This is an archived copy of the 2014-15 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ku.edu.

Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Graduate Programs

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies offers a broad range of graduate professional programs in educational leadership and policy. For complete program information, contact the department.

Graduate programs in educational leadership and policy studies promote the professional and intellectual development of practitioners, teachers, and scholars in this field at all levels of education. The department offers Master of Science in Education degrees in educational administration (K-12), social and cultural studies in education, higher education, and educational technology, as well as Ed.D. and Ph.D. degrees in educational leadership and policy studies with concentrations in educational administration, social and cultural studies in education, higher education, and policy studies, and a focus in educational technology.

Note: Degree requirements are subject to change. Prospective and current students should obtain the current degree requirements from the department.

Courses

ELPS 200. Making Connections Between Schools and Community. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to increase the students' awareness of learning in the classroom and to familiarize them with the role of the school and the community. Institutions and resources that support children and families will be addressed through large and small group sessions and field experiences. Emphasis is given to the diverse nature of schools, communities, and their populations. In addition, the course will acclimate students with the School of Education programs, admissions procedures, and curriculum offerings. Successful completion of this course does not guarantee eventual admission of the School of Education's Teacher Education Program. Prerequisite: Successful completion of C&T 100. LEC.

ELPS 250. Education and Society. 3 Hours. AE41/AE51.

This course provides students with an introduction to key ideas and socio- historical forces that have shaped the contemporary educational system in the United States, drawing upon the disciplines of the historical, philosophical, and social foundations of education. The development of school and community relations will be a point of emphasis. LEC.

ELPS 301. Educational Technology in Elementary-Middle Education. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is on developing integration strategies and acquiring computer skills for using instructional technology and educational software, digital media, and information technologies appropriate to elementary and middle school teaching environments. Students will gain expertise in (a) the selection of appropriate instructional technologies and digital media for use in the classroom; (b) production of technology-based instructional materials; and (c) the evaluation and validation of a variety of electronic information sources. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

ELPS 302. Educational Technology in Middle/Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is on developing integration strategies and acquiring computer skills for using instructional technology and educational software, digital media, and information technologies appropriate to middle school and high school teaching environments. Students will gain expertise in (a) the selection of appropriate instructional technologies and digital media for use in the classroom; (b) production of technology-based instructional materials; and (c) the evaluation and validation of a variety of electronic information sources. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

ELPS 437. Politics and Governance of Public Schools. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students not pursuing K-12 teaching or administrative positions to the organizational and legal foundations of the American educational system. LEC.

ELPS 450. Foundations of Education. 3 Hours.

A historical approach to the major social and philosophical foundations of American education, with an emphasis on the relation of educational theory to classroom practice. LEC.

ELPS 490. Senior Internship I. 4 Hours.

Supervised field experience in an on-site educational setting that provides the student an opportunity to study and participate in the professional activities of a designated educational setting with emphasis on the planning, implementation, and evaluation of such activities. Regular conferences with faculty to evaluate student progress will be scheduled. Prerequisite: Admission to the non-certificate baccalaureate program. LEC.

ELPS 491. Senior Internship II. 4 Hours.

Supervised field experience in an on-site educational setting with increasing emphasis placed on an integration of formal learning and in site experience. Regular conferences with faculty will be scheduled. Prerequisite: Admission to the non-certificate baccalaureate program. FLD.

ELPS 497. Independent Study in:. 1-2 Hours.

Only one enrollment permitted each semester. A maximum of four hours will apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Recommendation of advisor and consent of instructor. IND.

ELPS 537. The Governance and Organization of Schools. 3 Hours.

The course provides the prospective teacher with an overview of the legal foundations of the American educational system including the ways schools and school districts are organized and run; the role of various levels of government and various governmental and educational officials in controlling education; the rights of students and teachers; the terms, conditions, and responsibilities of teacher employment. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

ELPS 540. Ethics in Education. 3 Hours.

