The Psychology Department at the University of Kansas

Our mission is to further our understanding of behavior and the physiological, cognitive, and social processes associated with behavior. Psychology is also the profession that applies the science of behavior to practical problems, such as clinical, psychological disorders. This mission includes the discovery and dissemination of principles pertaining to both individual and group psychological functioning and its development. In addition to doing this critical research, we expend great effort in training students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels so that these students will be well equipped with the knowledge and methods that will place them at the forefront of progress across a broad range of the psychological disciplines.

Psychology Undergraduate Program

Students have many reasons for wanting to major in psychology. Some are simply fond of observing the behavior of others around them, fascinated with the results of their observations and curious to learn why people behave as they do. Some plan to become psychologists themselves or to enter one of the many professions where a background in psychology can be useful -- such as, business, teaching, medicine, nursing, law, social work, the ministry, counseling, student services, child development, administration, or human resources.

Psychology Graduate Program

We offer a single doctoral degree which may be earned in one of the following programs: clinical, cognitive, developmental, quantitative, or social psychology. Students admitted to one of these 5 programs enter with the expectation of continuing graduate study through the Ph.D. as the department does not admit terminal master's students. A clinical child psychology training program has been developed for doctoral students in an interdepartmental program with the Department of Applied Behavioral Science.

Undergraduate Programs

Undergraduate courses are designed as part of a general education, for students preparing for careers in professional fields, and for students majoring in psychology, including those anticipating graduate work.

Preparation for Graduate Study

Students who plan to apply for graduate work in psychology should supplement their beginning course in methodology (PSYC 200/PSYC 201) and statistics (PSYC 210/PSYC 211) with a laboratory course (e.g., PSYC 618, PSYC 620, PSYC 622, PSYC 624, or PSYC 625). Methods (PSYC 200/PSYC 201) and Statistics (PSYC 210/PSYC 211) should be taken as early as possible in the undergraduate education. The laboratory course should be completed during the junior or senior year.

Preparation for Graduate Study

Students who plan to apply for graduate work in psychology should supplement their beginning course in methodology (PSYC 200/PSYC 201) and statistics (PSYC 210/PSYC 211) with a laboratory course (e.g., PSYC 618, PSYC 620, PSYC 622, PSYC 624, or PSYC 625). Methods (PSYC 200/PSYC 201) and Statistics (PSYC 210/PSYC 211) should be taken as early as possible in the undergraduate education. The laboratory course should be completed during the junior or senior year.

Graduate Programs

The department offers a single doctoral degree in psychology, which may be earned in social, cognitive, quantitative, developmental, or clinical psychology. Students enter with the expectation of earning the Ph.D. The department does not admit students seeking the terminal master’s degree. The department cooperates with related departments in joint Ph.D. programs in clinical child psychology, behavioral psychology, and child language.

Dual-title Ph.D. in Psychology and Gerontology

This dual-title degree is an option available to students who have first been admitted to the doctoral program. The dual-title degree allows the pursuit of a single degree that incorporates study within a traditional discipline and training in an interdisciplinary field; the student is awarded one degree (Ph.D.) with both titles identified on the diploma (e.g., “Ph.D. in Psychology and Gerontology”).

This option is designed to appeal to students who are strong in a traditional discipline but also motivated to study across disciplinary lines. In the course of study, students can avail themselves of disciplinary depth and interdisciplinary breadth. At the post-doctoral stage, dual-title graduates will have enhanced career and employment opportunities, able to claim expertise in one or both titles of their degree when seeking positions in education and research.

More information about this option, its admissions requirements, and plan of study can be found on the department website or the website of the Gerontology program.

Courses

PSYC 102. Orientation Seminar in Psychology. 1 Hour S.

Provides an overview of the discipline of psychology. Emphasizes developing an understanding of opportunities in psychology at the University of Kansas, exploring service-learning options related to the major, and helping students plan goals for their education through an understanding of their personal values and options within and outside the discipline. Open to KU-degree-seeking students only. Contact the Psychology Department to enroll in the course. Non-degree-seeking and non-KU students may enroll in the course by signing up with KU Continuing Education. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC.

PSYC 104. General Psychology. 3 Hours SI GE3S / S.

A basic introduction to the science of psychology. LEC.

PSYC 105. General Psychology, Honors. 3 Hours SI GE3S / S.

Open to students in College or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 120. Personality. 3 Hours SI GE3S / S.

An introductory survey of personality theories, development, assessment and current research. LEC.

PSYC 121. Personality, Honors. 3 Hours SI GE3S / S.

Open to students in College or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours SI GE11.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, organized around current issues in psychology. May not contribute to major requirements in psychology. First year seminar topics are coordinated and approved through the Office of First Year Experiences. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

PSYC 200. Research Methods in Psychology. 3 Hours S.

An examination of the scientific "ways of knowing" employed by psychologists to discover the laws governing human behavior across a wide domain. The focus of the course is upon these methods and the statistical techniques that support them. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and MATH 101 or equivalent placement. LEC.

PSYC 201. Research Methods in Psychology, Honors. 3 Hours S.

An examination of the scientific "ways of knowing" employed by psychologists to discover the laws governing human behavior across a wide domain. The focus of the course is upon these methods and the statistical techniques that support them. Open to students in University and Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Not open to students taking PSYC 200. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and MATH 101. LEC.

PSYC 202. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-6 Hours S.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Psychology equivalent to courses at the 100 and 200 level at KU. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

PSYC 210. Statistics in Psychological Research. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to statistical concepts and methods as they relate to analysis and interpretation of psychological data. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and MATH 101 or equivalent placement. LEC.

PSYC 211. Statistics in Psychological Research, Honors. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to statistical concepts and methods as they relate to analysis and interpretation of psychological data. Open only to student in University and Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have taken PSYC 210. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and MATH 101 or equivalent placement. LEC.

PSYC 318. Cognitive Psychology. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to contemporary research and theory in human learning and memory, relevant perceptual processes, and higher functions such as language. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or equivalent placement. LEC.

PSYC 319. Cognitive Psychology, Honors. 3 Hours S.

Open to students in University or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC.

PSYC 333. Child Development. 3 Hours S.

A survey course on the science and application of child and adolescent development; including physical, motoric, social, emotional, and cognitive changes from conception through adolescence. The course covers methods and theory, genetics, and may incorporate content on aggression, morality, parenting, media, and peers. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC.

PSYC 334. Child Development, Honors. 3 Hours S.

A survey course on the science and application of child and adolescent development; including physical, motoric, social, emotional, and cognitive changes from conception through adolescence. The course covers methods and theory, genetics, and may incorporate content on aggression, morality, parenting, media, and peers. Open to students in University or Departmental Honors Programs or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC.

PSYC 350. Abnormal Psychology. 3 Hours S.

An examination of psychopathology including anxiety disorders, psycho-physiological disorders, affective disorders, and schizophrenic disorders. Disorders are considered from psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, and biological perspectives. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 351. Abnormal Psychology, Honors. 3 Hours S.

Open to students in College or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 360. Social Psychology. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to the psychology of social behavior. Systematic consideration of such concepts as social influence, conformity and deviation, social attitudes and prejudice, socialization and personality, communication and propaganda, morale, and leadership. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC.

PSYC 361. Social Psychology, Honors. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to the psychology of social behavior. Systematic consideration of such concepts as social influence, conformity and deviation, social attitudes and prejudice, socialization and personality, communication and propaganda, morale, and leadership. Open to students in University or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC.

PSYC 370. Behavioral Neuroscience. 3 Hours N.

A survey of topics related to the biological processes underlying behavior in humans and in animals, including the physiology of neuronal and synaptic, transmission, neurochemistry, and neuropharmacology. Selected topics within the area of behavioral neuroscience are also covered, such as motivation, appetite, reward, homeostasis, biological rhythms, addiction, aggression, stress, emotion, and sleep. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Psychology; an introductory course in Biology; and PSYC 200 or PSYC 201 and PSYC 210 or PSYC 211. LEC.

PSYC 371. Behavior Neuroscience, Honors. 3 Hours N.

A survey of basic topics related to the biological processes underlying behavior in humans and in animals, including the physiology of neuronal and synaptic transmission, neurochemistry, and neuropharmacology. Selected topics within the area of behavioral neuroscience are also covered, such as motivation, appetite, reward, homeostasis, biological rhythms, addiction, aggression, stress, emotion, and sleep. Open to students in University or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Psychology, an introductory course in Biology and PSYC 200 or PSYC 201 and PSYC 210 or PSYC 211. LEC.

PSYC 375. Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 Hours N.

A survey of topics related to the biological processes underlying cognition in humans and in animals, including the physiology of neuronal and synaptic transmission, neurochemistry, and functional neuroanatomy. Selected topics within the area of cognitive neuroscience also covered, such as sensory processing, hearing, vision, learning and memory, attention, motor control, language, hemispheric asymmetry, executive function, and neuroplasticity. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Psychology; an introductory course in Biology; and PSYC 200 or PSYC 201 and PSYC 210 or PSYC 211. LEC.

PSYC 380. Clinical Neuroscience. 3 Hours N.

The organization and function of the nervous system as it relates to topics of interest to psychologists, including pain, anxiety, stress, sleep, depression, schizophrenia, akinetic and dyskinetic movement disorders, and senile dementia. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Psychology, an introductory course in Biology, and PSYC 200 or PSYC 201 and PSYC 210 or PSYC 211. LEC.

PSYC 381. Clinical Neuroscience, Honors. 3 Hours N.

The organization and function of the nervous system as it relates to topics of interest to psychologists, including pain, anxiety, stress, sleep, depression, schizophrenia, akinetic and dyskinetic movement disorders, and senile dementia. Open to students in University or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Psychology, an introductory course in Biology, and PSYC 200 or PSYC 201 and PSYC 210 or PSYC 211. LEC.

