This is an archived copy of the 2014-15 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.ku.edu.

The School of Medicine

Graduate Programs

Academic programs at the University of Kansas Medical Center are offered through the Schools of Health Professions, Medicine, and Nursing. The Office of Graduate Studies on the Medical Center campus handles matters related to these graduate programs.

Basic admission requirements are listed in the Medical Center campus Graduate Studies section of the online catalog. Individual graduate programs have specific requirements including prerequisite undergraduate courses. These are listed or referenced in the individual program descriptions.

Graduation requirements and regulations for every academic program are provided in this catalog. Degree requirements and course descriptions are subject to change. In most cases, you will use the catalog of the year you entered KU. Other years’ catalogs »

Anatomy and Cell Biology Master of Arts in Cell Biology and Anatomy
Doctor of Philosophy in Cell Biology and Anatomy
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Master of Science in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Doctor of Philosophy in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Biostatistics Master of Science in Biostatistics
Doctor of Philosophy in Biostatistics
Statistical Applications Graduate Certificate
Statistics Graduate Certificate
Cancer Biology
Health Policy and Management Master of Health Services Administration
Doctor of Philosophy in Health Policy and Management
History and Philosophy of Medicine
Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences
Microbiology, Molecular Genetics, and Immunology Master of Arts in Microbiology
Doctor of Philosophy in Microbiology
Molecular and Integrative Physiology Master of Science in Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Doctor of Philosophy in Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Neurosciences Program Doctor of Philosophy in Neurosciences
Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Master of Arts in Pathology
Doctor of Philosophy in Pathology
Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics Master of Arts in Pharmacology
Master of Science in Pharmacology
Master of Science in Toxicology
Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmacology
Doctor of Philosophy in Toxicology
Preventive Medicine and Public Health Master of Public Health
Graduate Certificate in Community-Based Participatory Research
Master of Science in Clinical Research
Graduate Certificate in Clinical and Translational Research

Interdisciplinary Programs:

Other Programs

The School of Medicine also offers the Doctor of Medicine degree.  M.D. program information is detailed in the School of Medicine's Doctor of Medicine section of this online catalog.

Center for Health Informatics Courses

IPHI 850. Introduction to Health Informatics. 2-3 Hours.

This course will provide an overview of health informatics focused on five themes: health informatics foundations; clinical decision support; human factors/organization factors; public health informatics and current issues in health informatics including best practices. Students enrolled for 3 credits will develop and demonstrate a practical, innovative small-group information technology (IT) project from one of a set of faculty recommended projects or from a student-proposed idea. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor LEC.

IPHI 851. Transforming Health Care through Use of Information Systems and Technology. 3 Hours.

Includes 2 credit hour lecture and 1 credit hour practicum. The application of the information system development life cycle in the design, selection, and implementation of health information technology applications will be examined. Human computer interactions and emerging technologies will be explored for their impact on patient care and safety. The role of legal, regulatory, ethical and security issues will be discussed as they apply to clinical and consumer information technologies. PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Instructor. LEC.

IPHI 852. Health Data: Theory and Practice. 3-4 Hours.

Includes 2 credit hour lecture and 1-2 credit hour practicum. Principles of database theory, modeling, design and manipulation will be introduced. Students will have experience using a relational database management system. Database manipulation will be explored using structured query language (SQL) to compose and execute query statements and critically evaluate the results. Prerequisites: None. LEC.

IPHI 853. Abstraction and Modeling of Healthcare Information. 3 Hours.

Includes 2 credit hour lecture and 1 credit hour practicum. The information system development life cycle process is presented with emphasis on determination and analysis of information system requirements and system design that meet the identified health care information requirements. Object-oriented techniques will be introduced, including Unified Modeling Language and Unified Modeling Methodology, to facilitate process analysis and design proposal development. Prerequisites: NRSG 820 and consent of instructor. LEC.

IPHI 854. Knowledge Management in Healthcare. 3 Hours.

Includes 2 credit hour lecture and 1 credit hour practicum. Knowledge management is the creation, communication, and leveraging of a healthcare organization's knowledge assets. Defining knowledge, describing the knowledge creation cycle, and the identification of the knowledge worker and his/her impact on the organization are discussed. Information technology and communities of practice are presented in a balanced approach supporting a systematic viewpoint of the knowledge management process. Knowledge management theory is enhanced with the performance of a knowledge audit and the development of knowledge management tools. Prerequisite: NRSG 820 and consent of instructor. LEC.

