3 hours of retroactive credit will be awarded.
  • 3 Years of High School Latin: A student who initially enrolls in LAT 200 or LAT 201 and receives a grade of C or higher will receive 6 hours of retroactive credit. A student who enrolls in LAT 112 or LAT 113 and receives a grade of C or higher will receive 3 hours of retroactive credit.
  • 4 Years of High School Latin: A student who initially enrolls in a Latin course higher than LAT 200 or LAT 201 (e.g., any 300-level Latin course) and receives a grade of C or higher will receive 9 hours of retroactive credit. A student who enrolls in LAT 200 or LAT 201 and receives a grade of C or higher will receive 6 hours of retroactive credit.

Note: If a student initially enrolls in a course below the specified level (e.g., a student with 4 years of high school Latin enrolls in LAT 112 or LAT 113), he or she receives no retroactive credit. If a student initially enrolls in a course above the specified level (e.g., a student with 2 years of high school Latin enrolls in LAT 200 or LAT 201, or a student with 3 years of high school Latin enrolls in a Latin course higher than LAT 200 or LAT 201) and receives a grade of C or higher, he or she is eligible for the full retroactive credit allowed for that course.

Courses for Nonmajors

The department offers a range of courses in ancient art, archaeology, literature, and language, including 4 years of undergraduate Latin and 3½ years of ancient Greek. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is needed for courses labeled CLSX, such as the principal course CLSX 148 Greek and Roman Mythology.

Graduate Programs

The Department of Classics offers advanced course work in the ancient civilizations of Greece and Rome. Students are expected to study the classical languages (Greek and Latin) and literatures as well as the art and archaeological remains of the Greek and Roman worlds.

Graduate Teaching Assistantships

Financial support is available in the form of teaching assistantships in Latin, Greek, or mythology. Contact the department for information.

Visit the Graduate Studies website for information about funding opportunities for graduate students at KU.

Financial Aid and Scholarships administers grants, loans, and need-based financial aid.

Courses

CLSX 148. Greek and Roman Mythology. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H/W.

A systematic examination of the traditional cycles of Greek myth and their survival and metamorphosis in Latin literature. Some attention is given to the problems of comparative mythology and the related areas of archaeology and history. Slides and other illustrated materials. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is required. LEC.

CLSX 149. Greek and Roman Mythology Honors. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H/W.

The study of Greek and Roman mythology through extensive readings in primary classical texts and secondary authors. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 151. Introduction to Classical Archaeology. 3 Hours HT GE11/GE3H / H/W.

An introduction to the history, methods, and excavation techniques of archaeology, with special emphasis on ancient Greece and Rome. Topics include stratigraphy, chronology, artifact analysis, the role of archaeology in our understanding of Greek and Roman society, and the treatment of archaeology in popular culture. Illustrated throughout with presentations of important archaeological sites of the ancient Mediterranean such as Athens and Pompeii, from the earliest times through late antiquity. LEC.

CLSX 168. Ancient Epic Tales. 3 Hours HL AE42/GE11/GE3H / H.

This course provides a survey of ancient epic poetry, focusing on literature from the Greek, Roman, and Mediterranean world. All readings will be in English; no knowledge of any ancient languages is required. The works selected will be ancient epic tales primarily from Greece, Rome and the Mediterranean world (e.g. Epic of Gilgamesh, Homer, Apollonius, Vergil, Ovid, Statius) though some ancient epics from other cultures may be used for comparative purposes (e.g. Beowulf, Popol Vuh, Mahabharata). Class discussion and assignments focus on understanding the ancient cultures and their relation to our own, evaluating the arguments of scholars, and creating well-reasoned written and oral arguments about ancient epics. LEC.

CLSX 169. Ancient Epic Tales, Honors. 3 Hours HL AE42/GE11/GE3H / H.

Honors version of CLSX 168. This course provides a survey of ancient epic poetry, focusing on literature from the Greek, Roman, and Mediterranean world. All readings will be in English; no knowledge of any ancient languages is required. The works selected will be ancient epic tales primarily from Greece, Rome and the Mediterranean world (e.g. Epic of Gilgamesh, Homer, Apollonius, Vergil, Ovid, Statius) though some ancient epics from other cultures may be used for comparative purposes (e.g. Beowulf, Popol Vuh, Mahabharata). Class discussion and assignments focus on understanding the ancient cultures and their relation to our own, evaluating the arguments of scholars, and creating well-reasoned written and oral arguments about ancient epics. LEC.