This course examines practices and policies occurring in k-12 and postsecondary educational institutions through the lenses provided by ethics. During the semester, we will read, discuss, and write about ethics in education from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Prerequisite: Junior standing or higher. The course is suitable for advanced undergraduate and master¿s degree seeking students. LEC.

ELPS 550. Childhood and Youth in America. 3 Hours.

A study of the changing role and character of childhood and youth as stages of life in the context of American educational and cultural history. LEC.

ELPS 598. Special Course:. 1-5 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education students, primarily for undergraduates. LEC.

ELPS 627. Growing Up in Urbanizing America. 3 Hours.

A study of the changing role and character of childhood and youth as stages of life in the context of American urban and social history, with particular attention to education and human development. Prerequisite: Junior standing or higher. LEC.

ELPS 652. Residential Staff Skill Enhancement and Administration. 2-3 Hours.

This special course of study in residential staff skill enhancement and administration is an exploration of concepts and skills necessary for becoming an effective paraprofessional staff member in a residential living unit. Each class session will include presentations and experiential learning on topics to develop or improve interpersonal skills and skill in dealing with special concerns. The course is required or recommended for all residence and scholarship hall staff and open to upperclass or graduate students interested in student personnel work. LEC.

ELPS 715. Understanding Research in Education. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the concepts and skills involved in understanding and analyzing research in education and related areas. The course provides an overview of basic, general knowledge of various research methodologies. Students should expect to study much of this material in greater depth through additional course work before being prepared to conduct independent research. However, this course should enhance their ability to locate, read, comprehend, and critically analyze research artilces and reports. Topics in the course include quantitative and qualitative methods and designs, historical and descriptive research, and program evaluation. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate standing in the School of Education. LEC.

ELPS 750. Principalship. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the role, responsibilities, expectations and major duties of elementary, middle, and high school building administrators. Students are presented typical problems faced by school administrators through simulations and role playing and are expected, through reflection and discussion, to develop viable solutions. LEC.

ELPS 751. Educational Finance. 3 Hours.

A description and analysis of national, state, and local strategies for the financial support of education, utilizing social, economic, legal, and political frameworks. Particular attention to the principles of revenue acquisition and distribution at the local and state level for public school operations, with analysis of how these principles apply to Kansas. Designed for the wide variety of educational practitioners regardless of organizational and degree levels. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC.

ELPS 752. Education Law. 3 Hours.

A study of legal principles and issues affecting educational policy making and practice with emphasis on student and teacher rights, equity, and the administration of schools. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC.

ELPS 753. Introduction to Personnel Administration in Education. 3 Hours.

An overview of the theory and practice of personnel administration. The course focuses on the processes of recruitment, selection, training and development, evaluation, compensation, equal employment opportunity, and labor relations. LEC.

ELPS 754. Analysis of Administrative Problems. 3 Hours.

An introduction to various methods of problem identification; strategies of information gathering; schemes for the analysis of qualitative and quantitative data; models of problem resolution and decision making; and communication methods appropriate for differing audiences. Students will build basic computer, library, decision and communication skills useful in future administrative practice and subsequent coursework. LEC.

ELPS 755. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

An overview of the theory and practice of the management, recruitment, selection, compensation, placement, and development of personnel in the school setting. LEC.

ELPS 757. Education in American Society. 3 Hours.

A study of the roles and goals of education in the United States, the interrelationships among schools and students, teachers, administrators, and parents, and the culture of schools. LEC.

ELPS 760. Integration of Educational Technology. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on strategies for integrating educational technology in K-12 schools, universities, government or industry. Topics include applying technology in: a) understanding basic technology operations b) planning and designing learning experiences, c) curriculum development, d) assessment and evaluation e) productivity and professional practices, and considering f) social, ethical, legal, and human issues. Students produce a comprehensive electronic portfolio that describes the theoretical perspectives that guide their technology integrations strategies and evidence that demonstrates their competencies. LEC.

