Why study linguistics?

Because language is a window into the mind. Linguistics provides an understanding of the human capacity to acquire, perceive, and produce language and of language’s role in contemporary society.

Facilities

The Department of Linguistics houses 7 research and teaching laboratories.

The Developmental Psycholinguistics Laboratory is equipped to investigate how preschool-age children acquire and use the knowledge of meaning in their first language. The lab uses various psycholinguistic tasks, such as linguistic comprehension tasks and the visual-world eye tracking paradigm, to assess children’s representation and real-time processing of meaning. The lab houses an eye tracking system with a remote camera designed specifically for children to participate in the visual-world eye tracking paradigm.

The Field Linguistics Laboratory provides an environment for on-site elicitation work with speakers as well as the processing, analysis, and archiving of field data. The laboratory is equipped with computer workstations and an assortment of audio/video recording devices suitable for a range of fieldwork projects.

The Mayan Language Acquisition Laboratory provides facilities for documenting the acquisition of Mayan languages. The laboratory processes audio and video recordings of children acquiring the Mayan languages Ch'ol, K'iche', Mam, and Q'anjob'al. The laboratory uses the Qanform software suite to produce transcriptions that conform to the Minimal Coding standard (Pye 2001). A uniform transcription protocol ensures that transcriptions for all the languages have a standard format. Transcripts are available online at the Adquisición de Lenguas Mayas (ALMA) website.

The Neurolinguistics and Language Processing Laboratory is fully equipped for multi-method, cross-linguistic research on the implementation of language in the brain. The laboratory includes a 70-channel Neuroscan Synamps2 EEG system for visual and auditory ERP (event-related potentials) studies, and two dedicated testing rooms for psycholinguistic experiments including lexical decision, priming, and self-paced reading. Brain imaging studies, including MEG and fMRI, are conducted at the Hoglund Brain Imaging Center at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City.

The Phonetics and Psycholinguistics Laboratory provides an integrated environment for the experimental study of speech and language, including production, perception, and acquisition. Primary research areas in the lab are acoustic and auditory phonetics as well as spoken and written word recognition, all across a variety of languages. Software includes MultiSpeech and Praat for speech analysis and Paradigm, Superlab, and Matlab for collecting responses from up to six subjects simultaneously. Digital noise-free recordings are made in our anechoic chamber.

The Second Language Acquisition Laboratory is equipped with 5 computer workstations and 2 dedicated testing rooms. Computers are equipped with software (Paradigm) for running psycholinguistic experiments (including interpretation tasks, reaction time, self-paced reading, and speeded grammaticality judgment) and for conducting statistical analyses. Primary research areas in the lab are the acquisition and processing of syntax and semantics by adult second language learners, all across a variety of languages. Our research focuses on the linguistic and cognitive factors that impact acquisition at varying stages of development.

The Second Language Processing & Eye-Tracking Laboratory has 2 testing rooms equipped with computer stations for investigating second language speech and sentence processing as well as a head-mounted eye tracker. The research methods employed in the lab include speech perception and word recognition, cross-modal priming and masked priming, self-paced reading and sentence comprehension, and eye tracking in the visual world paradigm and in reading.

Undergraduate Programs

The department offers a broad range of courses that provide a basic understanding of human language and communication. Linguistics courses examine features of language that underlie the human capacity to express concepts and communicate ideas. They address the connections between language, brain, culture, mind, and history.

Graduate Programs

The Department of Linguistics offers the full range of degrees (B.A., M.A., and Ph.D.). Its nucleus of full-time faculty members in linguistics, plus several actively involved faculty members in other departments, serves a student body of about 40 graduate students, 90 undergraduate majors, and many nonmajors taking introductory and intermediate courses each semester.

Areas of special strength in the graduate program include

  • Phonetics and phonology
  • Syntax and morphology
  • First- and second-language acquisition
  • Psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics

Courses

LING 106. Introductory Linguistics. 3 Hours SC AE42/GE11/GE3S / S.

Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure and semantic structure of languages. The course will include a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and will introduce students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. (Same as ANTH 106). LEC.

LING 107. Introductory Linguistics, Honors. 3 Hours SC AE42/GE11/GE3S / S.

Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure, and semantic structure of languages. The course includes a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and introduces students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. (Same as ANTH 107.) LEC.

LING 110. Language and Mind. 3 Hours SI AE41/GE11/GE3S / S.

A study of the relation between language and the human mind, focusing on language as a fundamental aspect of human cognition. Topics include what is innate and what is learned during first and second language acquisition, how we process language, and whether there are areas of the brain specialized for language. LEC.

LING 111. Language and Mind, Honors. 3 Hours SI AE41/GE11/GE3S / S.

A study of the relation between language and the human mind, focusing on language as a fundamental aspect of human cognition. Topics include what is innate and what is learned during first and second language acquisition, how we process language, and whether there are areas of the brain specialized for language. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by consent of instructor. LEC.

