Why study philosophy?

Because philosophy teaches you how to think about all aspects of your life and the world around you.

Undergraduate Programs

The department offers a range of courses in philosophy, both in the main systematic divisions of the subject and in its major historical periods. Philosophy courses are often suitable not only for majors but also for students whose main interests lie in other areas. Many philosophy courses satisfy requirements in other degree programs in the College and professional schools.

Argument and Reason Requirement

PHIL 148 and PHIL 310 each meet the College argument and reason requirement for the B.A. and B.G.S. degrees.

Interdisciplinary Course Work

The department offers courses in applied ethics, ethics, feminism, logic, and the philosophy of science to fit the needs and interests of nonmajors. Many of these may be taken without prerequisites. The nonmajor may wish to supplement work in other fields or schools with a series of related courses in philosophy. Some suggested programs to be supplemented with this type of interdisciplinary course work are business, prelaw, premedicine, and engineering; classics, art history, and literature; and natural sciences and mathematics. Lists of philosophy courses relating to these areas are available. Consult the director of undergraduate studies.

Graduate Programs

The department offers graduate programs in philosophy leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. With the School of Law, the department also offers a joint program in law and philosophy leading to the J.D. in law and the M.A. in philosophy.  Our faculty is dynamic, professionally active, and committed to excellence in scholarship and teaching.  Excellent facilities, strong library holdings, and a faculty dedicated to both teaching and research assure students of a challenging and professional graduate preparation.

Departmental Funding

While it is not guaranteed, the department its best to provide funding in the form of Graduate Teaching Assistantship (GTA) appointments to all incoming graduate students.  GTA appointments are awarded for the academic year (9 months) and come with a starting salary of about $15,500, a 100% tuition waiver, and qualify the student for University-subsidized group health insurance.  The appointments are guaranteed based on performance for up to 3 years for M.A. students, 5 years for Ph.D. students and 6 years for students who receive both an M.A. and a Ph.D. at The University of Kansas.  GTAs in the department receive thorough training, close mentoring, and the opportunity to teach courses in a variety of fields within Philosophy, providing them with a strong base of teaching experience upon entering the job market.

Additional Funding

There are also university fellowships for truly outstanding students. Visit the Graduate Studies website for information about funding opportunities for KU graduate students.

Courses

PHIL 140. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Hours HR GE11/GE3H / H.

An introductory examination, based primarily on writings of major philosophers, of such central philosophical problems as religious belief, the mind and its place in nature, freedom and determinism, morality, and the nature and kinds of human knowledge. LEC.

PHIL 141. Introduction to Philosophy Honors. 3 Hours HR GE11/GE3H / H.

An introductory examination, based primarily on writings of major philosophers, of such central philosophical problems as religious belief, the mind and its place in nature, freedom and determinism, morality, and the nature and kinds of human knowledge. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by consent of department. LEC.

PHIL 148. Reason and Argument. 3 Hours GE11/GE3H / H.

An introduction to the theory and practice of logical analysis. Special emphasis is placed upon the logical appraisal of everyday arguments. LEC.

PHIL 150. Philosophical Communication. 3 Hours GE22 / S.

This course provides an introduction to philosophy, with a focus on the traditional philosophical practice of oral communication and argument. Through exploration of perennial philosophical questions (e.g., Are there different ways of knowing? What makes for a good life? Could computers have minds? Are we obligated to obey the law? What makes you the same person over time?), students develop their ability to participate in various forms of philosophical communication. In this course, students have the opportunity to teach course material to peers, engage in class debates over philosophical issues, and craft short presentations exploring a facet of the course topic. LEC.

PHIL 160. Introduction to Ethics. 3 Hours HR AE51/GE11/GE3H / H.

An introductory study of the nature of morality and of philosophical bases for the assessment of actions, agents, and institutions. Special emphasis will be placed upon the views of such important philosophers as Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Mill. Some attention will be paid to applications of moral theory to practice. LEC.

PHIL 161. Introduction to Ethics Honors. 3 Hours HR AE51/GE11/GE3H / H.

An introductory study of the nature of morality and of philosophical bases for the assessment of actions, agents, and institutions. Special emphasis will be placed upon the views of such important philosophers as Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Mill. Some attention will be paid to applications of moral theory to practice. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by consent of department. LEC.

PHIL 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Philosophy. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LAB.