ELPS 772. Philosophical Problems in Comparative Education. 3 Hours.

A study of significant philosophical problems encountered when comparing educational systems. Special emphasis on the implications of axiological analysis for educational theory and practice in different areas of the world. Relationships among the social sciences, philosophy, and the international or cross-cultural venture in education. The importance of systematic value-theory in comparative research and international education. LEC.

ELPS 773. School and Society in Comparative Education. 3 Hours.

Analysis of the role of social science in comparative education as perceived by different philosophies or schools of thought, such as Marxism, phenomenology, empiricism, pragmatism, and linguistic analysis. LEC.

ELPS 774. Modern Educational Theorists. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of prominent European thinkers who have contributed to educational theory and practice (e.g., Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Herbert, Froebel, Montessori, Nietzsche, Freud, Piaget, Ortegay Gassit, etc.). Prerequisite: ELPS 770 or ELPS 771 is recommended. LEC.

ELPS 777. Problems in Contemporary Educational Theory. 3 Hours.

Select explorations into such provocative and problematic trends in current educational theory as Marxism, behaviorism, phenomenology, existentialism, analytic philosophy, hedonism, nonverbal education, etc. Prerequisite: ELPS 770 or ELPS 771 is recommended. LEC.

ELPS 780. Introduction to Higher Education Administration. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for beginning master's degree students and for doctoral students who have had no previous administrative experience in college or university settings. Students will be introduced to the function and responsibilities of major administrative divisions of a college or university and to the major tasks of administration: planning, programming, budgeting, staffing, managing. An emphasis will be placed on current issues facing higher education and students will be introduced to the major journals of the field. As part of the course requirements, students will spend some time familiarizing themselves with one or more administrative offices on a college campus. Prerequisite: Admission to study in higher education at the graduate level. LEC.

ELPS 781. Student Affairs Administration in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to include the study of the history and development of student personnel services in higher education, the role and function of the student affairs administrator, contemporary issues and problems, and an understanding of the organization and role of student affairs administration within higher education settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the higher education program or permission of instructor. LEC.

ELPS 798. Special Course:. 1-5 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for graduate students. LEC.

ELPS 810. Educational Media Development. 3 Hours.

Media surrounds today's learning environments. How can you effectively engage learners with multimedia, meaningful interactions, and motivational strategies? This course will take a hands-on practical approach to creating interactive educational multimedia products including, but not limited to, digital images, movies, podcast, Web publishing and educational games. Also, students will learn about the underlying learning theories of educational media development. LEC.

ELPS 811. Constructivist Learning Technologies. 3 Hours.

This course explores the design and use of new educational technologies to support constructivist learning. Throughout the course, students will (1) get hands-on experiences with emerging educational technologies, (2) examine how the underlying learning theories are reified into concrete learning environments, and (3) analyze how the affordances of new technologies (e.g., modeling and visualization) can facilitate the constructivist learning processes. This course is suitable for students who wish to develop greater knowledge about the ways emerging computer technologies can empower constructivist learning. Prerequisite: C&T 770. LEC.

ELPS 812. Design of Educational Technology. 3 Hours.

This course introduces instructional design theory and production techniques for developing educational technology resources and systems. Students apply their understandings of design and education theories as they work in teams to develop real-world applications of educational technology for specific clients. LEC.

ELPS 820. Practicum in Educational Technology. 1-3 Hours.

Supervised practice in a media center in selection, classifying, designing, producing, and/or managing instructional materials. Prerequisite: C&T 770 and C&T 871. FLD.

ELPS 830. Foundations of Multicultural Education. 3 Hours.

This class provides students with an understanding multicultural education as an instructional concept, educational reform movement, and systemic process meant to ensure educational equity for all people, especially those who have been inadequately served and/or historically discriminated against because of their racial/ethnic or linguistic backgrounds, gender or sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and special needs. Students will examine different theoretical approaches that inform the practice of multicultural education and explore the contribution of various social sciences to the field. LEC.

