Why study European studies?

Because European studies broaden, deepen, and strengthen through interdisciplinary study a student’s knowledge and understanding of the enduring importance of our transatlantic partners, the Europeans.

Undergraduate Programs

The degree in European Studies is available as a co-major in conjunction with a bachelor’s degree major in another academic discipline. Students take advantage of this option by combining the co-major with modern European languages & literatures, History, Philosophy, or Global & International Studies, for example. The co-major also can be combined with a bachelor’s degree in a professional school, such as business or journalism. The European Studies co-major provides students with a solid foundation in the cultures, politics, languages, and history of Europe in preparation for graduate studies and/or careers in a wide variety of international fields. Studying with KU faculty in the broader disciplines such as social sciences, humanities, the arts, and business will enable students to increase their awareness and understanding of Europe’s past, present, and future and its significant role in our increasingly globalized world. The program offers personalized advising, interdisciplinary flexibility, diverse course offerings, opportunities to conduct research, frequent co-curricular activities, and many options for studying and completing internships abroad.

Courses

EURS 150. Study Abroad Topics in European Studies: _____. 1-5 Hours U.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in European Studies at the 100-level (Freshman/Sophomore level). Coursework must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty advisor in European Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

EURS 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in European Studies. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

EURS 302. European Culture and Society 1945 to Present. 3 Hours HT AE42 / H.

The course provides historical, cultural, and political overviews of Europe since 1945 with particular emphasis on the contribution of French and Italian culture and society. The course emphasizes Europe's contribution to Western intellectual thought, social movements, arts and literature, and global society. (Same as HWC 302.) LEC.

EURS 329. History of War and Peace. 3 Hours HL / H.

A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war; and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as HIST 329 and PCS 329.) LEC.

EURS 350. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-5 Hours H.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in European Studies at the Junior/Senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty advisor in European Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

EURS 430. European Civilization in World Context: _____. 3 Hours HL AE42/GE3H / H.

An introduction to the literature of encounter between European and non-European civilizations, drawing on both Western and non-Western sources. The course may include European interactions with areas such as the Mediterranean Basin, Sub-saharan Africa, South and East Asia, and the Americas. World areas and historical periods chosen for study will vary from semester to semester according to the interest and field of the instructor. Not open to freshmen. (Same as HWC 430.) Prerequisite: HWC 114 or HWC 204 and HWC 115 or HWC 205. LEC.

EURS 435. Islam in Europe. 3 Hours AE42 / H.

Investigation of Muslim migration into Europe and day-to-day interactions of Muslims with other European populations. This is an integrated study of historical, political, religious and economic influences that determine Muslim experience in contemporary European culture. (Same as HWC 435.) LEC.

EURS 500. Seminar in European Studies. 3 Hours AE42/AE61 / H.

Provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of modern European civilization. By discussing both classic and contemporary, controversial readings each week and writing several papers during the semester, students acquire an understanding of the development of modern European culture and society and Europe's contemporary problems. Topics for discussions and papers are drawn from the following subjects: the economic and political integration of European states; modernism and anti-modernism in European culture; imperialism, migration, and ethnic and racial division in European society; democracy versus dictatorship; American-European relations; mass culture, urban development, and the welfare state; and contrasts and comparisons between European Cultures--East and West, North and South. Seminar discussions are led by invited European Studies faculty as well as the instructor or instructors. Required of all European Studies majors. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

EURS 501. Senior Thesis in European Studies. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

European Studies majors will do research and write a substantial paper on a topic in the culture, economy, history, or politics of Europe. Topics will be approved by the European Studies Committee. Students will work with an advisor chosen from among the European Studies faculty and with the European Studies Coordinator. The majority of the students' work will be done independently with their advisors, but students will meet with the European Studies Coordinator several times as a class to report on their progress and present their final drafts. Required of all European Studies majors. Prerequisite: Completion of EURS 500 and 15 hours toward the Co-Major. IND.

EURS 502. Senior Honors Thesis in European Studies. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

Open to European Studies majors doing their senior thesis for Honors. Prerequisite: Completion of EURS 500, 15 hours toward the Co-Major, and approval of Honors thesis by European Studies Committee. Completion of or concurrent enrollment in EURS 501. IND.

EURS 503. Europe Today. 3 Hours S.

This intensive, interdisciplinary seminar focuses on current social, political, and economic changes in Europe. Topics include European integration and the European Union, the conflict between nationalism and European consciousness, NATO and U.S.-European relations, and international business in Europe. The seminar will include guest lectures from an international array of scholars, political officials, and business representatives, as well as site visits to their institutions and companies. The seminar takes place in Brussels, Belgium, and enrollment is restricted to students accepted in the KU Summer Institute for European Studies study abroad program. LEC.

EURS 505. Studies in Exile Literature. 3 Hours H.

A multidisciplinary study of selected literary, scholarly, and creative works produced by those Europeans forced into exile, emphasizing their impact on culture and society both in Europe and in those countries in which the exiles resided. Examples: exile during the Nazi dictatorship in Germany (1933-1945), during Cold War crises (Berlin 1960, Prague 1968). LEC.

EURS 506. Culture and Politics of the Cold War in Western Europe. 3 Hours H.

An interdisciplinary overview of the Cold War period (1945-1985) focusing on Western European dimensions of the problem, based on the view that the Cold War structured political institutions, cultures, and societies in enduring ways that continue to be relevant today. LEC.

EURS 507. Research in European Collections. 1-3 Hours H.

This course allows students in the European Studies Co-Major and related disciplines to receive credit for research related to European Collections in one or more of the following institutions: Watson and Spencer Research Libraries, the Dole Institute, the Eisenhower and Truman Presidential Libraries, the U.S. Army Combined Arms Research and Foreign Military Studies Office at Fort Leavenworth, the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City, and the Winston Churchill Collection at the Westminster College Library in Fulton, Missouri. May be taken in place of EURS 501 by European Studies Honors Students if taken for three credit hours. Permission of instructor necessary. IND.

EURS 508. Politics and Economics of Cultural Production in Western Europe. 3 Hours H.

