The Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures offers a complete curriculum of language, culture, literature, and linguistics courses for students interested not only in Russian, but also in Polish, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Slovene, Ukrainian, and Turkish languages and cultures.  The department also offers occasional coursework and independent study in Czech and other East European languages.

The department offers three degrees:  the B.A., the M.A., and the Ph.D.  The Bachelor of Arts degree program offers fundamental training in language and culture, while graduate training at the Masters and Doctoral levels focuses on Russian literature and culture, Slavic linguistics, and/or Slavic language pedagogy.  The department also offers select study abroad programs.   Working closely with KU’s Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (CREES), the department offers a variety of Slavic-related events throughout the year, including visiting distinguished lecturers, exhibits, and musical and theatrical performances.  Students participate in an active Russian Club, language tables, and the Graduate Students’ Organization. 

For more information about the department and its people, visit the department’s website.  Look for the Old Bridge in Mostar at the very top of the page.  Commissioned by Suleiman the Magnificent in 1557, the bridge metaphorically connects the Ottoman Empire with Europe -- it is the physical expression of the concept that Russia and the Slavs link the West and the East. 

Undergraduate Programs

The undergraduate major in Slavic languages and literatures prepares students to pursue a range of careers connected with Russia and Central Europe, including those related to international work in business, government, nonprofit organizations, etc. The undergraduate major serves equally as solid preparation for graduate study in Slavic languages and literatures and related fields and for entrance to professional schools such as law or journalism. Students learn these languages to pursue careers with international dimensions; enhance job opportunities; connect with their heritage, family, and communities; explore other literatures and cultures; and pursue personal interests.

The undergraduate program gives students solid functional language skills in speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Students develop the strategies and linguistic awareness to continue language study throughout their lives. The program acquaints undergraduates with the most significant works of the literature and culture of the Slavic region and gives them the tools and frameworks necessary to understand, analyze, and critique those works and place them in their cultural context. Students work with sources in English and in the original languages to develop transferable reading and analytical skills.

The department strongly encourages students to plan a substantial study abroad experience (at least a summer but preferably a semester or an academic year) as part of the major. Study abroad experience contributes to mastery of the language and facilitates students’ encounters with the people, practices, and attitudes of the culture in ways that can never be replicated on an American university campus.

Placement

Students may establish eligibility for enrollment in the second course in Polish, Russian, or Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian by having earned college credit in the first course in that language or by having studied the language in high school. Students with previous study should contact the department to arrange a consultation about enrollment at the appropriate level.

Retroactive Credit

Students with no prior college or university Russian course credit are eligible for retroactive credit according to this formula:

  • 3 hours of retroactive credit are awarded to a student with 2 or 3 years of high school Russian who enrolls initially at KU in a third-level Russian course (RUSS 204) and receives a grade of C or higher.
  • 6 hours of retroactive credit are awarded to a student with 3 or 4 years of high school Russian who enrolls initially at KU in a fourth-level Russian course (RUSS 208) and receives a grade of C or higher.
  • 9 hours of retroactive credit are awarded to a student with 4 years of high school Russian who enrolls initially at KU in a Russian course with a fourth-level course as a prerequisite and receives a grade of C or higher.

Courses for Nonmajors

Some courses in Slavic literatures and cultures are taught in English and fulfill various goals and learning outcomes related to the KU CORE, as well as existing B.A. requirements in the humanities and non-Western culture.

Students may fulfill the College language requirement for the B.A. degree by taking 2 years in one of the following languages: Russian, Polish, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Slovene, Ukrainian, or Turkish.

Courses are available in Russian for special purposes (Russian for Reading, Russian for the Professions). RUSS 110 Intensive Elementary Russian (10 credit hours) frequently is offered in the summer.

Graduate Programs

The department offers programs leading to Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts degree in Slavic Languages & Literatures provides students with foundational knowledge of the language, literature, culture, and linguistics of a region of study (Russian, Polish, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian). Working in a collegial and supportive departmental environment, M.A. students extend their foundationall knowledge of the field, while being encouraged to grow intellectually and develop new and innovative interpretive frameworks. Some of the work done at the MA level includes: reading key literary works in their historical, cultural, stylistic, and genre contexts; familiarization with literary theory; work on professionalization and job market readiness; learning technological and Digital Humanities skills; language testing and coursework to improve language capacity.

Doctor of Philosophy

Building on the MA foundational base, the KU PhD degree program encourages students to develop their particular intellectual interests in collaboration with KU faculty and their areas of specialization. PhD students also learn a second Slavic language and develop knowledge of a secondary field. For their second field we encourage our students to choose from philosophy, linguistics, religion, history, theater and cinema, literary theory, comparative literature, and folklore.

Two concentrations are offered in the PhD Program:

  • Russian Literature

  • Slavic Linguistics (including language pedagogy)

PhD students who focus their studies on Russian literature and Slavic linguistics have a full-service curriculum from which to choose their courses. PhD Doctoral students who wish to pursue a PhD concentration in another literature that the department offers, such as Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Polish, or Ukrainian may develop an individualized program of study in consultation with faculty.

PhD students interested in Russian culture, intellectual history, or Slavic folklore pursue their studies through the Russian literature PhD concentration.

Departmental Funding

While it is not guaranteed, the department does its best to provide funding in the form of Graduate Teaching Assistantship (GTA) appointments to all incoming graduate students.  GTA appointments are awarded for the academic year and come with:

  • a competitive academic year (9 month) salary
  • a 100% tuition waiver for all courses at KU
  • payment of up to 3 hours of student fees
  • optional University-subsidized group health insurance 

The appointments are guaranteed based on performance for up to 3 years for M.A. students, 5 years for Ph.D. students and 6 years for students who receive both an M.A. and a Ph.D. at The University of Kansas.  GTAs in the department receive thorough training in language instruction, close mentoring, and the opportunity to teach at a variety of levels, providing them with a strong base of teaching experience upon entering the job market. Additional information about teaching for the department is available on the Graduate Programs overview page of our departmental website.

Additional Funding

There are also university fellowships for truly outstanding students. Visit the Graduate Studies website for information about funding opportunities for KU graduate students.

Courses

BCRS 104. Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Beginning language course. Development of basic communicative and cultural competencies with interactive approach. Students acquire communicative skills for elementary personal and social needs. They are introduced to the basic Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian language rules and to the cultural context in which Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian discourse occurs. Through regular engagement with authentic multimedia materials they learn to recognize differing aspects of Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian and American life, culture, and values. LEC.

BCRS 105. Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, Honors. 5 Hours U / F1.

Similar to BCRS 104 but with additional work aimed at accelerating the student's progress to proficiency and widening understanding of cultural context. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

BCRS 108. Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Second-semester language course, continuation of BCRS 104. Further development of basic communicative and cultural competencies with interactive approach. Students continue the acquisition of communicative skills for elementary personal and social needs and their introduction to the basic Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian language rules and cultural context in which Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian discourse occurs. Through regular engagement with authentic multimedia materials they learn to recognize differing aspects of Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian and American life, culture, and values. Prerequisite: BCRS 104 or BCRS 105, or placement by examination. LEC.

BCRS 109. Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II, Honors. 5 Hours U / F2.

Continues BCRS 105. Similar to BCRS 108 but with additional work aimed at accelerating the student's progress to proficiency and widening understanding of cultural context. Prerequisite: BCRS 104 or 105. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

BCRS 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

BCRS 204. Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 Hours AE42 / U / F3.