ELPS 831. Sociology of Education. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to the sociology of education. This course is designed to fulfill the doctoral core requirement for social, historical and philosophical foundations of education. Specific topics will include: conflict over the purposes of education; how those purposes are-or are not-translated into actual classroom life; how educational systems have developed historically, how status, and more specifically race, class and gender relations, affect student experiences; and contemporary policy and reform movements. LEC.

ELPS 832. History of Educational Thought. 3 Hours.

An examination of the major ideas that have shaped practice in the schools. Emphasis is placed on assisting the student with the development of a coherent and consistent personal philosophy of education upon which administrative practice can be based. LEC.

ELPS 833. Social Context of Urban Education. 3 Hours.

This course examines education in urban communities through the foundational disciplines of history, philosophy, and the social sciences. Particular attention is given to ways in which the changing social and political contexts of American cities affect the educational process. LEC.

ELPS 834. History and Philosophy of Education. 3 Hours.

A comprehensive study of influential persons and movements in the development of educational thought, Eastern and Western, from ancient times to the present. Emphasis on those ideas and historical roots which are relevant to contemporary issues in teaching and school administration. LEC.

ELPS 835. Philosophy of Education. 3 Hours.

An analytic inquiry into basic philosophical positions and issues relevant to education. The difference between ELPS 770 and ELPS 771 is that the latter is topically arranged and does not necessarily follow a historical sequence; it normally proceeds by problems and schools of thought. LEC.

ELPS 837. History of Education and Culture in America. 3 Hours.

A study of the relation between education and culture in America from colonial times to the present. American schools are considered in the wider context of cultural and social change. LEC.

ELPS 838. History of Childhood and Youth in America. 3 Hours.

An exploration of changing attitudes toward children and youth, their subjective experience, their impact on adults, and the conditions that shaped their development. Special attention will be given to the relationship between the changing nature of childhood as a social and cultural category and the development of the education profession. LEC.

ELPS 839. Historical Inquiry in Education. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to the methodology of historical research in education. This course is designed to fulfill the doctoral core requirement for research methods in education for students interested in doing this type of research. Specific topics will include: the historiography of education; working with primary and secondary documents; oral history as method and documentation, quantitative approaches to history; constructing historical narratives; the question of interpretation. LEC.

ELPS 850. Educational Facilities. 3 Hours.

A study of the principles and processes of developing functional educational facilities. Special emphasis placed on the educational planning that precedes and provides the basis for architectural planning. Among topics considered are plant utilization analysis, enrollment projections, site and equipment needs, fiscal and legal constraints, environmental factors, and the development of educational specifications. Designed for both building and central office level administrators. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC.

ELPS 851. Supervision of Student Teaching. 2 Hours.

A study of the organization and functions of student-teaching programs. Emphasis on the development of effective interpersonal relationships among school administrators, cooperating teachers, university supervisors, and student teachers. Designed for both administrative and instructional personnel. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC.

ELPS 852. School Resource Management. 3 Hours.

An examination of the sources and uses of fiscal resources in education including underlying concepts from economic theory, the impact of values on fiscal policy, state funding formulas, and school budgeting and accounting practices. LEC.

ELPS 853. Staff Evaluation and Development. 3 Hours.

An examination of current trends in personnel evaluation with a focus on clinical supervision and adult development. Students will participate in simulation exercises to develop skills in classroom observation, conferencing techniques, evaluation of teaching artifacts, and the construction of staff development plans. LEC.

ELPS 854. The Student in Society. 3 Hours.

A study of children and youth with particular emphasis on demographic characteristics of the population served by schools and implications of those characteristics for schools and schooling. LEC.