PHIL 180. Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy. 3 Hours HR AE51/GE3H / H.

An introductory study, based primarily on classic philosophical texts, of such central issues as the justification of governmental authority, the social sources of power, the nature of a just distribution of social resources, competing conceptions of human nature, and the proper limits of governmental interference with individual liberty. LEC.

PHIL 181. Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy, Honors. 3 Hours HR AE51/GE3H / H.

An introductory study, based primarily on classic philosophical texts, of such central issues as the justification of governmental authority, the social sources of power, the nature of a just distribution of social resources, competing conceptions of human nature, and the proper limits of governmental interference with individual liberty. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by consent of department. LEC.

PHIL 200. Study Abroad Topics in Philosophy: _____. 1-6 Hours H.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Philosophy. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

PHIL 310. Introduction to Symbolic Logic. 3 Hours GE11/GE3H / H.

An introduction to the theory and practice of elementary symbolic logic. Special emphasis will be placed upon the logical analysis of mathematical proof and upon a proof of the consistency of elementary logic. LEC.

PHIL 320. Philosophical Issues in the Life Sciences. 3 Hours HR AE51/GE3H / H.

A philosophical analysis of theoretical and ethical issues that arise in the practice of the life sciences. Discusses the conceptual foundation of the life sciences--evolutionary theory and genetics. Critically explores the use of statistical and non-human-animal models. Examines ethical issues including problems that arise in human and other animal experimentation, obligations to the environment, proper use of patents, and conflicts in professional duties. LEC.

PHIL 350. Philosophical Issues in Religion. 3 Hours GE3H / H.

This course will consider, from a philosophical perspective, some of the problems in religion which arise in the development of "Natural Theology" broadly conceived. (Same as REL 380.) LEC.

PHIL 360. Moral Issues in Business. 3 Hours AE51 / H.

After a brief survey of techniques of moral argument and analysis, particular moral issues related to business will be discussed. These will include such topics as advertising, conflict of interest, personal and corporate responsibility, codes of conduct, private property, strikes, just wage, and the tension between moral ideals and business pressures. LEC.

PHIL 365. Moral Issues in the Professions. 3 Hours H.

An analysis of the nature and justification of standards of professional conduct. Issues of professional behavior that concern more than one profession such as fidelity to a client's interests, candor, confidentiality, obligations to human research subjects, obligations to uphold professional standards, professional strikes, and affirmative action will be discussed. LEC.

PHIL 368. Moral Issues in Sports. 3 Hours H.

This course is a philosophical investigation of the nature and value of sports. Provides students with an overview of ethical theory and considers principled answers to questions about the values of sports and about how those values can be sustained or demeaned. Students debate a variety of live controversies in sports today such as drugs, cheating, sexism, racism, the role of sports in educational institutions, Title IX, commercialization, and violence. LEC.

PHIL 369. Moral Issues in Warfare. 3 Hours H.

This course is a philosophical investigation of the nature and ethical dimensions of warfare and the use of force. It provides students with an overview of ethical theory and considers answers to questions about the principles of just war theory, the values served by these principles, and about how those values can be sustained or demeaned. Students debate a variety of live controversies in warfare today such as just causes for war, when threats ought to be deemed imminent, collateral damage and the nature of non-civilians on the battlefield, and terrorism. LEC.

PHIL 370. Moral Issues in Medicine. 3 Hours H.

After a brief survey of techniques of moral argument and analysis, particular moral issues related to medicine will be discussed. The justification and limits of some rules of professional conduct that deal with such matters as confidentiality, truth-telling, and protection of medical research subjects will be considered. Issues relating to death and dying in medicine such as abortion, euthanasia, and the refusal of life-saving medical therapy also will be discussed. LEC.

PHIL 375. Moral Issues in Computer Technology. 3 Hours AE51 / H.

After surveying the nature of ethics and morality and learning some standard techniques of moral argumentation, we shall examine such topics as: property and ownership rights in computer programs and software; privacy in computer entry and records; responsibility for computer use and failure; the "big brother" syndrome made possible by extensive personal data banks; censorship and the world-wide web; computer illiteracy and social displacement; and ethical limits to computer research. Prerequisite: EECS 168 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 380. Environmental Ethics. 3 Hours AE51 / H.