PSYC 402. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-6 Hours S.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Psychology equivalent to courses at the 300 to 600 level at KU. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

PSYC 405. Children and Media. 3 Hours H.

The applied study of child development theories and research methods on the influences and effects of television and related visual media on childhood in the contexts of families, schools, and society. (Same as ABSC 405 and THR 405.) LEC.

PSYC 406. Individual Differences. 3 Hours S.

A survey of the nature and sources of differences in human behavior and a consideration of the consequences of these differences for society. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 410. Intimate Relationships. 3 Hours S.

A social psychological perspective on adult intimate relationships, examining friendship, dating, committed relationships, and the dissolution of committed relationships. Topics include romance, jealousy, self-disclosure, power, loneliness, and social support. Discussion of heterosexual and homosexual relationships, traditional forms (e.g., marriage) of relationships as well as alternative lifestyles (e.g. cohabitation) and gender-linked differences in relationships. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 412. Introduction to Motivation and Emotion. 3 Hours S.

An examination of contemporary issues, theories, and research in motivation and emotion. Prerequisite: PSYC 360 or PSYC 361, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 415. Social and Cultural Sources of Self. 3 Hours S.

An interdisciplinary exploration of the social and cultural sources of self-experience. The first part of the course emphasizes a general process: how the development and experience of self, though it might seem essentially personal, is shaped by social interaction. The second part of the course highlights particular cases: how self-experience may be constructed differently depending on the particular social and cultural settings a person inhabits. Cases include influences of gender, socioeconomic status, and age group on the construction of self-experience within societies from around the world, and ethnic-identity groups within the USA. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 418. Introduction to Cognitive Science. 3 Hours S.

Examines the data and methodologies of the disciplines that comprise Cognitive Science, an inter-disciplinary approach to studying the mind and brain. Topics may include: consciousness, artificial intelligence, linguistics, education and instruction, neural networks, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, evolutionary theory, cognitive neuroscience, human-computer interaction, and robotics. (Same as LING 418, PHIL 418, and SPLH 418.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 420. Fundamentals of Personality. 3 Hours S.

Clinical application of personality theories; personality development and assessment research. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 430. Cognitive Development. 3 Hours S.

A basic survey course in the development of thinking and understanding in normal children. The course will cover Piaget's theory and information processing theories at the advanced undergraduate level. Topics include perception, attention, learning, memory, language, problem solving, and individual differences from birth to the mid-teens. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or ABSC/HDFL 160. LEC.

PSYC 432. Human Behavioral Genetics. 3 Hours S.

A survey of human behavioral genetics for upper division undergraduates. Emphasis is on how the methods and theories of quantitative, population, medical, and molecular genetics can be applied to individual and group differences in humans. Both normal and abnormal behaviors are covered, including intelligence, mental retardation, language and language disorders, communication, learning, personality, and psychopathology. (Same as ANTH 447, BIOL 432, SPLH 432.) Prerequisite: Introductory courses in biology/genetics or biological anthropology and psychology are recommended. LEC.

PSYC 435. Social and Personality Development. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to social and personality development with consideration of both classic and contemporary theoretical viewpoints. The role of social contexts is considered (e.g., family, peers, communities), as well as biological influences (e.g., behavioral genetics). Topics include parent-infant attachment, peer relationships, aggression, etc. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 449. Laboratory/Field Work in Human Biology. 1-3 Hours AE61 / N.

Faculty supervised laboratory or field research for Human Biology majors. Students design and complete a research project in collaboration with a Human Biology faculty member. (Same as ANTH 449, BIOL 449, and SPLH 449.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Human Biology major. FLD.

PSYC 453. Psychological Foundations of Musical Behavior. 3 Hours S.

Study of human musical behavior, including basic psychoacoustic phenomena, musical taste, functional music, musical ability, cultural organization of musical sounds, and the affective response. Prerequisite: General Psychology, MEMT 370, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 460. Honors in Psychology. 1-2 Hours AE61 / S.

A seminar for juniors and seniors in the Honors Program in Psychology. Students who have been admitted to the Honors Program in Psychology may enroll for one credit for one or both semesters of their junior year and are required to enroll for two credits for both semesters in their senior year. IND.

PSYC 465. Stereotyping and Prejudice Across Cultures. 3 Hours S.

This course covers a variety of theoretical views concerning the origins of stereotypes and the factors that maintain them, as well as how and when the revision of such beliefs take place. Analysis of various stereotypes (including gender and race) and the experience of prejudice across a variety of cultural contexts is examined. Many difficult social issues are discussed in depth. Prerequisite: PSYC 360 or PSYC 361; or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 468. Psychology of Women. 3 Hours S.

A survey of the psychological theories about women; similarities and differences in behavior of women and men; the effects of biological and social factors on the behavior of women and men; and issues of concern to women of different races, sexual orientations, ages, and so forth. (Same as WGSS 468.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or WGSS 201. LEC.

PSYC 470. Introduction to Contemporary Psychotherapies. 3 Hours S.

Review of current psychotherapies with special references to their underlying philosophies, theories of personality, techniques, and effectiveness. Issues concerning the use of drugs in the treatment of mental disorders are also reviewed. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 472. Psychology of Sleep and Dreaming. 3 Hours S.

This course reviews recent evidence on the roles of dreaming and dreamless sleep. Psychological, developmental, personality, and social psychological aspects are considered. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 475. Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 Hours S.

The neurobiology of higher mental processes such as perception, attention, learning, memory, thinking, and language, as studied by techniques such as recording from individual neurons, electrical brain stimulation, brain damage, and brain scans and measurements of regional cerebral blood flow in conscious people. Emphasis will be placed on in-class analysis of original research articles. Prerequisite: One of the following courses - PSYC 318, 319, 370, 371, 380, or 381; or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 480. Independent Study. 1-5 Hours U.

Investigation of a special research problem or directed reading in an area not covered in regular courses. No more than 3 hours of PSYC 480 may be counted toward the minimum hours required for the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

PSYC 481. Research Practicum. 1-5 Hours U.

Guided participation in ongoing research programs to augment quantitative skills through direct practicum experience. No more than 3 hours of PSYC 481 may be counted toward the Psychology minor or the Psychology, Developmental Psychology, and Behavioral Neuroscience major requirements. Prerequisite: PSYC 200 or PSYC 201 or PSYC 210 or PSYC 211 or consent of instructor. RSH.

PSYC 482. Sensation and Perception. 3 Hours S.

Introduction to human sensory and perceptual capabilities. Topics include: sensory systems, perceptual development, and perceiving color, objects, space, movement, sound, speech, touch, smell, and taste as well as various perceptual illusions. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 483. Undergraduate Internship in Psychology. 1-3 Hours U.

Students conduct psychology focused fieldwork in an organization related to their professional/career goals. Credit hours are determined on the basis of 120 clock hours for 3 credit hours, 80 clock hours for 2 credit hours, and 40 clock hours for 1 credit hour. An internship plan (contract) is developed by the student in conjunction with the student's academic adviser and signed off by the academic adviser and an authorized agent of the internship site. At the conclusion of the internship experience, the authorized agent of the internship site writes the academic adviser indicating that the student has met the goals of the internship plan and the hours required. No more than 3 hours of PSYC 483 may be counted toward the minimum hours required for the major. Prerequisite: Admission to the Psychology major. INT.

PSYC 490. Theories and Concepts of Child Development. 3 Hours S.

An advanced course in the theories and basic concepts of child development. Coverage includes: (a) analyses of the general logic, assumptions, and principles of the five major approaches: normative-maturation, psychoanalytic, social learning theory, cognitive-developmental, and behavior analysis; (b) historical background of developmental theory; (c) social-cultural influences on theory construction; and (d) some cross-cultural perspectives. Not open to students previously enrolled in HDFL 290. Prerequisite: PSYC 104, or HDFL 160, HDFL 161, HDFL 432, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 492. Psychology and Social Issues. 3 Hours S.

A study of psychological aspects of selected social issues in contemporary American society. Race relations and the civil rights movement. Political extremism. Public opinion and social change. Social psychological approaches to a variety of social problems. Prerequisite: PSYC 360 or 361, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 499. Conceptual Issues in Psychology. 3 Hours S.

This course examines classic issues in psychology--free-will and determinism, nature and nurture, the mind-body problem, approaches to human action, cultural influences on psychological theories, the evolution of intellectual paradigms, and inductive and deductive approaches to social scientific research--from multiple perspectives within psychology and related social sciences. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or equivalent. LEC.

PSYC 500. Intermediate Statistics in Psychological Research. 3 Hours U.

A second course in statistics with emphasis on applications. Analysis of variance, regression, analysis, analysis of contingency tables; possibly selected further topics. Prerequisite: Grade of B- or better in PSYC 210 or PSYC 211. LEC.

PSYC 502. Human Sexuality. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to the field of human sexuality. Topics to be covered include sexual anatomy and physiology, fertilization, pregnancy, birth and lactation, contraception, human sexual response, sexuality across the life cycle, love, marriage, alternatives to marriage, sexual orientation, sex differences in behavior, parenthood, sexually transmitted diseases, sex and the law, and sex education. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 511. Laboratory Research in Infant Behavior. 3 Hours S.

Optional course for students currently enrolled in PSYC 510 or may be taken after completion of PSYC 510. Will offer students practical experience in an infant research laboratory. Students must spend a minimum of nine hours a week (on three different half days) in laboratory. They will learn to observe and record infant behavior, to handle data from experiments and participate in the planning and discussion of laboratory research. Acquaintance with and involvement in the issues of obtaining informed consent and ethical aspects of infant research will be included. Prerequisite: Current enrollment or previous enrollment in PSYC 510 and consent of instructor. LAB.

PSYC 518. Human Memory. 3 Hours S.

In-depth coverage of human memory phenomena, including phenomena concerning acquisition, storage and retrieval, unconscious forms of memory, memory monitoring and control, and practical aspects of memory such as autobiographical memory, mnemonic techniques and eyewitness memory. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 520. Memory and Eyewitness Testimony in Children. 3 Hours S.

