Why study women, gender and sexuality studies?

Because much of what people think they know about women, gender, and sex is myth.

Undergraduate Programs

Women, gender, and sexuality studies offers an interdisciplinary program of courses with primary or significant emphasis on women. Courses are offered by the department or are cross-referenced with the department.

Graduate Programs

The Department of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies supports interdisciplinary research on topics pertaining to women, gender, and sexuality and administers an interdisciplinary program leading to a graduate certificate and a Ph.D. degree. Additional cross-referenced courses are available to complete requirements for the graduate certificate and doctoral degree. Students may pursue the graduate certificate in addition to a KU graduate degree or as a standalone program.

Courses

WGSS 101. Introduction to Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. 3 Hours SC AE41/GE3S / S.

This course examines the extensive role of gender in human life and examines the ways that gender structures power relations among individuals and within economic, political, educational and other social structures, with special attention paid to women's issues and movements in the United States and globally. Through readings drawn from the fields of women's studies, gender studies, and sexuality studies, this course examines and explores alternatives to traditional and/or normative constructions of gender and sexuality, and also considers other markers of difference, such as disability, race, class, and religion, which intersect with gender identity and sexual identity. LEC.

WGSS 102. Introduction to Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Honors. 3 Hours SC AE41/GE3S / S.

This course examines the extensive role of gender in human life and examines the ways that gender structures power relations among individuals and within economic, political, educational and other social structures, with special attention paid to women's issues and movements in the United States and globally. Through readings drawn from the fields of women's studies, gender studies, and sexuality studies, this course examines and explores alternatives to traditional and/or normative constructions of gender and sexuality, and also considers other markers of difference, such as disability, race, class, and religion, which intersect with gender identity and sexual identity. Similar in content to WGSS 201. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by consent of the instructor. LEC.

WGSS 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

WGSS 196. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-6 Hours S.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Women's Studies. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

WGSS 301. Research Methods in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. 3 Hours S.

This course explores feminist epistemologies and research methods. It focuses on research design, feminist critiques of dominant theories of knowledge, and the major methodologies employed in the social sciences and humanities. Prerequisite: WGSS 101. LEC.

WGSS 317. African American Women: Colonial Era to the Present. 3 Hours H.

This interdisciplinary course covers the history of African American women, beginning in West and Central Africa, extending across the Middle Passage into the Americas, and stretching through enslavement and freedom into the 21st century. The readings cover their experiences through secondary and tertiary source materials, as well as autobiographies and letters, plays and music, and poems, novels, and speeches. (Same as AAAS 317, AMS 317, and HIST 317.) LEC.

WGSS 320. From Goddesses to Witches: Women in Premodern Europe. 3 Hours HT GE11/GE3H / H.

This course examines the social, cultural, and political contexts of women's spirituality and their relations to gender relations in Europe from about 30,000 B.C.E. to the 16th century Protestant Reformation. Lectures move both chronologically and topically, covering such subjects as goddess-worshiping cultures, women's roles in Christian and Jewish societies, symbols of women, and male attitudes toward women. Students will be able to participate in weekly discussions of primary and secondary source readings about women. (Same as HIST 320.) LEC.

WGSS 321. From Mystics to Feminists: Women's History in Europe 1600 to the Present. 3 Hours HT AE42/GE11/GE3H / H.

This survey of women's history in Europe looks at changing patterns of women's economic roles and family structures in preindustrial and industrial society, the importance of women in religious life, cultural assumptions underlying gender roles, and the relationship of women to political movements, including the rise of feminism. (Same as HIST 321.) LEC.

WGSS 324. History of Women and the Body. 3 Hours H.

This course examines different notions about women and their bodies from a historical perspective. It discusses the arguments and circumstances that have shaped women's lives in relation to their bodies, and women's responses to those arguments and circumstances. This course covers a wide geographical and chronological spectrum, from Ancient societies to the present, from Latin America and the Middle East, to North America and Western Europe. (Same as HIST 324.) LEC.

WGSS 327. Perspectives in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies. 3 Hours AE41 / S.

An exploration of the experiences and histories of people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender (LGBT); of the influences on these experiences by individuals, the state, and artistic, legal and medical discourses; and of the intersections between sexual orientation, sexuality, ethnicity, class, and religion. LEC.

