Why study geography?

Because people, places, and environments interact and evolve in a changing world.

Why study atmospheric science?

The study of atmospheric processes enables us to understand human interactions with the environment.

Career Counseling

A major in geography may lead to a career in cartography, environmental analysis, physical geography, regional analysis, urban and regional planning, or to work that requires some combination of geographic subfields.

Professors in the Department of Geography provide career counseling. For general questions, see the undergraduate coordinator. For career counseling, see these professors:

Atmospheric Science

Donna Tucker, 417 Lindley; David Braaten, 413C Lindley; Nate Brunsell, 214A Lindley; David Rahn, 201 Lindley; David Mechem, 230 Lindley; Kees van der Veen, 203 Lindley

Cartography

Margaret Pearce, 404 Lindley

GIS

Xingong Li, 404 Lindley; Stephen Egbert, 217C Lindley; Ting Lei, 207 Lindley

Human and Cultural Geography

Pete Shortridge, 209 Lindley; Chris Brown, 223 Lindley; Peter Herlihy, 202 Lindley; Shannon O’Lear, 219B Lindley; So-Min Cheong, 221 Lindley; Barney Warf, 219C Lindley; Jay Johnson, 402 Lindley; Margaret Pearce, 404 Lindley; Alexander Diener, 413A Lindley; Abel Chikanda, 204 Lindley

Physical and Environmental Geography

William Johnson, 420 Lindley; Kees van der Veen, 203 Lindley; Dan Hirmas, 415A Lindley; Pamela Sullivan, 420 Lindley

Regional Geography and Area Studies

Chris Brown, 223 Lindley; Shannon O’Lear, 219B Lindley; So-Min Cheong, 221 Lindley; Peter Herlihy, 202 Lindley; Pete Shortridge, 209 Lindley; Jay Johnson, 402 Lindley; Abel Chikanda, 204 Lindley

Remote Sensing/Environmental and Land-Use Analysis

Stephen Egbert, 217C Lindley;

Undergraduate Programs

Geography integrates information from a variety of sources to study the nature of culture areas, the emergence of physical and human landscapes, and problems of interaction between people and the environment. Mapping and other techniques for gathering and displaying spatial information are integral parts of the field.

The atmospheric science program offers undergraduates a fundamental knowledge of the atmosphere and the weather it generates. Interactions between weather phenomena and human decisions and activities give the subject important applications. Several tracks lead to a Bachelor of Science degree.

Courses for Nonmajors

All geography courses below the 500 level are open to nonmajors, as are several above that level.

Graduate Programs

Geography

The graduate curriculum emphasizes broad geographic training while encouraging in-depth commitment to specialized concentrations. Students also are encouraged to take course work outside the department that complements their degree programs. Credit-hour requirements below are considered minimums for degree programs. Programs are tailored by the student and advisor to conform to the student’s interests and needs, as well as to fulfill the general degree requirements.

The central thrust of the department and the chief capabilities and interests of the faculty fall within these research-teaching areas:

  1. Human geography including cultural geography, regional development, and environmental policy;
  2. Geographic information science including cartography, geographic information systems, and remote sensing;
  3. Physical geography including geomorphology, soils, and biogeography;
  4. Regional geography including Africa, East Asia, Russia, Latin America, and the United States; and
  5. Atmospheric science and climatology.

Atmospheric Science

The purpose of the program is to expand the student’s knowledge of fundamental atmospheric processes and how the atmosphere interacts with other parts of the environment. Students become familiar with quantitative research methods and how these various approaches can be used to address different problems in atmospheric science. Students gain an in-depth ability to learn specific skills and apply them toward thesis work. These skills consist of, for example, statistical analysis techniques, numerical modeling, or work with atmospheric instrumentation. The breadth of the program and the diverse research topics explored by the faculty are able to accommodate students with a variety of interests.

Courses

ATMO 105. Introductory Meteorology. 5 Hours NE GE3N / N / LFE.

A lecture and laboratory course introducing students to the atmosphere, weather and climate phenomena, and their controlling physical processes. Topics covered include: the structure of the atmosphere, energy and energy budgets, climate and climate change, air pollution, clouds and precipitation, pressure and wind systems, severe weather, and weather forecasting. LEC.

ATMO 106. Introductory Meteorology, Honors. 5 Hours NE GE3N / N / LFE.

Honors version of ATMO 105. A lecture and laboratory course introducing students to the atmosphere, weather and climate phenomena, and their controlling physical processes. Topics covered include: the structure of the atmosphere, energy and energy budgets, climate and climate change, air pollution, clouds and precipitation, pressure and wind systems, severe weather, and weather forecasting. Prerequisite: Membership in University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.

ATMO 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Atmospheric Science. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

ATMO 220. Unusual Weather. 3 Hours NE GE11/GE3N / N.

An introductory lecture course which surveys the general principles and techniques of atmospheric science and illustrates their application through discussions of natural but unusual weather phenomena such as blizzards, hurricanes, tornados, and chinooks, of the effects of air pollution on weather, and of intentional human alteration of the atmosphere. LEC.

ATMO 310. Aviation Meteorology. 3 Hours N.

This course introduces students to meteorological events that affect aircraft operations. Aviation applications of meteorological observations including satellite and radar observations are discussed. Students learn about graphical displays of meteorological information. Numerical forecasting models and how their output is applied for aviation is also considered. Forecasting of weather events of particular interest to aviation such as ceiling, visibility, icing and turbulence is emphasized. Prerequisite: ATMO 105 or AE 245 or equivalent. LEC.

ATMO 321. Climate and Climate Change. 3 Hours N.

This course is designed to introduce students to the nature of the Earth's physical climate. It introduces the basic scientific concepts underlying our understanding of our climate system. Particular emphasis is placed on energy and water balances and their roles in evaluating climate change. The course also evaluates the impact of climate on living organisms and the human environment. Finally, past climates are discussed and potential future climate change and its impact on humans is evaluated. (Same as GEOG 321.) Prerequisite: ATMO 105 or GEOG 104. LEC.

ATMO 499. Honors Course in Atmospheric Science. 2-3 Hours AE61 / N.

Open to students with nine hours of upper level credit in Atmospheric Science, an average of at least 3.5 in all Atmospheric Science courses, and an overall average of at least 3.25. Includes the preparation of an honors paper and its defense before a committee of a least two regular faculty members. LEC.

ATMO 505. Weather Forecasting. 3 Hours N.

A first course in synoptic meteorology designed to introduce students to weather analysis and forecasting through the application of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic principles to operational analysis and forecasting. Topics include analysis and interpretation of surface and upper-air observations and data from satellites, radars, and wind profilers; chart and sounding analysis; and three-dimensional, conceptual models of weather systems. The course includes student-led weather briefings and analysis exercises. Prerequisite: ATMO 105 and MATH 125 or MATH 115. LEC.

ATMO 506. Forecasting Models and Methods. 3 Hours N.

Introduction to basic numerical weather prediction methods. Computer programs are used to apply numerical methods to weather data and to evaluate dynamical processes on numerical grids. Meteorological graphics packages are used to analyze current weather data and numerical model output. Current operational numerical models and output products are discussed. Prerequisite: ATMO 505, MATH 126, and EECS 138 or EECS 168. LEC.

ATMO 515. Energy and Water Balance. 3 Hours N.

A study of the distribution and circulation of water in the air-earth system as influenced by atmospheric processes and surface conditions. The solar and terrestrial radiation budget and the water balance at the earth's surface will be applied to agricultural and urban energy and water problems. Prerequisite: ATMO 105 or EECS 138. LEC.

ATMO 521. Microclimatology. 3 Hours N.