Second-year language course. Further development of communicative and cultural competencies with a content-based, interactive approach. Students develop the ability to understand and produce short written and spoken texts in BCS through engagement with a variety of authentic materials representative of cultural diversity of the studied area. They contrast and compare features of individual BCS-speaking countries and their cultures as well as differing aspects of B/C/S and American life, culture, and values. Prerequisite: BCRS 108 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

BCRS 205. Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, Honors. 3 Hours AE42 / U / F3.

Similar to BCRS 204 but with additional work aimed at accelerating the student's progress to proficiency and widening understanding of cultural context. Prerequisite: Open only to students who have received an A in BCRS 108 or an A or B in BCRS 109, and who are admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

BCRS 208. Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 3 Hours AE42 / U / F4.

A continuation of BCRS 204. Prerequisite: BCRS 204. LEC.

BCRS 209. Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II, Honors. 3 Hours AE42 / U / F4.

Similar to BCRS 208 but with additional work aimed at accelerating the student's progress to proficiency and widening understanding of cultural context. Prerequisite: BCRS 204 or 205. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

BCRS 380. Intensive Croatian. 6 Hours U.

This program consists of a six-week intensive language course in intermediate and advanced Croatian phonetics, conversation, and grammar, and is offered each summer in Croatia. In addition to the practical language work, there is a program of lectures on modern Croatian history, literature, and other cultural topics. Various excursions and tours bring the students into first-hand contact with the people, natural beauty and culture of Croatia. This program is a cooperative effort between the University of Kansas and faculty of the University of Zadar. LEC.

BCRS 504. Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

A practical Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian course involving the advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation and composition. Taught in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian. Designed for students who have had two or more years of Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian language. Prerequisite: BCRS 208, or equivalent. LEC.

BCRS 508. Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

A practical Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian course involving the advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation and composition. Taught in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian. Designed for students who have had two and one-half or or more years of Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian language. Prerequisite: BCRS 504, or equivalent. LEC.

BCRS 675. Readings in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian. 1-6 Hours H/W / FP.

Individually tailored readings and independent work in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian language and culture. Prerequisite: Two years of Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, and consent of instructor. IND.

Courses

CZCH 104. Elementary Czech I. 5 Hours U / F1.

First semester. Essentials of grammar, practice in speaking and writing Czech. Simple readings from selected texts. LEC.

CZCH 108. Elementary Czech II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Second semester. A continuation of CZCH 104. Prerequisite: CZCH 104. LEC.

CZCH 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Czech. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

CZCH 204. Intermediate Czech I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Second-year course in the language with emphasis on reading, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: CZCH 108. LEC.

CZCH 208. Intermediate Czech II. 3 Hours U / F4.

A continuation of CZCH 204. Prerequisite: CZCH 204. LEC.

CZCH 675. Readings in Czech. 1-6 Hours H/W / FP.

Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Czech language, and consent of instructor. IND.

Courses

PERS 110. Elementary Persian I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Course includes reading of simple texts. Five hours of class per week. LEC.

PERS 120. Elementary Persian II. 5 Hours / F2.

Continuation of PERS 110. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Course includes reading of simple texts. Five hours of class per week. Prerequisite: PERS 110 or departmental permission. LEC.

PERS 210. Intermediate Persian I. 3 Hours U / F3.

A continuation of PERS 120. Course emphasizes oral and written work in Persian. Systematic review of grammar and introduction to reading in cultural texts. Prerequisite: PERS 120 or departmental permission. LEC.

PERS 220. Intermediate Persian II. 3 Hours U / F4.

A continuation of PERS 210. Course emphasizes oral and written work in Persian. Systematic review of grammar and introduction to reading in cultural texts. Prerequisite: PERS 210 or departmental permission. LEC.

PERS 310. Advanced Persian I. 3 Hours U / FP.

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Persian. Readings from Persian literature introduced. Prerequisite: PERS 220 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Persian suited to Advanced Persian I. LEC.

PERS 320. Advanced Persian II. 3 Hours U / FP.

Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Persian. Readings from Persian literature introduced. Prerequisite: PERS 310 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Persian suited to Advanced Persian II. LEC.

PERS 593. Directed Study in Persian Culture and Literature: _____. 1-3 Hours U / FP.

This course is designed for students seeking proficiency in Persian beyond PERS 320. The instructor directs the student through readings and materials in Persian that add to the student's substantive knowledge of Persian culture in Iran, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. May be taken multiple semesters for credit with varying content. Prerequisite: PERS 320 and consent of instructor. LEC.

Courses

PLSH 104. Elementary Polish I. 5 Hours U / F1.

First Semester. Essentials of grammar, practice in reading, writing, and speaking Polish. LEC.

PLSH 105. Elementary Polish, Honors. 5 Hours U.

Honors version of PLSH 104, with additional work aimed at accelerating students progress to proficiency and expanding their cultural competence. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

PLSH 108. Elementary Polish II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Second semester. A continuation of PLSH 104. Prerequisite: PLSH 104. LEC.

PLSH 109. Elementary Polish II, Honors. 5 Hours U.

A continuation of PLSH 105. Honors version of PLSH 108, with additional work aimed at accelerating students progress to proficiency and expanding their cultural competence. Prerequisite: PLSH 104 or PLSH 105. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

PLSH 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Polish. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

PLSH 204. Intermediate Polish I. 3 Hours AE42 / U / F3.

Second-year course in the language with emphasis on reading, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: PLSH 108. LEC.

PLSH 205. Intermediate Polish I, Honors. 3 Hours AE42 / U.

Honors version of PLSH 204, with additional work aimed at accelerating students' progress to proficiency and expanding their cultural competence. Prerequisite: Open only to students who have received an A in PLSH 108 or an A or B in PLSH 109, and who are admitted to the University Honors Program; or by permission of instructor. LEC.

PLSH 208. Intermediate Polish II. 3 Hours AE42 / U / F4.

A continuation of PLSH 204. Prerequisite: PLSH 204. LEC.

PLSH 209. Intermediate Polish II, Honors. 3 Hours AE42 / U.

Honors version of PLSH 208, with additional work aimed at accelerating students progress to proficiency and expanding their cultural competence. Prerequisite: PLSH 204 or PLSH 205. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

PLSH 312. Polish Language and Civilization in Poland: Summer Program. 8 Hours H/W.

Polish grammar, conversation, and composition with select aspects of Polish civilization. Available only to participants in Polonicum, Warsaw University. LEC.

PLSH 504. Advanced Polish I. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

A practical Polish language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Polish. Designed for students who have had two or more years of Polish language. Prerequisite: PLSH 208 or equivalent. LEC.

PLSH 508. Advanced Polish II. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

A practical Polish language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Polish. Designed for students who have had two and one-half or more years of Polish. Prerequisite: PLSH 504 or equivalent. LEC.

PLSH 675. Readings in Polish Language and Literature. 1-6 Hours H/W / FP.

Directed individual readings on various topics concerning Polish literature and/or language. Prerequisite: Two years or four semesters of Polish, and consent of instructor. IND.

Courses

RUSS 100. Russian Reading Course I. 3 Hours U.

A special reading course for candidates for advanced degrees, faculty members, and graduate or undergraduate students from other schools or departments, designed to aid them in obtaining a reading knowledge for purposes of research. An intensive study of the fundamentals of grammar proceeding to the reading of material of medium difficulty. The course does not satisfy any part of the undergraduate language requirement. Presupposes no previous study of Russian. LEC.

RUSS 101. Russian Reading Course II. 3 Hours U.