CLSX 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Classics. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

CLSX 178. Writing About Greek and Roman Culture. 3 Hours GE21 / H.

This course uses focused content from Greek and Roman mythology as a vehicle for learning, applying, and practicing essential skills of writing. The content varies from term to term but is always circumscribed, such as Helen of Sparta, nature myths, the wandering hero, or children in Greek tragedy. Students complete a variety of writing exercises that build upon each other and include revision. The course will be taught in English. LEC.

CLSX 210. Greek Rhetoric in Theory and Practice. 3 Hours GE22 / H.

This course explores the theory and practice of ancient Greek rhetoric, with the aim of developing student's own rhetorical skills and habits. All readings are in translation; no knowledge of ancient Greek is required. Students study rhetoric in such authors as Homer, Demosthenes, Plato, and Lysias and discuss such topics as the role of public speaking in maintaining Greek democracy, the difference between rhetorical skill as a means and an end, the relationship between rhetorical style and civic identity, and the adaptability of rhetoric to various circumstances and audiences. Students practice delivery with ancient speeches; write and deliver speeches tailored to a variety of situations; and listen to and critique the speeches of their peers and others. LEC.

CLSX 220. Roman Oratory in Theory and Practice. 3 Hours GE22 / H.

This course explores the theory and practice of ancient Roman rhetoric, with the aim of developing student¿s own rhetorical skills and habits. All readings are in translation; no knowledge of Latin is required. Students will study rhetoric in such authors as Cicero, Quintilian, Caesar, and Seneca and discuss such topics as the role of rhetorical theory in Roman education; oratory as a hallmark of public service during the Republic, and its transition to a pastime in the Imperial age; the ways the Romans connected oratorical style with humor, the body, and gender identity; and the leeway given to speakers in constructing an argument. Students practice delivery with ancient speeches; write and deliver speeches tailored to a variety of situations; and listen to and critique the speeches of their peers and others. LEC.

CLSX 230. Greek Literature and Civilization. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be writers of poetry and prose such as Homer, Sappho, the tragedians, Aristophanes, Plato, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, athletics, oral performance, sexuality, and the development of literary genres. No knowledge of Greek required and no prerequisite. LEC.

CLSX 232. Word Power: Greek and Latin Elements in English. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of English words drawn from Greek and Latin for all those interested in the sources of the English vocabulary. Enough Greek and Latin for essential purposes is also studied. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332. LEC.

CLSX 240. Roman Literature and Civilization. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

An introduction to ancient Roman literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be authors such as Plautus, Vergil, Livy, Petronius, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, oratory, slavery, political propaganda, the Roman games, and the development of Roman literature. No knowledge of Latin required and no prerequisite. LEC.

CLSX 317. Greek and Roman Art. 3 Hours H/W.

A survey of the art of ancient Greece and Rome (ca. 1000 B.C.E.- 500 C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, architecture, sculpture, and painting. Illustrated lectures and discussion; use of the Wilcox Classical Museum. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Not open to students who have taken both CLSX 526/HA 526 and CLSX 527/HA 537, except with permission of the instructor. (Same as HA 317, HWC 317.) LEC.

CLSX 330. Greek Literature and Civilization, Honors. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

Honors version of CLSX 230. An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Greek texts. No knowledge of Greek required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 332. Medical Terminology: Greek and Latin Roots. 3 Hours H.

A comprehensive study of the Greek and Latin elements in medical terminology. Students will learn word roots and how to combine them, as well as become acquainted with their relationship to mythology and the influence of ancient ideas about health and the body on modern healthcare. This class is useful for anyone going into the health field including management, clinical areas, insurance, and technical fields. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332. LEC.

CLSX 340. Roman Literature and Civilization, Honors. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

Honors version of CLSX 240. An introduction to ancient Roman Literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Roman texts. No knowledge of Latin required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 350. Modern Themes, Ancient Models: _____. 3 Hours H.