A study of climatic environment near the earth-atmosphere interface. Consideration of rural climates in relation to agriculture and urban climates as influenced by air pollution and other factors. Emphasis is on physical processes in the lower atmosphere, distribution of atmospheric variables, the surface energy budget and water balance. (Same as GEOG 521.) Prerequisite: ATMO 105 and MATH 125. LEC.

ATMO 525. Air Pollution Meteorology. 3 Hours N.

A study of background levels and concentrated sources of atmospheric pollution together with considerations of pollution buildup in urban areas as related to particular weather conditions. Inadvertent weather modifications and effects of atmospheric pollution on particular weather events and general climate will be discussed. Prerequisite: ATMO 105, MATH 125, EECS 138 and CHEM 130. LEC.

ATMO 531. Topics in Atmospheric Science: _____. 1-3 Hours N.

An investigation of special topics in atmospheric science. May include topics in dynamic, physical or synoptic meteorology or climatology as well as related topics in earth and physical sciences. May be repeated if topic differs. LEC.

ATMO 605. Operational Forecasting. 2 Hours N.

Students enhance their forecasting expertise by preparing forecasts for presentation to the public through a variety of media. Classroom activities include weekly map discussions and analysis of current weather situations. Forecasting topics such as forecast verification, aviation forecast products, severe weather, flash floods and watches and warnings are examined. Credit for ATMO 605, ATMO 606, and ATMO 607 is limited to a total of eight hours, six of which may be counted toward a degree in atmospheric science. Prerequisite: ATMO 505. FLD.

ATMO 606. Forecasting Practicum - Private Industry. 2 Hours AE61 / N.

Practical experience in private industry working with current and/or archived meteorological data. Possibilities include the preparation of forecasts for TV stations and meteorological consulting firms, and working with environmental consulting firms to assess air pollution hazards. May be repeated two times for credit. Credit for ATMO 605, ATMO 606, and ATMO 607 is limited to a total of eight hours, six of which may be counted toward a degree in atmospheric science. Prerequisite: ATMO 605. INT.

ATMO 607. Forecasting Intern - National Weather Service. 2 Hours AE52/AE61 / N.

Practical experience working in a National Weather Service forecasting center in analyzing weather data and preparing weather forecasts. May be repeated two times for credit. Credit for ATMO 605, ATMO 606, and ATMO 607 is limited to a total of eight hours, six of which may be counted toward a degree in atmospheric science. Prerequisite: ATMO 605. INT.

ATMO 630. Synoptic Meteorology. 3 Hours N.

Interpretation, development, and analysis of synoptic charts. Prerequisite: ATMO 505 and ATMO 640. LEC.

ATMO 634. Physical Climatology. 3 Hours N.

Atmospheric processes are described and discussed in relation to the climate of the earth's surface. Such topics as the greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, and the effect of solar irradiance on climatic change will be included. The physical processes and relationships between various climatic features will be studied. Prerequisite: ATMO 505 and DSCI 301 or MATH 526. LEC.

ATMO 640. Dynamic Meteorology. 3 Hours N.

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of fluid dynamics necessary for understanding large scale atmospheric motions. Fundamental physical laws of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are examined and applied to atmospheric flows. Rotation in the atmosphere is examined quantitatively in terms of both circulation and vorticity. Prerequisite: MATH 223 and PHSX 214 or PHSX 212 and PHSX 236. LEC.

ATMO 642. Remote Sensing. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare students to effectively use remotely sensed data in operational or research settings for further work in this field. Topics include radiation and radiation transfer applied to active and remote sensing; radiative properties of space, sun, earth and atmosphere; instrument design considerations and operational characteristics; inversion methods for temperature or concentration profiling; surface temperature measurement; cloud top height determination; rain rate and wind velocity measurement; severe weather detection; satellite photograph interpretation. Prerequisite: ATMO 680, MATH 581. LEC.

ATMO 650. Advanced Synoptic Meteorology. 3 Hours N.

Analysis and interpretation of synoptic weather charts including treatment of numerical weather forecasting. Prerequisite: ATMO 630 and ATMO 660. LEC.

ATMO 660. Advanced Dynamic Meteorology. 3 Hours N.

Advanced study of the atmosphere including treatment of the vorticity equation. Prerequisite: ATMO 640 and MATH 220 or MATH 320. LEC.

ATMO 680. Physical Meteorology. 3 Hours N.

This course is designed to enhance the student's understanding of atmospheric processes through the study of these processes at molecular through micro scales. Topics include the properties and behavior of gases; transfer processes; phase change; solar and earth radiation; cloud drop, ice crystal and precipitation formation; atmospheric electricity; stratospheric chemistry. Prerequisite: MATH 223; PHSX 214, or PHSX 212 and PHSX 236. LEC.

ATMO 690. Special Problems in Meteorology. 1-3 Hours N.

Prerequisite: Nine hours in meteorology. IND.

ATMO 697. Seminar for Seniors. 1 Hour AE61 / N.

Current research in atmospheric science will be discussed. May be repeated for a total of two credit hours. Prerequisite: Senior level in atmospheric science. LEC.

ATMO 699. Undergraduate Research. 2 Hours AE61 / U.

Work on a research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Nine credit hours in atmospheric science. May be taken up to three times for credit. IND.

ATMO 710. Atmospheric Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Presentation of contemporary approaches to the study of atmospheric dynamics. May include methodologies that provide insight into global, synoptic, mesoscale or microscale motions. Prerequisite: ATMO 660 or equivalent. LEC.

ATMO 720. Atmospheric Modeling. 3 Hours.

Illustration and application of contemporary approaches to mathematical and statistical description of atmospheric phenomena. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

ATMO 727. Atmospheric Storms. 3 Hours.

The physical processes and operating principles involved in the development and life cycles of extreme or unusual weather events including tornadoes, blizzards, lightning displays, and tropical storms. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

ATMO 731. Advanced Topics in Atmospheric Science: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Advanced investigation of special topics in atmospheric science. May include topics in dynamic, physical or synoptic meteorology or climatology as well as related topics in earth and physical sciences. May be repeated if topic differs. LEC.

ATMO 750. Numerical Weather Prediction. 3 Hours.

An exploration of the mathematical methods used to describe the current state of the atmosphere and to predict future states. Current operational numerical weather prediction techniques will be included. Prerequisite: ATMO 660. LEC.

ATMO 825. Seminar in Climatology. 2-3 Hours.

LEC.

ATMO 827. Seminar in Atmospheric Science. 1-3 Hours.

LEC.

ATMO 898. Readings in Atmospheric Science. 1-4 Hours.

Independent readings of special problems in Atmospheric Science. IND.

ATMO 899. Master's Thesis. 1-10 Hours.

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.

ATMO 998. Research in Atmospheric Science. 1-5 Hours.

Individual investigation of special problems in Atmospheric Science. RSH.

ATMO 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-10 Hours.

Enrollment course for writing doctoral dissertation in Atmospheric Science. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.

Courses

GEOG 100. World Regional Geography. 3 Hours SC AE42 / S.

An introductory survey of the environmental setting, historically formative periods, and present-day issues that distinguish the major culture areas of the world. LEC.

GEOG 101. World Regional Geography, Honors. 3 Hours SC AE42 / S.

An introductory survey of the environmental setting, historically formative periods, and present-day issues that distinguish the major culture areas of the world. Open only to students in the College Honors Program, or by consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 102. Principles of Human Geography. 3 Hours SC AE42/GE3S / S.

An examination of the relationships between humans and their environments. The course introduces students to basic concepts in human geography relating to economic activities, landscapes, languages, migrations, nations, regions, and religions. Serves as the basis for further course work in cultural, economic, political, population, and urban geography. LEC.

GEOG 103. Principles of Human Geography, Honors. 3 Hours SC AE42/GE3S / S.