A review of the literature on the development of memory in young children, and the implications of this research for understanding children's eyewitness testimony. The course will present current research on children's long-term memory abilities, the impact of stress on recall performance, the effectiveness of various types of interviewing techniques, and the suggestibility of children's recollections. Policy issues and potential guidelines for the elicitation and evaluation of children's memory reports in both clinical and legal arenas will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or ABSC/HDFL 160, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 521. Women and Violence. 3 Hours S.

An examination of research on women and violence, including rape, domestic violence, sexual harassment, stalking, and child sexual abuse. The nature, prevalence, causes, and consequences of violence against women are discussed. (Same as WGSS 521.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 531. Language Development. 3 Hours S.

Introduction to the study of language development; emphasis on the psychological processes underlying syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic aspects of language development in children. Prerequisite: One of the following courses - PSYC 318, 319, 333, or 334; or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 533. The Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. 3 Hours S.

This course provides a comprehensive review of psychological theories and interventions for addressing addictive behaviors. Emphasis is placed on clinical processes. Prominent models are presented for conceptualizing addictive behaviors, along with clinical treatments based on these models. Specific topics covered include: screening for and diagnosing addictive behaviors, brief psychological interventions, understanding addiction as a syndrome, stages of change, empirically-supported treatments, evidence-based practice, relapse prevention, harm reduction, addressing common co-existing disorders, and community services. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 535. Developmental Psychopathology. 3 Hours S.

A review of the literature on contemporary psychological and developmental disorders of children and youth. Course will present current models of psychopathology, classification systems, assessment methods, and treatment approaches designed for the individual, the family, and the community. Specific attention will be given to age, gender, and cultural differences and similarities. Topics include: anxiety disorders, oppositional behavior disorders, physical/sexual abuse, learning disabilities, and autism. (Same as ABSC 535.) Prerequisite: ABSC 160, PSYC 333, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 536. The Psychology of Language. 3 Hours S.

A survey of recent research on psycholinguistics covering the perception, production, and comprehension of language. Topics include: the biological basis for language, the nature of comprehension processes, and memory for the syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic components of language. Prerequisite: One of the following courses - PSYC 318, 319, 333, or 334; or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 545. Culture and Psychology. 3 Hours S.

The course considers the relationship between culture and psyche. One theme throughout the course involves revealing the cultural grounding of psychological functioning. The second and complementary theme involves identifying the psychological processes involved in the phenomenon of culture. Prerequisite: PSYC 333, 334, 360 or 361 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 555. Evolutionary Psychology. 3 Hours S.

A review of evolutionary theory and its application to human personality, cognition, interpersonal relationships, family dynamics, and development. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and at least 3 additional hours in Psychology, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 565. Applied Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours S.

An advanced study of the application of theories and concepts of developmental and behavioral psychology to a range of specific issues and problems of childhood and adolescence. This course will rely heavily upon the empirical research literature. Topics include contemporary social issues and child development, research in applied settings, assessment, intervention, and prevention, as well as program evaluation. (Same as ABSC 565.) Prerequisite: ABSC 160 or PSYC 333, and ABSC/PSYC 535. LEC.

PSYC 566. Psychology and the Law. 3 Hours S.

An application of psychological processes and concepts to the American legal system. Among the topics covered are the socialization of legal attitudes, opinions about the purposes of the criminal justice system and especially of prisons, the concept of "dangerousness," the nature of jury decision making, and the rights of prisoners, patients, and children. LEC.

PSYC 570. Group Dynamics. 3 Hours S.

A study of the processes underlying the dynamics of the group, including the observation of group phenomena and a consideration of their relation to research findings. Prerequisite: PSYC 360 or 361, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 572. Psychology and International Conflict. 3 Hours S.

A study of psychological approaches to analysis and intervention in the field of international conflict and peace-making. Focus on major contributions and important paradigms for explanation and action. Prerequisite: PSYC 360 or consent of instructor. Background study in international relations or recent world history desirable. LEC.

PSYC 578. Social Attitudes. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to the study of attitudes focusing on problems of measurement and on empirical findings and theories of attitude acquisition and change. Prerequisite: PSYC 360, 361, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 580. Research Lab. 1-5 Hours S.

Supervised research under the guidance of a faculty member in the Department of Psychology. Students will be part of a collaborative laboratory environment, and will be involved in research design, data collection, and data analysis, and will take part in regularly scheduled laboratory meetings. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 581. Psychology of Religion. 3 Hours S.

Consideration of the psychological antecedents of religious experience, the nature of religious experience, and the behavioral consequences of religion. Focus will be on psychological theory and research relevant to religious thought, feeling, belief, and behavior. (Same as REL 581.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 590. Nonverbal Communication. 3 Hours S.

Examination of non-linguistic behavior in human communication, including proxemics (spacing), kinesics (movement and expression), and paralinguistics (voice quality). Includes phylogenetic and developmental perspectives, methods of analysis, applications to interpersonal problems. (Same as COMS 590.) Prerequisite: COMS 356 or PSYC 210 or PSYC 211. LEC.

PSYC 592. Psychological Significance of Physical Illness and Disability. 3 Hours S.

A lecture course to help students become more aware of and responsive to the psychological needs of persons with physical illnesses or disabilities. Emphasis is upon the meanings of such conditions in individuals' lives and the effects of treatment and rehabilitation settings on psychological adaptation. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 598. Positive Psychology. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to the core assumptions and research findings associated with human strengths and positive emotions. Also an exploration of interventions and applications informed by positive psychology in counseling and psychotherapy, and its application to school, work, family and other close relationships. (Same as EPSY 580.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 602. Basis and Nature of Individuality. 3 Hours S.

Individuality in cognitive and personality attributes is surveyed, and analyzed by current psychological theory. The course includes topics on the structure of intellect and personality, cognitive theory, brain research and behavior genetics as relevant to the understanding of individuality. Prerequisite: An introductory course in psychology. LEC.

PSYC 605. Health Psychology. 3 Hours S.

Review of research and theory concerning the role of psychological factors in the development of physical illness and the contribution of psychologists to the treatment and prevention of physical illness. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 608. Sex Role Development. 3 Hours S.

An examination of the theory and literature on sex role development in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Particular attention is given to approaches stressing androgyny and variations on traditional roles. Processes of socialization into both traditional and non-traditional roles are stressed. Literature on females is emphasized, but male sex role development is also covered. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or HDFL 160. LEC.

PSYC 610. Advanced Personality. 3 Hours S.

A survey of selected topics in the area of personality (e.g., defense mechanisms, aggression, interpersonal relations). Prerequisite: PSYC 120 or PSYC 420 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 613. History and Systems in Psychology. 3 Hours S.

A survey of the historical development of modern theoretical systems in psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 104, plus twelve hours in psychology. LEC.

PSYC 616. Foundations of Learning. 3 Hours S.

A consideration of experimental findings and theories concerning classical and instrumental conditioning. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 618. Experimental Psychology: Human Learning. 6 Hours AE61 / S.

Lectures and laboratory research on human information processing as related to theories of word recognition, reading, and language comprehension. Major emphasis on experimental design, data analysis, interpretation, and scientific writing. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and PSYC 210 or PSYC 211 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 620. Experimental Psychology: Sensation, Perception, and Cognition. 6 Hours AE61 / S.

Lectures and laboratory work on human sensory processes and how they result in perceptions of the environment. Experience is provided in designing and implementing research as well as in the skills necessary for statistical analysis, interpretation of data, and scientific writing. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and PSYC 210 or PSYC 211 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 622. Experimental Psychology: Social Behavior. 6 Hours AE61 / S.

Lectures, laboratory and field work on various issues in research in social psychology (e.g., conformity, attitude change, social processes). Two two-hour periods a week and appointment for research. Prerequisite: PSYC 104, PSYC 360, and PSYC 210 or PSYC 211 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 624. Experimental Psychology: Clinical Psychology. 6 Hours AE61 / S.

Lectures and laboratory research on contemporary issues in clinical psychology. Emphasis on experimental design, data analysis, interpretation of data, and scientific writing. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and PSYC 210 or PSYC 211 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 625. Experimental Psychology: Methods in Psychophysiology and Neuroscience. 6 Hours AE61 / S.

Lectures and laboratory work on psychophysiology and neuropsychology research methods. Overview of psychophysiological tools to measure the central and peripheral nervous systems. Experience designing and implementing neuropsychology and psychophysiology research. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and PSYC 210 or PSYC 211 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 626. Psychology of Adolescence. 3 Hours S.

Impact of factors of social environment and physical growth upon psychological development from puberty to young adulthood. (Same as ABSC 626.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104, PSYC 333, or HDFL/ABSC 160. LEC.

PSYC 630. Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours S.

The historical and empirical foundations of clinical psychology. Significant trends in theory, research, and social organization which have shaped clinical practice. A review of clinical practice. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 632. Advanced Child Behavior and Development. 3 Hours S.

An advanced course in child development that includes a survey of the field's principles and theoretical approaches, and current issues in research and practice. Topics will include: prenatal development, cognition and language, social-emotional development, socialization influences in childhood, developmental psychopathology, and social policies. (Same as ABSC 632.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160, PSYC 333, or instructor permission, and senior or graduate status. LEC.

PSYC 642. The Psychology of Families. 3 Hours S.

Study of the family as a psychosocial system. Emphasis is placed on factors affecting contemporary families including family structures, development, communication patterns, disorders, and treatment approaches. Theory, empirical evidence, and practical principles that may lead to maximizing individual growth in the family unit are discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 644. Behavioral Pharmacology. 3 Hours S.