Artists and intellectuals in their relation to state and society. This course is designed to introduce students (1) to the role European artists and intellectuals have often played in the arena of politics and (2) to the privileged place cultural production (arts, literature, media) occupies in the formation of various European identities and economies. LEC.

EURS 509. Introduction to the Study of Southern European Societies. 3 Hours H.

Social, historical, and economic study of Southern European societies with emphasis on modern period. Relevant to the study of European integration and EU enlargement. Consideration of the distinctive southern Mediterranean societies from the perspective of their collective identity as a regional economic and geopolitical bloc. LEC.

EURS 510. Scandinavian Life and Civilization. 3 Hours H.

This course is designed to impart a general knowledge of life in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden with emphasis on social and cultural conditions, against a geographical and historical background, from the Viking Age to the present. Slides and other illustrated materials. (Same as SCAN 570.) LEC.

EURS 511. Topics in European Studies: _____. 3 Hours H.

A study of significant themes, movements, or problems in European history, literature, politics, society, or culture. May also relate European issues to issues in other world areas (Africa, North America, Asia, etc.) May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC.

EURS 512. Irish Literature and Culture: ______. 3 Hours H.

Study of topics in Irish literature and culture. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as ENGL 530.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of at least one 300- or 400-level English course. LEC.

EURS 536. Economic Issues of the European Union. 3 Hours S.

A survey of the economies of the European Union, with a focus on the economic development of the member states since World War II, and an examination of the various economic issues confronting them today. (Same as ECON 536) Prerequisite: ECON 104 or ECON 144. LEC.

EURS 550. Classics of Peace Literature. 3 Hours HL AE51/AE61 / H.

A study of influential proposals for world peace from Erasmus' The Complaint of Peace (1516) to the 1995 Hague Appeal for World Peace. Selected writings by such authors as Erasmus, Hugo Grotius, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Henry Thoreau, Henri Dunant, Berthe von Suttner, Woodrow Wilson, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr., are considered. (Same as PCS 550.) Prerequisite: HWC 204 or HWC 205. LEC.

EURS 565. The Literature of Human Rights. 3 Hours H.

Examines in literature, art, and film from about 1800 to the present, both sides of the ongoing debate surrounding the idea that all human persons possess inalienable rights because all persons possess intrinsic value as persons, value independent of race, gender, caste or class, wealth, age, sexual preference, etc. Anti- and pro-rights proponents are paired and studied with equal care. (Same as PCS 565.) LEC.

EURS 580. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours AE61 / H.

Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. LEC.

EURS 581. Discussion Section in French. 1 Hour U.

The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC.

EURS 582. Discussion Section in German. 1 Hour U.

The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC.

EURS 583. Discussion Section in Italian. 1 Hour U.

The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC.

EURS 584. Discussion Section in Spanish. 1 Hour U.

The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC.

EURS 604. The European Union. 3 Hours H.

The European Union, the union of 27 European countries, is a culmination of a long history of European unity. The European Union now encompasses population and economic strength rivalling that of the United States. This course examines selected topics in the history of European integration and the political, legal, economic, and social implications of the present European Union as well as its relations with the United States and other regions of the world. LEC.

Courses

FARS 110. Elementary Farsi I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Course includes reading of simple texts. Five hours of class per week. LEC.

FARS 120. Elementary Farsi II. 5 Hours / F2.

Continuation of FARS 110. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Course includes reading of simple texts. Five hours of class per week. Prerequisite: FARS 110 or departmental permission. LEC.

FARS 210. Intermediate Farsi I. 3 Hours U / F3.

A continuation of FARS 120. Course emphasizes oral and written work in Farsi. Systematic review of grammar and introduction to reading in cultural texts. Prerequisite: FARS 120 or departmental permission. LEC.

FARS 220. Intermediate Farsi II. 3 Hours U / F4.

A continuation of FARS 210. Course emphasizes oral and written work in Farsi. Systematic review of grammar and introduction to reading in cultural texts. Prerequisite: FARS 210 or departmental permission. LEC.

FARS 310. Advanced Farsi I. 3 Hours U / FP.

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Farsi. Readings from Farsi literature introduced. Prerequisite: FARS 220 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Farsi suited to Advanced Farsi I. LEC.

FARS 320. Advanced Farsi II. 3 Hours U / FP.

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Farsi. Readings from Farsi literature introduced. Prerequisite: FARS 310 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Farsi suited to Advanced Farsi II. LEC.

FARS 593. Directed Study in Persian Culture and Literature: _____. 1-3 Hours U / FP.

This course is designed for students seeking proficiency in Farsi beyond FARS 320. The instructor directs the student through readings and materials in Farsi that add to the student's substantive knowledge of Iran and culture in the Farsi language. May be taken multiple semesters for credit with varying content. Prerequisite: FARS 320 and consent of instructor. LEC.

Courses

GIST 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Global & International Studies. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

GIST 201. Topics in: _____. 1-3 Hours U.

An interdisciplinary study of international topics. Designed especially for freshmen and sophomores. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

GIST 202. Topics in South Asian Studies: _____. 1-3 Hours U.

An interdisciplinary study of topics related to South Asia. Designed especially for freshmen and sophomores. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

GIST 203. Topics in Middle Eastern Studies: _____. 1-3 Hours U.

An interdisciplinary study of topics related to the Middle East. Designed especially for freshmen and sophomores. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

GIST 215. A Global History of Money: Aristotle to Bitcoin. 3 Hours H.

What is money? What does it enable, and why do we value it? Is money always the same thing? What are the relationships between money and wealth? Through examining how people across the world and over time used money and answered these questions, this course is an introduction to the global history of money in its myriad forms: gold coins, silver ingots, bonds, debts, cowry shells, and bricks of tea. It approaches money as a point of entry into themes in political, cultural, intellectual, and social history. As such, it is not a course in economic or business history, but a historical examination of how money has transformed our world. We read and view a wide range of secondary and primary sources, ranging from images of money itself to recent works by anthropologists, historians, and economists. (Same as HIST 215.) LEC.