After a brief survey of techniques of moral argument and analysis, particular moral issues related to the environment will be discussed. These will include such topics (one of which may be dealt with in depth) as animal rights, rights of future generations, wilderness preservation, population control, endangered species, and economics and public policy. Prerequisite: EVRN 148 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 381. Feminism and Philosophy. 3 Hours AE41/GE3H / H.

An examination of topics of philosophical interest that are important in the feminist movement such as the nature of sexism, the concept of sexual equality, the ethics of sexual behavior, the nature of love, feminist analyses of the value of marriage and family, the ethics of abortion, and justifications for preferential treatment of women. (Same as WGSS 381.) LEC.

PHIL 384. Ancient Philosophy. 3 Hours HR GE3H / H.

A survey of the thought of the principal philosophers of ancient Greece, with emphasis on the pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. LEC.

PHIL 386. Modern Philosophy from Descartes to Kant. 3 Hours HR GE3H / H.

A survey of the writings of such principal philosophers of the modern period as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. LEC.

PHIL 388. Analytic Philosophy: Frege to Quine. 3 Hours H.

An introduction to the principal figures in the philosophical tradition that forms the background to contemporary investigations in analytic philosophy of language. Particular attention will be paid to Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, and Quine. Prerequisite: PHIL 310 or equivalent, or PHIL 310 may be taken concurrently. LEC.

PHIL 418. Introduction to Cognitive Science. 3 Hours S.

Examines the data and methodologies of the disciplines that comprise Cognitive Science, an inter-disciplinary approach to studying the mind and brain. Topics may include: consciousness, artificial intelligence, linguistics, education and instruction, neural networks, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, evolutionary theory, cognitive neuroscience, human-computer interaction, and robotics. (Same as LING 418, PSYC 418, and SPLH 418.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 499. Senior Essay. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

This course is required, in addition to regular major requirements, of those students wishing to work for departmental honors in Philosophy. Students wishing to enroll should first speak with the departmental adviser for majors. Prerequisite: Open to senior majors in Philosophy by consent of instructor. IND.

PHIL 500. Studies in Philosophy: _____. 1-6 Hours H.

(Topic, instructor, and specific prerequisite to be announced in Schedule of Classes.) A study of particular philosophical problems or thinkers not covered by other courses. The course may be offered concurrently by different instructors under different subtitles, and may, with the consent of the chair, be taken more than once if content varies. LEC.

PHIL 504. Philosophy of Sex and Love. 3 Hours H.

A discussion of philosophical issues such as the relation between love, autonomy, and friendship; heterosexual and homosexual relationships; marriage and adultery; rape and sexual harassment; prostitution; and pornography. LEC.

PHIL 506. Chinese Thought. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H / H/W.

A survey of the principal modes of Chinese thought from their origins through the imperial period. Not open to students with credit in EALC 132. (Same as EALC 642 and HWC 524.) Prerequisite: Eastern Civilization course, or a course in Asian history, or a distribution course in Philosophy. LEC.

PHIL 508. Early Greek Philosophy. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of the doctrines of Greek philosophy before Plato. Emphasis on the Pre-Socratic philosophers, with some attention paid to the Sophists and the Hippocratic corpus. (Same as GRK 508.) Prerequisite: PHIL 384, or GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303, or GRK 310, or GRK 312, or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 555. Justice and Economic Systems. 3 Hours H.

An examination of important representative theories of the justness of an economic system, with particular attention paid to such institutions as private property, a market economy, means and relationships of production, and principles of distribution to individuals. The theorists under consideration include Locke, Adam Smith, Marx and Engels, contemporary utilitarians, Rawls, and Nozick. Prerequisite: A course in ethics or an introductory course in economics or in business. LEC.

PHIL 557. Kant. 3 Hours H.

A survey of the major works of Immanuel Kant, with attention to his critical method and its application to issues in theoretical philosophy, practical philosophy, aesthetics, or the philosophy of history. Prerequisite: PHIL 386. LEC.

PHIL 560. Nineteenth Century Philosophy. 3 Hours H.

The development of philosophy in the 19th century. Special attention will be paid to such major figures as Hegel, Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche, and Mill. Prerequisite: PHIL 386. LEC.

PHIL 562. Kierkegaard. 3 Hours H.

A study of the thought of Soren Kierkegaard through examination of some of his major writings. Some attention is given to his influence on the development of existentialist philosophies. Prerequisite: PHIL 384 or PHIL 386. LEC.