A continuation of RUSS 100. Completion and review of the fundamentals of grammar, with emphasis on reading and translation of learned, scientific, or technical writing and other material of an advanced nature. Each student will also have special assignments in his or her particular field. This course does not satisfy any part of the undergraduate language requirement. Prerequisite: RUSS 100. LEC.

RUSS 104. Elementary Russian I. 5 Hours U / F1.

First semester. Five hours of basic language acquisition and oral practice per week. Essentials of grammar, practice in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Russian. LEC.

RUSS 105. Elementary Russian I, Honors. 5 Hours U.

Honors version of RUSS 104, with additional work aimed at accelerating students progress to proficiency and expanding their cultural competence. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

RUSS 108. Elementary Russian II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Second semester. Five hours of basic language acquisition and oral practice per week. Essentials of grammar, practice in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Russian. A continuation of RUSS 104. Prerequisite: RUSS 104. LEC.

RUSS 109. Elementary Russian II, Honors. 5 Hours U.

A continuation of RUSS 105. Honors version of RUSS 108, with additional work aimed at accelerating students progress to proficiency and expanding their cultural competence. Prerequisite: RUSS 104 or RUSS 105. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

RUSS 110. Intensive Elementary Russian. 10 Hours U / F1 / F2.

Intensive course in elementary Russian providing the student with a complete survey of Russian grammar, and proficiency in understanding, reading, and speaking basic Russian. Twenty contact hours per week. Same content as RUSS 104 and RUSS 108 combined. LEC.

RUSS 150. Beginning Russian I. 3 Hours U.

Fundamentals of Russian grammar, reading, speaking, and writing. Course designed to accommodate the needs of students regardless of age, educational background, or occupation. No previous knowledge of Russian or other foreign languages required. LEC.

RUSS 152. Beginning Russian II. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of RUSS 150. Does not fulfill BA foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: RUSS 150 or equivalent. LEC.

RUSS 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Russian. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

RUSS 204. Intermediate Russian I. 5 Hours U / F3.

This course is designed to develop speaking, reading, and listening proficiency within the context of a review of grammar. Prerequisite: RUSS 108, RUSS 110, or equivalent. LEC.

RUSS 205. Intermediate Russian I, Honors. 5 Hours U.

Honors version of RUSS 204 with additional work aimed at accelerating students progress to proficiency and expanding their cultural competence. Prerequisite: Open only to students who have received an A in RUSS 108 or an A or B in RUSS 109, and who are admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

RUSS 208. Intermediate Russian II. 5 Hours U / F4.

Continuation of RUSS 204. Completes the undergraduate foreign language requirement. The course is designed to develop speaking, reading, and listening proficiency within the context of detailed grammatical review. Prerequisite: RUSS 204 or equivalent. LEC.

RUSS 209. Intermediate Russian II, Honors. 5 Hours U.

Honors version of RUSS 208, with additional work aimed at accelerating students progress to proficiency and expanding their cultural competence. Prerequisite: RUSS 204 or 205. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

RUSS 212. Second Year Russian I. 3 Hours U.

A review of Russian and further development of all four language skills. This course is intended for non-specialists and for students fulfilling the language requirement. Prerequisite: RUSS 108 or RUSS 110. LEC.

RUSS 216. Second Year Russian II. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of RUSS 212. More focused development of students' oral skills and reading abilities. This course fulfills the college foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: RUSS 204 or RUSS 212. LEC.

RUSS 250. Continuing Russian I. 3 Hours U.

Fundamentals of Russian grammar, reading, speaking, and writing. Course designed to accommodate the needs of students regardless of age, educational background, or occupation. Does not count towards the fulfillment of the undergraduate language requirement. Does not count towards the undergraduate major in Slavic. Prerequisite: RUSS 152 or equivalent. LEC.

RUSS 252. Continuing Russian II. 3 Hours U.

A continuation of RUSS 250. Does not count towards the fulfillment of the undergraduate language requirement. Does not count towards the undergraduate major in Slavic. Prerequisite: RUSS 250 or equivalent. LEC.

RUSS 504. Advanced Russian I. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

A practical Russian language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Russian. Designed for students who have had four semesters of Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 208 or RUSS 216. LEC.

RUSS 508. Advanced Russian II. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

A practical Russian language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Russian. Designed for students who have had two and one-half or more years of Russian language. Prerequisite: RUSS 504. LEC.

RUSS 512. Russian for the Professions I. 3 Hours U / FP.

This course focuses on the active mastery of language structures and vocabulary needed for people using Russian in professional capacities, particularly such as business and journalism. Materials will be drawn from the current Russian press and electronic media. Designed for students who have had basic language training and want to develop specialized language skills. Prerequisite: RUSS 208 or RUSS 216. LEC.

RUSS 516. Russian for the Professions II. 3 Hours U / FP.

A continuation of RUSS 512. Prerequisite: RUSS 504, RUSS 512, or RUSS 522. LEC.

RUSS 522. Problems in Translating Russian into English I. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Preparation of hitherto untranslated works, possibly with the intention of submitting for publication. Training and practice in the skills of oral interpretation. Prerequisite: Two years minimum of Russian language courses. LEC.

RUSS 526. Problems in Translating Russian into English II. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

A continuation of RUSS 522. LEC.

RUSS 550. Advanced Conversation, Composition, and Grammar in Russia: Summer Program. 6 Hours H/W / FP.

Held in Russia. Twenty-four hours of class work weekly, plus lectures and excursions, for six weeks at St. Petersburg University. Prerequisite: RUSS 208 or the equivalent of twenty-two hours of Russian language courses. LEC.

RUSS 552. Advanced Russian Language at Saint Petersburg University: Semester Program. 14 Hours H/W / FP.

Sixteen weeks of intensive Russian language and literature classes held at Saint Petersburg University, Russia. Classes in advanced phonetics, conversation, and grammar as well as lectures on literary and other cultural topics. Prerequisite: Minimum of five semesters of Russian language study at the college level or its equivalent. LEC.

RUSS 600. Classics of Russian Culture. 3 Hours H / FP.

This advanced Russian language class explores the monuments of Russian culture (1700-1980) in the context of the country's history, customs, artistic traditions and literary trends. It is designed to develop reading, writing, and speaking skills of advanced language students and includes the preparation of written and oral reports in Russian. Discussion format; conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 508 or equivalent. LEC.

RUSS 604. Contemporary Russian Culture. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

This advanced Russian language class explores issues in contemporary Russian culture (literature and the arts, societal trends and issues, politics, and national life) based on Russian film, television, and print materials. It is designed to develop reading, writing, and speaking skills of advanced language students who wish to develop high levels of fluency, accuracy, and idiomatic expressiveness. Includes the preparation of both written and oral reports. Discussion format; conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 508 or equivalent. LEC.

RUSS 608. Russian Phonetics and Grammar. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

A survey of fundamental issues in Russian phonetics, morphology, and syntax. The course will develop reading, writing, and speaking skills necessary for discussing and analyzing the major linguistic categories of Russian. Includes the preparation of both written and oral reports. Discussion format; conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 508 or equivalent. LEC.

RUSS 612. Introduction to Russian Literature. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Readings for this advanced Russian language class will be drawn from representative prose, poetry, and drama of 19th or 20th century authors. The course will develop reading, writing, and speaking skills necessary for discussing and analyzing the major texts and literary trends of the Russian tradition. Includes the preparation of both written and oral reports. Discussion format; conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 508 or equivalent. LEC.

RUSS 616. Stylistics. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Practical examination of the features of stylistic registers available in contemporary Russian, ranging from slang to colloquial speech to educated journalistic, scientific, and literary styles. The course will develop reading, writing, and speaking skills necessary for discussing and analyzing stylistic registers. Includes the preparation of both written and oral reports. Discussion format; conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 508 or equivalent. LEC.