GIST 250. Introduction to Globalization. 3 Hours S.

Along with an overview of the origins and historical development of globalization, the course addresses various aspects of the growth of transnational economic, cultural, institutional, and political interconnections, including the implications of rapidly-developing information technology and social media, international security in a transnational world, and the issues related to the movement of goods, people (immigration), images, ideas, and institutional forms across national borders. LEC.

GIST 301. Introduction to Global and International Studies. 3 Hours GE11 / S.

This course provides an overview to the major ways and themes involved in the study of world cultures, politics, and societies as applied by disciplines in the social sciences. Topics such as the construction and maintenance of cultures, comparative political systems, global and regional economies, popular culture, gender and the environment will be covered through their manifestations in particular regional and global contexts. LEC.

GIST 305. World Indigenous Literatures. 3 Hours NW / H.

A survey of contemporary world indigenous literatures that includes those from North America, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, the Arctic, and Latin America. Texts are in English (original or translation). Genres studied include the novel, poetry, and drama, supplemented by works from the oral tradition, the visual arts, and film. (Same as ENGL 305/ISP 305.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

GIST 308. Key Themes in Modern Global History. 3 Hours H.

A comparative historical analysis of major global developments from the late 15th century to the present. Some of the themes likely to be explored are empire-building, contact between cultures and colonial social relations; the attraction of cities, their role in a global economy and the shift to an urban world; and the impact of capitalism and industrialization on social organization including conflict between classes and changes in the nature of work. Students learn ways of interpreting primary historical documents and comparing historical investigations across time and space. (Same as HIST 308.) LEC.

GIST 314. Globalization: History and Theory. 3 Hours H.

Explores the rise of global capitalism in the 19th and 20th centuries, contemporary debates about 21st century globalization, and the role of globalization in our everyday lives. Questions considered include: Is globalization an incremental process that has been going on for centuries, or it is a dramatic new force reshaping the post-Cold War world? Is it a cultural and social process or an economic and political one? Or is it all of these things? Not open to students who have completed HIST 315. (Same as HIST 314.) LEC.

GIST 320. Love, Sex and Marriage in India. 3 Hours H.

This course addresses diverse aspects of the philosophies and expressions of intimacy and pleasure as found in India. Using old and new literature, including from the Kamasutra, as well as media, we examine the following: how and why in ancient times sensual pleasure was another path for ultimate bliss; how perspectives and traditions of intimacy have changed over time; diverse types of marriages; the culture and practice of arranged marriages; same-sex intimacy; and universal concepts of love. LEC.

GIST 325. Peoples and Cultures of South Asia. 3 Hours S.

This course provides an introduction to the diversity of peoples in South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh and Bhutan. The particular cultures and language of the indigenous peoples in the region are highlighted through academic sources and the direct study of reproductions of these cultures in literature and film. LEC.

GIST 350. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-5 Hours U.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in global and international studies at the junior/senior level. Course work must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty adviser in Global and International Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

GIST 354. Globalization: A Geographic Approach. 3 Hours S.

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of some major facets of the historical, economic, political, cultural, and geographical dimensions of contemporary globalization, the process by which individual regions and nations have become progressively linked to, and structured by, the world-system of states and markets, and the cultural contradictions associated with this process. (Same as GEOG 354.) LEC.

GIST 371. Environmental Geopolitics. 3 Hours S.

This course examines how human relationships with the biophysical world are politicized. Examines key contributions to debates surrounding environmental security, resource conflicts, and related issues, as well as geopolitical assumptions on which these debates build. (Same as EVRN 371 and GEOG 371.) LEC.

GIST 376. Immigrants, Refugees, and Diasporas. 3 Hours H.

This course looks at people who choose to cross political borders, are forced to flee beyond them, or constitute ethnic minorities living outside a homeland. Examining these groups from a global historical perspective, this course explores how ethical debates about the rights of non-citizens and ethnic outsiders have evolved in the modern age. Students learn about important issues that have affected the lives of immigrants, refugees, and diasporas, including citizenship, mobility, cultural representation, asylum policies, and the concept of human rights. The course concludes with a look at contemporary manifestations of these issues, from debates over the place of Muslims in Europe to discussions about immigration policy in the United States. (Same as HIST 376.) LEC.

GIST 424. Nationalism(s) in Turkey. 3 Hours S.

This course analyzes the major variations in nationalist paradigms existing in contemporary Turkey, including conservative nationalism, secular nationalism, religious (Islamic) nationalism, and Kurdish nationalism. Through the lens of seminal theories on the origins, development, and types of nationalism and the relevant historical background of the Turkish Republic, we explore how these competing visions of "the nation" and "homeland" have changed, fragmented, and manifested themselves in everyday Turkish politics and society. LEC.

GIST 493. Directed Readings. 3 Hours U.

Individual and supervised readings in a selected area of international studies. Course is repeatable with permission of the program director. LEC.

GIST 495. Global Internship. 3 Hours U.

Semester-long internship with a business or organization located abroad or that provides a global or international working context for the interning student. A term paper is required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. INT.

GIST 501. Topics in: _____. 1-3 Hours U.

An interdisciplinary study of international topics. Designed especially for juniors and seniors. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

GIST 502. Advanced Topics in South Asian Studies: _____. 1-3 Hours U.

An interdisciplinary study of topics related to South Asia. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Prerequisite depends on specific topic offered. LEC.

GIST 503. Advanced Topics in Middle East Studies: _____. 3 Hours U.

An interdisciplinary study of topics related to the Middle East. May be repeated for credit if content e depends on specific topic offered. LEC.

GIST 530. Politics and Society in the Contemporary Persianate World. 3 Hours S.

This course examines the major currents of political developments and their linkages with religion, culture and civil society in Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India since the late nineteenth century. During the "pre-modern" period, all these countries formed part of "the Persianate world," a region that extended from the Iranian plateau to the Balkans, Central Asia and the Indian subcontinent, mostly under the Turkic administrations, and tied together by trade, Islam, and Persian as the lingua franca. The dissemination of modern Western political thought and nationalism during the colonial period led to nation-states and the end of the linguistic domination of Persian in the region. Though each of these nation-states ultimately took a different trajectory, they each were faced with similar challenges that offer the basis for interesting comparisons between them. This course explores the trajectories of these countries in regard to the relations between the state, religion, and politics, various strands of nationalism, pluralism, religious and ethnic minorities, social equality, and democratization. Prerequisite: GIST 301 or POLS 150. LEC.