IPHI 856. Health Informatics Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

In collaboration with healthcare information faculty, preceptors, students design an experience to facilitate application of theories and research related to health care informatics. Emphasis is on the application of the information system development life cycle. Students analyze the leadership and technical behaviors of various informatics roles and negotiate an informatics project to be completed within the practicum. Prerequisite: All Specialty Core, Leadership Core, IPHI 853, Abstraction and Modeling of Health Care Information, IPHI 852, Health Data: Theory & Practice. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: IPHI 854, Knowledge Management in Healthcare, IPHI 851, Topics in Health Care Informatics, IPHI 860, Research Project in Nursing, or consent of instructor. LEC LEC.

IPHI 860. Research Project. 2 Hours.

Students will conduct a health informatics research project. A research report, designed artifact, or other appropriate deliverable will be developed. Prerequisite(s): A research course and two informatics core courses, or consent of instructor. The research project must meet research guidelines for the MS Informatics program. LEC.

Anatomy and Cell Biology Courses

ANAT 832. Electron Microscopy Techniques. 3 Hours.

Basic methods in preparation of tissues and cells for ultrastructural studies; use of electron microscopy in specific research problems; interpretation of biological ultrastructure; reading assignments and discussion sessions. Prerequisite: ANAT 830, or consent of course instructor. LEC.

ANAT 845. Graduate Histology. 2 Hours.

This course will bridge student knowledge of systems/organs with cellular histology and is designed as an accelerated introduction to histological techniques, microscope/optics, and histology. The course will be held within a one month period in the summer. Individual tissues will be covered by a brief 30 minute lecture followed by a 90 minute session of observing the tissues under the microscope. Prerequisite: Advanced course in cell biology (IGPBS module 4 or equivalent) or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANAT 846. Advanced Neuroscience. 5 Hours.

Team taught, in-depth neuroscience course focusing on normal and diseased brain function at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Lectures and discussions will emphasize current issues in neuroscience research. (Same as PHCL 846, PHSL 846 and NURO 846). Prerequisite: Permission of course director. LEC.

ANAT 847. Developmental Neurobiology. 2 Hours.

Development of the nervous system from early induction to the development of learning and memory. Topics include: Induction; Cellular Differentiation; Axon Growth and Guidance; Target Selection; Cell Survival and Growth; Synapse Formation; Synapse Elimination; and Development of Behavior. (Same as NURO 847 and PHSL 847.) Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846; NURO 846; PHSL 846) or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANAT 848. Molecular Mechanisms of Neurological Disorders. 3 Hours.

An in-depth coverage of pathogenic mechanisms in neurological diseases; cellular and molecular responses to brain injury and disease, neuroinflammatory diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis), neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion diseases), neurogenetic diseases (e.g., lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders, Down's syndrome and fragile X), trauma, stroke, and viral diseases (e.g., HIV encephalitis). (Same as NURO 848, PHCL 848, and PHSL 848.) Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846, PHCL 846 or PHSL 846) or an equivalent course and consent of instructor. LEC.

ANAT 868. Advanced Developmental Biology. 2 Hours.

In-depth exposure to the classically important aspects of development using several different animal systems. The course addresses a selected number of topics and bring students up to date with regard to cutting edge research accomplishments in each topic. The materials selected are designed to qualify students for future teaching assignments in Developmental Biology and enhance their research capabilities. Prerequisite: IGPBS Core Curriculum or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANAT 869. Grant Writing. 3 Hours.

All aspects of preparing grant applications are covered. This includes writing an actual grant application containing all the usual elements of grants - budgets, biosketches, resources, and scientific text. In addition, different funding agencies, building research teams, the review process, responding to reviewers, and resubmitting grants will be covered. (Same as HP&M 878 and NRSG 889.) Prerequisite: Appropriate research methods and statistics courses in student's current graduate program; and permission of the instructor. For students in the Outcomes Management and Research concentration, HP&M 821. LEC.

ANAT 870. Techniques in Anatomy and Cell Biology. 1-3 Hours.

Advanced study allowing a student to pursue a particular research or educational skill through directed laboratory work. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

ANAT 880. Advanced Topics: _____. 1-5 Hours.

Special study allowing a student to pursue a particular subject through readings, laboratory work, and conferences with a faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

ANAT 885. Seminar. 1 Hour.