LING 120. The Physics of Speech. 4 Hours N.

An introduction to the acoustic structure of speech intended for nonscience majors. Emphasis will be placed on the methods and standards by which scientists measure and evaluate the physical characteristics of speech. Topics will include: simple harmonic motion, the propagation of sound waves, aerodynamic aspects of vocal fold vibration, resonance, digital speech processing, frequency analysis, and speech synthesis. Three class hours and one laboratory per week. (Same as SPLH 120.) Prerequisite: MATH 101 or 104 or equivalent. LEC.

LING 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours SC GE11.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, organized around current issues in linguistics. May not contribute to major requirements in linguistics. First year seminar topics are coordinated and approved through the Office of First Year Experiences. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

LING 180. Study Abroad Topics in Linguistics: _____. 1-3 Hours U.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Linguistics. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

LING 300. Empirical Approaches to Languages. 3 Hours S.

This course provides students with a current overview of experimental data and up-to-date theories addressing empirical approaches to the study of language. A hands-on approach is used to facilitate understanding variation in language comprehension and production, the biological bases of language, and the acquisition of first and second languages. LEC.

LING 305. Phonetics I. 3 Hours S.

This course provides a basic introduction to the study of human speech sounds. Topics to be covered include anatomy and physiology of the speech production apparatus, transcription and production of the world's sounds, basic acoustics, computerized methods for speech analysis, acoustic characteristics of speech sounds, stress, and intonation. A hands on laboratory project is part of the course. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Linguistics. LEC.

LING 307. Phonetics II. 3 Hours AE61 / S / LFE.

This course is a continuation of Phonetics I (LING 305/705) and provides a more detailed survey of acoustic and auditory phonetics. Topics to be covered include vocal tract acoustics, quantal theory, speaker normalization, theories of speech perception, prosody, the phonetics of second language acquisition, and the production and perception of cues to gender, talker, region, and socio-economic status. In addition, a number of laboratory projects are required. Prerequisite: LING 305. LEC.

LING 308. Linguistic Analysis. 3 Hours GE11 / H.

Practice in applying the techniques of phonological, grammatical, and syntactic analysis learned in introductory linguistics to data taken from a variety of languages of different structural types. Prerequisite: LING 106. LEC.

LING 312. Introduction to Phonology. 3 Hours S.

This is an introductory course in phonology. It focuses on crucial phonological concepts such as the underlying and surface representations, phoneme and allophone, contrast, alternation, neutralization, distinctive features, and the syllable. It provides the basic skill set for phonological analysis, including how to discover phonological patterns, select underlying representations, and write phonological rules to capture the patterns. Common phonological universals in the world's languages will also be discussed. Prerequisite: LING 305. LEC.

LING 314. Phonological Theory I. 3 Hours AE61 / S.

This is a survey course on modern phonological theory. It starts with the discussion of the conspiracy and duplication problems in rule-based phonology and works its way to Optimality Theory (OT). Topics in OT include its conceptual and empirical advantages over rule-based phonology, its potential problems and their possible remedies, the relevance of phonetics in OT constraints, correspondence theory, and how OT can be applied to prosodic phenomena such as stress and tone. It also focuses on theory-building in phonology, with discussions on the external motivations for phonological grammar, how to lay out the predictions of a theoretical proposal, and how phonological predictions can be empirically tested. Prerequisite: LING 312 or instructor consent. LEC.

LING 320. Language in Culture and Society. 3 Hours SC AE41/AE61 / S.

Language is an integral part of culture and an essential means by which people carry out their social interactions with the members of their society. The course explores the role of language in everyday life of peoples in various parts of the world and the nature of the relationship between language and culture. Topics include world-view as reflected in language, formal vs. informal language, word taboo, and ethnography of speaking. (Same as ANTH 320.) LEC.

LING 321. Language in Culture and Society, Honors. 3 Hours SC AE41/AE61 / S.

An honors section of LING 320 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 320 or LING 320. (Same as ANTH 321.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

LING 325. Syntax I. 3 Hours H.

An introduction to generative syntax with special attention to theory and method. The course covers such topics as phrase structure, the lexicon, transformations and derivation. Prerequisite: LING 106. LEC.

LING 326. Syntax II. 3 Hours AE61 / S.

An advanced course covering one or more current theories of syntax. The course provides in-depth reading and discussion on the major areas of syntactic theory including universal grammar, phrase structure theory; lexicon and argument structure; binding, control, locality conditions; constraints on representation and derivation; and the relation between syntax and the semantic module. Prerequisite: LING 325. LEC.

LING 327. Morphology. 3 Hours S.