ELPS 855. Teacher Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Teacher Evaluation is based on clinical, empirical and theoretical information related to effective teacher evaluation behavior from the administrative perspective. It is intended to provide exposure to competencies essential to effective evaluation of teaching performance. Evaluation knowledge, skill and performance are acquired and developed through reading, discussion, active teaching of content related to teacher evaluation and practicing observation, recording and conferencing skills. A variety of approaches is considered, but behaviorally-anchored measurement of teaching behavior is emphasized. Opportunities and needs for improvement are identified with the assistance of video-taped diagnosis of conferencing behavior. Prerequisite: Two of the following: ELPS 750, ELPS 752, ELPS 753, or C&T 840. LEC.

ELPS 856. Law and Special Education. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on laws that apply to special education. The American legal system, particularly in respect to special education, the constitutional and statutory provisions of federal and state law and the judicial decisions interpreting those laws are reviewed. The course relates equal protection, procedural due process, and substantive due process doctrines to school practices affecting disabled children and examines the sex principles of P.L. 94-142 and similar principles in state legislation. This course is not the equivalent of or a substitute for ELPS 752. (Same as SPED 851.) Prerequisite: SPED 750 or permission of instructor. LEC.

ELPS 857. Disabled Citizens, Public Policy and Policy Analysis. 3 Hours.

To train students to analyze public policy that affects disabled citizens, various models of analysis are brought to bear on federal policy (education, transportation, housing, institutionalization, protection and advocacy, medical assistance, employment, vocational rehabilitation and others). Not valid for core requirement in history and/or philosophy of education. (Same as SPED 852.) Prerequisite: SPED 851 or SPED 750 or permission of instructor. LEC.

ELPS 858. Professional Ethics, Public Values and Disabled Citizens. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the issues that professionals (educators, physicians, allied health providers, attorneys and others) and families of disabled people face in the context of public values and attitudes and rules of law. The issues include, without limitation, education, treatment and non-treatment. Not valid for core requirement in history and/or philosophy of education. (Same as SPED 853.) Prerequisite: SPED 750, SPED 851, SPED 852 or permission of instructor. LEC.

ELPS 870. Philosophy of Education II. 3 Hours.

An exploration of select areas in philosophy, such as emphasis on value-theory or epistemology or metaphysics, and their implications for educational theory. Normally a limited number of authors will also be selected for monographic treatment. Prerequisite: ELPS 770 or ELPS 771 is recommended. LEC.

ELPS 871. Introduction to Qualitative Research. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the foundations of and techniques associated with qualitative research methods. Students will practice interview and participant observation skills and will analyze and interpret data. Additional topics include crafting qualitative research questions, ethics of fieldwork, and establishing trustworthiness of data. Common traditions of qualitative methods employed in education and other related fields will be introduced. LEC.

ELPS 880. The Community/Junior College. 3 Hours.

A survey of the history and development of the community/junior college. Particular emphasis will be given to the student, the faculty, the curricula, administration, and finance. The course is intended to provide a general understanding of the operation and concerns of today's community/junior college for the current or potential community/junior college staff member. LEC.

ELPS 881. Seminar in Leadership. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this seminar is to explore leadership in education, particularly higher education, from a variety of perspectives. Readings come from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, such as sociology, organizational behavior, and psychology. We consider various aspects of leadership and analyze the leader from a symbolic perspective, as a manager of meaning and critical change agent. We then challenge ourselves to deconstruct our leadership realities with the help of several critical perspectives as we prepare to examine who the leaders are as well as who they will, and need to, be in the educational organizations of tomorrow. LEC.

ELPS 882. Higher Education in the United States. 3 Hours.

The purpose of the course is to acquaint students in higher education, and students from other areas who intend to work in the post-secondary setting, with the history, philosophy and development of higher education in the United States. The course focuses on three periods: 1) the founding of Harvard to 1965; 2) dissent, disruption, and change, 1965-1979; and 3) the future and crucial issues, the 1980's. European higher education and its early influence on higher education in the United States is also examined. LEC.