RUSS 675. Readings in Russian. 1-6 Hours H/W / FP.

Prerequisite: Two years of Russian, and consent of instructor. IND.

Courses

SLAV 104. Elementary Slavic Language I: _____. 5 Hours U / F1.

First semester. Essentials of grammar, practice in speaking and writing a Slavic language. Simple readings from selected texts. Course may be used to teach the fundamentals of any Slavic language, for example, Slovenian, Macedonian, Slovak, etc. LEC.

SLAV 108. Elementary Slavic Language II: _____. 5 Hours U / F2.

Second semester. Essentials of grammar, practice in speaking and writing a Slavic language. A continuation of SLAV 104 in those languages whose fundamentals were being taught in SLAV 104. Prerequisite: SLAV 104 or equivalent (in same language). LEC.

SLAV 110. Introduction to the Peoples and Cultures of Kazakhstan Through Russian. 1 Hour U.

This 8-week course prepares students of all majors with little or no knowledge of Russian to function effectively in the experiential internship program in Almaty, Kazakhstan, with appropriate cultural sensitivity and survival Russian-language skills. The focus is basic grammar and key vocabulary terms of Russian (e.g., reading signs, menus; understanding key conversational phrases). Weekly readings treat the history, business culture, and language politics of Kazakhstan. LEC.

SLAV 140. Introduction to Russian Culture. 3 Hours HT AE42/GE3H / H/W.

An introduction to the principal achievements of Russian cultural history, with particular emphasis on literature, folklore, spirituality, and the visual arts. LEC.

SLAV 141. Introduction to Russian Culture, Honors. 3 Hours HT AE42/GE3H / H/W.

An introduction to the principal achievements of Russian cultural history, with particular emphasis on literature, folklore, spirituality, and the visual arts. LEC.

SLAV 144. Survey of Russian Literature in Translation. 3 Hours HL AE42/GE3H / H/W.

A survey of the principal works of Russian literature including such authors as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, and others. LEC.

SLAV 145. Survey of Russian Literature in Translation, Honors. 3 Hours HL AE42/GE3H / H/W.

A survey of the principal works of Russian literature including such authors as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, and others. LEC.

SLAV 148. Introduction to Slavic Folklore. 3 Hours HL AE42/GE3H / H/W.

An introduction to the various forms of folklore among the Slavic peoples, with particular emphasis on the folk literature, customs, and artifacts of Russia, Poland, and the South Slavic countries. LEC.

SLAV 149. Introduction to Slavic Folklore, Honors. 3 Hours HL AE42/GE3H / H/W.

An introduction to the various forms of folklore among the Slavic peoples, with particular emphasis on the folk literature, customs, and artifacts of Russia, Poland, and the South Slavic countries. LEC.

SLAV 152. Robots, Rockets, Radios: Progress and Technology in 20th-Century Slavic Literatures. 3 Hours HL.

This course introduces students to masterworks of literature written in response to the technological advances of the 20th century by some of the best authors in Czech, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, and formerly Yugoslav literatures. The writers covered include Karel Capek, Yuri Olesha, Valerian Pidmohylny, Ivo Andric, Stanislav Lem, Vaclav Havel, and Oksana Zabuzhko. Literary readings are supplemented with screenings of several films from the region. The course analyzes the ideological contexts in which these texts appeared, such as Soviet communism's dependence on technology and industrialization, post-World War II disillusionment with ideas of progress, and the Space Race. LEC.

SLAV 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Slavic. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

SLAV 204. Intermediate Slavic Language I: _____. 3 Hours U / F3.

Second-year level course in a Slavic language, for example, Slovenian, Macedonian, Slovak, with emphasis on reading, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: SLAV 108 (in same language). LEC.

SLAV 208. Intermediate Slavic Language II: _____. 3 Hours U / F4.

Second-year level course in a Slavic language, for example, Slovenian, Macedonian, Slovak, with emphasis on reading, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: SLAV 204 or equivalent (in same language). LEC.

SLAV 230. The Vampire in Literature, Film, and Television. 3 Hours H.

The vampire has been a fascinating and terrifying imagined other in human society for centuries. This course begins with the historical development of the vampire legend in Eastern Europe leading up to its contemporary Russian and English literary and cinematic variations. We will contextualize the myriad incarnations of the vampire and endeavor to answer questions such as: Why is the vampire so fascinating? What particular qualities do vampires embody? Do vampires become attractive during particular times? LEC.

SLAV 316. The Peoples and Cultures of Southeastern Europe Through Film. 3 Hours HL AE42/GE3H / H.

This course presents an introduction to the study of the culture of the South Slavs and other peoples of Southeastern Europe, combining background modules in geography, linguistic culture, history, folklore and contemporary cultural criticism with critical viewings of artistic films. The course serves as an introduction to humanistic inquiry about the peoples and cultures of Southeastern Europe. LEC.

SLAV 317. The Peoples and Cultures of Southeastern Europe Through Film, Honors. 3 Hours HL AE42/GE3H / H.

This course is similar in content to SLAV 316, but with an additional honors project. Prerequisite: Eligibility for or admission to the university Honors Program. LEC.

SLAV 318. Jews and Slavs in Eastern Europe. 3 Hours H.

Jews and Slavs have shared territory from the Middle Ages to the present day. The contact between these culturally and linguistically distinct groups have shaped many centuries of Eastern European history - from the extreme violence of the pogroms to long periods of peaceful coexistence and cooperation. "Jews and Slavs" examines the history and cultural geography of Slavic-Jewish contact from the perspectives of both groups. Through literature, film, journalism, and folklore, students learn about the profound influence Jews and Slavs have had on each other, the uneasy feelings that accompanied their interactions, and the creative and fascinating impact their interaction had on both cultures. (Same as JWSH 318.) LEC.

SLAV 322. Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Cinema. 3 Hours H.

A comprehensive introduction to Soviet cinema and its legacies in post-Soviet Russia. The course will examine what distinguished Soviet film industry from those in other countries and the ways in which it impacted the development of cinema worldwide. Films are analyzed both as artistic works (with attention to formal qualities, cinematic styles, and influences) and as documents that provide insight into the socio-political contexts of the times when they were made. We will also discuss influential contributions by Soviet filmmakers to our understanding of what makes film unique as an art form. The course is offered at the undergraduate and graduate level, with additional assignments at the graduate level. (Same as FMS 322.) LEC.

SLAV 330. Russian Business Culture. 3 Hours H.

The course examines how geography, history, and traditions of Russia impact its contemporary business practices. It addresses influence of Russian culture on business communication (verbal and nonverbal), relationship building, the role of manager, the functioning of teams, negotiation, and decision making. Topics also include cultural aspects of relationship between businesses and the state, entrepreneurialism, advertising, and consumerism. Students examine business practices that foreign businessmen encounter in Russia. LEC.

SLAV 340. Introduction to the Languages and Peoples of Russia and East-Central Europe. 3 Hours HT AE42/GE3H / H.

An overview of the languages and peoples of Russia and East-Central Europe, including the Slavic and Baltic languages, Romanian, and Albanian. Topics addressed include language prehistory, writing systems, and the relationship between language and national identity. Emphasis on language issues as a background to current events in order to impart an appreciation of the area, its uniqueness and complexity. LEC.

SLAV 341. Introduction to the Languages and Peoples of Russia and East-Central Europe, Honors. 3 Hours HT AE42/GE3H / H.