An exploration of several topics in word structure and formation. Covers three broad areas: traditional morphology, morpho-phonology, and morpho-syntax. Traditional morphology includes a survey of several kinds of word formation processes, the internal structure of words, morpheme types, inflection, paradigms, derivation, and compounding. Morpho-phonology deals with phonological constraints on morphological processes and prosodic morphology. Morpho- syntax concentrates on the syntactic properties of morphological phenomena and interaction of syntactic processes and morphology. The course has a strong emphasis on cross-linguistic comparative morphology. Prerequisite: LING 312 and LING 325, or permission of instructor. LEC.

LING 331. Semantics. 3 Hours S.

A study of meaning in natural language usage. Emphasis on referential semantics. Set theory, propositional and first-order logic, and intensional and modal logic as they relate to natural language sentences in a formalized language. Prerequisite: A course in syntax. LEC.

LING 338. Languages of the Jews. 3 Hours H.

From the beginning, Jewish history and culture is closely tied to language, from Hebrew and Aramaic to the languages of diaspora such as Yiddish and Ladino. Focusing on issues of language in society, this course will survey the languages spoken by the Jews throughout their long history in diverse communities around the world. We will learn about Hebrew as a spoken and a sacred language, examine how Jewish languages are born and die, and discuss the resurrection of Modern Hebrew in the state of Israel. All readings are in English. No prior knowledge of languages or linguistics is required. (Same as JWSH 338.) LEC.

LING 339. Languages of the Jews, Honors. 3 Hours H.

Honors version of LING 338 or JWSH 338, Languages of the Jews. (Same as JWSH 339.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

LING 340. Sociolinguistics. 3 Hours S.

The formal features of language reflect a broad range of social factors, including age, context, culture, occupation, sex and social class. This course will introduce students to the ways social variables affect the forms of spoken and written language. Prerequisite: An introductory linguistics course or consent of instructor. LEC.

LING 343. Bilingualism. 3 Hours S.

This course provides an introduction to bilingualism and bilingual education exploring the linguistic, sociolinguistic, and psycholinguistic aspects of bilingualism. We read about and discuss bilingualism in the world and in the U.S.; language maintenance and language loss; effects of languages in contact; bilingual acquisition; the cognitive advantages of bilingualism; and the processing of language in the multilingual mind. Students are guided in conducting a small research project on one of these areas, learning how to read scientific studies about bilingualism and developing an understanding of the relationship between primary research sources and the popular press. LEC.

LING 345. Language and Gender. 3 Hours S.

This course explores the relationship between language use and gender. The course will specifically focus on how gender affects the ways we use spoken language as well as how we interpret the speech of others. Topics to be discussed will include the function of language in social relationships and language variation in different social contexts. LEC.

LING 350. Comparative and Historical Linguistics. 3 Hours S.

Human language may be characterized as possessing flexibility, which causes languages to be different from one another in different degrees. This course explores the way languages undergo change in time (historical linguistics), and the ways two or more languages are similar or different (comparative linguistics). The course teaches students how to establish whether languages are genetically related or belong to totally different language families. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. LEC.

LING 370. Introduction to the Languages of Africa. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H / H/W.

A survey of the indigenous languages of Africa from a linguistic perspective, covering the main language families and their geographic distribution, and focusing on the features and structure of the more widely spoken and representative languages in each family (e.g. Fula, Hausa, Maninka, Swahili, Yoruba). (Same as AAAS 370.) LEC.

LING 415. Second Language Acquisition. 3 Hours H.

Introduction to the study of second language acquisition: The application of theoretical linguistics to the description of the language that a learner acquires, and to the process of acquisition. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. LEC.

LING 416. Second Language Acquisition II. 3 Hours AE61 / S.

This advanced course provides in-depth reading and discussion of several current topics including second language acquisition within a generative framework, processing approaches to second language acquisition, and the role of input and learnability principles in second language acquisition. Both theoretical and methodological issues are discussed. Prerequisite: LING 415 and LING 325; or permission of instructor. LEC.

LING 418. Introduction to Cognitive Science. 3 Hours S.

Examines the data and methodologies of the disciplines that comprise Cognitive Science, an interdisciplinary approach to studying the mind and brain. Topics may include: consciousness, artificial intelligence, linguistics, education and instruction, neural networks, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, evolutionary theory, cognitive neuroscience, human-computer interaction, and robotics. (Same as PHIL 418, PSYC 418, and SPLH 418.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

LING 420. Capstone: Research in Language Science. 3 Hours AE61 / S.

This course, an on-site practicum in Linguistics, provides a foundation for designing, conducting, and critically evaluating quantitative and qualitative research in the language sciences. Topics include formulating a research hypothesis, participant selection, ethical considerations, the scientific method, dependent and independent variables, data collection, descriptive and inferential statistics. Instruction builds discipline-specific knowledge and skills for career preparation. Students apply their knowledge of linguistics to formulate a research hypothesis and design an experiment to evaluate this hypothesis. Prerequisite: LING 305, LING 312, LING 325, and either LING 415, LING 425, LING 435, or LING 438. LEC.