WGSS 330. Women in Contemporary African Literature. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H / H.

A critical study of issues and questions raised about women in contemporary African literature and implications for the larger society through the analysis of theme, language, characterization, roles and functions of women in selected works. (Same as AAAS 340.) LEC.

WGSS 333. The Politics of Physical Appearance. 3 Hours AE41/GE11 / S.

An interdisciplinary analysis of standards of physical attractiveness and cultural conceptions of women's bodies. Includes analysis of how these standards change across time and cultural groups, and of the impact of these standards on women as individuals and on social and political outcomes. LEC.

WGSS 335. History of Jewish Women. 3 Hours H.

This course explores the history of Jewish women from antiquity to the twentieth century. It examines the historical constructions of women's gender roles and identities in Jewish law and custom as well as the social and cultural impact of those constructions in the context of the realities of women's lives in both Jewish and non-Jewish society. There are no prerequisites for this course. (Same as HIST 335, JWSH 335.) LEC.

WGSS 345. Popular Culture in Africa: Spiritual Thrills, Romance and Sexualities. 3 Hours H.

This course examines how the different constituents of popular culture mobilize, construct and structure gender, and spiritual and sexual identities in select contemporary African countries. Discussions also focus on how popular culture mediates the contesting spaces of indigenous local constructs and the push and pull of global forces to create geographic and contemporary specificities. (Same as AAAS 345.) LEC.

WGSS 351. Women and Leadership: The Legislative Process. 3 Hours S.

Examines current and historical roles and impacts of women involved in legislatures. Explores what difference women make when they are public officials. Students meet with local women legislators, lobbyists and political officials. Students learn how to analyze issues, access power, lobby, and organize at the grassroots. The course is designed to prepare students for an optional legislative internship during the subsequent semester. LEC.

WGSS 363. Gendered Modernity in East Asia. 3 Hours S.

This course explores rapidly changing gender relationships and the sense of being "modern" in East Asia by examining marriage and family systems, work, education, consumer culture, and geopolitics. The class seeks to understand how uneven state control over men and women shapes desires, practices, and norms and how men and women act upon such forces. Avoiding biological or social determinism, this course treats gender as an analytical category and examines how modern nation-states and global geopolitics are constituted and operated. (Same as ANTH 363 and EALC 363.) LEC.

WGSS 381. Feminism and Philosophy. 3 Hours AE41/GE3H / H.

An examination of topics of philosophical interest that are important in the feminist movement such as the nature of sexism, the concept of sexual equality, the ethics of sexual behavior, the nature of love, feminist analyses of the value of marriage and family, the ethics of abortion and justifications for preferential treatment of women. (Same as PHIL 381.) LEC.

WGSS 389. The Anthropology of Gender: Female, Male, and Beyond. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE21/GE3H/GE3S / S.

This course will introduce students to cultural constructions and performances of masculinity, femininity, and alternative genders across time and space. Topics and cases will be drawn from primarily non-Western cultures, ranging from Japanese markets to Pacific Rim gardens, and from Haitian voudou to Maya royal politics. This course uses research by archeologists, linguists, biological anthropologists, and sociocultural anthropologists. (Same as ANTH 389.) LEC.

WGSS 396. Studies in: _____. 3 Hours H.

The interdisciplinary study of selected and different aspects of women's studies in different semesters. LEC.

WGSS 397. Study Abroad Topic in: _____. 1-6 Hours.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Women's Studies at the junior/senior level. Course work must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

WGSS 430. Skin, Sex, and Disease. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

This course explores the complex historical relationships between gender, race, health, sickness, and oppression over time. Students examine the impact race and gender have on structuring experiences of health, sickness and health care; and examine the political activism surrounding definitions and concepts of health. LEC.

WGSS 440. Communication and Gender. 3 Hours AE41 / S.

Focuses attention on the relationship between communication and gender, including both physical and psychological dimensions. Topics include: sex role orientations and stereotypes; perceived and actual differences in verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors; the influence of gender on communication in a variety of contexts. (Same as COMS 440.) Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

WGSS 468. Psychology of Women. 3 Hours S.