An overview of the languages and peoples of Russia and East-Central Europe, including the Slavic and Baltic languages, Romanian, and Albanian. Topics addressed include language prehistory, writing systems, and the relationship between language and national identity. Emphasis on language issues as a background to current events in order to impart an appreciation of the area, its uniqueness and complexity. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

SLAV 370. War and Violence Russian Literature and Film. 3 Hours GE3H / H.

This course focuses on artistic representations of violence resulting from historical events such as World War II, Soviet collectivization, the Gulag, and political purges. We consider Soviet literature and film, including works by Isaac Babel, Andrei Platonov, Anna Akhmatova, and Alexander Solzhenitsyn. Readings in English. The course is offered at the 300 and 500 levels, with additional assignments at the 500 level. LEC.

SLAV 379. Topics in: _____. 1-3 Hours H.

Exploration of Slavic cultural forms such as literature, film, linguistics, arts, and press. Topics vary, and course may address topics across a narrow or broad time frame. May be repeated if content varies. LEC.

SLAV 390. Slavic Folk Culture: _____. 3 Hours H/W.

A broad exposure, both theoretical and practical, to various aspects of the traditional native culture of a particular Slavic country or ethnic group, including folk dance, song and musicianship, as well as forms of the material culture such as folk architecture, costumes and art in everyday life. Taught in the pertinent Slavic country in conjunction with the appropriate language course. LEC.

SLAV 494. Research Internship. 1-3 Hours H.

Practical research experience in Slavic Studies gained by assisting a faculty member on a faculty research, editorial, pedagogical, or digital project. Credit hours are graded by faculty on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Declaration of a Slavic Languages and Literatures major and permission of instructor. INT.

SLAV 495. Senior Capstone Seminar. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

The Senior Capstone Seminar offers undergraduate majors an opportunity to define, design and execute a substantial research/creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. The project integrates the knowledge and skills gained in the coursework for the major and across the undergraduate curriculum, and demonstrates the students competence in the field of Slavic studies. Prerequisite: Slavic major status, senior standing. LEC.

SLAV 499. Honors Thesis. 3 Hours H/W.

Independent study and preparation of honors thesis. Required of all students working for a degree with honors in Slavic languages and literatures. IND.

SLAV 500. Russia Today. 3 Hours H/W.

Study and discussion of contemporary problems in Russia and the former Soviet Union; readings in Russian, based on articles in newspapers, journals, etc. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 208 or equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 502. Introduction to Russian Culture and Society: _____. 3 Hours H/W.

An interdisciplinary course introducing the student to the principal features of Russian cultural and societal development in the modern era. Readings in English, no prerequisite for non-Russian majors. Majors and graduate students in Slavic languages and literatures will be required to do readings in Russian. LEC.

SLAV 503. Post-Soviet Communication. 3 Hours H.

The course is designed to acquaint students with the shifting manner of public discourse in Post-Soviet Russia and help them to explore in some depth cross-cultural communication between America and Russia. In addition to contemporary and historical background on Russian communicative practices, students examine discourse in business development, mass media, marketing, and advertising. All readings in English. (Same as COMS 503). LEC.

SLAV 504. Introduction to East-Central European Culture and Society: _____. 3 Hours H/W.

An interdisciplinary course introducing the student to the principal features of East-Central European cultural and societal development in the modern era. Countries that may be considered are: Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, the South Slavic countries, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Belorussia, and Ukraine. LEC.

SLAV 505. Introduction to Czech Culture. 3 Hours H.

This study-abroad trip offers a survey of Czech art, architecture, literature, theater, and film from the medieval period to the present with emphasis on the late 19th and 20th centuries. Combines 18 hours of lectures on campus and a ten-day trip to Prague. LEC.

SLAV 506. Masterworks of Polish and Czech Literature. 3 Hours H/W.

A survey of West Slavic Literature and Civilization (Polish and Czech) from its beginnings to the present with emphasis on the most important trends: Renaissance, Romanticism, Positivism/Realism, Modernism and Avant-guard; Socialist realism, and Post-modernism. The course combines lecture, discussion and small group activities. Movie clips, recordings, and slides are used to reflect various cultural dimensions of West Slavic Civilization. No knowledge of Polish or Czech is required. LEC.

SLAV 508. South Slavic Literature and Civilization. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H/W.

An introductory survey of the literature and culture of the South Slavic peoples: the Slovenes, Croats, Bosniacs, Serbs, Montenegrins, Macedonians and Bulgarians. No language required. LEC.

SLAV 510. The Russian Literary Genius. 3 Hours H/W.

Topics and problems in Russian cultural history as treated in the masterworks of Russian literature. Readings selected from the works of Pushkin, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Solzhenitsyn, and other great Russian writers. Readings in English, no prerequisite for non-Russian majors. Russian majors will do some of the readings in Russian. LEC.

SLAV 512. The Russian Novel and Digital Humanities: _____. 3 Hours.

The Russian literary canon has often been used to center meaning around the two capitals (Moscow and St. Petersburg). In this class we rely on several DH visualization tools to challenge conventional views of the canon and foreground Russia's regions. This course follows the lead of scholarly endeavors in the field and is the first in a series of attempts to reconceptualize Russia in a decentering way through the Digital Humanities. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian language at the university level or permission of instructor. LEC.

SLAV 514. Totalitarianism and Literature in Central Europe. 3 Hours H.

This course asks how fiction written in Central Europe engaged and grappled with the totalitarian experience imposed by Nazi and Soviet forms of government. The course focuses on the works by 20th-century Polish, Czech, and Hungarian writers that deal with totalitarianism. (Same as HWC 514.) LEC.

SLAV 516. Love, Lust and Liberty: Polish and Czech Film Adapations. 3 Hours.

A comparative study of several most representative and best works of 19th- and 20th-century Polish and Czech fiction and drama and their film adaptations. By providing a broad cultural and historical background of the works, the course offers a thorough introduction to modern culture of Poland and the Czech Republic. Readings and discussions are in English, and no knowledge of Polish or Czech is required. LEC.

SLAV 520. Russian Phonetics, Phonology, and Inflectional Morphology. 3 Hours H/W.

An analysis of the phonological and morphological systems of contemporary standard Russian, including normative and dialectal pronunciation of speech sounds, phonemics, morphophonemic alterations, and nominal and verbal inflections. Graduate students enrolled in this course will be held to a more stringent curriculum and grading system. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian language study or the equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 522. The Grammatical Categories of Russian: Linguistic Units, Functions and Meanings. 3 Hours H/W.

This course covers the main grammatical categories of Russian, including word formation, case, animacy, voice and reflexive verbs, imperatives, aspect, and word order. It is intended not only for linguists but anyone seeking a better understanding of the grammatical systems of Russian. Designed as a continuation of SLAV 520. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian language study or the equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 524. Russian Since the Revolution. 3 Hours H/W.

An examination of changes in the Russian language during the course of this century. Topics covered include changes in pronunciation, morphological and syntactic variation, and the impact of foreign borrowings, particularly from English. Graduate students enrolled in this course will be held to a more stringent curriculum and grading system. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian language study or the equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 526. The Pragmatics of Slavic Languages. 3 Hours H.

This course introduces students to the study pragmatics: the relationship between utterances, the contexts in which these utterances were produced, and their reception and interpretation by the speakers. It investigates how grammatical choices on the sentence level (such as case, aspect, impersonalization, and more) affect and are influenced by the context in which utterances are produced, and how social variables such as gender, age, peer pressure, institutional power, and other factors are influential in production and interpretation of meaning. Other topics include extra-linguistic elements such as gesture and prosody, (im)politeness expressions, the pragmatics of narratives, and cross-cultural differences in contexts and reception of specific speech genres. Prerequisite: RUSS 508 or consent of instructor. LEC.