An introduction to how human societies organize space and modify the world about them. Resultant patterns on the landscape are interpreted through principles of space perception, cultural ecology, diffusion, land use, and location theory. Comparisons are made between urban and rural areas and between subsistence and commercial societies. Open to students who have been accepted into the College Honors Program. LEC.

GEOG 104. Principles of Physical Geography. 3 Hours NE GE3N / N.

The components of the physical environment are discussed in order to familiarize the student with their distributions and dynamic nature. Major topics include the atmosphere, landforms, soils, and vegetation together with their interrelationships and their relevance to human activity. This course and GEOG 105 together satisfy the laboratory science requirement. Both courses are required for geography majors. LEC.

GEOG 105. Introductory Laboratory in Physical Geography. 2 Hours U / LFE.

A laboratory course designed to complement GEOG 104 in satisfying the laboratory science requirement. It is required for geography majors. Laboratory exercises include a wide variety of analyses using data on the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere. Prerequisite: GEOG 104, which may be taken concurrently. LAB.

GEOG 107. Principles of Physical Geography, Honors. 3 Hours NE GE3N / N.

Interactive processes among the systems of the earth are studied and discussed. Major topics include vegetation, soils, landforms, water, the atmosphere, and cycles of matter between these portions of the earth. The course includes lectures and critical discussions to address study problems in physical geography. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by consent of the instructor. LEC.

GEOG 110. Geopolitics in the News. 3 Hours S.

This course examines leading contemporary geopolitical events and processes through the lens of geography. It focuses on major political conflicts and struggles as they play out unevenly over space, contextualizing them within broader themes of neocolonialism, globalization, and the international system of nation-states. Emphasis is put on making issues commonly found in the media understandable to students by providing a relevant historical background and drawing comparisons among events. LEC.

GEOG 111. Maps and Mapping. 4 Hours H / LFE.

How do people find their way from here to there or just around? Simple--they use maps. Maybe not maps on pieces of paper but maps in their heads: mental maps. Different people have different maps, even of the same place. Mapping is an ancient form of communication and maps have created ideas and opinions, promoted understanding and confusion. A non-technical approach to the transformation of space onto maps, to their content and structure, and their role and impact in human activity, past and present. Neither background in geography nor artistic skills are required. LEC.

GEOG 140. Global Environment I: The Discovery of Environmental Change. 5 Hours GE3S / U / LFE.

This interdisciplinary course and laboratory sections survey the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to earth systems and the development of environmental understanding using historical and present-day examples. (Same as EVRN 140 and HIST 140.) LEC.

GEOG 142. Global Environment II: The Ecology of Human Civilization. 5 Hours GE3S / U.

This interdisciplinary course and its laboratory sections survey the history of humanity's relationship with the natural world over the long term from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the evolution of Homo sapiens and cultural systems; the development of hunter, gatherer, fisher, agricultural, and pastoral lifeways; the ecology of colonialism and industrial civilization, and the emergence of ideological and ethical perspectives on the relationship between nature and culture. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to the humanity's engagement with the global environment using historical and present-day examples. (Same as EVRN 142 and HIST 142.) LEC.

GEOG 144. Global Environment I: The Discovery of Environmental Change, Honors. 5 Hours U / LFE.

This interdisciplinary course surveys the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to earth systems and the development of environmental understanding using historical and present-day examples. (Same as EVRN 144 and HIST 144.) Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 145. Global Environment II: The Ecology of Human Civilization, Honors. 5 Hours U.

This interdisciplinary course and its laboratory sections survey the history of humanity's relationship with the natural world over the long term from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics include the evolution of Homo sapiens and cultural systems; the development of hunter, gatherer, fisher, agricultural, and pastoral lifeways; the ecology of colonialism and industrial civilization, and the emergence of ideological and ethical perspectives on the relationship between nature and culture. Laboratory sections apply the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to the humanity's engagement with the global environment using historical and present-day examples. (Same as EVRN 145 and HIST 145.) Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 148. Scientific Principles of Environmental Studies. 3 Hours NB GE3N / N.

This course presents an overview of our understanding of environmental processes and issues. Topics include scientific principles, resource issues, pollution and global change, among others. This course gives students a rigorous understanding of interactions between humans and their environment and provides students with a scientific basis for making informed environmental decisions. (Same as EVRN 148.) LEC.

GEOG 149. Scientific Principles of Environmental Studies, Honors. 3 Hours NB GE3N / N.

This course presents an overview of our understanding of environmental processes and issues. Topics include scientific principles, resource issues, pollution and global change, among others. This course gives students a rigorous understanding of interactions between humans and their environment and provides students with a scientific basis for making informed environmental decisions. An honors section of GEOG 148 designed for superior students. (Same as EVRN 149.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval of instructor required. LEC.

GEOG 150. Environment, Culture and Society. 3 Hours SC GE3N / S.

An introduction to geographic approaches to the study of the environment, emphasizing societal and cultural factors that influence human interaction with the biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere. The course involves analysis of a broad range of contemporary environmental issues from the local to global scales. (Same as EVRN 150.) LEC.

GEOG 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Geography. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

GEOG 210. Computers, Maps, and Geographical Analysis. 3 Hours N.

This course will introduce students to a number of different methods for the visualization, representation, and analysis of geographical phenomena. Both field and computer-based techniques will be employed to demonstrate the concept of experimental design and the collection, processing, and analysis of geographical data. Topics include: 1) the unique nature of geographic data; 2) mapping techniques and technologies; 3) geographical information systems; 4) remote sensing (aerial photography and satellite imagery); and 5) methods of geographical analysis (e.g., statistic and spatial modeling). LEC.

GEOG 304. Environmental Conservation. 3 Hours NE GE3N / N.

A survey of current methods of describing and modeling the function, structure, and productivity of natural and anthropogenically modified earth resource systems, along with a discussion of contemporary views of what constitutes a natural landscape. Fundamental natural science principles about the interplay among lithospheric, atmospheric, hydrospheric, and biospheric components of earth systems are emphasized. Uses of natural resources, including fossil fuels, minerals, and water are described with attention to the earth's total energy budget. Human activities that affect preservation, conservation, and multiple uses of earth regions receive attention. Systems under stress through population and other contemporary forces serve as examples. (Same as EVRN 304.) LEC.

GEOG 311. Map Conception and Development. 4 Hours N / LFE.

An examination of the map process with emphasis on two areas: 1) the mental map formed during interaction with the environment and 2) the map as a physical object which emerges from mapping activity. A local area will serve as the laboratory/environment for the mapping activity including production and use. LEC.

GEOG 316. Methods of Analyzing Geographical Data. 4 Hours N / LFE.

Introduces the benefits and limitations of using quantitative methods to analyze geographical problems. Covers traditional descriptive (e.g., measures of central tendency) and inferential statistics (e.g., hypothesis testing) but also inherently geographical approaches such as shape and point pattern analysis, and spatial autocorrelation. Laboratory emphasizes using the computer to explore and analyze geographical problems. LEC.

GEOG 319. Topics in Techniques: _____. 1-3 Hours N.

An investigation of special topics in Techniques. May include coursework in cartography, GIS, or remote sensing. May be repeated if topic differs. LEC.

GEOG 321. Climate and Climate Change. 3 Hours N.

This course is designed to introduce students to the nature of the Earth's physical climate. It introduces the basic scientific concepts underlying our understanding of our climate system. Particular emphasis is placed on energy and water balances and their roles in evaluating climate change. The course also evaluates the impact of climate on living organisms and the human environment. Finally, past climates are discussed and potential future climate change and its impact on humans is evaluated. (Same as ATMO 321.) Prerequisite: ATMO 105 or GEOG 104. LEC.

GEOG 331. Regional Geomorphology of the United States. 3 Hours N.