Addresses psychological and behavioral effects of drugs, including psychotropic medications. A central theme is that effects of drugs frequently cannot be characterized solely from a pharmacological perspective. Thus, emphasis is placed on examining the interaction of pharmacological and behavioral variables. For example, how do psychological factors moderate responses to drugs? The nature of this area assumes some knowledge of general psychology, research methods, biology, chemistry, neurophysiology, and the nervous system. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 646. Mental Health and Aging. 3 Hours S.

Reviews recent research and application in the field of mental health and aging. Theoretical perspectives appropriate for understanding mental health issues with increased age are discussed. The epidemiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment methods associated with a variety of mental health conditions are surveyed. The community mental health resources available for older adults are discussed as well as practically-related issues such as evaluations of functional independence and competency among older adults. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 650. Statistical Methods in Behavioral and Social Science Research I. 4 Hours S.

Elementary distribution theory; t-test; simple regression and correlation; multiple regression and multiple correlation; curvilinear regression; logistic regression; general linear model. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Students taking this course as PSYC 790 will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: A grade of B- or better in a beginning course in statistics (e.g., PSYC 210 or PSYC 211, MATH 365, POLS 306, COMS 356, SOC 510, or equivalent) is recommended, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 651. Anova and Other Factorial Designs. 4 Hours S.

Course covers one-way analysis of variance, linear trends, contrasts, post hoc tests; multi-way analysis of variance for crossed, blocked, nested, and incomplete designs; analysis of covariance; repeated measures analysis of variance; general linear model. Applications across the social, educational, and behavior sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Students taking this course as PSYC 791 will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: PSYC 650 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 652. Behavior Therapy. 3 Hours S.

A review of the principal techniques of behavior therapy, exclusive of operant-based therapies. Emphasis upon systematic desensitization, implosion, assertion training, and modeling techniques. Special attention given to outcome research relevant to the effectiveness of these techniques. Recommended: A course in abnormal psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 678. Drugs and Behavior. 3 Hours S.

A survey of the methods used to study the effects of drugs on behavior, and of the effect of selected drugs on behavior, particularly the narcotics, hallucinogens, and drugs used in the treatment of mental illness. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 679. Applied Nonparametric Statistical Methods. 4 Hours S.

This course covers nonparametric statistical methods for testing hypotheses. Topics include a review of parametric statistics, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, and motivations for using nonparametric techniques. In-depth coverage is given to distribution-free procedures, goodness-of-fit tests, resampling methods, and theory underlying nonparametric methods. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Students taking this course as PSYC 879 will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: PSYC 650 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 685. Human Factors Psychology. 3 Hours S.

Research techniques and methods useful in quantifying parameters of human performance that affect system functioning. Special emphasis is placed on modeling visual, auditory, and orienting systems and on human information processing. Prerequisite: PSYC 210 or PSYC 211 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 687. Factor Analysis. 4 Hours S.

This course covers the theory behind, and application of, exploratory factor analysis. Topics include a review of multiple linear regression and matrix algebra. In-depth coverage is devoted to diagrams, model specification, goodness of fit, model selection, parameter estimation, rotation methods, scale development, and sample size and power issues. Extensions to confirmatory settings are elaborated. Both the theory underlying factor analytic techniques and hands-on application using software are emphasized. Applications across the social and behavioral sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Students taking this course as PSYC 887 will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: PSYC 650 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 689. Conceptual Issues in Human Sexuality. 3 Hours S.

An examination of the social construction of sexuality and research methods and issues relevant to sexuality. These concepts are applied to various topics, such as defining and conceptualizing sex and gender, sexual dysfunction, sexual orientation, the social control of sexuality, sexual coercion and abuse, and abstinence-only sex education. The course does not cover anatomical or physiological aspects of sexuality. (Same as WGSS 689.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or WGSS 201. LEC.

PSYC 690. Seminar: _____. 1-5 Hours U.

Discussion of current problems in psychological theory and research. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and sophomore status. LEC.

PSYC 691. The Psychology of Aging. 3 Hours S.

Social, psychological, and economic adjustments required by aging; changes in cognition, role and personality necessitated by advancing age. Prerequisite: PSYC 210 or PSYC 211 and one of the following: PSYC 318, PSYC 319, PSYC 350, PSYC 351, PSYC 360, PSYC 361, PSYC 370, PSYC 371, PSYC 380, or PSYC 381; or graduate standing; or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 692. Test Theory. 4 Hours S.

This course begins with recommendations for how to write a test, covers basics of classical test theory, and then emphasizes modern statistical methods for analyzing item data. Methods include factor analysis of categorical responses, methods for identifying measurement invariance (differential item functioning), and item response theory. Approximately one-half of the meetings are labs (primarily consisting of data analysis). The course is offered at the 600 and 800 levels with additional assignments at the 800 level. Prerequisite: PSYC 790/650 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. LEC.

PSYC 693. Multivariate Analysis. 4 Hours S.

Introduction to the central methods used in the analysis of multivariate data. Includes linear transformations, multivariate analysis of variance, multivariate multiple regression, discriminant analysis, canonical correlation, factor analysis, and an introduction to methods for clustering and classification. Applications across the behavior and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Students taking this course as PSYC 893 will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: PSYC 650 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 694. Multilevel Modeling I. 4 Hours S.

Introduction to statistical methods for modeling multilevel (hierarchically structured) data. Topics include a review of ordinary least squares regression analysis, random effects ANOVA, intraclass correlation, multilevel regression, testing and probing interactions, maximum likelihood estimation, model assumptions, model evaluation, and the analysis of longitudinal data. Emphasis will be on the theory underlying multilevel modeling techniques and hands-on application using software. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Students taking this course as PSYC 894 will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: PSYC 650 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 695. Categorical Data Analysis. 4 Hours S.

Introduction to multivariate analyses of count data, including error models, statistical inference, loglinear models, logit models, logistic regression, homogeneity, symmetry, and selected other topics. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Students taking this course as PSYC 895 will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: PSYC 650 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 696. Structural Equation Modeling I. 4 Hours S.

Introduction to statistical methods for modeling latent variables. Topics include a review of latent variables, covariance structures analysis, mean structures analysis, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), structural equation modeling (SEM), multiple group CFA, longitudinal CFA, longitudinal SEM, and hierarchical CFA. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Students taking this course as PSYC 896 will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: PSYC 650 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 697. Longitudinal Data Analysis. 3 Hours S.

Reviews and contrasts various statistical models for the analysis of change. Course focuses on techniques to analyze longitudinal (repeated measures) data beyond the repeated-measures ANOVA framework. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Students taking this course as PSYC 991 will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: PSYC 696 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 704. Research Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course provides students in the Clinical Child Psychology Program with the opportunity to enhance and consolidate their research activities by fulfilling one of the elective cluster course requirements. This practicum involves a contract with a research advisor and the program director. The contract includes definable products and dates for completion to prepare research for submission for publication, develop a grant proposal, or conduct additional research project independent of other requirements in the program. The course is not to be taken as an overload, but is to be part of a full-time course schedule. May be repeated. (Same as ABSC 704, formerly HDFL 704.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. LEC.

PSYC 706. Special Topics in Clinical Child Psychology: _____. 3 Hours.

A course offering detailed discussion of the literature and research methods of a special topic within clinical child and pediatric psychology. Topic and instructor may change by semester and will be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated. (Same as ABSC 706, formerly HDFL 706.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. LEC.

PSYC 710. Feminist Issues in Psychology. 3 Hours.

Detailed examination and discussion of psychological theory and research from a feminist perspective. Specific topics will vary. The goal of the course is to facilitate students' ability to develop feminist critiques of existing research and theory as well as to generate nonsexist alternative approaches. Open to advanced undergraduates with consent of instructor. Prerequisite: Some familiarity with research methods in the social sciences. LEC.

PSYC 723. Advanced Cognitive Psychology. 3 Hours.

Advanced cognitive psychology reviewing theories of pattern recognition, attention, working memory, language comprehension and problem solving. Emphasis will be placed upon the application of these theories to real-life situations. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and six additional credit hours in psychology, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

PSYC 725. Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

A survey of the critical issues within cognitive and behavioral neuroscience. The course will provide information about neuronal physiology, functional neuroanatomy, and psychophysiological research methods. Human cognition and the neurophysiology that subserves the primary cognitive functions will be discussed. LEC.

PSYC 735. Psycholinguistics I. 3 Hours.

A detailed examination of issues in the processing of language. The course will provide a survey of research and theory in psycholinguistics, reflecting the influence of linguistic theory and experimental psychology. Spoken and written language comprehension and language production processing will be examined. (Same as LING 735.) LEC.

PSYC 737. Psycholinguistics II. 3 Hours.

An in-depth examination of selected topics in psycholinguistics. Topics may include spoken language processing, written language processing, neurolinguistics, prosody, and syntactic processing. (Same as LING 737.) Prerequisite: PSYC 735/LING 735 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 750. Advanced Seminar in Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation. 3 Hours.

Design and execution of research on the causes and consequences of variations in gender identity, sexual orientation or affectional preference, sex roles, and sex-linked behaviors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 757. Theories of Perception. 3 Hours.

A consideration of the facts and theories of human perception. The emphasis will be on vision, although hearing, smell, pain, and other senses will also be discussed. Of particular concern is the question of perceptual modifiability and the response of the human observer to unusual sensory environments. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

PSYC 774. Advanced Social Psychology I. 3 Hours.

First semester of a two-semester course. Designed to provide a thorough background in social psychology and to motivate a continuing exploration of theoretical problems and issues in the field. Combines examination of historical development of theories and methods in social psychology with analysis of theoretical and methodological approaches to a variety of contemporary topics. LEC.

PSYC 775. Advanced Social Psychology II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of PSYC 774. LEC.

PSYC 777. Social Psychology: Theory, Research, and Clinical Applications. 3 Hours.

Basic theories in social psychology, as well as their applications to the process of coping with life events. The focus is on the nature of each theory, including the history and more recent developments; however, where clinical applications have been made of a particular theory, these will be discussed. LEC.