GIST 535. Literature and Society in the Contemporary Middle East. 3 Hours H.

This course offers a general introduction to the modern Middle Eastern literatures in English translation. Through analyses of selected short stories and novels from Arabic, Turkish and Persian literature, the students develop an understanding of the issues that shape everyday life in the Contemporary Middle East. The course investigates issues of nation and national identity, war, ethnicity, class, religion, and gender and sexuality. We use a variety of paradigms, namely nationalist, Marxist, feminist, and Islamist, to provide a theoretical framework for discussion of the selected works. No prior knowledge of Arabic, Turkish or Persian language is needed. Prerequisite: GIST 301. LEC.

GIST 550. Issues in Global Studies: _____. 3 Hours U.

An interdisciplinary study of topics with particular emphasis on issues of global importance--i.e. transnational and trans-regional. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Prerequisite: GIST 301. LEC.

GIST 601. Indigenous Peoples of the World. 3 Hours S.

A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of external economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law are used. (Same as GEOG 601 and ISP 601.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

GIST 610. Interdisciplinary Methods for Global Contexts. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to a variety of widely-employed quantitative and qualitative research methods in the social sciences and humanities, including methods such as statistical analysis, ethnography, and content analysis. LEC.

GIST 624. Social Movements in the Middle East. 3 Hours S.

Using the major theories and approaches comparatively applied to social movements around the world, this course critically analyzes historical and existing cases of social movements and "nonmovements" in the Middle East. We cover examples of Islamist (and post-Islamist), women's, nationalist, democratic, youth and labor movements and their impact on the region. Contextual factors like technology and social networking, regime type, institutions, and socioeconomic structures are also considered for their role in supporting or inhibiting collective action. Prerequisite: GIST 301 or POLS 150. LEC.

GIST 667. Islam and Politics. 3 Hours S.

This course gives students a basic understanding of Islam and Islamic movements, explores the economic, social, political, and cultural context in which these movements take place, and examines the impact of Islam on politics in select countries. Issues such as compatibility of political Islam and democratic politics, political economy in Muslim societies, fundamentalism in Islam, gender relations, identity politics and questions on clash of civilizations are explored. (Same as POLS 667 and SOC 640.) Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology, POLS 150, or consent of instructor. LEC.

GIST 684. International Law: The State and the Individual. 3 Hours S.

International law has assumed an increasingly significant role in international life. This course examines major issues in international law including (but not limited to): the changing status and role of the state; rights of minorities and self-determination; the environment; and human rights. The course examines the central questions and the relevant international legal principles associated with each issue. Prerequisite: POLS 170. LEC.

GIST 685. International Law: Laws of Armed Conflict. 3 Hours S.

This course examines the principles, roles, and functions of international law in the conduct of war. As the course reviews the development and application of the basic rules of armed conflict, several current issues and conflicts are addressed including: the legitimate use of force; the proper definitions of combatants and civilians; actions that constitute war crimes, the legality of new weapons technology, and, if the laws of armed conflict apply to the current "war on terrorism." Prerequisite: POLS 170. LEC.

GIST 696. Diplomacy Lab. 1 Hour S.

This course is a supplemental research lab designed to partner with a jr/sr level course offering this research lab option and an innovative program implemented by the US Department of State. Students enrolling in this course team up with a group of four or more students to address a real world problem posed by a State Department officer. This one-credit hour course is intended to function as a special lab project and must be taken in conjunction with a standard course that has a diplomacy lab option. Prerequisite: GIST 301, POLS 150 or POLS 170. GIST undergraduate majors must have also taken GIST 610 or GIST 697. LEC.

GIST 697. Research and Diplomacy Lab. 1-3 Hours S.

This course is designed to provide students with basic tools and an understanding of interdisciplinary social science research and to simultaneously partner with an innovative program implemented by the US Department of State. While learning about the research process and research design, students enrolling in this course team up with a group of four or more students to address a real world problem posed by a State Department officer with whom they have contact through videoconferencing throughout the semester. The team engages in extensive and systematic research to address the problem and presents their finding in a formal report presented to the State Department in the desired format. Prerequisite: GIST 301. LEC.

GIST 698. Capstone Seminar. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

A seminar designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of global and international studies. A research paper will be required. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 12 hours of junior/senior level and above courses that satisfy requirements for the major. LEC.

GIST 699. Capstone Seminar, Honors. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

A seminar designed to introduce honors students to the theory and practice of global and international studies. A research paper will be required. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 12 hours of junior/senior level and above courses that satisfy requirements for the major. LEC.

GIST 701. Approaches to International Studies. 3 Hours.

This course examines various approaches to the study of cultures, politics, and societies in their global and international contexts through the exploration of a series of exemplary works of global/international research from a variety of disciplines (eg. anthropology, sociology, political science, economics, geography, history, etc.). The course will cover the major contributions of these disciplines in their approaches to global questions and themes and will provide a multi-disciplinary framework within which students can begin exploring their own global and international research questions. The course also provides an introduction to the major regions and many of the themes that students will be able to specialize in during the course of the MA program. LEC.

GIST 702. Globalization. 3 Hours.

A central issue in international studies is globalization, the increasing interconnectedness of societies and economies. This course examines globalization from an historical and contemporary perspective. Major topics include (but are not necessarily limited to) the historical expansion of the West since 1500, the growth of international economic institutions, conflict among global cultures, the future of state sovereignty, and the challenges of economic integration. LEC.

GIST 703. The World Economy. 3 Hours.

An introduction to international trade and finance, theories of economic development, and international economic structures. Not appropriate for economics majors. LEC.

GIST 704. Global Cultures and Societies. 3 Hours.