The study of the evolution of a cultural or literary tradition from the Graeco-Roman world into modern times. The theme of the course will normally vary from semester to semester; topics such as these may be examined: the analysis of a literary genre (e.g. drama, satire, lyric), the transformation of the ancient mythical heritage, the reception of ancient astronomy. Students should consult the Schedule of Classes for the theme of the course in a given semester. With departmental permission, may be repeated for credit as topic varies. (Same as HWC 380.) LEC.

CLSX 351. Introduction to Classical Archaeology, Honors. 3 Hours HT GE11/GE3H / H/W.

Honors version of CLSX 151, with the focus towards critical approaches and research. Special attention is paid to recent methodological, theoretical, and ethical debates within the profession of Classical archaeology. Assignments and activities may include position papers on contentious issues of the day, research assignments, and/or field trips to museums and related institutions. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 355. Ancient Greece and Rome in Film. 3 Hours H.

This course explores the reception of the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome in film. Students in this course learn about the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome through primary sources, and analyze several films from the 20th and 21st centuries for which these sources are relevant. The course considers the relationship between historical accuracy and artistic license in the films selected for the course, how each film reflects the concerns of the modern cultural context in which it was made, the common visual and thematic elements that link films set in ancient Greece or Rome, and the reuse of elements from Greek and Roman mythology and history in films set in the modern world. No knowledge of Latin or Greek required. LEC.

CLSX 371. Archaeology of Ancient Israel. 3 Hours H.

Archaeology and art, sites and monuments of ancient Israel from the Neolithic period to Late Roman. Special topics will include the peoples of the region, nomadism and urbanization, the kingdoms of Israel, Second Temple Period, Qumran, Roman Jerusalem, and the creation and development of the synagogue. (Same as JWSH 371.) LEC.

CLSX 374. Gender and Sexuality, Ancient and Modern. 3 Hours AE42 / H.

Classical Greek and Roman attitudes to gender and sexuality compared and contrasted with modern notions and behaviors. Attention is paid to literature (dramatic, philosophical, medical, and legal texts) and archaeological evidence (vase painting, sculpture, and domestic architecture). The course may include the following topics: age divisions and rites of passage from childhood to maturity; marriage; conception, birth, and infanticide; the family; love; homoeroticism; property and economics; and sexuality and the law, politics, and religion. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HWC 374.) LEC.

CLSX 375. Studies in: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W.

Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 382. Jerusalem Through the Ages. 3 Hours H.

As a prominent site in the religious and cultural histories of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, Jerusalem is uniquely situated as one of the world's most sacred cities. For more than 3,000 years, this city has been a focal point of religious and political activity. Through the critical reading of historical and religious texts, and archaeological data, this course will explore the historical development of Jerusalem as a sacred place in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. (Same as HIST 382, JWSH 382 and REL 382.) LEC.

CLSX 384. Ethics in Greek Tragedy. 3 Hours HL AE51 / H.

This course provides an introductory survey of theories of morality and uses Greek tragedy as case studies for understanding ethical problems. Students will read passages from ethical theorists alongside plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, giving particular attention to identifying the ethical dilemmas the characters face, the criteria by which these characters make their decisions, ethical assessment of their decisions by their own standards and by those of ethical theories, and the role of cultural context in understanding the ethical dimensions of the plays. No knowledge of Greek is required. LEC.

CLSX 388. Poetry and Politics in Fifth-Century Athens. 3 Hours H.

The later plays of Euripides and Sophocles, selected plays by the comic dramatist Aristophanes, and passages from the historian Thucydides. Criticism of the plays, and discussion of themes common to literature and history in this period. The dissolution of a high culture. CLSX 384 is NOT a prerequisite. No knowledge of Greek required. LEC.

CLSX 490. Comprehensive Examination of Classical Antiquity. 1 Hour U.

An examination covering the six areas of course work and reading for the Classical Antiquity major, to be taken by the student pursuing the major in the last semester of the senior year. Prerequisite: A declared major in Classical Antiquity and status as a graduating senior. IND.

CLSX 492. Independent Study for Classical Antiquity Majors. 3 Hours U.

Under the supervision of an advisor in Classics, the student will do extensive reading in the area of Classics generously defined, to result in two or more papers as agreed upon between faculty and student. IND.

CLSX 496. Honors Essay in Classical Antiquity. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W.

Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Classical literature, culture, or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay advisor. IND.

CLSX 501. The History of the Latin Language. 3 Hours H.

The place of Latin among the Indo-European languages and the languages of Italy, its development as a literary medium, and how it changed in pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar from its beginnings through the Medieval period. LEC.

CLSX 502. Development of Ancient Greece, ca. 1000-300 B.C.. 3 Hours H/W.

Emphasis on the ancient sources and texts, developments in political institutions and society, the changing definitions of personal, cultural, and national identities, and the cultural tensions between Greece and the cultures to the west and east, especially Italy and Persia. No knowledge of the ancient languages is required. (Same as HIST 502). LEC.

CLSX 506. Jewish History and Literature in the Greek and Roman Periods. 3 Hours H/W.

The history and literature of the Jewish people from the hellenistic period (late fourth century B.C.E. to the codification of the Mishnah 210 C.E.). Select texts from the Hebrew Bible, the so-called apocrypha and pseudepigrapha, the Qumran scrolls, Philo, Josephus, related early Christian texts, and Rabbinic texts will be studied. (Same as JWSH 526 and REL 526.) Prerequisite: REL 124 or JWSH 124 or permission of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 515. Gender and Sexuality in Greek Culture. 3 Hours AE42 / H.

This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Greek antiquity. Contents will vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as WGSS 515.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 516. Gender and Sexuality in Roman Culture. 3 Hours HL AE42 / H.

This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Roman antiquity. Contents vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as WGSS 516.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 525. Aegean Archaeology and Art. 3 Hours H/W.

An interdisciplinary survey of the major cultures of the prehistoric Aegean (Greek) world from the Neolithic period to the end of the Bronze Age (ca. 3000-1100 B.C.E.), with special emphasis on the cultural and artistic achievements of the Mycenaeans, Minoans, and Cycladic islanders, including their contacts with the neighboring cultures of Anatolia (Hittites and Troy), the Levant, Egypt, and South Italy. Includes lecture with slides and discussion. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 525.) LEC.

CLSX 526. Greek Archaeology and Art. 3 Hours H/W.

An interdisciplinary survey of the material culture of the ancient Greek world from the Protogeometric period to the end of the Hellenistic age (ca. 1100 - 30 B.C.E.), with emphasis on the major sites, monuments, and changing forms of social and artistic expression (e.g., architecture, sculpture, vase painting). Includes lectures with slides and discussion; use of the Wilcox Museum of Classical Antiquities. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 526.) LEC.

CLSX 527. Roman Archaeology and Art. 3 Hours H/W.

An interdisciplinary survey of the material culture of ancient Rome from its origins to the late empire (8th c.B.C.E. - 4th c.C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, monuments, and changing forms of social and artistic expression, as well as on Etruscan and Greek influence on Rome and Rome's influence on its provinces. Includes lectures with slides and discussion; use of the Wilcox Museum of Classical Antiquities. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities; and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). (Same as HA 537.) LEC.

CLSX 529. Archaeology and Art of the Ancient Near East. 3 Hours H.

A cross-cultural survey of the material remains of the major civilizations of the ancient Near East, including Anatolia, Mesopotamia, the Levant, and Egypt from Neolithic period to the rise of the Roman empire (ca. 6000 B.C.E. - 30 B.C.E.). Includes lectures with slides and discussion. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 529.) LEC.

CLSX 538. Pompeii and Herculaneum. 3 Hours H.

An interdisciplinary treatment of the art and archaeology of the ancient Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum in Italy. Emphasis on the structures and decorations of major public spaces and houses and on aspects of cultural, social, political, commercial, and religious life from the period of the second century B.C.E. to 79 C.E., when Pompeii and Herculaneum were buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. Slide lectures and discussion. (Same as HA 538, HWC 538.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, History of Art, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

CLSX 550. Capstone in Classics. 1-3 Hours AE61 / H.

This capstone seminar synthesizes various aspects in the discipline of Classics by focusing on recent award-winning scholarship or creative work in the field. Specific assignments and additional readings vary from one semester to another and will be stated on the instructor's syllabus. Introductory knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Prerequisite: 15 hours in CLSX/LAT/GRK at the 200 level or above, or status as a senior major in the department, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

CLSX 570. Study Abroad Topics in Greek and Roman Culture: _____. 1-3 Hours H.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Classics at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

CLSX 575. Readings in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only six hours may count toward the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 576. Topics in Greek and Roman Literature: _____. 3 Hours H.