LING 421. Capstone: Typology-Unity and Diversity of Human Language. 3 Hours AE61 / S.

This course, an on-site practicum in Linguistics, explores the similarities and differences among the worlds' languages. Students apply their knowledge of phonetics, phonology, morphology, and syntax in describing and analyzing phenomena from a number of languages. The typological perspective that students develop is applied to topics such as word order, morphological typology, case, lexical categories, and valency. In addition to lecture style instruction, students get hands on practice in collecting, transcribing, and analyzing data from different languages through face to face elicitation with native speakers. Instruction builds discipline-specific knowledge and skills for career preparation. Prerequisite: LING 305, LING 312, and LING 325. LEC.

LING 425. First Language Acquisition. 3 Hours S.

An introductory course in the acquisition of child language. The course will cover relevant historical studies of child language but will focus primarily on recent psycholinguistic approaches toward the description of the process by which a child acquires his native language. Phonological, syntactic, semantic, cognitive, pragmatic, sociolinguistic, and anthropological aspects of the acquisition process are covered. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. LEC.

LING 430. Linguistics in Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

The study of language as a symbolic system. Exploration into the interrelatedness of linguistic systems, of nonlinguistic communicative systems, and of other cultural systems. (Same as ANTH 430.) LEC.

LING 435. Psycholinguistics. 3 Hours S / LFE.

A detailed examination of issues in the processing of language. The course provides a survey of research and theory in psycholinguistics, reflecting the influence of linguistic theory and experimental psychology. Spoken and written language comprehension and language production processes are examined. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics or permission of instructor. LEC.

LING 437. Topics in Psycholinguistics. 3 Hours AE61 / S.

An in-depth examination of selected topics in psycholinguistics. Topics may include spoken language processing, written language processing, neurolinguistics, prosody, and syntactic processing. Prerequisite: LING 435 or consent of instructor. LEC.

LING 438. Neurolinguistics I. 3 Hours S.

The course explores how language is represented and processed in the human brain. This includes a critical survey of the foundations and the current research in the cognitive neuroscience of language, focusing on the techniques of functional brain imaging (fMRI, PET, EEG. MEG, and related methods), and research on aphasia and other language disorders. This course also includes a component providing laboratory experience with brain imaging research on language. Prerequisite: At least one course in linguistics or permission of the instructor. LEC.

LING 440. Linguistic Data Processing. 3 Hours H.

This course introduces the tools and techniques necessary to analyze fieldwork data, including research design, recording and elicitation techniques, computational data processing and analysis, and field ethics. The course also covers field recording and data analysis technology, along with methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation and analysis of language context. Practice of techniques is provided via short studies of at least one language. Prerequisite: LING 305 or permission of instructor. LEC.

LING 441. Field Methods in Linguistic Description. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

The elicitation and analysis of phonological, grammatical, and discourse data from a language consultant. In-depth research on one language. Techniques of research design, methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation, and analysis of language context. Prerequisite: LING 305, LING 312, and LING 325 or permission of instructor. LEC.

LING 442. Neurolinguistics II. 3 Hours S.

An in-depth discussion of the representation and processing of language from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. This course involves critical discussion of selected topics of current research interest in neurolinguistics. The course also includes a significant hands-on component, in which students receive training in research on the cognitive neuroscience of language by developing and implementing a new EEG study on an aspect of language, as well by completing as a series of mini-labs introducing neuroimaging methods and analyses. Prerequisite: LING 438 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

LING 447. North American Indian Languages. 3 Hours AE41 / S.

This course introduces students to the indigenous languages of North America. Students critically examine the structures and status of these languages, which have greatly expanded our knowledge of human language and linguistic theory. Topics include the history and future of North American languages and indigenous speech communities, the history of the field of Americanist linguistics, as well as important linguistic questions raised by phenomena from American languages in phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and historical linguistics. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. Not open to students enrolled in 747 LEC.

LING 451. Topics in Research in Acquisition and Processing: _____. 3 Hours H.

This course is primarily intended for students actively engaged in linguistic research on language acquisition, language processing, and neurolinguistics. Students in this course present and discuss study design, methods, data analysis and interpretation of results for their research projects. Professional development topics such as CV development, applications for fellowships, grants and jobs, and the dissemination of research findings are also discussed. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

LING 470. Language and Society in Africa. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H / H/W.

Examines issues and problems associated with language use in sub-Saharan Africa from a sociological perspective. Topics covered include an overview of the types of languages spoken on the continent: indigenous languages, colonial languages, pidgins and creoles, and Arabic as a religious language; problems associated with the politics of literacy and language planning; writing and standardization of indigenous languages; and the cultural and ideological dilemmas of language choice. (Same as AAAS 470.) Prerequisite: AAAS 103, AAAS 305, or LING 106; or consent of instructor. LEC.

LING 483. Computational Linguistics. 3 Hours S.