PHIL 570. Nietzsche. 3 Hours H.

A study of Nietzsche's major writings and ideas, with some attention to his philosophical influence. Prerequisite: PHIL 384 or PHIL 386 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 580. Marxism. 3 Hours H/W.

A philosophical study of the classical texts of Marxism and of their contemporary development. Prerequisite: A course in philosophy or a course in political science. LEC.

PHIL 582. Existentialism. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of the main themes and leading philosophers of the existentialist movement. Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy. LEC.

PHIL 590. Phenomenology. 3 Hours H.

A study of the main themes and leading philosophers of the phenomenological movement. Prerequisite: PHIL 386. LEC.

PHIL 592. Contemporary Continental Philosophy. 3 Hours H.

A study of selected topics in 20th century European philosophy, such as hermeneutics, critical theory, and poststructuralism. Figures to be studied could include Heidegger, Gadamer, Adorno, Habermas, and Foucault. Prerequisite: PHIL 386. LEC.

PHIL 600. Readings in Philosophy: _____. 1-6 Hours H.

Individual reading on topics not covered in course work. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

PHIL 605. The Philosophy of Plato. 3 Hours H.

A survey of the major works of Plato, with attention both to Plato's distinctive arguments and positions in the major areas of philosophy and to the distinctive literary form in which Plato presents his thinking. Prerequisite: PHIL 384. LEC.

PHIL 607. The Philosophy of Aristotle. 3 Hours H.

A survey of the major works of Aristotle, with the aim of understanding Aristotle's distinctive formulations of central philosophical questions, the arguments he presents for his answers to those questions, and the systematic interconnections between his positions in the different areas of philosophy. Prerequisite: PHIL 384. LEC.

PHIL 608. Hellenistic Philosophy. 3 Hours H.

Survey of Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Scepticism from their beginnings through the second century AD. Prerequisite: PHIL 384 and another course in philosophy. LEC.

PHIL 610. Symbolic Logic. 3 Hours H.

Propositional calculus, predicate calculus, consistency, decidability of formal systems, the paradoxes and number concept will be covered. LEC.

PHIL 611. Topics in Symbolic Logic: _____. 1-3 Hours H.

This course is a workshop in any of a variety of topics in symbolic logic of special importance to contemporary analytic philosophy, such as modal logic, tense logic, axiomatic set theory, Goedel's theorems, model theory, etc. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: PHIL 310. LEC.

PHIL 620. Philosophy of Natural Science. 3 Hours H.

An examination of conceptual and foundational issues in the natural sciences. Topics may include the methodology of science (the nature and status of laws, the precise way in which experiment contributes to theory) and puzzles concerning the content of science (the status of space and time, the problematic nature of quantum mechanics). Prerequisite: PHIL 310 or PHIL 610, or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 622. Philosophy of Social Science. 3 Hours H.

A critical examination of the methods, concepts, and practices of the social sciences. Topics to be considered may include: theories of explanation, methodological individualism vs. holism, objectivity, the role of rationality, myth and the unconscious in the explanation of behavior, and the value neutrality of science. Prerequisite: One previous course in philosophy, or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 628. Philosophy of Logic. 3 Hours H.

A systematic treatment of logical theory. Different types of logic will be studied along with their philosophical assumptions, motivations, implications, and uses. Prerequisite: PHIL 310 or PHIL 610. LEC.

PHIL 630. Philosophy of Mathematics. 3 Hours H.

An examination of varying conceptions of the role and status of mathematical arguments. Topics may include realism/anti-realism, the consequences of Goedel's Incompleteness Theorems, the role of mathematics in the sciences, and an examination of such historical thinkers as Plato, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Goedel, and Hilbert. Prerequisite: PHIL 310 or PHIL 610, or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 638. Philosophy of Language. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

An examination of the nature of language using the methods of analytic philosophy. Topics may include meaning, truth, reference, language and thought, and the nature of linguistic rules. Prerequisite: PHIL 388 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 648. Theory of Knowledge. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

An examination of the nature of knowledge. Topics may include the concept of knowledge, knowledge of the external world, induction, theories of justification, and scientific knowledge. Prerequisite: PHIL 384 and PHIL 386, PHIL 388 (which may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 650. Metaphysics. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

An examination of some of the central issues in metaphysics. Topics may include causation, the mind-body problem, free will and determinism, modality, natural kinds, the nature of properties, and personal identity. Prerequisite: PHIL 384 and PHIL 386, PHIL 388 (which may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 654. Philosophy of Mind. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

An examination of the nature of mind using the methods of analytic philosophy. Topics may include consciousness, perception, propositional attitudes, thought and language, action and intention, mind and body, the prospects for scientific psychology, and personal identity. Prerequisite: PHIL 388 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 662. Aesthetics. 3 Hours H.