PSYC 780. Research Lab. 1-5 Hours S.

Supervised research under the guidance of a faculty member in the Department of Psychology. Students will be part of a collaborative laboratory environment, and will be involved in research design, data collection, and data analysis, and will take part in regularly scheduled laboratory meetings. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 782. Research Methods in Child Language. 3 Hours.

A survey of methods for studying phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic change during language development. Methods include: diary interpretation, language sample analysis, probe elicitation tasks, and clinical assessment. (Same as LING 782.) LEC.

PSYC 784. Proseminar in Communication and Aging. 1 Hour.

A weekly forum for students and faculty to discuss professional issues and interdisciplinary research in communication and aging. May be repeated for credit. (Same as COMS 784.) (Same as SPLH 784.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 787. Gerontology Proseminar. 3 Hours.

A proseminar coordinated by the Gerontology Center. The proseminar explores essential areas of gerontology for researchers and practitioners, providing a multidisciplinary (psychology, biology, sociology, and communication) perspective on aging. The proseminar surveys contemporary basic and applied research, service programs, and policy and management issues in gerontology. (Same as ABSC 787, AMS 767, COMS 787, and SOC 767.) (Formerly HDFL 787.) LEC.

PSYC 789. Psychological Statistics: Foundations and Applications. 3 Hours.

A course emphasizing the practical application of inferential statistics to a variety of research designs and outcome variables. Topics will include both parametric and nonparametric statistical procedures, and various applications of both ANOVA and multiple regressions. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Department of Psychology or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 790. Statistical Methods in Psychology I. 4 Hours.

Elementary distribution theory; t-test; simple regression and correlation; multiple regression and multiple correlation; curvilinear regression; logistic regression; general linear model. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: A beginning course in statistics and graduate standing, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 791. Statistical Methods in Psychology II. 4 Hours.

Continuation of PSYC 790. One-way analysis of variance, linear trends, contrasts, post hoc tests; multi-way analysis of variance for crossed, blocked, nested, and incomplete designs; analysis of covariance; repeated measures analysis of variance; general linear model. Applications across the social, educational, and behavior sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 795. Computing and Psychology. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the use of personal computers to facilitate and standardize administration of research protocols and to automate data collection. Lectures and projects emphasize direct application to research in the behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Department of Psychology and consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 796. Computer Models of Brain and Behavior. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the techniques of computer modeling with applications in the study of brain-behavior mechanisms. Early and contemporary efforts to simulate the neuron, neural networks, and neural processes which regulate behavior, are reviewed. Application of modeling techniques in sample brain-behavior problem areas are used to illustrate the operation of thresholds, feedback, dynamic equilibrium, redundancy, plasticity, network structure, and similar constructs. Programming skill in a high-level language available on personal computers or mainframe is required. Prerequisite: EECS 128 or EECS 138 or PSYC 795, and PSYC 370, or equivalent courses or experience. LEC.

PSYC 798. Introduction to Mathematical Methods in Psychology. 3 Hours.

A first course in scaling and modeling psychological processes. Substantive areas treated selected from sensation, perception, learning, memory, preference, choice and decision processes, problem solving, games, social interaction, and individual differences. May be repeated with permission. Prerequisite: Previous course work beyond the introductory level in psychology or a closely related area, a course in statistics, and a course in calculus. LEC.

PSYC 799. Proseminar in Child Language. 2 Hours.

A review and discussion of current issues in children's language acquisition. May be repeated for credit. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Same as ABSC 797, CLP 799, LING 799, and SPLH 799.) (Formerly HDFL 797.) LEC.

PSYC 800. Experimental Psychology: _____. 3 Hours.

An advanced survey of theory and research in a selected area of experimental psychology. Continual enrollment for four semesters is required of entering graduate students in experimental psychology. Open to other students with graduate standing in psychology or a closely related field. May be repeated with permission. LEC.

PSYC 802. Social-Psychological Aspects of Health,Disability, and Associated Life Stress. 3 Hours.

Disabling myths; perception of causes and effects of disease and disability; attitudes and interpersonal relations; hoping, coping, and reality issues; values; professional-client relations; public media and societal rehabilitation. A departmental core course for graduate students. LEC.

PSYC 803. Fundamentals of Psychological Assessment and Intervention with Children. 3 Hours.

Lecture and supervised experience covering the theoretical and empirical literature on assessment and intervention methods for children, adolescents, and families. Students will learn and demonstrate evidence-based clinical interviewing skills, behavioral observation techniques, risk assessment techniques, therapeutic communication approaches, strategies for providing assessment feedback to families, and ethical principles related to the provision of assessment and psychotherapy (including client file and resource management.) The course requires interaction with clinical populations and communication with referral sources. (Same as ABSC 803.) Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical child psychology program. LEC.

PSYC 805. History of Psychology. 3 Hours.

A historical survey of basic concepts and theories in psychology with emphasis on their relationship to contemporary problems in theory. LEC.

PSYC 809. Professional Issues: Clinical Child Psychology. 1 Hour.

Consideration of special problems confronting the child and family oriented scientist-practitioner, and in the development of a professional identity. Topics include critical issues including ethical, legal, cultural, empirical, and clinical aspects of research and practice. May be repeated. (Same as ABSC 809, formerly HDFL 809.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology. LEC.

PSYC 810. History and Ethics in Psychology. 3 Hours.

A historical survey of basic concepts and theories in psychology with emphasis on their relationship to contemporary issues. Examination of historical and contemporary code of ethics and its application to the conduct of clinical psychologists. SEM.

PSYC 811. Achievement and Intellectual Assessment in Clinical Child Psychology. 3 Hours.

Course covers the basic theory, research, administration, and reporting of psychological assessment of development, intelligence, and achievement for children, adolescents, and adults within cultural and developmental contexts. The range of psychological instruments examined includes, for example, WIAT, K-ABC, W-J, S-B, WISC, WAIS, and WPPSI. (Same as ABSC 811.) Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical child psychology. LEC.

PSYC 812. Behavioral and Personality Assessment of Children. 3 Hours.

Lecture, laboratory, field work, and supervision appointment. Theory and applications in the psychological evaluation of children with standardized assessment techniques. The administration, scoring, interpretation, and reporting of behavioral and personality functioning in children. (Same as ABSC 812, formerly HDFL 812.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology. LEC.

PSYC 814. Advanced Child and Family Assessment. 3 Hours.

Lecture, laboratory, field work, and supervision appointment. Supervised experience in specialized psychological assessment approaches for children and families. Emphasis on interviewing, observation, psychometric scales, and consultation. Rationale, administration, analysis, and reporting of mental health functioning of children and families. Experience with clinical populations, and communication with referral sources. (Same as ABSC 814, formerly HDFL 814.) Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical child psychology. LEC.

PSYC 815. Design and Analysis for Developmental Research. 3 Hours.

Coverage of the philosophy and basic principles of group-design research, with a special emphasis on designs that are appropriate for developmental studies. Designs for both experimental and quasi-experimental research are covered, and appropriate statistical procedures are presented concomitantly with the designs. Individual-difference analyses and statistical control issues are also addressed. LEC.

PSYC 816. Design and Analysis for Neuroimaging Research. 3 Hours.

Course covers research design and analysis issues for event-related potential (ERP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Repeated measures, statistical parametric mapping, principal components analysis, and independent components analysis techniques are covered. Both practical and theoretical aspects of these statistical techniques will be explored in Matlab environment. Matrix algebra recommended but not required. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 and 791 or equivalent are required. LEC.

PSYC 818. Experimental Research Methods in Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Systematic discussion of the techniques of research in social psychology, with practice in the utilization of selected methods. Prerequisite: One course in social psychology in addition to introductory social psychology. LEC.

PSYC 819. Field and Evaluation Research Methods in Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Basic principles and practices of field methods in basic and applied research in social psychology and related fields; relationships between field and laboratory studies; special emphasis on survey and evaluation research methods and study designs; client and respondent relationships; research and public policy. LEC.

PSYC 820. Advanced Child Development. 3 Hours.

A survey of the basic empirical research in the field of child development, covering intelligence, cognition, perception, attention, personality, social behavior, and socialization processes. These literatures are integrated and their implications for social application are addressed. (Same as ABSC 820, formerly HDFL 820.) Prerequisite: A course in child development or equivalent. LEC.

PSYC 821. Women and Violence. 3 Hours.

An examination of research on women and violence, including rape, domestic violence, sexual harassment, stalking, and child sexual abuse. Research on the nature, prevalence, causes, and consequences of violence against women is discussed. (Same as WGSS 821.) Prerequisite: Six hours in WGSS and/or PSYC, or permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 825. Social Development. 3 Hours.

A lecture and discussion course in social development. It includes such topics as theoretical approaches to the study of social development, as well as the literature on family processes, peer relations, aggression and prosocial behavior, child abuse and neglect, family violence, child care, and the media. (Formerly PSYC 880.) (Same as ABSC 825.) Prerequisite: A course in child psychology or development. LEC.

PSYC 831. Advanced Human Learning and Memory. 3 Hours.

An in-depth analysis of current research and theory. Focus will be on experimental methodology in these areas. LEC.

PSYC 832. Clinical Health Psychology: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. 3 Hours.

An overview of the field of health psychology as applied to health promotion and disease prevention. Content areas include history and current research regarding behavioral and psychosocial risk factors for disease, as well as empirically supported assessment and therapeutic techniques for risk factor reduction and health promotion. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or health-related fields, or permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 833. Clinical Health Psychology: Acute and Chronic Illness. 3 Hours.

An overview of the field of health psychology as applied to acute and chronic illness in adult, adolescent, and child populations. Content areas include psychological aspects of acute and chronic illness, including relevant empirically supported assessment and intervention strategies, adherence to medical regimens, pain, and enhancement of the psychologist's role in medical settings. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or health-related fields, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 834. Clinical Health Psychology: Physical Aspects of Health and Disease. 3 Hours.