A survey of the psychological theories about women; similarities and differences in the behavior of women and men; the effects of biological and social factors on the behavior of women and men; and issues of concern to women of different races, sexual orientations, ages, and so forth. (Same as PSYC 468.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or WGSS 201. LEC.

WGSS 498. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours S.

Intensive reading or research under faculty supervision culminating in the writing of a paper or research report. IND.

WGSS 499. Honors in Women, Gender and Sexualty Studies. 3 Hours S.

An individual research project under the direction of a specialist in the area of the student's interest. May be counted towards the total hours required for the major. Prerequisite: Majors only, with approval of the project adviser and the Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies honors coordinator. IND.

WGSS 510. History of American Women: Colonial Times to 1870. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

A survey of women's history in the United States, which will consider women's roles as housewives, mothers, consumers, workers, and citizens in pre-industrial, commercial and early industrial America. (Same as AMS 510 and HIST 530.) LEC.

WGSS 511. History of American Women: 1870 to Present. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

A survey of women's history in the United States, which includes radical and reform movements, the impact of war and depression, professionalization, immigration, women's work, and the biographies of leading figures in women's history. (Same as AMS 511 and HIST 531.) LEC.

WGSS 512. History of Women and Work in Comparative Perspective. 3 Hours H.

This course explores the connection between historical changes in the labor process and the occupational choices available to women in different countries. Through discussion and analyses of texts, students will evaluate the construction of a gendered division of work as shaped over time by economic, cultural, and political forces. The chronological and geographical focus may vary depending on the instructor. (Same as AMS 512 and HIST 532.) LEC.

WGSS 513. Modern American Women in Film and Literature. 3 Hours H.

Exploration of the images both real and ideal found in twentieth century popular culture. By using popular culture as social history, it examines the connections between these images and the life experiences of women in the family, at work, in war, and in economic depression. LEC.

WGSS 515. Gender and Sexuality in Greek Culture. 3 Hours H.

This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Greek antiquity. Contents will vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as CLSX 515.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and "Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC.

WGSS 516. Gender and Sexuality in Roman Culture. 3 Hours HL / H.

This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Roman antiquity. Contents vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as CLSX 516.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and "Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC.

WGSS 521. Women and Violence. 3 Hours S.

An examination of research on women and violence, including rape, domestic violence, sexual harassment, stalking, and child sexual abuse. The nature, prevalence, causes, and consequences of violence against women are discussed. (Same as PSYC 521.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

WGSS 530. Sex and Gender in New Media. 3 Hours S.

This course examines the construction of sexuality and gender in new media platforms. Students will explore how contemporary media platforms are used to reify dominant representations, and produce new or alternative expressions of identity, culture or political engagement. LEC.

WGSS 549. History of Feminist Theory. 3 Hours H.

This discussion course will cover the development of feminist theories from the late Middle Ages to the 1970s. Reading will include Pisan, Wollstonecraft, Mill, Freud, Woolf, Beauvoir, Friedan, Daly, Kristeva, and others. (Same as HIST 649.) LEC.

WGSS 560. Race, Gender, and Post-Colonial Discourses. 3 Hours H.

An examination of the ways in which the concept of race, gender, and post-colonialism frame African literatures from the Caribbean, North America, and the continent itself. The course will focus on these discourses grounding them in critical frameworks within which they can be contextually analyzed and evaluated, at the same time examining their impact in literary praxis and theory. (Same as AAAS 560.) LEC.

WGSS 562. Women and Politics. 3 Hours AE41 / S.

This course exposes students to contemporary research on women and politics by surveying the sub-fields of political science. Topics include women's representation in the U.S., women and U.S. public policy, gender and legal theory, international women's movements, women and revolution, and women as political elites. We will examine the ways in which feminist theory and women's activism have challenged the narrow focus of the discipline as well as redefined women's place in society. (Same as POLS 562.) Prerequisite: Sophomore level or consent of the instructor. LEC.

WGSS 563. Gender, Sexuality and the Law. 3 Hours AE41/GE11 / H.