A study of some of the central themes and problems in aesthetics, such as the beautiful and the sublime in nature and the arts. Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy or graduate standing. LEC.

PHIL 666. Rational Choice Theory. 3 Hours H.

This course is an introduction to the philosophical issues surrounding individual decision theory, game theory, and social choice theory. This includes issues of scientific theory selection, the nature of preference, the uses of games to model social interaction, and the ethical and political implications of Arrow's impossibility theorem. Formal techniques of modeling and proof, akin to those used in logic and mathematics, will be used in much of the course. Prerequisite: Two courses in economics, a philosophy course numbered 500 or above, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 668. Political Philosophy. 3 Hours H.

A systematic analysis of the concepts of politics, with reference to representative political theories. Prerequisite: A course in philosophy and a course in political science. LEC.

PHIL 670. Contemporary Ethical Theory. 3 Hours AE51 / H.

An examination of some major moral philosophers and some important issues in ethical theory since the beginning of the twentieth century. Topics covered typically include intuitionism, emotivism, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and the relationship between morality and rationality. Prerequisite: PHIL 160 or PHIL 161 or two courses in philosophy. LEC.

PHIL 671. Feminist Theories in Ethics. 3 Hours H.

This course addresses the role (if any) that gender plays in constructing ethical theories. Topics include the impact of culture, affect, and the body on our understanding of gender differences and the importance of these differences for ethics. Prerequisite: PHIL 160 or PHIL 161, or two previous philosophy courses. LEC.

PHIL 672. History of Ethics. 3 Hours AE51 / H.

An interpretive and critical examination of central texts in the history of moral philosophy, which may include works by Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and J.S. Mill. Prerequisite: PHIL 160 or PHIL 161 or two previous philosophy courses. LEC.

PHIL 674. Philosophy of Law. 3 Hours H.

An examination of the concept of law and of legal reasoning. In addition, the course may consider such topics as natural law, legal excuses, the relations between law and morality, civil disobedience, civil liberties, the concept of property. Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy or one course in philosophy and one course in law or consent of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 676. Medical Ethics: Life and Death Issues. 3 Hours AE51 / H.

After a brief survey of techniques of moral argument and analysis especially as they pertain to the moral impermissibility of murder, particular moral and conceptual issues relating to death and dying in medical contexts will be addressed. Topics such as abortion, infanticide, suicide, euthanasia, the definition of death, and the right to refuse life-saving medical therapy will be included. Prerequisite: Two courses in biology or consent of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 677. Medical Ethics: Professional Responsibilities. 3 Hours H.

After a brief survey of techniques of moral argument and analysis, particular moral issues related to the obligations of health care professionals and the rights of patients will be discussed. These will include such matters as confidentiality, truth-telling, informed consent, the ethics of research on human subjects, psychosurgery, the rights of the mentally ill, and the rights of the mentally retarded. Prerequisite: Two courses in biology or consent of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 684. Main Currents of Russian Thought I. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of philosophical, theological and literary monuments designed to acquaint the student with the main cultural forces that have shaped Russian thought and manners. From the origins to Napoleonic times. (Same as SLAV 684.) LEC.

PHIL 686. Main Currents of Russian Thought II. 3 Hours H/W.

A continuation of SLAV 684 from the age of Pushkin to the present. (Same as SLAV 686.) LEC.

PHIL 800. Tutorial. 3 Hours.

Intensive supervised training in and application of the techniques of research. Required of every graduate student seeking an advanced degree in the first or second semester of enrollment. Passing this tutorial constitutes partial fulfillment of the Ph.D. RSRS requirements. Consent of instructor required for repeating the course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. RSH.