This course examines forces and processes affecting the earth's surface, and furthermore identifies and describes the physiographic regions that are the result of these processes. Special efforts are made to explore various photographic resources, satellite imagery, and internet sources or geomorphic data from a regional perspective since there is no wholly satisfactory text available for the course. A research paper is required. Prerequisite: An introductory earth science course or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 332. Glaciers and Landscape. 3 Hours N.

Elements from glaciology, geology, and climatology are merged to examine the interactions between glaciers and their natural environments, including the processes involved in glacier formation, the relationship between glaciers and climate, the mechanisms of glacier flow, and interpretation of the Earth's glacial record. Emphasis is placed on an interdisciplinary approach to study environmental change and paleoclimate reconstruction. Prerequisite: GEOG 104 or GEOL 101, or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 335. Introduction to Soil Geography. 4 Hours N / LFE.

This course focuses on the properties and processes of soils as they occur in their environment. The student is introduced to the nature of soil as it functions as a body; genesis of soils; properties of soil solids, especially colloids; soil chemical composition, properties, and reactions; interaction between solid, liquid, and gaseous components in soils; plant-soil-water relationships; biological interactions with soil; classification of soils; and the distribution of soils on the landscape. Not open to students who have taken EVRN 535 or GEOG 535. (Same as EVRN 335.) Prerequisite: GEOG 104 or GEOL 101 or consent of instructor; BIOL 100 and CHEM 130 or CHEM 190 recommended. LEC.

GEOG 336. Introduction to Environmental Hydrology and Water Resources. 3 Hours N.

Water is vital to life on earth. In this course we cover components of the water or "hydrologic" cycle, how management has altered them, and how they are predicted to change with the changing climate. We discuss the evolution of water policy, its implications for managements and the economic impact of human perturbation on water. We study the physical processes that govern the water cycle, learn how they are measured, and estimate hydrologic fluxes. (Same as EVRN 363.) Prerequisite: GEOG 104 or GEOL 101 or GEOL 102. LEC.

GEOG 338. Introduction to River Systems. 3 Hours N.

A course of fluvial geomorphology. Topics include the drainage basin, fluvial processes, river channel adjustment and forms, human disturbance and geomorphic response, and research methods in fluvial geomorphology. Field trip. Prerequisite: GEOG 104. LEC.

GEOG 339. Topics in Physical Geography: _____. 1-3 Hours N.

An investigation of special topics in Physical Geography. May include coursework under headings of soils, vegetation, climate, or geomorphology. May be repeated if topic differs. LEC.

GEOG 350. Physical Geography of Africa. 3 Hours N.

This course is a survey of the basic physical features of the African continent including structure and relief, rivers and lakes, soils and mineral resources. It includes characteristics and processes of African climates, and the ecology of Africa's four major biomes: tropical rain forest, savanna, steppe, and desert. Climatic and environmental variations of the past, emergence of humankind, and development of pastoral and farming systems are discussed. Contemporary environmental concerns also include deforestation and desertification, the impacts of drought, methods for monitoring African environments, and Africa's prospects in a 21st century suffering from global warming. (Same as AAAS 350.) LEC.

GEOG 351. Africa's Human Geographies. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H/GE3S / S/W.

An introduction to historical, cultural, social, political, and economic issues in Africa from a geographic perspective. The course begins with the historical geography of humanity in Africa, from ancient times through to the present. Other topics include cultural dynamics, demography, health, rural development, urbanization, gender issues, and political geography. Case studies from Eastern and Southern Africa will be used to illustrate major themes. (Same as AAAS 351.) LEC.

GEOG 352. Economic Geography. 3 Hours S.

This course offers an overview of contemporary economic geography with an underlying theme of uneven regional development. Topics examined include: the historical context in which capitalism emerged; the major theoretical approaches used to understand the temporal and spatial dynamics of capitalist society; a series of case studies of different economic sectors; and the global economy, including its development with respect to colonialism, neocolonialism, international trade, third world development, and population growth. LEC.

GEOG 354. Globalization. 3 Hours S.

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of some major facets of the historical, economic, political, cultural, and geographical dimensions of contemporary globalization, the process by which individual regions and nations have become progressively linked to, and structured by, the world-system of states and markets, and the cultural contradictions associated with this process. (Same as GIST 354.) LEC.

GEOG 357. History and Philosophy of Geographic Information Science. 3 Hours N.

An examination of the development of geographic information science (GISci) from its roots in traditional geography, cartography, and remote sensing to modern geographic information systems (GIS). GIS is explored as a new scientific instrument, a "macroscope" for representing and analyzing complex earth processes, both physical and cultural. The societal benefits and risks of GIS are demonstrated and discussed. LEC.

GEOG 358. Principles of Geographic Information Systems. 4 Hours N / LFE.

An introduction to computer-based analysis of spatial data. Covers basic principles of collecting, storing, analyzing, and displaying spatial data. Emphasis is on problem-solving activities using common spatial analytical techniques (e.g., map overlay). The student will gain extensive hands-on experience with state-of-the-art GIS software. LEC.

GEOG 370. Introduction to Cultural Geography. 3 Hours GE3S / H.

Charts some of the major lines of research in cultural geography, including critical theory, political economy, poststructuralist thought, feminism, and global consumption. Through fieldwork, diverse research methods are applied to issues such as community development, cultural patterns on the landscape and global impacts on local economies. Prerequisite: GEOG 100, GEOG 101, GEOG 102 or GEOG 103; or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 371. Environmental Geopolitics. 3 Hours S.

This course examines how human relationships with the biophysical world are politicized. Examines key contributions to debates surrounding environmental security, resource conflicts, and related issues, as well as geopolitical assumptions on which these debates build. (Same as EVRN 371 and GIST 371.) LEC.

GEOG 372. Environmental Policy. 3 Hours N.

An historical and analytical study of the formulation, implementation, and consequences of environmental policy in the United States. Attention is directed at relevant interest groups, issues specific to both rural and urban populations, relationships between national policies and international organizations concerned with environmental problems. Prerequisite: GEOG 148 or EVRN 148; and either EVRN 103 or HIST 103, EVRN 347 or HIST 347, or GEOG 150 or EVRN 150. LEC.

GEOG 373. Political Geography. 3 Hours S.

Political Geography is concerned with spatial dynamics of power. It concerns issues such as territory, boundaries, and identify as well as feminist, post-colonial, geopolitical, and environmental perspectives. This class will consider the development of this subfield, the role it has played in imperial expansion, and ways in which more recent critiques have shaped political geography to be a means of understanding different forms of power and its relationship to people and places. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or GEOG 102 or equivalent or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 375. Intermediate Human Geography. 3 Hours S.

An examination of processes of cultural-economic interaction and patterns of human activity on a global scale. The topics cover the whole spectrum of human geography, with focus on urban-economic development, innovation and diffusion, and trade. Each week the third hour will be devoted to discussion of topics dealt with in lectures presented during the first two hours. Prerequisite: Introductory course in Geography or consent of the instructor. LEC.

GEOG 377. Urban Geography. 3 Hours S.

This course explores the city from the multiple perspectives of its inhabitants. The cultural viewpoints of place, gender, age, and ethnicity are stressed. Traditional topics such as urban hierarchy, functions of the city, suburbanization, and ongoing changes in core and peripheral areas also receive attention. The distinctive landscapes of individual North American cities are emphasized, but examples also are drawn from throughout the world. LEC.

GEOG 379. Topics in Cultural Geography: _____. 1-3 Hours S.

An investigation of special topics in Cultural Geography. May include coursework under headings of culture theory, material culture, language, foodways, or religion. May be repeated if topic differs. LEC.

GEOG 390. Geography of the United States and Canada. 3 Hours S.