An overview of physical manifestations of health and disease. Content areas include overview of anatomy and physiology of each body system, description of how deviations form normal anatomical development and physiological function result in common disorders, methods for distinguishing psychological from organic etiologies, indications of side effects of medications for common disorders, and description of roles of key members of health care team members. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or health-related fields, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 835. Clinical Practicum IV: Health. 3 Hours.

Supervised assessment and treatment of individuals and families within a medical setting, as well as multidisciplinary consultation. Inpatient and outpatient clinical health psychology rotations may include pediatrics, oncology, pain, rehabilitation, and other health psychology related fields. Emphasis in selection of and training in psychological intervention strategies is on the use of empirically supported treatments where possible. Grading on Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 970 and graduate student in clinical health psychology specialty. FLD.

PSYC 836. Clinical Practicum V: Health. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PSYC 835. Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical health psychology specialty. FLD.

PSYC 838. Pain and Its Management. 3 Hours.

Focuses on biological, cognitive/affective, and social causes and effects of pain. Emphasis on basic research methods in pain, origins of pain, and how the experience of pain alters many aspects of the individual's life. Topics include anatomy and physiology of pain, impact of pain on a variety of aspects of individuals' lives, treatments for pain, and the role of various health care professionals in treating pain. Discussions also will include basic research methods in pain, tools for assessing pain, barriers to adequate pain management, and ethical/legal/public policy issues in working with pain patients. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or health-related fields, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 839. Palliative Care in Health Psychology. 3 Hours.

Based on the biopsychosocial model, this course focuses on the current practice of palliative care in community and hospital settings by health care professionals. Classes will be discussion based, centered on current issues and controversies in care of the chronically ill and dying. Recent research will be highlighted, as will cultural perspectives on death. Students will be expected to identify applicable literature for presentation and class discussion, along with assigned readings. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or health-related fields, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 840. Psychology of Women's Health. 3 Hours.

A seminar devoted to examination of psychosocial and behavioral factors in women's health. Content areas include women and the health care system, social roles and health, gender differences, and similarities in morbidity and mortality, gynecologic health, chronic diseases, and health-related behaviors. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or health-related field, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 841. Stress and Coping. 3 Hours.

Theories and research on conceptualization, assessment, and effects of stress. Focus on coping processes and other determinants of adjustment to stressful conditions. Discussion of psychological interventions for managing stress and trauma. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or related fields. LEC.

PSYC 842. Specialized Health Psychology Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Specialized advanced practicum in clinical health psychology, with an area of emphasis mutually defined by student and instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. FLD.

PSYC 843. Behavioral Pharmacology. 3 Hours.

Addresses psychological and behavioral effects of drugs, including psychotropic medications. A central theme is that effects of drugs frequently cannot be characterized solely from a pharmacological perspective. Thus, emphasis will be placed on examining the interaction of pharmacological and behavioral variables. For example, how do psychological factors moderate responses to drugs? The nature of this area assumes some knowledge of general psychology, research methods, biology, chemistry, neurophysiology, and the nervous system. Specific course structure will be modified to suit student interests. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or health-related fields, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 844. Mental Health and Aging. 3 Hours.

Reviews recent research and application in the field of mental health and aging. Theoretical perspectives appropriate for understanding mental health issues with increased age are discussed. The epidemiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment methods associated with a variety of mental health conditions are surveyed. The community mental health resources available for older adults are discussed as well as practically-related issues such as evaluations of functional independence and competency among older adults. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or related health field, or permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 845. Impression Formation and Interpersonal Behavior. 3 Hours.

Intensive investigations of the processes involved in impression formation and of the effects of established impressions upon interpersonal communications. (Same as COMS 835.) Prerequisite: PSYC 670 or COMS 535. LEC.

PSYC 846. Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology I. 1-3 Hours.

Introductory practicum experience for the Clinical Child Psychology Program. Orientation to psychological evaluation and treatment of children, adolescents, and their families and initial development of professional self-assessment skills. Students acquire specific clinical competencies through shadowing cases, assisting with interpretation of test of intelligence and academic achievement, conducting behavioral observations in field settings, and performing co-therapy of cases presenting to the KU Child and Family Services Clinic. May be taken in more than one semester. (Same as ABSC 846.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD.

PSYC 847. Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology II. 1-3 Hours.

Intermediate practicum experience for the Clinical Child Psychology Program. Development of specific competencies in assessment and intervention with children, adolescents, and their families through didactics, field experience, and supervision. Students acquire specific clinical competencies through supervised provision of assessment and interventions for cases presenting to the KU Child and Family Services Clinic. Students develop ability to identify specific treatment goals and select therapeutic interventions that are conceptually congruent with clients' presenting problems and are based on sound empirical evidence. Students also develop the ability to integrate and synthesize test results, interview material, and behavioral observations into coherent case conceptualizations. May be taken in more than one semester. (Same as ABSC 847.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD.

PSYC 848. Clinical Practicum VI: Health. 3 Hours.

Intensive clinical psychology practice, including group and individual supervision that may be taken either through Clinical Psychology or an approved site outside of the university. Focus is on the acquisition and demonstration of advanced therapy skills with a focus on acquiring core Health Psychology competencies. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 835 and PSYC 836 and graduate student in clinical health psychology specialty. FLD.

PSYC 850. Assessment I: Foundations of Psychological Assessment. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the history, methods and theory underlying psychological assessment techniques and methods. Students learn to administer, score, and interpret mental status exams and intelligence tests for children, adolescents and adults. Structured diagnostic assessments are introduced and practiced. Psychological report writing is introduced and practiced. The psychometric theory underlying the construction and validation of personality assessment instruments is reviewed. Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical psychology or consent of instructor. FLD.

PSYC 853. Advanced Acoustical and Psychological Aspects of Musical Behavior. 3 Hours.

Study and experimental investigation of acoustic, psychoacoustic, and psychological phenomena as they influence music. Attention will be given to physical parameters; perception of pitch, loudness, and timbre; magnitude estimation; theories of consonance; experimental aesthetics; and measurement and prediction of musical ability. Each student will be expected to complete an experiment or quasi-experiment related to human musical behavior. (Same as MEMT 953.) Prerequisite: PSYC 453 or equivalent; or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 855. Assessment II: Integrative Psychological Assessment. 3 Hours.

Lecture, laboratory and field work. Students learn to administer, score and interpret various personality assessment instruments. Students apply skills acquired in previous coursework to write integrated psychological assessment reports based on anamnesis, structured interview data, intelligence tests, and both objective and projective personality assessment instruments. Prerequisite: PSYC 850 or consent of instructor. FLD.

PSYC 860. Affective Science. 3 Hours.

An in-depth analysis of current research and theory in affective bases of psychological science. Emphasis will be placed on basic research on emotion, culture, and psychopathology using a broad range of experimental, psychophysiological, and neural methods to test theories about affective psychological mechanisms underlying human behavior. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or health-related fields. LEC.

PSYC 863. Clinical Neuropsychology Across the Lifespan. 3 Hours.

Reviews neural development and the brain-behavior relationships in intact, injured, and diseased brain systems. Details basic issues in clinical assessment and reporting of cognitive impairment resulting from developmental disorders, stroke, traumatic brain injury, and brain-disease. Selected topics include perception, speech, memory/dementia, judgment, and attention. Prerequisite: Graduate status and PSYC 961 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 864. Clinical Neuropsychology. 3 Hours.

Brain-behavior relationships in humans; structure and function of the brain; evaluation of function; the interpretation of neuropsychological data. Lecture and laboratory. LEC.

PSYC 865. Advanced Psychological Assessment: Interview Based Techniques. 3 Hours.

Lecture and fieldwork. Advanced clinical interviewing. Structured diagnostic interviewing. Coverage of specialized areas of clinical interviewing (e.g., motivational interviewing). Report writing focused on documentation of clinical and structured interviewing. Prerequisite: PSYC 855 or consent of instructor. FLD.

PSYC 870. Cognitive Development. 3 Hours.

A lecture/discussion course in cognitive development. The course will contrast the theory and research of Jean Piaget and his followers, with an information processing or cognitive psychology approach to issues. Topics include development of perception, attention and information getting; memory and metamemory; problem solving; discrimination learning and concept formation; and individual differences in cognitive styles and strategies. Prerequisite: A course in child psychology or development, a course in cognitive psychology, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 872. Attention, Perception, and Learning in Infancy. 3 Hours.

Coverage of the basic literatures on perceptual-cognitive behavior during the first three years of life, as assessed by measures of attention, perception, learning, and memory. Course material is approached from an information-processing framework. LEC.

PSYC 875. Advanced Assessment: Integration of Assessment Techniques. 3 Hours.

Lecture and fieldwork on selection, administration, scoring and interpretation and integration of data from personality and abilities tests. Focus on assessments includes history, theory and application in psychological assessment batteries. Emphasis on advanced training in objective personality assessment, projective personality assessment, psychometric theory and integrated report writing. Prerequisite: PSYC 855 or consent of instructor. FLD.

PSYC 879. Applied Nonparametric Statistical Methods. 4 Hours.

This course covers nonparametric statistical methods for testing hypotheses when the assumptions of ordinary parametric statistics are not met. Topics include a review of parametric statistics, sampling distributions, the logic of hypothesis testing, and motivations for using nonparametric techniques. In-depth coverage will be given to distribution-free procedures, sign tests, contingency tables, median tests, chi-square and other goodness-of-fit tests, rank correlations, randomness tests, Monte Carlo methods, resampling methods, tests of independence, 1-sample, 2-sample, and k-sample methods, permutation tests, and function smoothing and splines. There will be an emphasis on the theory underlying nonparametric methods. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 and 791 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 881. Proseminar in Quantitative Behavioral and Social Sciences. 1 Hour.