Examination of the components of culture, economic and political anthropology, major global cultural areas, and the impact of cultural differences as expressed through language, literature, religion, thought, and motivation in cross-cultural communications. LEC.

GIST 705. Globalization in History. 3 Hours.

A study of the increasing interaction among world societies since 1500 and an investigation of the long-term developments behind current world problems. Major topics include Western expansion since 1500, the spread of state sovereignty, the formation of a world economy, and the spread of international institutions. Current issues will vary, but may include environmental crises, human rights, migration, free trade and the spread of consumer culture, ethnicity and nationalism, and international intervention within states. (Same as HIST 705.) LEC.

GIST 706. Comparative Governments. 3 Hours.

Survey of different governmental structures in the contemporary world and the ways these countries have confronted issues such as modernization and development, economic security, ethnic pluralism and conflict, and globalization. LEC.

GIST 709. Research Design. 1-3 Hours.

This course guides new graduate students through the process of designing and developing an original research project. The fundamentals of interdisciplinary research will be the instructional framework within which students will design their own original research project. Instruction regarding the review of literature, methodology, and how to structure and scale the project will be given. Students taking this course will be required to take the companion course, GIST 810. RSH.

GIST 710. Interdisciplinary Research Methods for Global Contexts. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the challenges for students engaged in research in an interdisciplinary and international context. The course will take issues for research and place them within the structure of a research design process, including formulation of a general question, the appropriation of theory, the grounding of a literature review, and the positing of a testable research question and/or hypothesis. Students will also be exposed to research methodologies and how these manifest themselves through the logic of the disciplines--such as anthropology, sociology, geography, political science, history and literature. With a final thesis project design in mind, students will be expected to be expected to be able to utilize the research tools of accessing secondary analytical data, archival research, SPSS, ArcView and methods such as survey construction, implementation, and analysis, interviews, content analysis, dicourse analysis, case study, and GIS. Prerequisite: GIST 701 or consent of instructor. LEC.

GIST 750. Topics in International Studies: _____. 3 Hours.

A study of one or more selected topics in international studies. Course may be taken more than once. LEC.

GIST 793. Directed Readings. 1-5 Hours.

Individual and supervised readings in a selected area of international studies. Course is repeatable with permission of the program director. LEC.

GIST 810. Graduate Writing Experience. 1-3 Hours.

This course guides students through the process of effectively communicating the findings of original research through formal writing. The purpose of the course is to provide writing guidance and instruction to students conducting ongoing research, so that they are familiar with successful ways of communicating research to academic and professional audiences. Depending on the career objectives of the student, the writing project will be tailored to address the relevant audience--academic or professional. The fundamental components of the research writing process will be individualized to correspond with student's research goals. Prerequisite: GIST 709. RSH.

GIST 888. Contemporary China Studies. 3 Hours.

This course will review and analyze the current literature on China's social and political development, including a wide range of topics within political science. There is a rich body of literature within each topic such as civil society in China, legal reform, political culture, nationalism, gender issues, ethnicity, political behavior, elections, economic development, and inequality. This course will introduce key literature within each topic focusing on the debates among China scholars as well as how these debates fit in the general field of political science. (Same as EALC 888 and POLS 888.) Prerequisite: POLS 668 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

GIST 897. Examination Preparation. 1 Hour.

Independent study in preparation for the Comprehensive M.A. examination. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. May be repeated. LEC.

GIST 898. Thesis Writing. 3 Hours.

This course guides MA students through the crafting of their academic or professional thesis. The students begin the course with a literature review and data/research completed, and they will be directed through in-class workshops and deadlines with the intention to produce a full draft of their thesis. Students may choose to draft a thesis that fits either academic conventions for a similar body of research, or they may develop a body of research whose target would be a business or professional audience. Course is designed to assist students in the development of theses with varying methodologies, methods, and audiences on global and international topics. Prerequisite: GIST 710. THE.

GIST 899. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Enrollment for writing thesis for master's degree. THE.

Courses

HEBR 110. Elementary Israeli Hebrew I. 5 Hours U / F1.

A beginning course in modern Israeli Hebrew. Essentials of grammar, syntax and conversational practice; elementary reading and writing. Note: Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. LEC.

HEBR 120. Elementary Israeli Hebrew II. 5 Hours U / F2.

A continuation of HEBR 110. Note Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. Prerequisite: HEBR 110. LEC.

HEBR 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Hebrew. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

HEBR 210. Intermediate Israeli Hebrew I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Further development of language skills: listening comprehension, oral efficiency, intermediate grammar and syntax, reading and writing. Note: Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. Prerequisite: HEBR 120. LEC.

HEBR 220. Intermediate Israeli Hebrew II. 3 Hours U / F4.

A continuation of HEBR 210. Note: Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. Prerequisite: HEBR 210. LEC.

HEBR 230. Biblical Hebrew. 3 Hours U.

This course introduces students to the grammatical structure and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew. It includes basic biblical passages for students to translate into English and analyze. LEC.

HEBR 240. Biblical Hebrew II. 3 Hours U.

This is a continuation of Hebrew 230. It continues the study of the grammatical structure and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew, and includes biblical texts for students to translate and analyze. Prerequisite: HEBR 230 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

HEBR 340. Advanced Israeli Hebrew I. 3 Hours U / FP.

Advanced study of Modern Hebrew. This course is designed to strengthen linguistic skills, enrich vocabulary, and further the study of grammar and syntax. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 220 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

HEBR 350. Advanced Israeli Hebrew II. 3 Hours U / FP.

Continued advanced study of modern Hebrew. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 340 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

HEBR 395. Study Abroad Topics in Hebrew: _____. 3-6 Hours H.

This course is designed for the study abroad of special topics in Hebrew at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

HEBR 410. Studies in Modern Hebrew Literature. 3 Hours H / FP.

An introduction to Hebrew literature from the nineteenth century to the present day. The course emphasizes the development of basic interpretive skills and the understanding of basic literary movements, genres, and concepts. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 220 or equivalent. LEC.

HEBR 420. Studies in Modern Hebrew. 3 Hours U / FP.