A study of the different physical, economic, and cultural settings in the United States and Canada which form the basis for the various forms of livelihood. Emphasis on the United States. (Same as AMS 390.) Prerequisite: An introductory geography course or background in the United States or Canadian history, social science, or culture or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 395. Environmental Issues of: _____. 3 Hours S.

This regional geography course examines contemporary environmental issues of a particular region of the world based on the expertise of the professor. Course emphasis is on the interaction of natural, socio-economic, and cultural factors of development that give rise to environmental problems. Students learn how local, national, and international government and non-governmental stakeholders address environmental problems. Course may be repeated with different professors. LEC.

GEOG 396. East Asia. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H/GE3S / S/W.

This course is an introduction to the contemporary politics, economy, and culture of Korea, China, and Japan in the context of globalization. In addition to the discussion of individual countries, the course examines the cross-cutting themes such as international relations, cultural exchange, and economic development in the region of East Asia. LEC.

GEOG 397. Geography of Kansas and the Plains. 3 Hours S.

A study of the different physical, economic, and cultural settings in Kansas and the Plains that form the basis for various kinds of livelihood. LEC.

GEOG 399. Topics in Regional Studies: _____. 1-3 Hours S.

An investigation of special topics in Regional Studies. May include coursework related to a specific country or region. May be repeated if topic differs. LEC.

GEOG 410. Human Biogeography, Honors. 3 Hours N.

Principles of evolution and earth change are used to examine distributions of human populations, wealth, and resources. Readings from the current literature will be included. Lecture and discussion. (Same as BIOL 410.) Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or 153 or GEOG 107 and membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 418. Workshop in Production Cartography. 1-3 Hours AE61 / N.

Theory and practice of map production and other related graphics using the latest graphic and GIS software. Projects vary but include the processes of design and production, editing and quality control, and a final printed or operational product. Involves a weekly consultation session and laboratory time in KU Cartographic & GIS Services. Prerequisite: Completion of GEOG 311 and consent of instructor. IND.

GEOG 433. Biogeography Field and Laboratory Techniques. 3 Hours N.

This course provides undergraduate students with practical experience in field data collection techniques and laboratory data analysis methods. During the first half of the semester, students work in the field using a variety of methods to measure such vegetation characteristics as: cover, density, biomass, leaf area, and canopy architecture. Students gain experience in the use of field instruments including a spectoradiometer, and techniques for quantifying biophysical attributes of vegetation. During the later part of the course, students learn to summarize their field data and examine relationships between the vegetation attributes and measurements made using remote sensing instruments. Recommended: GEOG 316 or an introductory statistics equivalent. (Same as EVRN 433.) FLD.

GEOG 458. Geographical Information Systems: _____. 1-6 Hours N.

An introduction to the organization and components of geographic information systems and their software. Fundamental concepts and their implementation with applications to physical and human systems. LEC.

GEOG 490. Geographic Internship. 1-6 Hours AE61 / N.

Supervised practical experience. The student submits a proposal describing the internship prior to enrollment. Upon acceptance, regularly scheduled meetings with the advisor provide assistance, guidance and evaluation of progress in the professional experience. A written summary of the experience or outcomes of the research project are prepared independently by the student, a representative of the host agency, and the advisor. Total credit not to exceed six hours. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of geography and permission of instructor. INT.

GEOG 498. Special Topics in Geography: _____. 1-5 Hours U.

Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of geography. IND.

GEOG 499. Honors Course in Geography. 2-3 Hours AE61 / U.

Open to students with nine hours of upper level credit in geography, an average of at least 3.5 in all geography courses, and an overall average of at least 3.25. Includes the preparation of an honors paper and its defense before a committee of at least two regular faculty members. IND.

GEOG 500. Senior Capstone in Geography. 3 Hours AE61 / N.

The capstone project provides students with a broad-based, interdisciplinary educational experience and allows them to integrate and synthesize the knowledge they have gained in their studies. The course is designed to achieve several objectives: provide an overview of geography as a unified, coherent discipline with multiple perspectives, emphasize writing and analytical skills, introduce students to a major research project that integrates elements of physical and human geography, and cultivate knowledge of future professional development. Graduate students may take this course by permission only. Prerequisite: Nine hours in Geography and status as a senior major in the department; or permission of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 510. Human Factors. 4 Hours N.

An introduction to the concepts and theories underlying the study of human-technological systems. Human-machine interfaces and system properties and the environment are considered. Lecture-discussion sessions are supplemented by computer-supported laboratory and research activities. LEC.

GEOG 511. Intermediate Cartography: _____. 1-6 Hours N / LFE.

An investigation of special topics in cartography. Can be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: A course in cartography and consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 513. Cartographic Design. 3 Hours S.

A study of graphic elements and their role in the physical and perceptual structure of the map image. Concepts and principles of design are stressed with particular emphasis on the figure-ground relationships, color and lettering. Prerequisite: GEOG 311. LEC.

GEOG 514. Visualizing Spatial Data. 4 Hours N / LFE.

Students use Visual Basic or other currently prominent programming language to visualize spatial data. Early projects cover basic principles such as color manipulation and spatial transformations. Later projects involve developing more sophisticated software for data presentation, data exploration, and map animation. Prerequisite: Some experience with Visual Basic or other programming language. LAB.

GEOG 516. Applied Multivariate Analysis in Geography. 3 Hours N.

An introduction to the application of multivariate statistical analysis in geography. Techniques covered include univariate and multivariate analysis of variance, multiple regression, logistic regression, principle components analysis, and spatial regression. Practical applications of the techniques in a geographical research context are emphasized. Students will learn how to use statistical packages such as SPSS. Prerequisite: GEOG 316 or equivalent. LEC.

GEOG 517. Data Handling and Map Symbolization. 3 Hours N.

An analysis of methods for manipulating and symbolizing spatial data. Techniques studied include dot, choropleth, proportional symbols, and isarithmic (contour) mapping. Topics covered include data classification, the use of color, and automated methods of interpolation (triangulation, inverse distance, and kriging). Emphasis is on developing maps that can be presented to the general public, although some consideration is given to visualization software that can be utilized by individuals to explore spatial data. Prerequisite: GEOG 111 or GEOG 210 or GEOG 311. LEC.

GEOG 519. History of Cartography. 3 Hours H.

A history of mapmaking worldwide from its origins to the present day. Emphasis on maps as historical records of evolving civilizations and cultural landscapes and methods of studying early maps. (Same as HIST 546.) LEC.

GEOG 521. Microclimatology. 3 Hours N.

A study of climatic environments near the earth-atmosphere interface. Consideration of rural climates in relation to agriculture and urban climates as influenced by air pollution and other factors. Emphasis is on physical processes in the lower atmosphere, distribution of atmospheric variables, the surface energy budget, and water balance. (Same as ATMO 521.) Prerequisite: ATMO 105 and MATH 125. LEC.

GEOG 526. Remote Sensing of Environment I. 4 Hours N / LFE.

Introduction to study of the environment through air photos and satellite imagery, including principles of remote sensing, interactions of electromagnetic energy with the atmosphere and earth's surface, aerial photography, satellite systems, and sensors (electro-optical, thermal, and radar). Emphasis in the latter part of the course is on such applications as global monitoring, land cover mapping, forestry, agriculture, and oceanography. Laboratory emphasizes visual interpretation of aerial photography and satellite imagery and an introduction to digital image processing in the department's NASA Earth Science Remote Sensing Laboratory. (Same as EVRN 526.) Prerequisite: MATH 101 or equivalent. GEOG 358 recommended. LEC.

GEOG 531. Topics in Physical Geography: _____. 1-3 Hours N.