This course is an open forum discussion of issues, topics, and presentations in quantitative behavioral and social sciences. The course can be repeated for credit and is open to any graduate student in any discipline across the behavioral and social sciences. SEM.

PSYC 882. Theory and Method for Research of Human Environments. 3 Hours.

Conceptual and technical methods for analysis of behavioral environments; theory and research utilization of behavior settings and other ecobehavioral units. Prerequisite: Nine hours of social science including at least one course dealing with research methods and consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 885. Altruism and Helping Behavior. 3 Hours.

Review of contemporary research of prosocial behavior. Topics to be covered include the existence of altruism, why people do and do not help others, and the effect of institutional roles on the behavior of service professionals such as therapists, counselors, and social workers. LEC.

PSYC 886. Item Response Theory. 4 Hours.

This course covers the basic concepts and methods of item response models. Focal topics include the theory underlying IRT models and their general properties. Also covered are methods for checking model assumptions and interpreting IRT estimates. The course uses examples from the social and behavioral sciences to demonstrate how IRT methods can be used to inform and refine survey development, to assess measurement equivalence, link survey scores, and build item banks for short forms or computer-adaptive testing (CAT). Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 and 791 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 887. Factor Analysis. 4 Hours.

This course covers the theory behind, and application of, exploratory factor analysis. Topics include a review of multiple linear regression and matrix algebra. In-depth coverage is devoted to diagrams, model specification, goodness of fit, model selection, parameter estimation, rotation methods, scale development, and sample size and power issues. Extensions to confirmatory settings are elaborated. Both the theory underlying factor analytic techniques and hands-on application using software are emphasized. Applications across the social and behavioral sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 888. Diversity Issues in Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours.

Review of individual differences pertaining to culture, ethnicity, race, gender, sexual orientation, age, etc., as these have an impact upon theory, research, assessment, and treatment issues in clinical psychology. (Same as ABSC 888.) Prerequisite: Graduate status in clinical psychology, or instructor permission. LEC.

PSYC 889. Conceptual Issues in Human Sexuality. 3 Hours.

An examination of the social construction of sexuality and research methods and issues relevant to sexuality. These concepts are applied to various topics, such as defining and conceptualizing sex and gender, sexual dysfunction, sexual orientation, the social control of sexuality, sexual coercion and abuse, and abstinence-only sex education. The course does not cover anatomical or physiological aspects of sexuality. (Same as WGSS 889.) Prerequisite: Six hours in WGSS and/or PSYC, or permission of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 890. Foundations of the Mind. 3 Hours.

Advances in cognitive psychology have illuminated the way in which we understand mind and mental processes and have the power to affect how we conduct our lives as moral beings (e.g., Are human beings alone in the animal kingdom in possessing minds?). In this graduate course, we will cover key historical and social events that shaped the field; when and how cognitive psychology became a science; and future directions of studying the mind, especially in light of cognitive neuroscience. Students will analyze and critically evaluate cognitive psychological theory, empirical research, and practice in a historical context, as well as develop ideas, critiques, and conclusions of their own on the accomplishments and prospects of the science of cognitive psychology. Readings and discussion include an analysis of significant theoretical, historical, and empirical work of topics in cognitive psychology, as well as the cognitive and brain sciences more generally. LEC.

PSYC 891. Intelligence and Cognition. 3 Hours.

This course concerns the nature of intelligence. Theory and research on cognitive abilities, reasoning, and complex problem solving are surveyed. Special emphasis is given to contemporary cognitive ability research that applies both experimental and correlation methods to understand the nature of intelligence. LEC.

PSYC 892. Test Theory. 4 Hours.

This course begins with recommendations for how to write a test (with or without correct answers, for assessing a wide variety of constructs of interest in social and behavioral sciences), covers basics of classical test theory, and then emphasizes modern statistical methods for analyzing item data. Methods include factor analysis of categorical responses, methods for identifying measurement invariance (differential item functioning), and item response theory. Lectures and Laboratory. This course is offered at the 600 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. Prerequisite: PSYC 790/650 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 893. Multivariate Analysis. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the central methods used in the analysis of multivariate data. Includes linear transformations, multivariate analysis of variance, multivariate multiple regression, discriminant analysis, canonical correlation, factor analysis, and an introduction to methods for clustering and classification. Applications across the behavior and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 894. Multilevel Modeling. 4 Hours.

Statistical methods for modeling multilevel (hierarchically structured) data. Topics include a review of ordinary least squares regression analysis, random effects ANOVA, intraclass correlation, multilevel regression, testing and probing interactions, maximum likelihood estimation, model assumptions, model evaluation, and the analysis of longitudinal data. There will be a heavy emphasis on the theory underlying multilevel modeling techniques and hands-on application using software. Applications across the social, educational, and behavior sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 895. Categorical Data Analysis. 4 Hours.

Multivariate analyses of count data. Error models, statistical inference, loglinear models, logit models, logistic regression. Homogeneity, symmetry, and selected other topics. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 896. Structural Equation Modeling I. 4 Hours.

Introduction to statistical methods for modeling latent variables. Topics include a review latent variables, covariance structures analysis, mean structures analysis, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), structural equation modeling (SEM), multiple group CFA, longitudinal CFA, longitudinal SEM, Hierarchical CFA, and Multi-trait Multi-Method SEM. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 897. Master's Thesis in Clinical Child Psychology. 1-10 Hours.

Supervised research experience completing thesis leading to master's degree. (Same as ABSC 897.) RSH.

PSYC 898. Proseminar: Professional Issues in Clinical and Health Psychology. 1 Hour.

Discussion of current theoretical, empirical, and applied issues in clinical and clinical health psychology involving students, faculty, guest speakers. Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical psychology. RSH.

PSYC 899. Thesis. 1-10 Hours.

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.

PSYC 902. Proseminar in Experimental Psychology. 1 Hour.

Seminar in experimental psychology to be conducted in rotation by the experimental psychologists on the staff and a monthly visiting experimental psychologist. LEC.

PSYC 903. Proseminar in Social Psychology. 1 Hour.

A series of research talks on topics relevant to social and personality psychology featuring different weekly speakers from inside and outside the university. SEM.

PSYC 905. Psychopathology in Children. 3 Hours.

Diagnosis and treatment of psychological problems in childhood and adolescence. (Same as ABSC 905.) Preference given to graduate students in child clinical psychology, school psychology, and counseling psychology. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of graduate credit in psychology or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 921. Seminar in Early Development. 3 Hours.

A seminar devoted to factors affecting early human development with some attention to theoretical formulations and the relevant animal literature. LEC.

PSYC 923. History and Systems of Developmental Psychology: Developmental Theory. 3 Hours.

An intensive study of traditional and recent developmental theories with an emphasis upon the role of heredity, early stimulation, reinforcement, and modification as each affects the course of the development of children. LEC.

PSYC 927. Seminar in Psychobiology. 3 Hours.

A detailed study of a specific research area dealing with the biological foundations of behavior. Each week articles will be assigned from the journal literature. LEC.

PSYC 930. Research Seminar on Intimate Relationships. 3 Hours.

Consideration of current psychological theory and research on adult intimate relationships: friendship, dating, committed relationships, dissolution of committed relationships. Students will be expected to be involved in on-going empirical research in the area. Prerequisite: Graduate level courses in research design and statistics. LEC.

PSYC 933. Seminar: The Measurement of Attitudes. 3 Hours.

An examination of the concept of attitude and the methods developed to assess the various aspects of attitudes. Prerequisite: PSYC 578 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 935. Seminar in Group Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Intensive examination of selected problems in the functioning of small groups. May be taken for two semesters. LEC.

PSYC 936. Group Therapeutic Techniques. 3 Hours.

LEC.

PSYC 943. Advanced Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology III. 1-3 Hours.

Advanced practicum experience for the Clinical Child Psychology Program. Development of advanced competencies in assessment and intervention with children, adolescents, and their families through didactics, field experience, and supervision. Students acquire advanced clinical competencies through supervised provision of assessment and interventions for cases presenting to the KU Child and Family Services Clinic and/or approved external practicum sites, leadership of didactic components of practicum (i.e., formal case presentation), and modeling of clinical competencies for junior students. Students will demonstrate the ability to implement empirically derived therapeutic interventions in consideration of individual differences, cultural values, and individual preferences. Students in external practicum sites will demonstrate an understanding of evidence-based models of consultation and provision of consultation to care providers in professional contexts. May be taken in more than one semester. (Same as ABSC 943.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD.

PSYC 944. Advanced Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology IV. 1-3 Hours.

Advanced practicum experience for the Clinical Child Psychology Program. Demonstration of advanced competencies in assessment, intervention, and consultation with children, adolescents, and their families through didactics, field experience, and supervision in the semester(s) prior to required clinical internship. Students demonstrate advanced clinical competencies through supervised provision of assessment and interventions for cases presenting to the KU Child and Family Services Clinic and/or approved external practicum sites, leadership of didactic components of practicum (i.e., integrated case presentation), and modeling of clinical competencies for junior students. Course requirements include the development of portfolios for demonstration of clinical competencies and application to clinical internships. May be taken in more than one semester. (Same as ABSC 944.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD.

PSYC 946. Theories and Methods of Psychotherapy. 3 Hours.

Comparative examination and analysis of major theories and approaches to psychotherapeutic interventions, core principles of therapeutic change, scientific approaches to establishing treatment efficacy, current intervention issues. Prerequisite: Nine hours in graduate clinical psychology or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 947. Advanced Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology V. 1-5 Hours.

Specialized practicum experience for the Clinical Child Psychology Program. Demonstration of advanced competencies related to supervision and consultation in clinical psychology. With faculty supervision, students will develop and demonstrate the ability to provide effective supervision to less advanced students in the program in selected cases appropriate to the service setting. Further development of advanced clinical competencies through supervised provision of assessment and interventions for cases presenting to the KU Child and Family Services Clinic and/or approved external practicum sites, leadership of didactic components of practicum, and modeling of clinical competencies for junior students. May be taken in more than one semester. (Same as ABSC 947.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD.