SLAV 528. Comparative Study of Slavic Literatures. 3 Hours H/W.

The course is intended as an introduction to the most significant writers and works in Slavic literatures. The emphasis will be on some of the themes and ideological concepts that have shaped the literatures of the Slavic world. Representative works of Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Mrozek, Rozewicz, Capek, Hasek, Djilas, Havel, Ivo Andric and others, will be studied. The diversity of expression and, at the same time, homogeneity of spirit in the works of these writers will be stressed. No knowledge of Slavic languages is required. LEC.

SLAV 530. Introduction to Russian Poetry. 3 Hours H/W.

An introduction to the principles of Russian versification and to masterpieces of Russian poetry selected from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Students will learn to read, translate, and analyze poems in terms of rhyme, meter, euphony, metaphor, and other prosodic features. Emphasis will be placed upon preparing students for independent study and appreciation of Russian poetry in the original. Prerequisite: Language proficiency. LEC.

SLAV 532. Dostoevsky. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of the life and works of Fyodor Dostoevsky. In translation. No prerequisite. LEC.

SLAV 534. Tolstoy. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of the life and works of Leo Tolstoy. In translation. LEC.

SLAV 536. Turgenev. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of the life and works of Ivan Turgenev. In translation; however, note that Russian majors will be required to read selected works in Russian. LEC.

SLAV 538. The Modern Polish Short Story. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of the development of the Polish short story from Positivism to the present. Readings of major Polish writers including Prus, Sienkiewicz, Schulz, Borowski, Andrzejewski, and others. Emphasis on trends in the Polish short story within the context of West European literatures. No prerequisites. Readings in English. Students with knowledge of Polish will read some works in Polish. LEC.

SLAV 540. Language and Identity in East-Central Europe and the Former Soviet Union. 3 Hours H.

The course treats the formation of modern nation states as defined by language, where the history of the linguistic community played a central, if mythic role. Focus is on sociolinguistic case studies of the connection between language and identity in the former USSR and Yugoslavia, as well as transnational groups defined by common language and culture. The impact of global English, EU membership, and migration on language and identity issues are also discussed. LEC.

SLAV 558. Readings in Slovene. 1-6 Hours H.

Individually tailored coursework in Slovene, from beginning to advanced level. Can include development of all four skills depending on the needs of the student. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

SLAV 560. Introduction to Slavic Language: _____. 3 Hours H/W.

Basic introduction to the language, with emphasis on grammar and reading skills. Prerequisite: Two years of a different Slavic language at the college level. LEC.

SLAV 561. Readings in Slavic Language: _____. 1-6 Hours H/W.

A course of readings and discussion of grammar in a Slavic language as a continuation of SLAV 560, for example, in Bulgarian, Macedonian, etc. Prerequisite: SLAV 560 or the equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 562. Russian Theatre and Drama from Stanislavski and Chekhov to the Present. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of the development of Russian theatre and dramatic literature from 1898 to the present. Lectures and readings in English. (Same as THR 725.) LEC.

SLAV 564. The "Woman Question" in Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature. 3 Hours H.

An exploration of the "woman question" in nineteenth-century Russia as treated in literary texts. Authors to be included are: Tolstoy, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, as well as women writers such as Karolina Pavlova and Evgeniia Tur, and prominent literary and social critics. Readings in English. LEC.

SLAV 566. The Devil in Russian Literature. 3 Hours H.

This course traces the various manifestations of the Devil through Russian and European folklore, myth, theology, culture, and literature. Although the focus is on Russian literature, classic European works are discussed, as they had a powerful impact on the modern Russian Conception of the Evil One. Readings in English. (Same as HWC 566.) LEC.

SLAV 568. Biblical Themes in Modern Russian Literature. 3 Hours H.

An exploration of the creative process of modern Russian literature (1700 to present) through the ways in which Russian writers have responded to the Bible, the cornerstone of both Western and Eastern Christianity. LEC.

SLAV 570. War and Violence Russian Literature and Film. 3 Hours GE3H / H.

This course focuses on artistic representations of violence resulting from historical events such as World War II, Soviet collectivization, the Gulag, and political purges. We consider Soviet literature and film, including works by Isaac Babel, Andrei Platonov, Anna Akhmatova, and Alexander Solzhenitsyn. Readings in English. The course is offered at the 300 and 500 levels, with additional assignments at the 500 level. LEC.

SLAV 572. Russian and East European Science Fiction. 3 Hours H.

A comprehensive introduction to Russian, Soviet, and East European science fiction as it emerged in dialogue with utopian thinking, fantasy writing, and other cultural trends, and to how it responded to wider social contexts. Particular emphasis will be placed on the unique features of the Slavic science fiction tradition and its relationship the dominant Western forms of the genre. Prerequisite: RUSS 508 or consent of instructor. LEC.

SLAV 600. Biography of a City: _____. 3 Hours H/W.

Examination in depth of the historical, social, intellectual, and artistic development of one or more major Slavic urban centers. LEC.

SLAV 612. Introduction to Russian Literature of the Nineteenth Century. 3 Hours H/W.

Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and others with an introduction to Russian culture. Lectures and readings in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian language study or its equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 614. Russian Literature in Translation: _____. 3 Hours H/W.

A survey of the principal Russian authors and literary works of the 19th and/or 20th century. Readings in English, no prerequisites for non-Russian majors. Students with a sound knowledge of Russian will be expected to do some of the readings in Russian. LEC.

SLAV 616. Introduction to Russian Literature of the Twentieth Century. 3 Hours H/W.

A survey of recent Russian and Soviet literature. Lectures and readings in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian language study or its equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 622. Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Cinema. 3 Hours H.

A comprehensive introduction to Soviet cinema and its legacies in post-Soviet Russia. The course will examine what distinguished Soviet film industry from those in other countries and the ways in which it impacted the development of cinema worldwide. Films are analyzed both as artistic works (with attention to formal qualities, cinematic styles, and influences) and as documents that provide insight into the socio-political contexts of the times when they were made. We will also discuss influential contributions by Soviet filmmakers to our understanding of what makes film unique as an art form. The course is offered at the undergraduate and graduate level, with additional assignments at the graduate level. Not open to students with credit in SLAV 322/FMS 322. (Same as FMS 722.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. LEC.

SLAV 626. The Cultural Impact of Ottoman Empire on the South Slavs. 3 Hours H.

An examination of the cultural development of the South Slavs in the context of the Ottoman invasions and subsequent rule (14th-19th century), focusing on the frontier aspects of the Balkans, military culture, religion, economics and banditry, as well as other aspects of material and folk culture. No language requirement. Prerequisite: SLAV 316 or SLAV 508; or consent of instructor. LEC.

SLAV 630. Slavic Folklore. 3 Hours H/W.

Introduction to the phenomena and problems of Slavic folklore. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian on the college level. LEC.

SLAV 635. Language, Culture and Ethnicity in Prehistoric Eastern Europe. 3 Hours S.

The course is for students who wish to understand the prehistory of Eastern Europe with special attention to the Slavs. The interdisciplinary course examines East European prehistory from the perspectives of archaeology and linguistics, considering also how ideologies have influenced the interpretation of results. No language prerequisite. (Same as ANTH 696) LEC.

SLAV 642. Pushkin and Evgenij Onegin. 3 Hours H/W.