An investigation of special topics in physical geography. May include specific course work under the headings of geomorphology, climatology, soils, vegetation, quaternary, paleoenvironments, hydrology, etc. May be repeated, if topic differs. LEC.

GEOG 532. Geoarchaeology. 3 Hours N.

Application of the concepts and methods of the geosciences to interpretation of the archeological record. The course will focus primarily on the field aspects of geoarchaeology (e.g., stratigraphy, site formational processes, and landscape reconstruction), and to a lesser extent on the array of laboratory approaches available. (Same as ANTH 517.) Prerequisite: GEOG 104, ANTH 110, or ANTH 310. LEC.

GEOG 535. Soil Geography. 4 Hours N / LFE.

A broad study of the principles and properties of soils and their distribution on the landscape. Topics covered include: pedology, clay mineralogy, soil physics, soil chemistry, management of soils, soil biology, taxonomy, and soil geomorphology. Laboratory section and a field project are required. Not open to students who have taken GEOG 335 or EVRN 335. (Same as EVRN 535.) Prerequisite: GEOG 104 or GEOL 101 or consent of the instructor; BIOL 104 and CHEM 130 or 190 recommended. LEC.

GEOG 537. Elements of Plant Geography. 3 Hours N.

An introduction to spatial and temporal variation in natural plant populations and communities. Included is an introduction to methods of analysis, and an overview of structure and process in the earth's major biomes. Prerequisite: GEOG 331; or an introductory biology/botany course and GEOG 104; or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 538. Soil Chemistry. 3 Hours N / LFE.

This course examines the chemical properties and processes of soils and methods of evaluation. Topics include solid and solution speciation, mineral solubility, soil colloidal behavior, ion exchange, surface complexation, soil salinity and sodicity, soil acidity, oxidation-reduction reactions, and kinetics of soil chemical processes. (Same as EVRN 538.) Prerequisite: GEOG 335 or GEOG 535 or EVRN 335 or EVRN 535, CHEM 135 or CHEM 195, MATH 125 or consent of the instructor. LEC.

GEOG 540. Ecohydrology. 3 Hours N.

Ecohydrology is the discipline that answers real world hydrologic and biologic questions through integrating knowledge from hydrology, ecology, atmospheric science and biogeochemistry. We focus on the key concepts, methodological approaches and analytical techniques utilized in ecohydrology to understand and quantify: plant water use, evolution of hydrologic properties, groundwater-surface water interactions, controls on landscape patterns, spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture and nutrient concentrations, and vegetation competition. Students should leave the class having developed critical skills in: 1) reviewing scientific literature, 2) collecting environmental samples, 3) analyzing ecohydrologic data, 4) writing a scientific research paper, 5) working collaboratively and independently. (Same as EVRN 540.) Prerequisite: GEOG 104 or GEOL 101 or GEOL 102, or EVRN 363 or GEOG 336 or permission of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 541. Geomorphology. 4 Hours N / LFE.

A critical study of land forms in relation to tectonics, climatic environment, and geologic processes. The use of geomorphic methods in the interpretation of Cenozoic history is emphasized. Laboratory exercises in analysis of field observations, maps, and photographs. Required field trip and fee. (Same as GEOL 541.) Prerequisite: GEOL 101 and GEOL 103, GEOG 104 and GEOG 105, or GEOL 103 and GEOL 304. LEC.

GEOG 550. Environmental Issues in Africa. 3 Hours S.

Acquaints students with the complexities of debates on environmental problems in Sub-Saharan Africa. Topics addressed may include deforestation, desert expansion, wildlife conservation, soil erosion, climate change, coral reef destruction, water resources development, mangrove preservation, the environmental effects of war, industrialization, and urbanization. Class presentations and projects synthesize the perspectives of both human and physical geography. (Same as AAAS 551.) Prerequisite: GEOG 104 or permission of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 552. Topics in Urban/Economic Geography: _____. 1-3 Hours S.

An investigation of special topics in urban/economic geography. May include specific course work under the headings of energy, economic development, international trade, environmental perception, housing, transportation, and migration. May be repeated. LEC.

GEOG 553. Geography of African Development. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H/GE3S / S.

Acquaints students with the values of social parameters of African agricultural and pastoral practice. Topics include customary land rights, African perspectives on the natural world, gender issues in African agriculture, and the urbanization of African cultures. The course also contrasts African views with those of Western development practitioners and donor agencies. Case studies from different countries are used to highlight the continent's regional differences. (Same as AAAS 553.) LEC.

GEOG 556. Geography of the Energy Crisis. 3 Hours S.

A discussion and analysis of the basic facts and causes of energy problems on a national and world scale. Examines current production, consumption, efficiency, reserves, conservation, and other energy policy options, including adjustments that will affect consumer use, national politics, and strategic issues. Prerequisite: GEOG 102 or GEOG 375. LEC.

GEOG 557. Cities and Development. 3 Hours S.

An intermediate level course in urban geography, with an emphasis on cities in the developing world. Example cities in Latin America and the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, and/or Southeast Asia may be examined. The main focus is on the intersection between urbanization and economic development, but social, political, and cultural aspects of development in cities are considered. Other topics include the geographic impacts of European colonialism, urbanization and industrialization, rural-to-urban migration, urban structure and spatial dynamics, urban planning, and environmental sustainability. (Same as AAAS 557.) LEC.

GEOG 558. Intermediate Geographical Information Systems. 4 Hours N / LFE.

An intermediate level course in geographic information science designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate level students who already have an introductory understanding of GIS. Emphasis will be placed on the application of spatial analytical techniques to geographical problem-solving. Topics include spatial data structures, interpolation techniques, terrain analysis, cost surfaces, and database management technique. Students will apply knowledge gained in lecture and reading to natural resource, urban, and scientific applications using state-of-the-art GIS software. Prerequisite: GEOG 358 or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 560. GIS Application Programming. 3 Hours N.

This course teaches programming within Geographic Information Systems. Students learn how to customize GIS applications to automate data processing and spatial analysis through programming languages. GIS programming concepts and methods are introduced from the aspects of spatial data management and analysis covering both the vector and raster data models. Prerequisite: GEOG 558 and a course in programming languages. LEC.

GEOG 570. Geography of American Indians. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H/GE3S / S.

A survey of the culture and history of selected indigenous peoples of the Americas. Emphasis is placed on the environmental setting, the settlement and subsistence patterns, and the impact of European colonization. Discussion includes present-day ethnic and resource issues. LEC.

GEOG 571. Topics in Cultural Geography: _____. 1-3 Hours S.

An investigation of special topics in cultural geography. May include specific course work under the headings of cultural theory and methodology, material culture, foodways, religion, and similar topics. May be repeated, if topic differs. LEC.

GEOG 574. Exploring Oceania. 3 Hours S.

Acquaints students with the culture and history of Oceania including its settlement and the impacts of European and American colonialism on Australasia, Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. Emphasis is placed on applying broad geographical concepts to this vast Oceanic region through the lenses of development, media and migration studies. Prerequisite: GEOG 102 or GEOG 103; or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 576. Cultural Geography of the United States. 3 Hours S.

Distributions of major culture elements including folk architecture, religion, dialect, foodways, and political behavior are systematically studied from a predominately historical perspective. These discussions are followed by a survey of the major culture regions in America. Although not absolutely necessary, familiarity with concepts treated in any of the following courses would be helpful: AMS 100, AMS 110, ANTH 108, ANTH 308, GEOG 102, or GEOG 390. (Same as AMS 576.) LEC.

GEOG 579. Geography of American Foodways. 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary approach to food that explores the diversity of eating habits across the United States and the role of food as in indicator of cultural identity and change. Current regional and ethnic food consumption patterns are stressed. Topics include multiculturalism and regional identity, the symbiotic relationship between restaurant food and home cooking, the recent interest in farmers' markets and organic foods, and the importance of the food industry and the popular press in setting trends. (Same as AMS 579.) LEC.