This course is designed to help students achieve fluency in speaking, listening, and writing Modern Hebrew. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 220 or equivalent. LEC.

HEBR 490. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours U.

Intensive reading or research under faculty supervision. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 220 or equivalent. IND.

Courses

HNDI 110. Beginning Hindi I. 5 Hours U / F1.

An introduction to modern standard Hindi that emphasizes acquisition of basic language skills (speaking, comprehension, reading and writing) through a combination of lecture, drill, and work with the Devanagari script. LEC.

HNDI 120. Beginning Hindi II. 5 Hours U / F2.

A continuation of Beginning Hindi I that builds on basic skills of speaking and comprehension, and the writing and reading of the Devanagari script developed in Beginning Hindi I. Prerequisite: HNDI 110 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Beginning Hindi II. LEC.

HNDI 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Hungarian. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

HNDI 210. Intermediate Hindi I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in modern standard Hindi, with emphasis on grammar. Readings will be introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite: HNDI 120 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Intermediate Hindi I. LEC.

HNDI 220. Intermediate Hindi II. 3 Hours U / F4.

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension,reading and writing abilities in modern standard Hindi, with emphasis on grammar. Readings will be introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite: HNDI 210 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Intermediate Hindi II. LEC.

HNDI 301. Topics in Hindi Culture, Language and Literature: _____. 3 Hours U.

Investigation of special topics on Hindi culture, language and literature at the undergraduate level. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC.

HNDI 310. Advanced Hindi I. 3 Hours U / FP.

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Hindi. Readings are introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite: HNDI 220 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Advanced Hindi I. LEC.

HNDI 320. Advanced Hindi II. 3 Hours U / FP.

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Hindi. Readings are introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite: HNDI 310 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Advanced Hindi II. LEC.

HNDI 593. Directed Study in Hindi Culture and Literature: _____. 1-3 Hours H.

This course is designed for students seeking proficiency in Hindi beyond HNDI 320. Instructor will direct the student through readings and materials in Hindi that will add to the students substantive knowledge of India and culture in the Hindi language. May be taken multiple semesters for credit with varying content. Prerequisite: HNDI 320, and consent of instructor. LAB.

Courses

JWSH 107. Living Religions of the West. 3 Hours HR AE42 / H.

A basic introduction to the major religious traditions of the Near East, Europe, and the Americas, with an emphasis on their development through the modern period and their expressions in contemporary life. Not open to students who have taken REL 109. (Same as REL 107.) LEC.

JWSH 124. Understanding the Bible. 3 Hours HR / H.

An introduction to the literature of the Bible, exploring the relationships among the various types of literature present and the function of each type in the history and religious life of the people who produced and used them. Cannot be taken concurrently with REL 311 or JWSH 321 or REL 315. Not open to students who have taken REL 125 or JWSH 125. (Same as REL 124.) LEC.

JWSH 125. Understanding the Bible, Honors. 3 Hours HR AE42/GE3H / H.

An introduction to the literature of the Bible, exploring the relationships among the various types of literature present and the function of each type in history and religious life of the people who produced and used them. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have taken REL 124 or JWSH 124. (Same as REL 125.) LEC.

JWSH 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Jewish Studies. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

JWSH 300. Topics in Jewish Studies:_____. 3 Hours H.

Examination of special topics in Jewish Studies. May be repeated if topic varies. LEC.

JWSH 311. Narratives of Jewish Life. 3 Hours HL AE42 / H.

The course focuses on the narratives through which Jews made sense of their lives under the impact of the forces of modernity, beginning in the "old world," and moving through the 19th century and into the 20th. The goal is to analyze how the imagination of Jewish writers was captured by the changes in social structures such as new educational, residential and occupational opportunities, leading to increased interactions with the gentile society. Students read and discuss literary works based in the shtetl in revolutionary Russia, and in America. We will also look at memoirs and letters written by ordinary Jews. All assigned texts will be in English. LEC.

JWSH 315. The Spanish Inquisition. 3 Hours AE42 / H.

A broad historical study of the Spanish Inquisition from 1478 to its afterlife in modern culture, including its use in political debates and its depiction in popular culture. Topics include anti-Semitism, the nature of the inquisitorial investigation, the use of torture, censorship and the relationship between the Inquisition, the Spanish monarchy and other religious and lay authorities. Taught in English. Will not count toward the Spanish major. (Same as HIST 325 and SPAN 302.) LEC.

JWSH 318. Jews and Slavs in Eastern Europe. 3 Hours H.

Jews and Slavs have shared territory from the Middle Ages to the present day. The contact between these culturally and linguistically distinct groups have shaped many centuries of Eastern European history - from the extreme violence of the pogroms to long periods of peaceful coexistence and cooperation. "Jews and Slavs" examines the history and cultural geography of Slavic-Jewish contact from the perspectives of both groups. Through literature, film, journalism, and folklore, students learn about the profound influence Jews and Slavs have had on each other, the uneasy feelings that accompanied their interactions, and the creative and fascinating impact their interaction had on both cultures. (Same as SLAV 318.) LEC.

JWSH 321. Religion of Ancient Israel. 3 Hours H/W.

An introduction to the religion of ancient Israel through examination of biblical texts and archaeological evidence. Emphasis is placed on understanding the texts of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) in their historical and cultural contexts, including the relationship of their religious views to other religious perspectives current in ancient Israel and the Near East. Attention is given to the processes by which the biblical texts developed and came to be viewed as scripture. (Same as REL 311.) LEC.

JWSH 325. Introduction to Judaism. 3 Hours H.

Analyzes a selection of the core texts, teachings, and practices of Jewish religious traditions in terms of classical and contemporary understanding. (Same as REL 325.) LEC.

JWSH 326. The Talmud: Its Origins, Nature, and Evolution. 3 Hours H.

This course demystifies the Talmud, arguably the most central yet also the most mysterious text of rabbinic Judaism. Students are introduced to the scope, substance, styles, and major figures of the Talmud, and also learn how the text came into being over the course of several centuries. (Same as REL 326.) Prerequisite: REL 104, REL 107, or REL 124 or REL 125, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

JWSH 329. Politics and Conflict in Israel and Palestine. 3 Hours H.