A survey of computer-based approaches to the study of morphology and syntax. In addition to its relevance for basic linguistic research, computer-based syntactic analysis in the form of parsers and syntactic/string generators, provide model testers for the linguistic and analytical tools for the computer scientist concerned with language applications. When taught with LING 783, students at the 700 level will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. LEC.

LING 490. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours AE61 / U.

A special research project or directed readings in an area of linguistics not covered in other courses. No more than 3 hours of LING 490 may be applied toward the requirements for the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

LING 491. Topics in Linguistics: _____. 1-3 Hours H.

The content, prerequisites, and credits of this course will vary. May be repeated. IND.

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics: _____. 1-3 Hours S.

The content, prerequisites, and credits of this course will vary. May be repeated. (Distribution credit given for two or three hours only.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

LING 496. Honors Essay in Linguistics. 1-3 Hours AE61 / H.

Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a linguistic topic. Prerequisite: A grade-point average of 3.5 in linguistics and 3.25 in all courses, and consent of the major adviser. IND.

LING 539. First Language Acquisition II. 3 Hours.

A second semester course in child language that explores the acquisition of morphology, syntax, and the ways in which morphology and syntax interact in linguistic theory and language development. Topics covered in the course include agreement, case, null subjects, question formation, pronoun binding, quantification, and control. Prerequisite: LING 325 or LING 425 or consent of instructor. LEC.

LING 543. Language and Culture in Arabic-Speaking Communities. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H / H.

The course examines the links between structure, patterns of use, language choice, and language attitudes in the diglossic and bi-lingual Arabic-speaking communities. It also explores language as a reflector and creator of Arab culture (e.g. linguistic encoding of politeness, the Quranic text as the spoken and written word, the role of tropes in Arabic rhetoric). The topics for discussion range from the micro-level language choice to the macro-level issues of national language policies and planning within the domain of government and education across the Arab world. (Same as AAAS 543) LEC.

LING 565. Native Mesoamerican Writing. 3 Hours H.

An introduction to the Indigenous writing of Mesoamerica, primarily Epi-Olmec and Mayan hieroglyphic writing. The course will survey the languages of the cultures that originated writing in the New World, and demonstrate the methods being used to decipher Mesoamerican hieroglyphic writing. The connections between language, culture, and writing will be highlighted. Prerequisite: An introductory linguistics course. LEC.

LING 570. The Structure of Japanese. 3 Hours H.

A detailed study of the phonological and grammatical structure of Japanese and the use of the language in social/cultural contexts. Primarily for students who want a linguistic knowledge of the language rather than a practical command of it. (Same as EALC 570.) LEC.

LING 572. The Structure of Chinese. 3 Hours H.

A detailed study of the phonological and grammatical structure of Chinese and the interactions between language and culture. Depending on student interests, a unit on the pedagogy of teaching Chinese as a foreign language may also be included. Primarily for students who want a linguistic knowledge of the language rather than a practical command of it. (Same as EALC 572.) LEC.

LING 575. The Structure of: _____. 3 Hours S.

A detailed study of a language, including its phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic characteristics. The course provides students with a linguistic knowledge of the language rather than a practical command of it. Prerequisite: A course in linguistics. LEC.

LING 700. Introduction to Linguistic Science. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the theory and techniques of linguistic science for majors and others intending to do advanced work in linguistics and linguistic anthropology. Emphasis on the sound system, grammatical structure, and semantic structure of languages. Lectures and laboratory sessions. (Same as ANTH 725.) Not open to students who have taken ANTH/LING 106 or ANTH/LING 107. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. LEC.

LING 705. Phonetics I. 3 Hours.

This course provides a basic introduction to the study of human speech sounds. Topics to be covered include anatomy and physiology of the speech production apparatus, transcription and production of the world's sounds, basic acoustics, computerized methods for speech analysis, acoustic characteristics of speech sounds, stress, and intonation. A 'hands on' laboratory project is part of the course. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC.

LING 706. Current Linguistic Anthropology. 3 Hours.

The fundamental issues, methods, and theories in contemporary linguistic anthropology. (Same as ANTH 706.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. LEC.

LING 707. Phonetics II. 3 Hours / LFE.

This course is a continuation of Phonetics I (LING 705) and provides a more detailed survey of acoustic and auditory phonetics. Topics to be covered include vocal tract acoustics, quantal theory, speaker normalization, theories of speech perception, prosody, the phonetics of second language acquisition, and the production and perception of cues to gender, talker, region, and socio-economic status. In addition, a number of laboratory projects will be required. Prerequisite: LING 705. LEC.

LING 708. Linguistic Analysis. 3 Hours.

Practice in applying the techniques of phonological, grammatical, and syntactic analysis learned in introductory linguistics to data taken from a variety of languages of different structural type. (Same as ANTH 736.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. Not open to students who have taken LING 308. LEC.

LING 709. First Language Acquisition. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the study of language acquisition: the significant findings, the basic methodological procedures, and some of the more recent theoretical accounts. Not open to students who have taken LING 425. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC.