GEOG 590. Understanding Central Asia. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

An intensive, multidisciplinary survey of Central Asia, focusing on the former Soviet republics-Kazakhstan, Krygystan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan-with additional coverage of neighboring regions (the Caucasus and the Caspian basin, Afghanistan, and western China). The course addresses the history of the region (from the Silk Road to Soviet rule), geography, religion, and the building of post-Soviet states and societies. (Same as REES 510.) LEC.

GEOG 591. Geography of Latin America. 3 Hours SC AE42/GE3S / S/W.

A study of the different physical, economic, and cultural settings in Latin America which form the basis for the various forms of livelihood. LEC.

GEOG 592. Middle American Geography. 3 Hours S.

This regional study of the natural environments and cultural-historical backgrounds of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean details the physical and historical processes that have shaped the cultural landscape. LEC.

GEOG 593. Central American Peoples and Lands. 3 Hours S.

This is a study of the natural and cultural history of the region's lands and peoples that focuses on the cultural geography of the surviving indigenous populations, including their culture area, culture history, cultural landscape, and cultural ecology. LEC.

GEOG 594. Geography of the Former Soviet Union. 3 Hours S/W.

An analysis of the spatial organization of the successor states to the USSR. A study of the diverse human and natural resources, demographic, cultural, and economic conditions. Prerequisite: An introductory geography course or background in Russian-East European history, social science, or culture, or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 595. Geography of Eastern Europe. 3 Hours S/W.

A study of nations and regions of Eastern Europe, excluding Russia. Prerequisite: An introductory geography course or background in Slavic-East European history, social science, or culture or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 597. Geography of Brazil. 3 Hours S.

Study of geographic factors, physical and cultural, that are basic to understanding the historical development of Portuguese South America and the contemporary and cultural geography of Brazil. Course also includes a survey of Brazil's South American neighbors. LEC.

GEOG 601. Indigenous Peoples of the World. 3 Hours S.

A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of external economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law are used. (Same as GIST 601 and ISP 601.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 635. Soil Physics. 3 Hours N.

Provides theoretical and practical foundations for understanding physical properties and processes of variably-saturated porous media. Focus is on the transport, retention, and transformation of water, heat, gas, and solutes through the soil. We examine modern vadose zone measurement methods, analytical tools, and numerical models for data collection and interpretation. (Same as EVRN 635.) Prerequisite: GEOG 335 or EVRN 335; or GEOG 535 or EVRN 535, and MATH 125, PHSX 114; or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 658. Topics in Geographic Information Science: _____. 1-6 Hours / LFE.

An investigation of special topics in geographic information science. May include specific coursework under the headings of methodology, basic research, thematic or regional applications, geographic information systems (GIS), Global Positioning System (GPS), and geostatistics. May be repeated if topic differs. LEC.

GEOG 670. Cultural Ecology. 3 Hours S.

Investigation of the interrelations between socio-cultural systems and the natural environment, including a survey of major theories and descriptive studies. (Same as ANTH 695.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in geography or anthropology. LEC.

GEOG 710. Information Design. 3 Hours.

Concepts and principles for the organization of verbal, numerical, and graphic/spatial data and their application to the production of information displays and instruments. Examination of the evolution of the information design process from the traditional (communication system) perspective to interactive user-centered design approaches. The nature of human information processing in handling information for both visualization and analysis, with particular emphasis on decision-making and usability. Prerequisite: GEOG 510, INDD 510, PSYC 318, PSYC 685, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 711. Advanced Cartography: _____. 3 Hours.

An investigation of special topics in cartography. Can be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 713. Practicum in Cartography. 1-6 Hours.

Experience in the organization and presentation of cartographic material in lecture, discussion, and laboratory formats. May be repeated to a total of six credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. FLD.

GEOG 714. Field Experience. 3 Hours AE61.

Working in a new environment presents problems unlike those encountered in a classroom situation. Data collection techniques and exercises discussed in this off-campus course are intended to provide experience in dealing with an unfamiliar situation. Course location is dictated by the interests and composition of the student group; offered in the first three weeks of August. Geography majors are encouraged to attend. This course is required for graduate students. Fee required. Prerequisite: Junior-senior standing and fifteen hours of geography or consent of instructor. FLD.

GEOG 716. Advanced Geostatistics. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the practical application of advanced geospatial statistical techniques. Potential topics include: spatial regression, interpolation, clustering, and advanced nonparametric statistics. Knowledge of a statistical package and GIS is assumed. Prerequisite: GEOG 516 or equivalent and GEOG 358 or equivalent. LEC.

GEOG 719. Development of Geographic Thought. 2-3 Hours.

Critical analysis of the growth of geographic thought from antiquity to the present: emphasis on structure of modern geography. Prerequisite: Twenty hours of geography or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 726. Remote Sensing of Environment II. 4 Hours.

An overview of techniques for computer analysis of digital data from earth orbiting satellites for environmental applications. Topics covered include: data formats, image enhancements and analysis, classification, thematic mapping, and environmental change detection. The laboratory exercises provide hands-on experience in computer digital image processing in the department's NASA Earth Science Remote Sensing Laboratory. Prerequisite: Introductory statistics and GEOG 526 or equivalent. LEC.

GEOG 731. Topics in Physical Geography: _____. 1-3 Hours.

An investigation of special topics in physical geography. May include specific course work under the headings of geomorphology, climatology, soils, vegetation, quaternary, paleoenvironments, hydrology, etc. May be repeated. RSH.

GEOG 733. Advanced Biogeography Field and Laboratory Techniques. 3 Hours.

This course provides graduate students with practical experience in field data collection techniques and laboratory data analysis methods. During the first half of the semester, students will work in the field using a variety of methods to measure such vegetation characteristics as: cover, density, biomass, leaf area, and canopy architecture. Students will gain experience in the use of field instruments including a spectroradiometer, and techniques for quantifying vegetation biophysical attributes. The laboratory analyses component will include: data summary, data entry, correlation, regression, MANOVA, cluster analysis, and data display, and reporting. Recommended: GEOG 516 or multivariate statistics equivalent. LEC.

GEOG 735. Soil Geomorphology. 3 Hours.

Examines the interaction of pedogenic and geomorphic processes during the Quaternary with an emphasis on strategies and methodologies employed in soil-geomorphic studies. Group research projects incorporating field data collection and analyses are required. Prerequisite: GEOG 335 or GEOG 535 or consent of the instructor. LEC.

GEOG 741. Advanced Geomorphology. 1-3 Hours.

Detailed discussions of processes and landforms characteristic of specific environments. Considered during separate semesters will be general methodology, and fluvial, arid regions, glacial, and shoreline geomorphology. Course may be taken more than once. (Same as GEOL 741.) Prerequisite: GEOG 541. LEC.

GEOG 749. Topics in Stable Isotopes in the Natural Sciences:. 2-3 Hours.

Isotopic compositions of substances provide powerful insights into many topics in the natural sciences. Applications of isotopic analyses of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen to selected research topics such as plant resource use, food web analysis, paleoecology, paleodiet reconstruction, hydrology, and soils genesis will be examined. Knowledge of isotope chemistry is not required. (Concepts necessary to understand pertinent articles will be taught during the first class meetings.) May be repeated. (Same as BIOL 749.) LEC.

GEOG 751. Analysis of Regional Development. 3 Hours.

An analytical approach to spatial organization of economic activities and aspects of growth and development. Location theory and the geography of trade and migration. A research paper is required. Prerequisite: GEOG 551, or a course in economics, or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 752. Topics in Urban/Economic Geography: _____. 1-3 Hours.