This course focuses on various aspects of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict including its history from the Ottoman period to the present day, the social and political effects on Israeli and Palestinian life and citizenship, official and unofficial narratives, and international responses. LEC.

JWSH 335. History of Jewish Women. 3 Hours H.

This course explores the history of Jewish women from antiquity to the twentieth century. It examines the historical constructions of women's gender roles and identities in Jewish law and custom as well as the social and cultural impact of those constructions in the context of the realities of women's lives in both Jewish and non-Jewish society. (Same as HIST 335, WGSS 335.) LEC.

JWSH 336. Jewish American Literature and Culture. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

An examination of Jewish American literature and culture from the 17th century to the present. Materials may include a broad range of literary genres as well as folklore, music, film, and visual art. (Same as ENGL 336.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

JWSH 337. Religious Zionisms. 3 Hours HL AE42 / H.

A survey of the many types of Religious Zionism, from the origins of the movement to the present, from Left to Right, and from Jewish to Christian. The class asks questions about the relationship between religion and politics in Israel using case studies as examples, and also considers the views of religious Jewish anti-Zionists. No previous knowledge of Judaism or Israeli history is required. (REL 337.) LEC.

JWSH 338. Languages of the Jews. 3 Hours H.

From the beginning, Jewish history and culture is closely tied to language, from Hebrew and Aramaic to the languages of diaspora such as Yiddish and Ladino. Focusing on issues of language in society, this course will survey the languages spoken by the Jews throughout their long history in diverse communities around the world. We will learn about Hebrew as a spoken and a sacred language, examine how Jewish languages are born and die, and discuss the resurrection of Modern Hebrew in the state of Israel. All readings are in English. No prior knowledge of languages or linguistics is required. (Same as LING 338.) LEC.

JWSH 339. Languages of the Jews, Honors. 3 Hours H.

Honors version of JWSH 338 or LING 338, Languages of the Jews. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. (Same as LING 339.) LEC.

JWSH 340. Topics in Modern Jewish Literature: _____. 3 Hours.

This course treats Jewish literature in English or English translation in the 20th and 21st centuries either as a broad survey or according to specific themes. May be repeated for credit. LEC.

JWSH 341. Hitler and Nazi Germany. 3 Hours H/W.

An examination of the rise of Hitler and Nazism, beginning with the breakdown of 19th century culture in the First World War and continuing through the failure of democracy under the Weimar Republic. The course will also discuss the impact of Nazism on Germany and how Nazism led to the Second World War and the Holocaust. (Same as HIST 341.) LEC.

JWSH 343. The Holocaust in History. 3 Hours H.

The systematic murder of the Jews of Europe by the Nazis during World War II is one of the most important events of modern history. This course studies the Holocaust by asking about its place in history. It compares other attempted genocides with the Holocaust and examines why most historians argue that it is unique. Other topics covered include the reasons the Holocaust occurred in Europe when it did, the changing role of anti-Semitism, and the effects of the Holocaust on civilization. The course also discusses why some people have sought to deny the Holocaust. The course concludes by discussing the questions people have raised about the Holocaust and such issues as support for democracy, the belief in progress, the role of science, and the search for human values which are common to all societies. (Same as HIST 343.) LEC.

JWSH 344. Modern Jewish History. 3 Hours H.

This course explores the complex of interactions between Jews, Judaism, and modernity by examining the challenges to Jewish life and thought, community and culture, self-understanding and survival, from the early modern period to the present day. Through the lenses of religious, cultural, intellectual, and political expression, the course examines the social, economic, and demographic changes in Jewish communities in Western, Central and Eastern Europe, the United States, and Israel along with the impact of antisemitism and the Holocaust. (Same as HIST 344.) LEC.

JWSH 350. Contemporary Jewish Identities. 3 Hours SC / H.

This course explores the variety of ways in which American Jews create Jewish identities as individuals and groups. It traces the emergence of the various current divisions within Judaism: Reform Judaism (which by definition, implies Orthodoxy), then Conservative Judaism, and then the later development of Reconstructionist Judaism. The course also explores other contemporary options for being Jewish: cultural Jews, secular Jews, unaffiliated Jews, religious Jews, and gay or lesbian or transgendered Jews. LEC.

JWSH 361. Jewish Film. 3 Hours HL / H.

An examination of the cultural history of the Jews through films that explore Jewish themes, including but not limited to: issues of tradition and modernity, religion and secularism, immigration, gender, Zionism, anti-Semitism, and the Holocaust. Films studied may be in English and in foreign languages (with English subtitles) like Yiddish, Hebrew, and Russian. LEC.

JWSH 395. Study Abroad Topics in Jewish Studies: _____. 3-6 Hours H.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Jewish Studies at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

JWSH 490. Directed Study in Jewish Studies. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

Intensive reading or research under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

JWSH 491. Directed Study in Jewish Studies, Honors. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

Honors version of JWSH 490. Intensive reading or research under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. IND.

JWSH 523. The Dead Sea Scrolls. 3 Hours H.

A study of the archeological evidence and texts from the Dead Sea area that provide primary evidence for Jewish religious belief and practice in the Greek and Roman periods (ca. 250 B.C.E. - 135 C.E.). (Same as REL 523.) Prerequisite: REL 124 or JWSH 124 or consent of instructor. LEC.

JWSH 525. Jews and Christians. 3 Hours H.

This course examines the ways Jews and Christians have interacted with and characterized one another at various points in their histories. Special emphasis is placed on the gradual separation of the two religious traditions in the 1st-4th centuries. (Same as REL 525.) Prerequisite: A previous course in Religious Studies or Jewish Studies; or consent of instructor. LEC.

JWSH 526. Jewish History and Literature in the Greek and Roman Periods. 3 Hours H.