ELPS 883. The College Student. 3 Hours.

The characteristics of college students; impact of college on student behavior, changing attitudes, values, beliefs, and the implications of recent research on traditional and new students for instructional and administrative practices. LEC.

ELPS 884. Research on College Students. 3 Hours.

Examination of the American college student from societal, development, research, and institutional perspectives and to review the policy implications of these findings for college and university administrators and faculty. Topics include research and theory concerning the college student experience, the diverse nature of the student body and its implications for institutional policy and practice, and formulation of individual philosophies and priorities applicable to working with college students. LEC.

ELPS 885. Assessment and Program Evaluation in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Nature, objectives, and basic procedures of assessment and program evaluation as applied to the various aspects of higher education settings. In addition to basic procedures for evaluating programs, topics covered include accreditation, program review, benchmarking, student outcomes assessment, and evaluation of teaching in colleges and universities. Prerequisite: ELPS 715 or equivalent. LEC.

ELPS 886. Theory into Practice in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

This course is required as a final course for all master's students in higher education. It is designed to prepare students for professional life after graduation. Using a case study approach, students will examine the reality of practice in a variety of higher educational settings including relevant political and ethical factors. Prerequisite: Higher education students in last semester of master's coursework. LEC.

ELPS 893. Advanced Building Leadership Internship. 2 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences to enhance the necessary leadership skills of a building/district leaders. Activities will include building/district level resource assessment, data analysis, professional development of teachers/principals (and district level professionals), and cooperative planning with teachers and administrators around responsibilities of curriculum, instruction, resource management and student achievement. Prerequisite: Completion (at the University of Kansas) of all certification program (MS/EdD) requirements for the Building/District Leadership Licenses. FLD.

ELPS 895. Internship. 1-5 Hours.

The on site development of the skills necessary to effectively function as a school building leader. Activities will be tailored to the needs of individual students in consultation with a university advisor and a field advisor. FLD.

ELPS 896. Seminar in:. 1-4 Hours.

LEC.

ELPS 897. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and instructor. IND.

ELPS 898. Master's Project. 1-4 Hours.

RSH.

ELPS 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

THE.

ELPS 948. Research in Education Policy and Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to methods of inquiry in education policy and leadership studies. It is designed to help doctoral students explore possible research interests, formulate research questions, and to review a rich variety of approaches to inquiry in the field of education. Specific topics include: interview- and observation-driven studies, ethnography, feminist and narrative methods, legal and historical methods, questionnaire-driven studies, quantitative evaluation studies, and studies using administrative and large national data sources. LEC.

ELPS 950. Educational Policy Making and Reform. 3 Hours.

An analysis of patterns of influence, organizations, and governmental agencies which impact education at the community, state and national levels. Particular emphasis is placed on analysis of policy development process and the relationship of policy to administration. Recommended to students in educational administration and higher education. LEC.

ELPS 951. Supervision of Instruction. 3 Hours.

A study of the principles and techniques necessary for coordinating, monitoring, and improving the educational programs of elementary and secondary schools. LEC.

ELPS 952. School Finance: Policy and Practice. 3 Hours.

The objective of this course is to understand the financial systems and mechanisms used by states in the funding of elementary and secondary education in the United States. In simple language, we will be concerned with five basic issues: (1) Where the money comes from; (2) How it is redistributed; (3) How it is spent; (4) The relative effectiveness of spending decisions including selected international comparisons; and (5) How the previous four financial activities participate in a common financial ecology. The course provides an overview of theory and concepts central to the understanding of school finance with an emphasis on policy issues. It also examines the mechanics of school finance funding in light of state policies. LEC.

ELPS 953. District Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of theory and research in personnel administration. The focus will be on current literature dealing with empirical assessments of personnel theory and techniques. Specific concepts to be considered include the following: educator characteristics, job analysis and design, personnel recruitment, selection and evaluation techniques, staffing and development, and labor relations. Prerequisite: ELPS 753 or its equivalent. LEC.