Research-oriented presentations in a seminar format by students, faculty, and guests. LEC.

ANAT 890. Master's Research. 1-10 Hours.

Independent laboratory investigation approved by and under the supervision of the student's advisor, and in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the M.A. degree. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor. RSH.

ANAT 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Preparation of the formal thesis based upon independent research and in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the M.A. degree. Credits will be given only after the thesis has been accepted by the department. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor. THE.

ANAT 900. Analysis of Scientific Papers. 1 Hour.

Research articles are analyzed by the student with the guidance of an instructor in terms of quality of scientific content and mechanics of the presentation. One or more articles are discussed in each tutorial session. The research topics and the instructor are chosen in accordance with the research interest of the student. LAB.

ANAT 990. Doctoral Research. 1-12 Hours.

Original and independent laboratory investigation, approved by and conducted under the supervision of the students' advisor and advisory committee, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor. LEC.

ANAT 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

Preparation of the dissertation based upon original research and in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree. Credits will be given only after the dissertation has been accepted by the student's dissertation committee. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor. THE.

Biochemistry & Molecular Biol Courses

BCHM 801. Research in Biochemistry. 1-10 Hours.

LEC.

BCHM 802. Biochemistry Seminar. 1 Hour.

Weekly meetings. LEC.

BCHM 808. Methods for Analyzing Biomolecules. 3 Hours.

Application of physical techniques to the study of biological macromolecules in solution. Emphasis on utilization of data obtained from such studies in interpreting biological processes at the molecular level. Course will be taught in the spring. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

BCHM 850. Topics in Biochemistry. 1-3 Hours.

Selected topics in biochemistry with varying subject matter. Students should inquire before enrolling. Topics are in-depth studies of current research areas. The course may consist of formal lectures and/or directed readings and studies. IND.

BCHM 862. Biochemical Research-Literature Seminar. 1 Hour.

Students and faculty meet once weekly to discuss the research of students or the current biochemical literature. The student is required to make one presentation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

BCHM 890. Master's Research. 1-15 Hours.

Research for the M.A. degree. RSH.

BCHM 899. Master's Thesis. 1-15 Hours.

Restricted to the writing of the master's thesis. THE.

BCHM 922. Advanced Molecular Genetics. 3 Hours.

An in-depth analysis of the structure and function of gene regulatory proteins and the mechanisms of gene transcription, and DNA replication and repair. Lectures and discussion of current literature. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Course will be presented in the fall semester and will include several faculty leading discussions in their area of research interests. LEC.

BCHM 923. Protein Structure and Function. 3 Hours.

The relationship between protein structure, binding, and physiological function. Emphasis is on proteins as enzymes, structural components, and regulators. Course will be taught in the spring. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. LEC.

BCHM 990. Doctoral Research. 1-15 Hours.

Research for the doctoral degree. RSH.

BCHM 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 Hours.

Restricted to the writing of the doctoral dissertation. THE.

Cancer Biology Courses

CBIO 800. Mechanisms of Tumor Development and Progression: Colloquium Format. 3 Hours.

Elective course. This upper level course examines the genetic alterations and cellular phenotypes involving cancer development in a practical manner. The course discusses the underlying molecular and biological principles that result from these genetic alterations and the methods/approaches to examine cancer phenotypes. By the end of the course, students should understand how cancer develops and how to design experiments to address the scientific hypothesis. In addition, students are expected to learn key points to give scientific presentation. The class will involve two, 1.5-hour lecture per week: one consists of didactic lecture and the other is student-led journal club related to the lecture topic. Prerequisite: College level biology. LEC.

Graduate Studies Medical Ctr Courses

GSMC 50. Science Special Studies. 0 Hours.

The aim of the course is to teach the methodologies and skills required for conducting research in the area of biomedical sciences. The learning experience will be tailored to individual needs, personalized instructions, with the opportunity to learn new skills and competencies and exposure to new developments. Depending on the selected research placement, the student will learn to: utilize a variety of basic biochemical and molecular biology laboratory skills; develop the ability to independently formulate a testable experimental hypothesis; design experiments to test formulated hypothesis in a classic application of the scientific method. Progress of the student will be monitored through weekly laboratory meetings with members of the research lab. The student will present their progress and have the ability to receive constructive feedback from laboratory members. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LBN.

GSMC 99. Postdoctoral Studies. 0 Hours.

Postdoctoral Studies RSH.