LING 712. Phonological Theory I. 3 Hours.

This is a survey course on modern phonological theory. It starts with the discussion of the conspiracy and duplication problems in rule-based phonology and works its way to Optimality Theory (OT). Topics in OT include its conceptual and empirical advantages over rule-based phonology, its potential problems and their possible remedies, the relevance of phonetics in OT constraints, correspondence theory, and how OT can be applied to prosodic phenomena such as stress and tone. It also focuses on theory-building in phonology, with discussions on the external motivations for phonological grammar, how to lay out the predictions of a theoretical proposal, and how phonological predictions can be empirically tested. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: LING 705. LEC.

LING 714. Phonological Theory II. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced course on modern phonological theory. It discusses phonology as an interdisciplinary and experimental discipline and presents current development in both experimental techniques that shed light on speakers' phonological knowledge and the formal modeling of speakers' phonological grammar. Issues of learnability and how phonological acquisition can be modeled will also be touched upon. Prerequisite: LING 712. LEC.

LING 715. Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the study of second language acquisition: The application of theoretical linguistics to the description of the language a learner acquires, and to the process of acquisition. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC.

LING 716. Second Language Acquisition II. 3 Hours.

This advanced course will provide in-depth reading and discussion of several current topics including second language acquisition within a generative framework, processing approaches to second language acquisition, and the role of input and learnability principles in second language acquisition. Both theoretical and methodological issues will be discussed. Prerequisite: LING 715; LING 725, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of instructor. LEC.

LING 720. Research Methods in Linguistics. 3 Hours.

This course provides a foundation for designing, conducting, and critically evaluating quantitative and qualitative research in the language sciences. Topics include formulating a research hypothesis, participant selection, ethical considerations, the scientific method, validity, reliability, data collection, dependent and independent variables, descriptive and inferential statistics. This course will serve students who are interested in the basics of research design and statistics for the study of language. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC.

LING 722. Linguistic Typology. 3 Hours H.

Different languages use different linguistic mechanisms to encode meanings. This course surveys grammatical concepts and categories found in the world's languages including tense, aspect, mood, voice, person, and number as well as case relations such as nominative, accusative, ergative, and absolutive. Basic word order typology and discourse functions such as topic, focus, and cohesion are introduced. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of languages to illustrate how the same concept may be encoded differently, i.e., morphologically, syntactically, or lexically, in different languages. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC.

LING 725. Syntax I. 3 Hours.

The basics of theoretical syntax, examining the principles of universal grammar. Topics include phrase structure, relations among syntactic constituents, and the nature of syntactic rules and lexical categories. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC.

LING 726. Syntax II. 3 Hours.

An advanced course covering one or more current theories of syntax. The course will provide in-depth reading and discussion on the major areas of syntactic theory including universal grammar, phrase structure theory, lexical projections of argument structure, binding, control, locality condition, constraints on representation, and the relation between syntax and the semantic module. Prerequisite: LING 725. LEC.

LING 727. Morphology. 3 Hours.

An exploration of several topics in word structure and formation. Covers three broad areas: traditional morphology, morpho-phonology, and morpho-syntax. Traditional morphology includes a survey of several kinds of word formation processes, the internal structure of words, morpheme types, inflection, paradigms, derivation, and compounding. Morpho-phonology deals with phonological constraints on morphological processes and prosodic morphology. Morpho syntax concentrates on the syntactic properties of morphological phenomena and interaction of syntactic processes and morphology. The course has a strong emphasis on cross-linguistic comparative morphology. Prerequisite: LING 712, LING 725, or permission of instructor. LEC.

LING 730. Linguistics in Anthropology. 3 Hours.

The study of language as it concerns anthropology. Language systems in relation to culture, language taxonomy, semantics, linguistic analysis as an ethnographic tool. (Same as ANTH 730.) LEC.

LING 731. Semantics. 3 Hours.

A study of meaning in natural language usage. Emphasis on referential semantics. Set theory, propositional and first-order logic, and intensional and modal logic as they relate to nature. Questions that arise in representing the meanings of natural language sentences in a formalized language. Prerequisite: LING 725. LEC.

LING 732. Discourse Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on linguistic frameworks for the analysis of discourse. Discourse is a linguistic system larger than the sentence (utterance), which connects and contextualizes speech and written text. This course focuses on current issues and theoretical frameworks in the analysis of discourse. Using oral and written data, students will examine how contexts influence and shape linguistic form. Topics covered include transcription systems, the structure and organization of different genres of language, and the performance of social actions, including stance-taking, framing, and the construction of identity. Students will also have an opportunity to perform discourse analytic research on the data of their choice. (Same as ANTH 732.) Prerequisite: ANTH 706 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

LING 733. Language, Gender, and Sexuality. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the complex relationship between language use and the social construction of gender and sexuality i.e. how language is used in the construction of gender and sexuality, and how gender and sexuality are performed and enacted through language. Examines theoretical notions of language, gender, and sexuality from linguistics, linguistic anthropology, and sociology. Among the topics covered are cross-cultural definitions of masculinity and femininity, construction of gendered and sexual identities through language use, language and power, ideologies, style, and performativity. The course will consider research on language, gender, and sexuality from a variety of cultures within the last 50 years. (Same as ANTH 733.) Prerequisite: ANTH 706 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

LING 734. Language Evolution. 3 Hours.