This course provides a broad introduction to Western legal systems (especially the American legal system) and then focuses on how sex, gender, and sexuality operate in and are understood by those systems and how the law is a site of social and political struggle. Topics may include intimate relations, First Amendment law, sexual harassment and employment discrimination; reproduction policies and governance; rape and sexual assault; gender identity discrimination; and the legal understandings and constructions of equal protection and due process. No prior knowledge of legal concepts is necessary. LEC.

WGSS 565. Gender, Culture, and Migration. 3 Hours H.

This course brings a human face to the 21st century manifestation of globalization by focusing on the issues of culture, gender and migration. How do these three aspects create the "global village" amongst both the host and donor peoples? When people move from one place to another, what do they leave behind, what do they take with them? What is gained, or lost by the host community? What is the impact of migration on a specific group's and individual's sense of identity? How has migration affected the people's construction, understanding, and practice of gender? Given their primary roles in the home and within the culture, these questions and more are posed with particular attention to women. Migration theories, interviews and personal testimonies as well as literary and dramatic works are critical to our analyses of the issues raised and enable us to hold conversations with, and listen to the stories of the ordinary people who make globalization happen and sustain it. (Same as AAAS 565 and AMS 565.) LEC.

WGSS 570. Men and Masculinities. 3 Hours H.

An intensive examination of the history and theory of masculinities in the Western world. Students become acquainted with some of the key theories of men and masculinities, and develop research projects on a topic negotiated with the instructor. (Same as HIST 626, HWC 570.) Prerequisite: An upper-division course in HIST, HWC, or WGSS; or permission of instructor. LEC.

WGSS 573. Judaism and Sexuality. 3 Hours H.

An exploration of the complex interactions of Judaism, Jewishness, and sexuality. The course serves as a basic introduction to traditional Jewish understandings of gender and power, love and sex, and the body and embodiment. It also introduces the changes undergone by this tradition under the impact of contemporary feminism and queer theory. (Same as JWSH 563, REL 573.) Prerequisite: At least one course in Jewish Studies or Religious Studies, or permission of instructor. LEC.

WGSS 575. Body, Self and Society. 3 Hours H.

An intensive examination of the role of the human body in the creation of personal and social identities in the Western world. Students become acquainted with contemporary theories of embodiment and the senses as they are applied to a variety of historical themes, and develop research projects on a topic negotiated with the instructor. (Same as HIST 625, HWC 575.) Prerequisite: An upper-division course in HIST, HWC, or WGSS; or permission of instructor. LEC.

WGSS 580. Feminism and Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

This seminar will introduce students to feminism in anthropology, including feminist theories, methodologies, ethnographic styles, and the history of women in the discipline since the late 1800s. Emphasis is on the social contexts for feminist theory-building since the 1960s and changing ideas about gender and power. (Same as ANTH 580.) Prerequisite: One of the following: ANTH 389, ANTH 460, WGSS 201; or permission of instructor. LEC.

WGSS 583. Love, Sex, and Globalization. 3 Hours S.

Escalating transnational flows of information, commodities, and people have created innumerable kinds of "intimate" contacts on a global scale, such as mail order brides, child adoption, sex tourism, commodified romance, and emotional labor. Exploring the ways that cultural artifacts of intimacy are rendered, fetishized, and reified in a free market economy, this course examines how discourses on love and sex encounter, confront, and negotiate the logics of the capitalist market, the discrepant narratives of (colonial) modernity, and the ethics of pleasure. In so doing, this course navigates the treacherous interplay among emotions-specifically love, sex, and money, seeking the potential and limits of cultural politics of emotions. (Same as ANTH 583.) LEC.

WGSS 600. Contemporary Feminist Political Theory. 3 Hours S.

A detailed introduction to feminist thought post-1960. Examines feminism in relation to the categories of political theory: liberal feminism, socialist feminism, radical feminism, and postmodern feminism. Within these categories and separately, we will also consider feminism as it is influenced by women traditionally excluded from mainstream feminist thought, namely U.S. women of color and women of post-colonial societies. (Same as POLS 600.) Prerequisite: Sophomore level or consent of the instructor. LEC.

WGSS 601. Seminar in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. 3 Hours AE61 / S.

Investigation of a topic related to women, gender or sexuality from an interdisciplinary perspective. Open only to women's studies majors and human sexuality majors. Suggested for the senior year. LEC.

WGSS 630. Politics of Identity. 3 Hours AE41 / S.