ELPS 954. Sociology of Educational Organizations. 3 Hours.

This class is an overview of basic and advanced sociological and political theories of organization, with specific application to issues and problems in K-12 education. It is designed for graduate students and practicing educational leaders and administrators who intend to utilize research on organizations in their studies of the governance of schools, the sociology and politics of education, and education policy. The topics covered include the origins and nature of modern bureaucracy, formal structure and function, organizational control, transaction cost economics, population ecology, resource dependence, the new institutionalism, organizational effectiveness and legitimacy, organizational culture, power and politics, and change. LEC.

ELPS 955. District Business Management. 3 Hours.

This course emphasizes skills for effective and efficient business and financial management of school districts in a Kansas or Missouri context. Basic topics include: Short range and long range financial planning, analysis of financial statements, budget preparation, fund accounting and financial reporting, contracting of services including transportation and food services, staff salaries and benefits and insurance. The course also includes a number of strategic methods for institutional planning including: Cost Benefit Analysis, Cost Effectiveness Analysis, and enrollment, revenue and expenditure forecasting techniques. Prerequisite: ELPS 952. LEC.

ELPS 956. District Leadership. 3 Hours.

The focus of the course is the role of the public school district superintendent. Organized study will include assigned readings, lectures, guest speakers, discussion, and the completion of a study project. The course will include consideration of such topics as boardsmanship, community relations, district leadership, professional accountability, district maintenance and operations, professional employment and relationships with other agencies. The course is designed to serve the needs of those graduate students pursuing advanced study with the intention of completing requirements for district certification. Some students will also find the field appealing as an area for dissertation research. Prerequisite: Doctoral status in education administration or permission of instructor. LEC.

ELPS 957. Educational Policy, Ethics and Law. 3 Hours.

Course focuses on use of legal and moral reasoning in analysis of educational policy issues. Specific topics will vary depending on interests of instructor and students and current controversy. Examples of possible topics to be included: school desegregation, teacher collective bargaining, separation of church and school, equal educational opportunity. Prerequisite: ELPS 752, equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

ELPS 958. American Educational Reform Movements: Past and Present. 3 Hours.

An examination of the origin, nature, and consequences of educational reform in the United States. The primary goal is to attain a balanced evaluation of current educational reform. LEC.

ELPS 959. Organization and Administration of Services for Exceptional Children. 3 Hours.

To aid administrators and prospective administrators responsible for organizing and administering programs of education for exceptional children, state and federal guidelines and regulations, legal aspects and financing of special education, planning a program, administering special services. (Same as SPED 971.) Prerequisite: Nine hours of Education including educational psychology and SPED 725. LEC.

ELPS 960. Specialist Project. 1-4 Hours.

RSH.

ELPS 970. Theory and Research in Administration. 3 Hours.

A survey of the theoretical and empirical literature in educational administration and the methods used to investigate these content areas. Major emphasis is devoted to developing research skills applicable in practice and to the identification of possible generic topics suitable for future dissertation work. LEC.

ELPS 971. Comparative Education. 2 Hours.

A factual, descriptive, and analytical study of national systems of formal education, or schooling, as exemplified in contemporary educational establishments. Organizational and administrative policies and teaching practices, with emphasis on Germany, France, England, U.S.S.R., People's Republic of China and Japan. Other nations may be examined on an individual project basis. The difference between ELPS 971 and ELPS 772 is the philosophical emphasis of the latter. LEC.

ELPS 972. Educational Problems in Latin America. 3 Hours.

Designed to meet the needs of students majoring in Latin American studies or interested in the area. Development of an awareness of the concept of cross-cultural confluence with Latin America as it relates to education. Survey of the main problems confronted by Latin American educational systems and examination of the difficulties experienced by North American educators when confronted with such problems. LEC.

ELPS 975. Education, Technology and Social Change. 3 Hours.