Human language demonstrates a level of complexity not found in the communicative systems of other species. This course focuses on the development of human language, so as to obtain a better understanding of the origin and development of human language. Questions addressed include: what features of language are distinct from other communicative system, when did human language originate, in what stages did human language evolve, and how does language relate to properties of the human brain and mind? Data from a variety of disciplines will be considered, including primatology, human development, cognition, evolutionary biology, archaeology, and linguistics. (Same as ANTH 734.) Prerequisite: ANTH 106 or LING 106 or ANTH 107 or LING 107 or ANTH 736 or LING 708 or ANTH 725. LEC.

LING 735. Psycholinguistics I. 3 Hours / LFE.

A detailed examination of issues in the processing of language. The course will provide a survey of research and theory in psycholinguistics, reflecting the influence of linguistic theory and experimental psychology. Spoken and written language comprehension and language production processes will be examined. (Same as PSYC 735.) LEC.

LING 737. Psycholinguistics II. 3 Hours.

An in-depth examination of selected topics in psycholinguistics. Topics may include spoken language processing, written language processing, neurolinguistics, prosody, and syntactic processing. (Same as PSYC 737.) Prerequisite: PSYC 735/LING 735 or consent of instructor. LEC.

LING 738. Neurolinguistics I. 3 Hours.

We will explore how language is represented and processed in the human brain. This will include a critical survey of the foundations and the newest state-of-the-art research in the cognitive neuroscience of language, focusing on the techniques of functional brain imaging (fMRI, PET, EEG, MEG, and related methods), and research on aphasia and other language disorders. This course will also include a laboratory component providing hands-on experience with brain imaging research on language. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC.

LING 739. First Language Acquisition II. 3 Hours.

A second semester course in child language which explores the acquisition of morphology, syntax and the ways in which morphology and syntax interact in linguistic theory and language development. Topics covered in the course include agreement, Case, null subjects, question formation, pronoun binding, quantification, and control. Prerequisite: LING 709 and LING 725 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

LING 740. Linguistic Data Processing. 3 Hours.

The tools and techniques necessary to analyze linguistic fieldwork data, including research design, recording and elicitation techniques, computational data processing and analysis, and field ethics. Techniques of research, field recording, and data analysis technology. Methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation, and analysis of language context. Practice of techniques via short studies of at least one language. (Same as ANTH 740.) Prerequisite: LING 700 or permission of instructor. LEC.

LING 741. Field Methods in Linguistic Description. 3 Hours.

The elicitation and analysis of phonological, grammatical, and discourse data from a language consultant. In-depth research on one language. Techniques of research design, methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation, and analysis of language context. (Same as ANTH 741.) Prerequisite: LING 705 or permission of instructor. LEC.

LING 742. Neurolinguistics II. 3 Hours.

An in-depth discussion of the representation and processing of language from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. This course involves critical discussion of selected topics of current research interest in neurolinguistics. The course also includes a significant hands-on component, in which students receive training in research on the cognitive neuroscience of language by developing and implementing a new EEG study on an aspect of language, as well by completing as a series of mini-labs introducing neuroimaging methods and analyses. Prerequisite: LING 738 or permission of the instructor. SEM.

LING 747. North American Indian Languages. 3 Hours.

This course introduces student to the indigenous languages of North America. Students will critically examine the structures and status of these languages, which have greatly expanded our knowledge of human language and linguistic theory. Topics include the history and future of North American languages and indigenous speech communities, the history of the field of Americanist linguistics, as well as important linguistic questions raised by phenomena from American languages in phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and historical linguistics. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. LEC.

LING 748. Language Contact. 3 Hours.

Theories and case studies of languages in contact. Areal and genetic linguistics, genesis of pidgins and creoles, multilingualism. Social, political, economic, and geographic factors in language change. (Same as ANTH 748.) Prerequisite: A course in Linguistics. LEC.

LING 749. Linguistics and Ethnolinguistics of China and Central Asia: _____. 3 Hours.

Selected topics in Linguistics and Linguistic Anthropology, focusing on dominant and/or minority languages of China, Central Asia, or a particular region of Central and Eastern Eurasia. Topics may include any subfield of linguistics, including language contact, typology, dialectology, and sociolinguistics. Topic for semester to be announced. (Same as ANTH 749.) Prerequisite: A course in Linguistics. LEC.