This seminar explores the nature of identity and how identity is relevant to politics and policy with a focus on political attitudes and behavior, institutions, and public policy. Topics include individual and group identity, identities such as gender, racial, sexual orientation, and partisan, and the enduring importance of identity for understanding politics as well as the policy process. The approach is multidisciplinary but political science perspectives are relied on more heavily. (Same as POLS 630.) Prerequisite: Sophomore level or consent of the instructor. LEC.

WGSS 640. Politics of Reproductive Policy. 3 Hours S.

Reproductive policy has historically been a highly politicized policy arena, which has elicited attention from the political community as well as the public. This course moves beyond the popular rhetoric associated with reproductive issues, by critically investigating the history, development, implementation and the relative success of various reproductive policies in the United States. These policies are compared to, and assessed against, policies governing similar topics in various countries. (Same as POLS 640.) Prerequisite: Sophomore level or consent of the instructor. LEC.

WGSS 646. Witches in European History and Historiography. 3 Hours H.

This course examines witches, witchcraft, and magic in Europe in the late medieval and early modern period (approximately 1200-1700 C.E.). Particular emphasis will be on the variety of historical and anthropological approaches that have been used to study the subject and their meaning in the context of gender politics and gender theory. (Same as HIST 646.) LEC.

WGSS 650. Service Learning in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. 3 Hours S.

This course, to be taken in the senior year, is designed to give students the opportunity to apply women's studies knowledge and ideas gained through course work to real-life situations in various agencies and women's centers. Open to Women's Studies majors and others with significant Women's Studies backgrounds. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor is required. FLD.

WGSS 652. Jazz and American Culture. 3 Hours H.

This course considers cultural and social histories of jazz, from the 1920s through the present day, as sites for exploring ideological struggles over such fields as race, class, gender, sexuality, democracy, capitalism, freedom, community, Americanness, and globalization in the U.S. The course will explore such questions as the following: What music was called jazz at what times and places? What did it mean to whom? Who played it? Who wrote about it? Who listened to it? Who danced to it? Who policed it? Who produced it? Who used it to rebel? Who used it to survive? What did all of these practices mean to participants? The course will examine struggles over social meanings in the U.S. through a study of jazz performance, labor, representation, marketing, consumption, censorship, and historiography. Prerequisite: A course in American studies, American history, or consent of instructor. (Same as AMS 650.) LEC.

WGSS 653. Gender, War, and Peace. 3 Hours S.

This course explores ways in which militarization and warfare are gendered processes. We ask, what does war tell us about gender, and what does gender tell us about war? Though the majority of fighters are men, women are essential to war efforts. They also represent a high proportion of the casualties of war. Yet women are rarely examined in relation to war; thus we work to uncover women's experiences of war. We also look to women's contributions to the peace movement in terms of both theory and practice, asking: Is peace a feminist issue? Should feminists support women's access to combat positions or oppose the military? What if women ruled the world--would that end wars? Does militarized masculinity harm men more than benefit them? How do states mobilize citizens to war and how is the process gendered? (Same as POLS 653.) Prerequisite: Sophomore level or consent of the instructor. LEC.

WGSS 660. Human Reproduction: Culture, Power, and Politics. 3 Hours S.

This seminar analyzes and critiques the socially constructed nature of reproductive practices and their articulation with relations of power. Topics range from conception to menopause, infertility to population. Cases are drawn from a wide variety of cultural contexts. This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence (beginning with ANTH 650) that examines in detail biological and cultural determinants of human reproduction. (Same as ANTH 660.) Prerequisite: ANTH 650, or 6 hours in Women's Studies, or permission of instructor. LEC.

WGSS 662. Gender and Politics in Africa. 3 Hours S.

This course is designed to explore the field of gender and African politics. We begin by paying particular attention to African women's political roles during the pre-colonial and colonial society. Next, we examine the impetus, methods, and path of liberation struggles and how gender roles were shaped, shifted, and changed during these struggles. The majority of the class focuses on current issues in African politics, including gender and development; HIV/AIDS and women's health; gender and militarism. We also explore women's roles in political institutions; civil society organizations; trade and labor unions; and transnational movements. We also examine contemporary constructions of masculinity and femininity in African states and explore how these constructions affect social policy and national political agendas. (Same as AAAS 662.) LEC.