PHIL 805. Plato. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PHIL 508 or PHIL 605 or PHIL 607 or PHIL 608 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 807. Aristotle. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PHIL 508 or PHIL 605 or PHIL 607 or PHIL 608 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 820. Topics in the History of Philosophy: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered by different instructors under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic, instructor, and specific prerequisites to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: 500-600 level course as specified or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 824. Hume. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PHIL 648 or PHIL 650 or PHIL 654 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 828. Kant. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PHIL 648 or PHIL 650 or PHIL 654 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 831. Hegel. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PHIL 560 or 500-600 level course as specified or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 833. Nietzsche. 3 Hours.

A study of the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. Prerequisite: PHIL 560 or PHIL 570 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 835. Frege. 3 Hours.

Gottlob Frege was the founder of the analytic movement in philosophy, having done seminal work in logic, the philosophy of language, and the philosophy of mathematics. This course will focus on his primary texts as well as his influence on present-day studies. Prerequisite: PHIL 628 or PHIL 630 or PHIL 638 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 843. Heidegger. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PHIL 560 or PHIL 562 or PHIL 570 or PHIL 582 or PHIL 590 or PHIL 592 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 848. Wittgenstein. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PHIL 638 or PHIL 650 or PHIL 654 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 850. Topics in Recent Philosophy: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered by different instructors under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic, instructor, and specific prerequisite to be announced in Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: 500-600 level as specified or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 852. Quine. 3 Hours.

A systematic study of the major work of W. V. Quine and its influence on subsequent analytic philosophy. Topics will include Quine's theory of meaning, philosophical logic, and philosophy of science. Prerequisite: PHIL 638 or PHIL 648 or PHIL 650 or PHIL 654 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 855. Davidson. 3 Hours.

An examination of Donald Davidson's seminal work in philosophy of language and philosophy of mind. Among the topics to be considered will be meaning, truth, interpretation, action, and propositional attitudes. Prerequisite: PHIL 638 or PHIL 654 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 860. Topics in Philosophy of Science: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 620 or PHIL 622 or PHIL 648 or PHIL 650 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 862. Topics in Logic: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 610 or PHIL 628 or PHIL 630 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 868. Topics in Philosophy of Language: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered under different subtitles and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Prerequisite: PHIL 638 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 870. Topics in Metaphysics: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 650 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 872. Topics in Theory of Knowledge: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 648 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 877. Topics in Philosophy of Mind: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 654 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 880. Topics in Ethics: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 670 or PHIL 672 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 884. Topics in Social and Political Philosophy: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 555 or PHIL 666 or PHIL 668 or PHIL 674 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 885. Topics in Law and Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Explores various topics at the intersection of law and philosophy. Content varies but may include: What is freedom and what role should government play in a free society? What is equality and what is the best way to achieve it? What is the relationship between law and social justice? What is the source and value of human rights? Should social and economic rights be legally guaranteed? How should government redress historical injustices such as slavery, apartheid, and the Holocaust? Students must complete a substantial seminar paper. LEC.

PHIL 886. Topics in Applied Ethics: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered under different subtitles, such as professional ethics or some issue in business ethics (e.g., corporate responsibility) or in medical ethics (e.g., the definition of death); it may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic, instructor, and specific prerequisite to be announced in Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 670 or PHIL 672 or 500-600 level course as specified or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 888. Topics in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered under different subtitles, such as philosophy of a particular social science (e.g., economics, psychology) or a particular issue in the social sciences (e.g., ideology, reductionism), and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 622 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHIL 890. Topics in Continental Philosophy: _____. 3 Hours.

This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topics, instructor, and specific prerequisites to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. LEC.

PHIL 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Six hours of credit will be awarded upon completion of the master's thesis, but no more than six hours of credit may be obtained in this course altogether. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. THE.

PHIL 900. Research in Philosophy: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Intensive research in philosophy. This course may be taken through individual arrangement, or in connection with small research seminars which are offered occasionally. Students may only enroll for three hours in any given semester. May be repeated if content varies significantly. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of graduate work. RSH.

PHIL 901. Ph.D. Tutorial. 3 Hours.

Independent research on any topic that a graduate student and a faculty member shall agree on. It shall result in a tightly focused 20-30 page paper. The student's written work will be repeatedly evaluated over the semester by the director, and the final product must be defended in an oral examination conducted by a three-member faculty committee (including the director). Prerequisite: Students must be admitted to the Ph.D. program and have successfully completed the Ph.D. core courses requirement. RSH.

PHIL 999. Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

This course may be taken more than once, but not for more than twelve hours of credit in any one semester. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. THE.