Lectures, reading, and analysis of Pushkin's "novel in verse." Prerequisite: Three years of Russian language courses or the equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 650. The Russian Short Story. 3 Hours H/W.

Readings from the short stories of major Russian writers of the 19th and/or 20th centuries, e.g., Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Chekhov; readings and discussion in English for non-Russian majors, Russian majors will be expected to read most stories in Russian. Prerequisite: None for non-majors in the department; two years of college-level Russian for majors. LEC.

SLAV 656. Russian Literature of the Eighteenth Century. 3 Hours H/W.

Readings from Kantemir, Trediakovsky, Lomonosov, Derzhavin, Karamzin, and others in their literary and intellectual contexts. Readings in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian language study or its equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 660. The Russian Novel in the Age of Realism. 3 Hours H/W.

This course traces the evolution of the Russian novel from its beginnings with Pushkin and through the novels of Turgenev, Goncharov, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and others. In translation. Russian majors will read most works in Russian. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian language or consent of the instructor. LEC.

SLAV 662. Russian Literary Modernism: 1880-1930. 3 Hours H/W.

Readings from late Tolstoy through the period of the 1920's. In translation; no prerequisites for non-Russian majors. Russian majors will be required to have achieved senior standing and will read most works in Russian. LEC.

SLAV 664. Soviet Russian Literature: 1930-1990. 3 Hours H/W.

Readings in the period, in all genres. In translation; no prerequisite for non-Russian majors. Russian majors are required to have senior standing and read most works in Russian. LEC.

SLAV 667. Post-Soviet Literature. 3 Hours H.

A survey of post-Soviet literary art, from approximately 1985 to the present, dealing with a range of subjects including the emergence of literature from the strictures of socialist realism and its relationship to concepts of postmodernism and postcolonialism. LEC.

SLAV 668. Nabokov. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of the life and works of Vladimir Nabokov. In translation. No prerequisite. LEC.

SLAV 675. Readings in Slavic Studies (English). 1-3 Hours H.

Directed readings on Slavic culture in English. For non-majors. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC.

SLAV 678. Readings in Slavic Linguistics. 1-6 Hours H/W.

Directed individual readings on various topics concerning Slavic linguistics. Prerequisite: Proficiency in at least one Slavic language, and consent of instructor. IND.

SLAV 679. Topics in: _____. 1-6 Hours H.

Intensive study of a selected topic from Slavic languages, literatures, linguistics, or pedagogy. IND.

SLAV 684. Main Currents of Russian Thought I. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of philosophical, theological, and literary monuments designed to acquaint the student with main cultural forces that have shaped Russian thought and manners. From the origins to Peter the Great. (Same as PHIL 684.) LEC.

SLAV 686. Main Currents of Russian Thought II. 3 Hours H/W.

A continuation of SLAV 684. From the age of Peter the Great to revolutions of 1917. (Same as PHIL 686.) LEC.

SLAV 710. Introduction to Slavic Languages and Linguistics. 3 Hours.

The Slavic languages and peoples, including briefly: their origin, prehistory, and early culture. Basic linguistic methodology as applied to Slavic material from the beginnings of Slavic linguistics to the present. LEC.

SLAV 711. Russian Poetry: Nineteenth Century. 3 Hours.

Readings from the works of the major poets, in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian language study or the equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 712. Russian Poetry: Twentieth Century. 3 Hours.

Readings from the works of the major poets, in Russian. Prerequisite: Language proficiency. LEC.

SLAV 714. Russian Theatre and Drama to 1900. 3 Hours.

A study of the development of Russian theatre and dramatic literature from their beginnings to 1900. Readings in English. Students with knowledge of Russian will read some works in Russian. LEC.

SLAV 715. Russian Drama and Theatre 1953 to the Present. 3 Hours.

A study of the development of Russian theatre and dramatic literature from 1953 to the present. Readings in English. Students with knowledge of Russian will read some works in Russian. LEC.

SLAV 716. History of Russian Literary Criticism: Late Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century. 3 Hours.

A study of the various literary periods, such as sentimentalism, romanticism, naturalism, realism, with particular reference to individual literary critics and critical journals. LEC.

SLAV 719. Philosophical and Aesthetic Thought of the Russian Silver Age. 3 Hours.

A survey of the works of Solovyov, Florensky, Berdyaev, Merezhkovsky, Ivanov, and others, and their relation to the literature and culture of the Silver Age. LEC.

SLAV 721. Pushkin. 3 Hours.

A study of the life and works of Alexander Pushkin. Readings in Russian, open to senior Russian majors and graduate students. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian or the equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 726. Chekhov. 3 Hours.

A study of the life and works of Anton Chekhov. Open to senior Russian majors and graduate students. Readings in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian or the equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 727. Bely and Blok. 3 Hours.

A study of the life and works of the Symbolist writers, Andrei Bely and Aleksandr Blok. Readings in Russian. LEC.

SLAV 728. 19th Century Russian Prose. 3 Hours.

Readings from the works of Turgenev, Chekhov, Leskov, Saltykov, and others. Readings and discussion in English. Russian majors will be expected to read some works in Russian. No prerequisite. LEC.

SLAV 730. Russian Emigre Literature. 3 Hours.

A study of representative works in all genres, by Russian emigre writers. Readings in English. LEC.

SLAV 740. Introduction to Graduate Studies in Slavic Languages and Literatures. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the skills required of students doing graduate degrees in Slavic languages and literatures; areas covered include 1) introduction to literary theory and criticism, 2) bibliography and research methods, including database management software, 3) preparation and presentations of a research/conference paper, 4) technology training, including web design, on-line portfolio, and digital humanities, and 5) professional ethics and awareness of the academic market and alternative careers. We will also be working on practical, professionally useful goals, such as how to (better) make use of technology, how to create a CV and modify it for different positions, how to write an abstract, and how to produce a conference paper. Course requirements will include a variety of smaller assignments and two larger projects, a web-based professional portfolio and an 8 to 10-page conference paper. LEC.

SLAV 748. Old Church Slavic. 3 Hours.

A course in the first written language of the Slavs (9-12th centuries AD), with discussion of Indo-European, Baltic and Common Slavic background. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian or the study of another ancient Indo-European language. LEC.

SLAV 750. Introduction to Russian Historical Grammar. 3 Hours.

The linguistic history of Russian from the emergence of East Slavic dialects of Common Slavic to the modern period, with emphasis on fundamental structural changes and the introduction of skills necessary for the reading and analysis of Old and Middle Russian texts. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian or the equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 752. Old Russian Grammar and Texts. 3 Hours.

An examination of the Russian language from its beginnings to the 17th century through close reading of Old and Middle Russian texts and reading and discussion of the literature on issues in Russian historical linguistics. Prerequisite: SLAV 748, SLAV 750, or equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 754. Seminar in Slavic Verbal Aspect. 3 Hours.

A detailed examination of the morphology and usage of verbal aspect in Russian and other Slavic languages, which is a particularly troublesome area for foreign learners of Russian. Prerequisite: SLAV 522. SEM.

SLAV 756. Structure of Russian: _____. 3 Hours.

Synchronic study of the contemporary Russian language with special emphasis on problems of functional morphology and syntax. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian language study or its equivalent. LEC.

SLAV 799. M.A. Seminar in Slavic Linguistics. 3 Hours.

Topics in Slavic linguistics. Content will vary. May be repeated. LEC.

SLAV 802. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

THE.

SLAV 804. Comparative Slavic Linguistics. 3 Hours.

An examination of the development of the Slavic languages from the Common Slavic period to the present, proceeding from Indo-European. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Russian. LEC.