Lecture and discussion course focusing on a theme, genre, or period of literature from the ancient classical world. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only 6 hours may count toward the major. LEC.

CLSX 577. Topics in the Archaeology and Art of the Ancient Mediterranean: _____. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

Lecture and discussion course focusing on a theme, medium, region, or period in the archaeology and art of the ancient Near Eastern and classical world. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only 6 hours may count toward the major. LEC.

CLSX 675. Studies in: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W.

Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

CLSX 717. Investigations in Greek Drama I. 3 Hours.

Attendance at CLSX 384 required, plus one seminar per week, discussing the scholarly background of the major lecture, as well as the problems and aims of teaching Greek drama in English to undergraduates. No knowledge of Greek is required. RSH.

CLSX 718. Investigations in Greek Drama II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of CLSX 717. Attendance at CLSX 388 plus one seminar per week. No knowledge of Greek is required. RSH.

CLSX 790. Practicum in the Teaching of Classics. 0.5 Hours.

Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Classics courses. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD.

CLSX 899. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Thesis hours. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. THE.

Courses

GRK 104. Elementary Ancient Greek. 5 Hours U / F1.

The essentials of ancient Greek grammar, with readings. LEC.

GRK 105. Elementary Ancient Greek, Honors. 5 Hours U / F1.

The essentials of ancient Greek grammar, with readings. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC.

GRK 108. Ancient Greek Readings and Grammar. 5 Hours U / F2.

A continuation of Greek 104, with extensive readings from one or more classical authors. Prerequisite: GRK 104 or GRK 105. LEC.

GRK 109. Ancient Greek Readings and Grammar, Honors. 5 Hours U / F2.

A continuation of GRK 105, with extensive readings from one or more classical authors. Prerequisite: GRK 104 or 105; and membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC.

GRK 112. Intermediate Ancient Greek. 3 Hours U / F3.

Systematic grammar review and selected texts from Plato and Euripides. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109 or consent of instructor. LEC.

GRK 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Greek. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

GRK 301. Philosophy and Oratory. 3 Hours H/W / F3.

Systematic grammar review in conjunction with readings selected from Plato, Aristotle and the Attic orators, with attention to issues of interpretation and social and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109. LEC.

GRK 302. Drama and Lyric Poetry. 3 Hours H/W / F3.

Systematic grammar review in conjunction with readings selected from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and the lyric poets, with attention to issues of literary interpretation and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109. LEC.

GRK 303. Greek Narrative Prose. 3 Hours H/W / F3.

Systematic grammar review in conjunction with readings selected from the historians Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon, as well as from the Greek novels and the New Testament. Attention will be given to issues of interpretation and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109. LEC.

GRK 310. Homer's Odyssey. 3 Hours H/W / F4.

Selections from Homer's Odyssey, with attention to issues of literary translation and interpretation, performance, and social and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303. LEC.

GRK 312. Homer's Iliad. 3 Hours H/W / F4.

Selections from Homer's Iliad, with attention to issues of literary translation and interpretation, performance, and social and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303. LEC.

GRK 375. Readings in: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W / F3.

Readings in classical Greek texts. May be repeated for up to twelve hours. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or the equivalent. IND.

GRK 496. Honors Essay in Greek. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W / FP.

Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Greek literature or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay advisor. IND.

GRK 508. Early Greek Philosophy. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

A study of the doctrines of Greek philosophy before Plato. Emphasis on the Pre-Socratic philosophers with some attention paid to the Sophists and the Hippocratic Corpus. (Same as PHIL 508.) Prerequisite: PHIL 384, or GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303, or GRK 310, or GRK 312, or permission of instructor. LEC.

GRK 701. Archaic Poetry. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from Homer, Hesiod, Pindar, the lyric poets. LEC.

GRK 702. Drama. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes. LEC.

GRK 703. History and Oratory. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Attic orators. LEC.

GRK 704. Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from Plato, Aristotle, the Pre-Socratics. LEC.

GRK 705. Readings in Classical Greek. 3 Hours.