An investigation of special topics in urban/economic geography. May include specific coursework under the headings of energy, economic development, international trade, environmental perception, housing, transportation, and migration. May be repeated. LEC.

GEOG 756. Energy Problems and the Economic-Physical Environment. 2-3 Hours.

This course investigates the economic, social, political, and environmental conditions of energy production, transport, and use: total energy consumption and mix, relations to the level and structure of the economy, substitutability of fuel and energy sources, resource endowment in an international setting. Prerequisite: GEOG 551 or a course in economics or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 758. Geographic Information Science. 4 Hours.

This course integrates topics in geographical information science (GISci) with spatial analytical techniques to solve spatial problems. Focuses on the most current research in GISci and its relevance to the environmental sciences, natural resource management, and spatial decision-making. Students are expected to apply the concepts and techniques learned in this class to their own research projects. Prerequisite: GEOG 316 and GEOG 558, or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 771. Topics in Cultural Geography: _____. 1-3 Hours.

An investigation of special topics in cultural geography. May include specific course methodology, material culture, foodways, religion, and similar topics. May be repeated. LEC.

GEOG 772. Problems in Political Geography. 3 Hours.

Case studies of regional and national power settings with particular emphasis upon the geographical analysis of political developments in unstable areas of the world. Prerequisite: GEOG 102 or GEOG 375. LEC.

GEOG 773. Humanistic Geography. 3 Hours.

A discussion and project-oriented course focused on ways of studying the character and meaning of places. Concepts examined include place image and image makers, landscapes as text, sense of place, vernacular regions, and alternate representations of space. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or fifteen hours of geography or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 775. Proseminar in Population Geography. 3 Hours.

Evaluation of problem formulation data gathering, research methods, and substantive knowledge in the geography of human populations. Concurrent auditing of GEOG 575 plus an additional meeting each week is required. Prerequisite: GEOG 575 and GEOG 516, and SOC 514. LEC.

GEOG 790. North American Regions: _____. 3 Hours.

A detailed description and analysis of selected regions of North America. Prerequisite: An introductory geography course or background in United States or Canadian history, social science, or culture or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 791. Latin American Regions: _____. 3 Hours.

A description and analysis of the principal sources of geographic information pertaining to portions or all of Latin America. Prerequisite: GEOG 591 or concurrent auditing of GEOG 591, or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 794. Regions of the Former USSR. 3 Hours.

A description and analysis of geographic data pertaining to the successor states to the USSR. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of Geography courses or background in Russian, East European or Middle East studies, or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 795. European Regions: _____. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of geography, background in specified area, or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 796. Asian Regions: _____. 2-3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Fifteen hours in geography courses or background in Asia, or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 801. Indigenous Peoples of the World. 3 Hours.

A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of externally-dominated economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law will be used. The course is offered at the 600 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. (Same as ISP 801.) LEC.

GEOG 802. Urban Geographic Information Systems. 3 Hours.

An advanced survey of urban GIS/LIS focusing on: (1) history; (2) the wide range of applications from Automated Mapping/Facilities Management (AM/FM) to topologically related GIS; (3) generic analytical functions in both raster and vector modalities; and (4) software employed, hardware platforms, and institutional settings. A limited experience in the use of GIS is provided from exercises employing ARC/Info software. Prerequisite: Some experience with DOS based computing. LEC.

GEOG 805. History of Geographic Thought. 2 Hours.

A course to familiarize students with the history and philosophy of geography as a science and humanity. The course summarizes, reviews, and explores the ongoing relevance of 2,500 years of theoretical and methodological advancements in human and physical geography. LEC.

GEOG 806. Basic Seminar. 2 Hours.

The second of two courses required of M.A. students designed to provide experience in the development of research proposals and exposure to methodologies in geography. This course deals with approaches to geographic problems, and involves individual examination of special topics which require preparation, presentation, and critical evaluation of research proposals. LEC.

GEOG 818. Problems in Production Cartography. 1-3 Hours.

Advanced instruction in the theory and practice of producing maps and other related graphics for classroom instruction and research projects. Emphasis will be on current photo-mechanical and automated techniques. Prerequisite: By appointment. Consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 835. Practicum in Soil Mapping and Soil Erosion. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to give graduate students field experience in soil mapping and in the evaluation of soils for loss through processes of erosion. Prerequisite: GEOG 535 or equivalent or consent of instructor. FLD.

GEOG 858. Environmental Geographic Information Systems. 4 Hours.

An introduction to the use of GIS for environmental inventory, monitoring, and modeling. This course integrates the principles of landscape ecology with the analytical tools of GIS, remote sensing, and spatial analysis. Students will be taught GIS methodologies used to address real world problems and the use of GIS spatial analysis techniques to characterize landscapes and monitor their change. Prerequisite: GEOG 316 and GEOG 558 or equivalents, multivariate analysis recommended. LEC.

GEOG 890. Geographic Internship. 1-6 Hours.

Supervised professional experience. The student submits to the program committee a proposal describing the internship prior to enrollment. Upon acceptance, regularly scheduled meetings with the advisor provide assistance, guidance and evaluation of progress in the professional experience. A written summary of the experience or outcomes of the research project are prepared independently by the student, a representative of the host agency, and the advisor. Total credit not to exceed six hours. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of graduate level geography courses and consent of program committee. INT.

GEOG 898. Readings in Geography. 1-4 Hours.

RSH.

GEOG 899. Master's Thesis. 1-10 Hours.

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.

GEOG 911. Seminar in Cartography: _____. 1-4 Hours.

Study of selected topics in cartography. Can be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: GEOG 513 or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 912. Seminar in Quantitative Methods. 2-3 Hours.

LEC.

GEOG 926. Seminar in Remote Sensing. 2-4 Hours.

Study of selected topics in remote sensing theory and application. May include independent or group research and/or development work. Topic will be specified in advance. Prerequisite: GEOG 726 or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 935. Seminar in Soil Geography. 2-3 Hours.

Subject matter varies but focuses on modern concepts and trends in soil geography. Sample topics include classification, paleopedology, and soil genesis. Field trip and fee may be required. Prerequisite: GEOG 735 or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 937. Seminar in Vegetation Geography. 1-3 Hours.

(Same as BIOL 968.) LEC.

GEOG 939. Seminar in Fluvial Systems. 2-3 Hours.

Study of selected topics in theory and method of fluvial systems. Samples include hydraulic geometry, the nature of alluvial sediments, and basin case studies. Topic will be specified in advance. LEC.

GEOG 957. Seminar in Urban and Economic Geography. 2-3 Hours.

LEC.

GEOG 958. Seminar in Geographic Information Systems. 2-4 Hours.

Study of selected topics in analysis of digital geographic data. May include research and/or developmental work. Prerequisite: GEOG 758 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 970. Seminar in Cultural Geography: _____. 2-3 Hours.

Study of selected topics in the theory and method of cultural geography. Samples include religious patterns, folk architecture, and place-defining novels. Topic will be specified in advance. LEC.

GEOG 972. Seminar in Political Geography. 2-3 Hours.

Study of selected topics in the theory and method of political geography. Samples include insurgent states, electoral patterns, and political ecology. Topic will be specified in advance. Prerequisite: GEOG 772 or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 975. Seminar in Population Geography. 2-3 Hours.

Study of selected geographic topics and problems dealing with the distribution of human populations. Prerequisite: GEOG 775 or consent of instructor. LEC.

GEOG 980. Seminar in Geography: _____. 1-3 Hours.

LEC.

GEOG 990. Seminar in Regional Geography: _____. 1-3 Hours.

(Selected areas to be specified.) LEC.

GEOG 998. Research in Geography. 1-5 Hours.

RSH.

GEOG 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-10 Hours.

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.