SLAV 806. East Slavic Linguistics. 3 Hours.

An examination of the linguistic phenomena and historical development of the East Slavic languages (Russian, Belorussian, and Ukrainian). Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Russian. LEC.

SLAV 808. West Slavic Linguistics. 3 Hours.

An examination of linguistic phenomena and historical development of the West Slavic languages (Polish, Czech, Slovak, and Upper and Lower Sorbian). LEC.

SLAV 810. South Slavic Linguistics. 3 Hours.

An examination of linguistic phenomena and historical development of Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian-Serbian, Slovene. LEC.

SLAV 820. Old Russian Literature: Beginnings to 1700. 3 Hours.

Readings of selected texts in Russian. Prerequisite: SLAV 752. LEC.

SLAV 822. Seminar in Russian Literature: Eighteenth Century. 3 Hours.

An investigation of specific themes or authors in the literature, culture, and thought of the 18th century. All readings in Russian. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and advanced Russian language. SEM.

SLAV 824. Proseminar in Methods of Teaching Slavic Languages I. 1-3 Hours.

Required for all teaching assistants, assistant instructors engaged in the teaching of Slavic languages and persons planning for careers in teaching Slavic languages. Combines discussion of theoretical teaching concepts with practical solution of problems arising concurrently in Slavic language courses. Students enrolled for two or three hours will study advanced Slavic grammar topics and stylistics as they apply to the teaching of Slavic languages. LEC.

SLAV 825. Investigation and Conference. 1-3 Hours.

Individual work in language or literature of the teaching of Slavic languages by qualified students under direction of members of the department. RSH.

SLAV 826. Proseminar in Methods of Teaching Slavic Languages II. 1-3 Hours.

Required for all teaching assistants, assistant instructors engaged in the teaching of Slavic languages and persons planning for careers in teaching Slavic languages. Combines discussion of theoretical teaching concepts with practical solution of problems arising currently in Slavic language courses. Students enrolled for two or three hours will study advanced Slavic grammar topics and stylistics as they apply to the teaching of Slavic languages. LEC.

SLAV 850. Seminar in Russian Literature: Nineteenth Century: _____. 3 Hours.

A regular seminar for graduate students, devoted to special problems in Russian literature. (Ancient Russian literature, Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Symbolism, etc.) Designed to introduce the student to the more advanced methods in criticism, literary analysis, and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Slavic Languages and Literatures, or permission of instructor. LEC.

SLAV 852. Seminar in Russian Literature: Twentieth Century. 3 Hours.

Various topics including pre- and post-Revolutionary poetry, the prose of the 1920s, the development of Socialist Realism, individual authors, etc. LEC.

SLAV 899. Ph.D. Seminar Slavic Linguistics. 3 Hours.

Topics in Slavic linguistics. Content will vary. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Ph.D. student in Slavic Languages and Literatures. LEC.

SLAV 912. Seminar: Topics in Contemporary Slavic Linguistics. 3 Hours.

Synchronic examination of specific topics, i.e., phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology of several Slavic languages. LEC.

SLAV 914. Seminar: Topics in Historical Slavic Linguistics. 3 Hours.

Diachronic examination of selected topics, i.e., phonology, morphology, syntax, or lexicology, of one or more Slavic languages. LEC.

SLAV 917. Seminar in Russian Culture and Society. 3 Hours.

Examination of selected topics in Russian cultural history, especially as treated in the works of Russian literature and intellectual history. Prerequisite: At least one course in Russian history, or one of the following courses--SLAV 502, SLAV 510, SLAV 684, SLAV 686, plus graduate standing. LEC.

SLAV 932. Seminar: Topics in Slavic Folklore. 3 Hours.

Investigation and concentrated study of one or more themes (e.g., mythology, demonology, life rituals, folklore and literature), figures (e.g., Baba Yaga), or genres (e.g., magic tales, byliny, riddles) of Slavic folklore. All readings in Russian. Prerequisite: SLAV 630. SEM.

SLAV 940. Seminar: Topics in Comparative Slavic Literature. 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Slavic Languages and Literatures. LEC.

SLAV 999. Dissertation. 1-9 Hours.

THE.

Courses

TURK 104. Elementary Turkish I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Basic language acquisition, including essentials of grammar, speaking, and writing standard (Osmanli) Turkish. LEC.

TURK 108. Elementary Turkish II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Continuation of TURK 104. Prerequisite: TURK 104. LEC.

TURK 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Turkish. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

TURK 204. Intermediate Turkish I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Second-year course in Turkish language with emphasis on reading, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: TURK 108. LEC.

TURK 208. Intermediate Turkish II. 3 Hours U / F4.

Continuation of TURK 204. Prerequisite: TURK 204. LEC.

TURK 314. Turkish Culture Through Film and Literature. 3 Hours H.

This course introduces the student to Turkish culture, with a focus on the 20th and 21st centuries, mainly through films and literature. Among the topics are Turkey's geography, politics, history, religion, feminism, poetry, music and cuisine. This interdisciplinary course does not require any previous knowledge of Turkey or the Turkish Language; it is open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Representative works of major authors and film directors will be discussed and analyzed in their historical, political and theoretical contexts. The course is offered at the 300 and 500 levels, with additional assignments at the 500-level. LEC.

TURK 514. Turkish Culture Through Film and Literature. 3 Hours H.

This course introduces the student to Turkish culture, with a focus on the 20th and 21st centuries, mainly through films and literature. Among the topics are Turkey's geography, politics, history, religion, feminism, poetry, music and cuisine. This interdisciplinary course does not require any previous knowledge of Turkey or the Turkish Language; it is open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Representative works of major authors and film directors will be discussed and analyzed in their historical, political and theoretical contexts. The course is offered at the 300 and 500 levels, with additional assignments at the 500-level. Prerequisite: REES 550 or permission of instructor. LEC.

TURK 675. Readings in Turkish: _____. 3 Hours U / FP.

Prerequisite: Two years of college-level Turkish and consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. IND.

Courses

UKRA 104. Elementary Ukrainian I. 5 Hours U / F1.

First semester. Five hours per week of recitation and drill in the spoken language. Essentials of grammar, practice reading, writing and speaking Ukrainian. LEC.

UKRA 108. Elementary Ukrainian II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Second semester. Continuation of UKRA 104. Prerequisite: UKRA 104. LEC.

UKRA 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Ukrainian. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

UKRA 204. Intermediate Ukrainian I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Second year course in Ukrainian language with emphasis on reading, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: UKRA 108. LEC.

UKRA 208. Intermediate Ukrainian II. 3 Hours U / F4.

Second semester. Continuation of UKRA 204. Prerequisite: UKRA 204. LEC.

UKRA 512. Intensive Ukrainian Language and Culture I. 3 Hours U / FP.

A practical Ukrainian language course involving advanced study of the grammar, conversation, composition. Reading of texts on a variety of subjects (culture, literature, history, folklore etc.), taught in Ukrainian. Prerequisite: Three years of a Slavic language or permission of instructor. LEC.

UKRA 516. Intensive Ukrainian Language and Culture II. 3 Hours U / FP.

A practical Ukrainian language course involving advanced study of the grammar, conversation, composition. Reading of texts on a variety of subjects (culture, literature, history, folklore etc.), taught in Ukrainian. Prerequisite: Three years of a Slavic language or permission of instructor. LEC.

UKRA 675. Readings in Ukrainian Language. 1-6 Hours H / FP.

Directed individual readings on various topics concerning the Ukrainian language. Prerequisite: Two years of Ukrainian. IND.