LING 782. Research Methods in Child Language. 3 Hours.

A survey of methods for studying phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic change during language development. Methods include: diary interpretation, language sample analysis, probe elicitation tasks, and clinical assessment. (Same as PSYC 782.) LEC.

LING 783. Computational Linguistics. 3 Hours.

A survey of computer-based approaches to the study of phonology, morphology, and syntax. In addition to its relevance for basic linguistic research, computer-based work on phonology is central to current research in speech analysis, speech synthesis, and the major artificial intelligence effort described as speech understanding. Computer-based morphological analysis is of theoretical interest to the linguist as well as a major component in content analysis, information retrieval, and other related application areas. Computer-based parsers and syntactic/string generators provide model testers for the linguist and analytical tools for the computer scientist concerned with language applications. Prerequisite: An introductory linguistics course. LEC.

LING 791. Topics in Linguistics: _____. 1-3 Hours.

The content and prerequisites of this course will vary. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

LING 794. Proseminar. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the field of linguistics. Topics include research literature and research methods, thesis and grant writing, and ethics in linguistic research. Required for all first-year graduate students in linguistics. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC.

LING 799. Proseminar in Child Language. 2 Hours.

A review and discussion of current issues in children's language acquisition. May be repeated for credit. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Same as ABSC 797, CLDP 799, PSYC 799 and SPLH 799.) (Formerly HDFL 797.) LEC.

LING 810. Seminar in Ethnolinguistics: _____. 2-3 Hours.

An advanced study of the relations between language and culture. Subject will vary each semester. Students may repeat the course more than once. (Same as ANTH 810.) LEC.

LING 822. Seminar on Acquisition of Language. 3 Hours.

An analysis of recent theoretical issues and research problems in the study of children's acquisition of language. Prerequisite: LING 709 or consent of instructor. LEC.

LING 850. Topics in Research in Experimental Linguistics: _____. 3 Hours.

This course is primarily for students actively engaged in experimental linguistic research. The course provides students with the opportunity to focus on their current research projects and involves critical analysis, presentation, and discussion of research design, methods, statistical analysis, and data interpretation. May be repeated. Prerequisite: An advanced course in Linguistics or permission of instructor. SEM.

LING 851. Research in Language Acquisition and Processing. 3 Hours.

This course is primarily intended for students actively engaged in linguistic research on language acquisition, language processing, and neurolinguistics. Students in this course present and discuss study design, methods, data analysis and interpretation of results for their research projects. Professional development topics such as CV development, applications for fellowships, grants and jobs, and the dissemination of research findings are also discussed. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. SEM.

LING 852. Research in Field Linguistics. 3 Hours.

This course is intended for students who are conducting field work on syntax or morphology, typically of an understudied language. The course is structured around a set of topics (variable by semester) which each student will investigate in a particular language. The focus of the course is on data collection and analysis and students will present and discuss the results of their research projects. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. SEM.

LING 860. Seminar in Second Language Acquisition. 3 Hours.

Analysis of recent theoretical and methodological issues in the study of second language acquisition. Prerequisite: LING 716 or permission of instructor. LEC.

LING 899. Master's Research Project. 1-3 Hours.

A course for students working on their M.A. Research Project. Normally to be taken during the semester in which the student is submitting the M.A. Research Project. Students must enroll for at least one credit hour. Up to three credits will count toward the minimum number of credits required for the M.A. degree in linguistics. RSH.

LING 910. Linguistic Seminar: _____. 1-3 Hours.

The content and prerequisites of this course will vary. May be repeated. LEC.

LING 947. Seminar in Amerindian Linguistics. 1-3 Hours.

The aim of the seminar is to provide opportunity for interaction among faculty and students sharing an interest in North American Native languages and linguistics. Activities include reading, discussion, and criticism of literature on Amerindian languages and linguistics, and reports on current research of the participants. May be repeated. Prerequisite: LING 747. LEC.

LING 980. Linguistics Field Work. 3-6 Hours.

Independent field work with an informant on a language not normally offered at the University of Kansas, or on a non-standard dialect of one of the more accessible languages. Student must show evidence (file slips for grammatical and phonological analysis, dictionary slips, etc.) of having done the required amount of work without necessarily being able to turn in a completed analysis. Normally for three credits; six credits would be available under certain circumstances such as intensive summer work on location away from the university. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: LING 712 and LING 725. FLD.

LING 997. Ph.D. Examinations. 1-12 Hours.

A course for students writing answers to the preliminary Ph.D. examination and/or preparing to take the Oral Comprehensive Examination. Normally to be taken during the semester in which the student is submitting answers to the written preliminary examination. May be taken for a maximum of two semesters or twelve credits, whichever comes first. Does not count toward the minimum number of credits required for a graduate degree in linguistics. Graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory on the results of the examination. RSH.

LING 998. Independent Study. 1-12 Hours.

Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor. RSH.

LING 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

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