WGSS 665. Women, Health, and Healing in Latin America. 3 Hours S.

This seminar uses a life-cycle approach to examine women's health (physical, mental, and spiritual) and their roles as healers. Special consideration is given to the effects of development programs on well-being, access to health care, and hanging roles for women as healers. Cases will be drawn from a variety of Latin American contexts. (Same as ANTH 665 and LAA 665.) Prerequisite: 6 hours coursework in Anthropology and/or Women's Studies and/or Latin American Studies. LEC.

WGSS 689. Conceptual Issues in Human Sexuality. 3 Hours S.

An examination of the social construction of sexuality and research methods and issues relevant to sexuality. These concepts are applied to various topics, such as defining and conceptualizing sex and gender, sexual dysfunction, sexual orientation, the social control of sexuality, sexual coercion and abuse, and abstinence-only sex education. The course does not cover anatomical or physiological aspects of sexuality. (Same as PSYC 689.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or WGSS 201. LEC.

WGSS 696. Studies in: _____. 3 Hours S.

Interdisciplinary study of different aspects of women's studies in different semesters. LEC.

WGSS 701. Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours.

A research seminar in women's studies. Instructor and topic will vary. LEC.

WGSS 702. Women, Gender and Sexuality in the Archives. 3 Hours.

The pioneering historian Mary Beard once said "No documents. No history." While historical methods have broadened since Beard's time to include oral history, public history and more, the archive still remains central to scholarship on individuals, groups, social movements and more. In this class we will explore the usefulness of the archive for research in women, gender and sexuality topics as well as learn practical methods of archival research. We will read theoretical assessments of the archive, case studies based on archival research, and discuss new phenomena such as the digital archive and community archive. LEC.

WGSS 770. Research in Men and Masculinties. 3 Hours.

An intensive examination of the history and theory of masculinities in the Western World since the sixteenth century. Students will become acquainted with some of the key theories of men and masculinities, examine in depth the interplay between manhood and modernity, and develop research projects on a topic negotiated with the instructor. May be repeated if content varies sufficiently. (Same as HWC 770.) LEC.

WGSS 775. Advanced Study in Body and Senses. 3 Hours.

An intensive examination of the role of the human body in the creation of personal and social identities in the West since the sixteenth century. Emphasis is on understanding how contemporary theories of embodiment are applied to concrete historical or contemporary problems. May be repeated if course content varies sufficiently. (Same as HWC 775.) LEC.

WGSS 789. Anthropology of Gender: Advanced Seminar in the Four Fields. 3 Hours.

This seminar is intended primarily for graduate students in anthropology or other disciplines who share an interest in any of the subdisciplines of anthropology (archaeology, linguistics, biological anthropology, and sociocultural anthropology) and/or anthropological theories and methods. Undergraduates pursuing Honors or other major research projects are also encouraged to participate. Students will receive training in the contemporary theories, research, and pedagogies informing the anthropology of gender. Class participants will explore how these materials intersect with their current thesis or research projects and develop syllabi specific to their subdiscipline. (Same as ANTH 789). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

WGSS 797. Directed Readings. 1-3 Hours.

Directed reading in an area of women's studies in which there is no appropriate course in the offerings of the Women's Studies Program, but in which there is a member of the cooperating graduate faculty competent and willing to direct the program of study. RSH.

WGSS 800. History of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the field of women, gender, and sexuality studies, paying particular attention to its development, its reception by and influence on academic disciplines, and its institutionalization. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. SEM.

WGSS 801. Feminist Theory. 3 Hours.

A survey of contemporary feminist theories produced within and across disciplines (including but not limited to, eco-feminism, and liberal, cultural, materialist, psychoanalytic, radical, and black feminist thought). Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. LEC.

WGSS 802. Feminist Methodologies. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the methods used in feminist research in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences (e.g., quantitative and qualitative research methods, archival research, and oral histories). We will consider examples of applications of each method, the strengths and limitations of each method, and how each method relates to feminist theories and principles. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. SEM.

WGSS 803. Topics in Feminist Pedagogy: _____. 0.5 Hours.