The history and literature of the Jewish people from the hellenistic period (late fourth century B.C.E. to the codification of the Mishnah 210 C.E.). Select texts from the Hebrew Bible, the so-called apocrypha and pseudepigrapha, the Qumran scrolls, Philo, Josephus, related early Christian texts, and Rabbinic texts will be studied. (Same as REL 526.) Prerequisite: REL 124 or JWSH 124 or permission of instructor. LEC.

JWSH 560. Modern Jewish Thought. 3 Hours H.

This course examines how a number of prominent Jewish thinkers from the seventeenth century through the present have encountered and engaged the special challenges posed by modernity to religious traditions, including the challenge of science to the validity of miracles, the challenge of the secular state to religious authorities, and the challenge of historical studies to the integrity of scripture. Thinkers covered may include Spinoza, Mendelssohn, Frankel, Hirsch, Geiger, Hermann Cohen, Buber, Rosenzweig, Arendt, Scholem, Leo Strauss, Levinas, and Derrida. Prerequisite: A previous course in Religious Studies or Jewish Studies; or consent of instructor. (Same as REL 560.) LEC.

JWSH 562. Judaism and Political Theology. 3 Hours H.

A consideration of the relationship between religion and politics in Judaism, and of the relevance of Judaism to broader discussions about religion and politics. Topics will include sovereignty, secularization, pluralism, democracy, and revolution. (Same as REL 572.) Prerequisite: At least one course in Jewish Studies or Religious Studies, or permission of instructor. LEC.

JWSH 563. Judaism and Sexuality. 3 Hours H.

An exploration of the complex interactions of Judaism, Jewishness, and sexuality. The course serves as a basic introduction to traditional Jewish understandings of gender and power, love and sex, and the body and embodiment. It also introduces the changes undergone by this tradition under the impact of contemporary feminism and queer theory. (Same as REL 573, WGSS 573.) Prerequisite: At least one course in Jewish Studies or Religious Studies, or permission of instructor. LEC.

JWSH 570. Studies in Judaism. 3 Hours H.

A study of the major intellectual sources of the Jewish tradition from the Mishna, Talmud, Midrash, prayerbook, philosophers, the Zohar, and the Shulchan Aruch. (Same as REL 570.) Prerequisite: A course in Religious Studies or Jewish Studies numbered 300 or above. LEC.

JWSH 572. Jewish Folklore. 3 Hours H.

Jewish folklore is extraordinarily rich and varied. From folktales to riddles, from legends about the exalted rabbis to irreverent jokes, folklore is central to the Jewish way of life. This course traces the extent to which oral elements appear in traditional Jewish literary texts such as the Bible; read and discuss folktales, and examine minor genres such as proverbs, riddles and jokes. Topics include the supernatural beings of Jewish folklore dybbuks, seductive female demons, and golems. Students acquire theoretical tools with which to analyze folklore (Jewish or otherwise), read stories, watch movies, and collect samples of folklore from informants. LEC.

JWSH 573. Jewish Folklore, Honors. 3 Hours H.

Honors version of JWSH 572. Jewish folklore is extraordinarily rich and varied. From folktales to riddles, from legends about the exalted rabbis to irreverent jokes, folklore is central to the Jewish way of life. This course traces the extent to which oral elements appear in traditional Jewish literary texts such as the Bible; read and discuss folktales, and examine minor genres such as proverbs, riddles and jokes. Topics include the supernatural beings of Jewish folklore dybbuks, seductive female demons, and golems. Students acquire theoretical tools with which to analyze folklore (Jewish or otherwise), read stories, watch movies, and collect samples of folklore from informants. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.

JWSH 600. Advanced Topics in Jewish Studies: _____. 3 Hours H.

Examination of advanced topics in Jewish Studies. May be repeated if topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

JWSH 601. Senior Seminar in Jewish Studies. 3 Hours H.

Investigation of topics related to Jewish studies from an interdisciplinary perspective: Jewish culture, history, and religion. The course focuses on research methods and intensive writing. Open only to Jewish studies majors. Suggested for students with senior standing. SEM.

JWSH 650. Service Learning in Jewish Studies. 3 Hours S.

This course, to be taken in the junior or senior year, is designed to give students the opportunity to apply the knowledge, concepts, and ideas gained in courses in Jewish studies to real-life situations in appropriate agencies and organizations. Open to students in the Jewish Studies program. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. FLD.

Courses

TAJ 110. Elementary Tajik I. 5 Hours U.

Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Course includes reading of simple texts. Five hours of class per week. LEC.

TAJ 120. Elementary Tajik II. 5 Hours U.

Continuation of TAJ 110. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Course includes reading of simple texts. Five hours of class per week. Prerequisite: TAJ 110 or departmental permission. LEC.

TAJ 210. Intermediate Tajik I. 3 Hours U.

A continuation of TAJ 120. Course emphasizes oral and written work in Tajik. Systematic review of grammar and introduction to reading in cultural texts. Prerequisite: TAJ 120 or departmental permission. LEC.

TAJ 220. Intermediate Tajik II. 3 Hours U.

A continuation of TAJ 210. Course emphasizes oral and written work in Tajik. Systematic review of grammar and introduction to reading in cultural texts. Prerequisite: TAJ 210 or departmental permission. LEC.

TAJ 310. Advanced Tajik I. 3 Hours U.

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Tajik. Readings from Tajik literature introduced. Prerequisite: TAJ 220 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Tajik suited to Advanced Tajik I. LEC.

TAJ 320. Advanced Tajik II. 3 Hours U.

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Tajik. Readings from Tajik literature introduced. Prerequisite: TAJ 220 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Tajik suited to Advanced Tajik II. LEC.

TAJ 510. Tajik for Geographers. 1 Hour H.

The course is designed to facilitate the use of primary sources in Tajik for carrying out research in human geography of Tajikistan. TAJ 510 compliments REES 510. Prerequisite: TAJ 220, or consent of instructor. LEC.

TAJ 532. Tajik For Sociologists. 1 Hour H.

The course is designed to facilitate the use of primary sources in Tajik for carrying out research in sociology of Tajikistan. TAJ 532 compliments SOC 532. Prerequisite: TAJ 220, or consent of instructor. LEC.