Extensive reading in a variety of Greek authors. LEC.

GRK 790. Practicum in the Teaching of Greek. 0.5 Hours.

Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Greek. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD.

GRK 798. Studies in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Selected readings for qualified students who desire special work on a flexible basis. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Undergraduate proficiency in Greek or equivalent. RSH.

GRK 899. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Thesis credit. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. THE.

Courses

LAT 104. Elementary Latin I. 5 Hours U / F1.

An introduction to the Latin language. LEC.

LAT 105. Elementary Latin I, Honors. 5 Hours U / F1.

Integrates study of elementary Latin with study of Roman culture. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 108. Elementary Latin II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Latin grammar concluded with selected readings. Prerequisite: LAT 104 or LAT 105, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 109. Elementary Latin II, Honors. 5 Hours U / F2.

Latin grammar concluded with selected readings, integrated with study of Roman culture. Prerequisite: LAT 105 or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 112. Readings in Latin Literature. 3 Hours U / F3.

Systematic grammar review in conjunction with selected prose authors, such as Cicero or Caesar, with additional readings in Roman poetry. Attention to literary history and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 108 or LAT 109, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 113. Readings in Latin Literature, Honors. 3 Hours U / F3.

Systematic grammar review in conjunction with selected prose authors, such as Cicero or Caesar, with additional readings in Roman poetry. Exercises in literary analysis and/or prose composition. Prerequisite: LAT 109 or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Latin. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

LAT 200. Vergil's Aeneid. 3 Hours H/W / F4.

Selections from Vergil's Aeneid, with attention to literary interpretation and literary history. Prerequisite: LAT 112 or LAT 113 or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 201. Vergil's Aeneid, Honors. 3 Hours H/W / F4.

Selections from Vergil's Aeneid with attention to literary history. Exercises in literary interpretation and verse composition. Prerequisite: LAT 113 or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 300. Intermediate Latin Composition. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Composition in Latin prose, stressing the basic principles of Latin syntax and style. Recommended for majors and minors. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201. LEC.

LAT 301. Prose Fiction and Epistolography. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Selected readings from such authors as Cicero, Seneca, Petronius, Pliny, and Apuleius, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 302. Hexameter Poetry. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Selected readings from such authors as Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, and the satirists, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 303. Roman Historians. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Selected readings from such authors as Caesar, Livy, and Tacitus, with attention to issues in Roman history and historiography. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 304. Lyric and Elegiac Poetry. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Selected readings from such authors as Catullus, Horace, Tibullus, Propertius, Sulpicia, Ovid, and Martial, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 305. Roman Drama. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Selected readings from such authors as Plautus, Terence, and Seneca, with attention to literary interpretation, theater history, and performance. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 375. Readings in: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W / FP.

Readings in Latin literature, selected in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for up to twelve hours. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or consent of instructor. IND.

LAT 496. Honors Essay in Latin. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W / FP.

Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Latin literature or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay advisor. IND.

LAT 700. Advanced Latin Prose Composition. 3 Hours.

An examination of the grammar, syntax, and style of the Latin language through exercises in composition. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

LAT 701. Hexameter Poetry. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from authors such as Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, Statius. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

LAT 702. Lyric and Elegy Poetry. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from authors such as Catullus, Horace, Propertius, Tibullus, Sulpicia, Ovid, Martial. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

LAT 703. History, Oratory, Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from authors such as Cicero, Livy, Seneca, Tacitus, Augustine. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

LAT 704. Drama, Satire, and Novel. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from Plautus, Terence, Horace, Petronius, Seneca, Juvenal, Apuleius. LEC.

LAT 705. Readings in Classical Latin. 3 Hours.

Extensive reading in a variety of Latin authors. LEC.

LAT 790. Practicum in the Teaching of Latin. 0.5 Hours.

Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Latin. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD.

LAT 791. Seminar in the Teaching of Latin. 3 Hours.

An introduction to teaching required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants. Topics to include: pronunciation, etymology, Latin style, testing methods, and the selecting of texts. LEC.

LAT 798. Studies in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Selected readings for qualified students who desire special work on a flexible basis. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Undergraduate proficiency in Latin or equivalent. RSH.

LAT 899. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Thesis credit. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. THE.