The goal of the course is to teach students to teach. By reading core texts of feminist pedagogy, understanding critical theories, and attending seminars at the Center for Teaching Excellence selected by instructor and student, students will learn how to present knowledge and stimulate learning in the classroom, as well as such practical skills as leading discussion sections, preparing and presenting class sessions, developing syllabi, devising fair grading and helpful advising, and solving pedagogical problems like maintaining civility in the classroom and coping with academic misconduct. Must be repeated twice for a total of 1 credit hour while actively teaching. Prerequisite: Must be Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies graduate students. SEM.

WGSS 804. Topics in Professional Development: _____. 3 Hours.

The goal of this course is to train students in the skills essential to becoming effective scholars and educators, and successful members of the profession. The material to be covered by these three iterations includes 1) the ethics and practice of feminist research (e.g., protection of human subjects, conflicts of interest, confidentiality, legal strictures); 2) the practical aspects of producing knowledge (e.g., writing research papers, proper citation methods, conference presenting, responding to peer reviews); and 3) acquiring and securing a place in the work force (e.g., CV preparation, job interviews, grant writing, getting promotion [and, in the academy, tenure]). Prerequisite: Must be Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies graduate students. SEM.

WGSS 810. Comparative Sexualities. 3 Hours.

Employing an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective, this course introduces the study of human sexuality in various disciplines. Students will also gain an understanding of the historical development and cross-cultural analysis of sexuality research, including the methodological, theoretical, and ethical issues involved in investigating sexual behavior and meanings. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. SEM.

WGSS 821. Woman and Violence. 3 Hours.

An examination of research on women and violence, including rape, domestic violence, sexual harassment, stalking, and child sexual abuse. Research on the nature, prevalence, causes, and consequences of violence against women is discussed. (Same as PSYC 821.) Prerequisite: Six hours in WGSS and/or PSYC, or permission of instructor. LEC.

WGSS 835. Colloquium in the History of Gender. 3 Hours.

This colloquium will cover theoretical and topical readings on the history of manhood, womanhood, and gender systems. (Same as AMS 835 and HIST 895.) LEC.

WGSS 836. Colloquium in United States Women's History. 3 Hours.

This colloquium will cover theoretical and topical readings on the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present. It is designed to familiarize students with the most important and current historiography in the field. (Same as AMS 836 and HIST 896.) LEC.

WGSS 837. Comparative Colloquium in Women's History. 3 Hours.

This colloquium will approach the history of women from a comparative perspective through theoretical and topical readings on women in at least two different cultures. (Same as AMS 837 and HIST 897.) LEC.

WGSS 873. Seminar in United States Women's History. 3 Hours.

This research seminar will focus on the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present. Students will research and write a paper using primary sources, and present those papers to the seminar for evaluation. (Same as HIST 973 and AMS 973.) LEC.

WGSS 880. Advanced Feminist Anthropology: _____. 3-6 Hours.

Intensive consideration of special problems in feminist anthropology. Topics for the semester to be announced. May be repeated for a total of six hours credit. (Same as ANTH 880.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

WGSS 889. Conceptual Issues in Human Sexuality. 3 Hours.

An examination of the social construction of sexuality and research methods and issues relevant to sexuality. These concepts are applied to various topics, such as defining and conceptualizing sex and gender, sexual dysfunction, sexual orientation, the social control of sexuality, sexual coercion and abuse, and abstinence-only sex education. The course does not cover anatomical or physiological aspects of sexuality. (Same as PSYC 889.) Prerequisite: Six hours in WGSS and/or PSYC, or permission of instructor. LEC.

WGSS 898. Research Colloquium. 3 Hours.

This course is the "capstone" to the Women's Studies Graduate Certificate program. Members of the seminar will produce a major paper and will share their research. During the first part of the term a small number of visitors (professors at KU and/or visiting speakers from other universities) will be invited to assign readings and subsequently present their work on women and gender. Students will be expected to attend the Gender Seminar of the Hall Center for the Humanities. Prerequisite: WGSS 801 and at least 3 hours of other graduate work in the Women's Studies graduate certificate program, or by special permission. LEC.

WGSS 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

Original research that is to be incorporated into a PhD dissertation. THE.