PSYC 949. Evidence Based Practice in Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of theoretical and applied issues germane to evidence-based treatment in clinical psychology. The course will include an in-depth examination of several psychotherapy protocols which have been identified as empirically supported, with considerable attention accorded to implementation of techniques within the context of evidence-based practice. LEC.

PSYC 950. Clinical Supervision and Consultation: Theory & Research. 1 Hour.

Lecture, readings, and discussion of theory and research related to the practices of clinical supervision and consultation. Developmental and competency based approaches to supervision with exposure to other approaches. Professional issues, ethics, and multicultural aspects of supervision and consultation. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 969 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 951. Clinical Supervision Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Fieldwork in supervision under direction of instructor. Practice in supervision of clinical work, assessment, psychotherapy, and documentation. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 950 and PSYC 969, or consent of instructor. FLD.

PSYC 955. Close Relationships and Adult Attachment: Theory, Research, and Current Controversies. 3 Hours.

Review of attachment theory literature and the research it has generated in clinical developmental, personality, and social psychology. The course will allow discussion of a wide range of issues including the evolution of behavioral systems that underlie close human relationships, the developmental roots of relational styles and affect-regulation processes, the role of mental representations in interpersonal behavior, and some of the attachment and close relationship processes involved in good and poor mental health. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 956. Social Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

Acquaint students with the Social Neuroscience approach as well as recent findings using this approach. The course will focus on particular social phenomena and (a) evaluate the utility of current social neuroscience research examining these phenomena and (b) consider future experimental designs using the Social Neuroscience approach to further inform our understanding of each phenomenon. After being acquainted with foundational concepts, students will analyze findings in a number of core content domains (including emotions, emotion regulation, self, stereotyping, attitudes and beliefs, social decision making, cooperation, close relationships), focusing on neuroscience's contribution beyond traditional methods. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 960. Advanced Psychopathology. 3 Hours.

Review of current nosology of adult psychopathological syndromes emphasizing development of diagnostic skills. Critical survey of recent research and theory related to the etiology, course, prognosis, and treatment of adult psychopathological conditions. Prerequisite: Graduate student status in clinical psychology, clinical child psychology, or counseling psychology. LEC.

PSYC 961. Biological Foundations of Psychopathology. 3 Hours.

A review of fundamental topics in the neurosciences and their relevance to selected psychopathological disorders. The fundamental topics are taken from genetics, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neurochemistry. The disorders include schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical psychology or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 962. Advanced Personality. 3 Hours.

A survey of selected advanced topics in the area of personality. Includes review of theoretical and research issues in the area of personality. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 963. Clinical Child Psychology Internship. 1 Hour.

Three consecutive enrollments, covering a minimum of eleven months of experience in an approved clinical psychology field setting; supervision by qualified clinical child psychology faculty and field staff clinicians. Required of all clinical child psychology program students. An intensive guided experience in application of clinical child psychology theory, methods, and practices. Integrates scientific and clinical aspects of field. (Same as ABSC 963, formerly HDFL 963.) Prerequisite: Completion of Ph.D. comprehensive examinations and permission of clinical child psychology faculty. INT.

PSYC 964. Clinical Practicum I. 3 Hours.

Lecture, laboratory and field work, and supervision appointment. Psychological evaluation and treatment of individuals, couples, families, and groups; supervised, progressive experience in psychological treatment and in the clinical evaluation of intellectual, personality, and social functioning. Emphasis in selection of and training in psychological intervention strategies is on the use of empirically supported treatments where possible. Grading on Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical psychology program. FLD.

PSYC 965. Clinical Practicum II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of PSYC 964. Grading on Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 964 or permission of instructor. FLD.

PSYC 966. Clinical Practicum III. 3 Hours.

A continuation of PSYC 964. Grading on Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 964 or permission of instructor. FLD.

PSYC 967. Psychotherapy with Families. 3 Hours.

Clinical approaches to marriage and family therapy. Intensive consideration of the theoretical positions, research findings, clinical methods, and technical problems in marriage and family therapy. Prerequisite: PSYC 946. LEC.

PSYC 968. Research Methods in Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours.

Systematic consideration of research methods in clinical psychology including identification of a research problem, selection of the research design and assessment strategies, and methods of evaluating the results. The principles, pitfalls, artifacts, biases, and sources of controversy in research in this area are also covered. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical or counseling psychology. LEC.

PSYC 969. Clinical Practicum IV. 3 Hours.

Lecture, laboratory, field work, and supervision appointment. Advanced psychological treatment of the individual, couple, family, and group client; supervised, progressive experience in the clinical application of psychotherapeutic treatment methods with emphasis on the use of empirically supported interventions where possible. Grading on Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 966 or consent of instructor. FLD.

PSYC 970. Clinical Practicum V. 3 Hours.

A continuation of PSYC 969. Grading on Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 969 or consent of instructor. FLD.

PSYC 974. Clinical Psychology Internship. 1-3 Hours.

Three consecutive enrollments, covering a minimum of eleven months of experience in an approved clinical psychology field setting; supervision by clinical psychology faculty and field staff clinical psychologists. Required of all clinical psychology program students. An intensive guided experience in the application of clinical psychology theory, methods, and practices. An emphasis upon the relationships between scientific and clinical functions. Integrations between research and clinical practice. Prerequisite: Completion of Ph.D. comprehensive examinations and consent of clinical psychology faculty. INT.

PSYC 975. Professional and Ethical Problems in Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours.

Interprofessional relationships, case security, legal aspects, ethical code of practice, clinic administration, and problems in the clinical practice of psychology. Issues involving ethics in research will also be explored. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 976. Therapeutic Interventions with Children. 3 Hours.

Clinical approaches to the therapeutic treatment of children with special emphasis on research findings and laboratory (practicum) experience. A survey of relationship therapies, operant strategies, system approaches, parent education and play therapy by the right therapist for a specific child with a particular problem. (Same as ABSC 976.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC.

PSYC 977. Specialized Clinical Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Lecture; laboratory and field work, and supervision appointment. Specialized psychological services for the evaluation and/or treatment of the individual client or the group or the institution. Investigation of and experience in a special practicum area not covered in regular courses. Prerequisite: Students must consult with members of the clinical faculty and propose an acceptable project in advance of enrollment. FLD.

PSYC 980. Special Problems in Psychology. 1-5 Hours.

Investigation of a special research problem or directed reading in an area not covered in regular courses. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH.

PSYC 981. Teaching Psychology. 1 Hour.

Discussion of the problems and techniques of teaching psychology at the undergraduate level. A minimum of one credit of this course must be taken by all assistant instructors during the two semesters of the first year of their appointment in the department. Only three hours may count toward the Ph.D. degree. LEC.

PSYC 982. Issues in Scientific Conduct. 3 Hours.

Lectures and discussion on issues in the conduct of a scientific career, with emphasis on practical topics of special importance in behavioral science. Topics will include the academic and scientific roles of behavioral scientists, establishing a research lab, communicating research findings, tenure processes, gender equity, ethical conduct, and good scientific citizenship. Discussions will highlight important case studies. (Same as SPLH 982.) LEC.

PSYC 983. Methods & Professional Issues in the Cognitive & Brain Sciences. 3 Hours.

Methodology, inferential problems, and professional issues in the cognitive and brain sciences. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 and PSYC 791 or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 984. Missing Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

The primary goal of the course is to promote a solid understanding of the logic and implementation of modern missing data techniques. The following topics are included: missing data theory, traditional missing data techniques, maximum likelihood estimation, EM algorithm, multiple imputation, planned missing data designs, and techniques for missing not at random data. Students will learn how to implement the missing data techniques in SAS, Mplus and R. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 and PSYC 896. LEC.

PSYC 988. Modeling of Intraindividual Observations. 4 Hours.

Many statistical methods are apt for modeling cross-sectional data or growth processes. These methods are often not ideal for researchers collecting intensive intra-individual observations, such as those from diary studies, ecological momentary assessments, and physiological data, which often exhibit complex, nonlinear changes over time. This class examines methods for extracting information from intensive intra-individual observations. This class will survey methods and concepts from areas such as dynamical systems, chaos theory, time series analysis and differential equation modeling. Some prior experience with R or related language strongly encouraged. Some prior experience with R or related language strongly encouraged. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent and a course in Structural Equation Modeling or Multilevel Modeling (Hierarchical Linear modeling, Mixed Models.) LEC.

PSYC 990. Methods for Clustering and Classification. 3 Hours.

Statistical methods for identifying classes, clusters, and taxa. Topics include k-means, discriminant analysis, hierarchical clustering algorithms, additive trees, neural network models for clustering, latent class models, finite mixture models, and models for skills/cognitive diagnosis. Applications across the social and behavior sciences are emphasized. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 and PSYC 791 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 991. Longitudinal Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

Reviews and contrasts various statistical methods for the analysis of change. Course focuses on various techniques to analyze longitudinal (repeated-measures) data beyond the repeated-measures ANOVA framework. Techniques covered included latent change scores, latent difference scores, individual-differences modeling of latent residual and change scores, intra-individual differences modeling (e.g., growth curve, mixed modeling) and growth mixture modeling. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Prerequisite: PSYC 896 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 993. Seminar: _____. 1-5 Hours.

LEC.

PSYC 996. Structural Equation Modeling II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PSYC 896. Advanced applications of modern methods for testing hypotheses on multivariate correlational data in the behavioral and social sciences. Topics include advanced confirmatory factor analysis, mediation and moderation among latent variables, latent growth curve modeling, and other latent variable mean and covariance structures analysis techniques. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Prerequisite: PSYC 896 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

PSYC 998. Doctoral Dissertation in Clinical Child Psychology. 1-10 Hours.

Research experience making original contribution to literature in clinical child psychology. (Same as ABSC 998, formerly HDFL 998.) THE.

PSYC 999. Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.