This interdisciplinary course provides an opportunity to read, reflect upon, and discuss ideas drawn from the emerging field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) in connection with education. Its focus is the interrelationships between technology, society, and education (defined broadly to include non-school and adult learning settings). It explores how knowledge, expertise, and authority are constructed within and across social and cultural groups, with particular attention social and economic inequality. It also considers the relationship between emerging technologies, educational experiences and the nature of "the self" in society, among other issues. Prerequisite: Admission to ELPS doctoral program, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ELPS 980. Postsecondary Finance. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for advanced doctoral students in higher education, particularly those who will be preparing unit budgets or budget presentations and those who make and implement fiscal policy (e.g., financial aid offers). The course material covers different types of college and university budgeting -- incremental, zero-based and formula -- and their impact on university revenues; statewide coordination and its impact on programs, program duplication and funding; retrenchment and quality issues; the legislative role in budget preparation; unified and comparative management systems (e.g., WICHE and NCHEMS); and the impact of federal contracting and student aid policies. LEC.

ELPS 981. Higher Education Law. 3 Hours.

An overview of the developing law of higher education, with emphasis on and analysis of employer-employee relationships, student-faculty/administration relationships, and the impact of federal and state regulation on these relationships. LEC.

ELPS 982. Faculty in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

This course considers the role and circumstances of faculty in higher education including variations among different types of institutions. Topics include the history and demographics of the professoriate, the academic work environment and labor market, the role of faculty in institutional governance and policy making, and the social and political context of academia. LEC.

ELPS 983. Curriculum Innovation in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

A study of contemporary post-secondary curriculum with particular emphasis on the nature of curriculum, the organization and structure of academic programs, the nature of change in academic communities and exemplary innovative institutions. LEC.

ELPS 984. Teacher Education in the United States. 2 Hours.

A study of the development, issues, and programs for the preparation of teachers. Open to all regular graduate students. LEC.

ELPS 985. Evaluations of Programs in Higher Education. 2 Hours.

Nature, objectives, and basic procedures of evaluation as applied to the various aspects of higher education. Open to all regular graduate students. LEC.

ELPS 986. The Governance and Administration of Higher Education. 3 Hours.

A theory-based course aimed at providing an understanding of the governance and administration of academic institutions -- particularly universities. Emphasis is directed toward an analysis of decision-making in these complex organizations. LEC.

ELPS 993. Advanced District Leadership Internship. 2 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences to enhance the necessary leadership skills of a building/district leaders. Activities will include building/district level resource assessment, data analysis, professional development of teachers/principals (and district level professionals), and cooperative planning with teachers and administrators around responsibilities of curriculum, instruction, resource management and student achievement. Prerequisite: Completion (at the University of Kansas) of all certification program (MS/EdD) requirements for the Building/District Leadership Licenses. FLD.

ELPS 994. Advanced Topics:. 1-3 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for post-master's level students. LEC.

ELPS 995. Field Experience in:. 1-5 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences in selected educational settings. The advisor will schedule regular observations of the field experience and conferences with the student. Written summaries and evaluations of the field experience will be prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agencies, and the advisor. Open only to advanced students. Field experience credit in any one semester may not exceed five hours, and total credit may not exceed eight hours. FLD.

ELPS 996. College Teaching Experience in: _____. 2 Hours.

To meet the college teaching experience requirement for doctoral programs, a student shall engage in a semester-long, planned, instructional activity that shall include college classroom teaching under supervision. Planning shall be done with the advisor and/or the member of the faculty who will supervise the experience. The activity shall be done under the supervision of a member of the University of Kansas faculty or by an individual or individuals designated by the candidate's committee. FLD.

ELPS 997. Individual Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Prior graduate course work in the area of study and consent of instructor. RSH.

ELPS 998. Seminar in: _____. 1-4 Hours.

LEC.

ELPS 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 Hours.

THE.