GSMC 800. Scientific Communication. 2 Hours.

This course is limited to non-native English speakers who need to achieve an adequate score on the SPEAK test. Emphasis will be placed on speaking but also include pronunciation, intonation, grammar, sentence organization, and word choice. Limited to 10 students. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

GSMC 803. Introduction to Clinical Research. 1 Hour.

Course will provide a comprehensive overview to clinical research. The student will gain an understanding of how to develop clinical research questions including protocol design and the factors that should be considered in initiating a clinical research study. This will include biostatistical considerations, the recruitment of study participants, regulatory issues, and data management, and defining measures and instruments. Students will gain knowledge of how to define clinical research among the various institutional entities involved with clinical research at the University of Kansas Medical Center such as the Research Institute (RI), General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) and the Human Subjects Committee (HSC). Additionally, one component of the course will focus on how to apply for funding (grantsmanship), critical appraisal of research studies, and how to present research data. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC.

GSMC 808. Scientific Communication. 0 Hours.

This course is limited to non-native English speakers who need to improve their oral and written skills in English for the purpose of scientific communication. Emphasis will be placed on academic writing, grammar, and vocabulary, but will also include pronunciation, reading and listening skills. Students will attend a weekly class and complete written homework. Class size will be limited to 10 students. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

GSMC 835. Grammar for Scientific Communication. 0 Hours.

This course is limited to non-native English speaking students who need to improve their use of English. Emphasis will be on grammar, speaking, pronunciation, vocabulary but will also include reading, listening, writing. Students will attend one weekly class and complete written homework. Students will be given an exam at the end of each section of the textbook. Class size will be limited to 15 students. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

GSMC 840. CLINICAL OBSERVATION IN HEALTH CARE FOR BIOENGINEERS. 3 Hours.

This course requires a 6 hour time commitment each week over the semester. During each weekly session the student will observe various medical practitioners in specific health care environments. The course gives the bioengineer an opportunity to see the inside of medical practice and exposes students to medical questions and challenges that could provide opportunities for engineers to contribute to the improvement of medical practice. Each student must select a concentration for this course from a health care specialty depending on availability. Some specialty options might include: Orthopedic, Radiology, Cardiology, Physical Therapy, etc. Grading will be pass/fail based on participation and journal keeping. PREREQUISITES: Graduate engineering standing, Consent of instructor. LEC.

GSMC 850. Proteins and Metabolism. 2 Hours.

This course is the first of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of metabolism, protein structure and an introduction to nucleic acids. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 852 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC.

GSMC 851. Molecular Genetics. 2 Hours.

This course is the second of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of molecular genetics, DNA replication, DNA repair, transcription and translation. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 852 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC.

GSMC 852. Introduction to Biomedical Research I. 2 Hours.

This is the first semester of a one year series in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. The course is composed of weekly meetings to discuss research problems, methods and current literature. The course will interface with the lectures and students will learn to critically evaluate our scientific knowledge base. The students will be introduced to the tools that are available to obtain and evaluate information. The students will be challenged to identify areas of our scientific knowledge that require further experimentation and clarification. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 850 (Proteins and Metabolism) and GSMC 851 (Molecular Genetics). LEC.

GSMC 853. Cellular Structure. 2 Hours.

This course is the third of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of cellular structure and function. Topics include the lipid bilayer, membrane proteins, and cellular organelles. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 855 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC.

GSMC 854. Cell Communication. 2 Hours.

This course is the fourth of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of cell communication. Topics include G-protein-coupled signaling, cellular cytoskeleton; cell cycle control; cell death; extracellular matrix; and cancer. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 855 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC.

GSMC 855. Introduction to Biomedical Research II. 2 Hours.

This is the second semester of a one year series in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. The course is composed of weekly meetings to discuss research problems, methods and current literature. The course will interface with the lectures and students will learn to critically evaluate our scientific knowledge base. The students will be introduced to the tools that are available to obtain and evaluate information. The students will be challenged to identify areas of our scientific knowledge that require further experimentation and clarification. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 853 (Cellular Structure) and GSMC 854 (Cell Communication). LEC.

GSMC 856. Introduction to Research Ethics. 1 Hour.

The objective of this course is to introduce students to research ethics. Students will learn and discuss some of the following areas of ethics in research: 1) sources of errors in science, 2) Scientific Fraud, 3) plagiarism and misrepresentation, 4) conflicts of interest, and 5) confidentiality. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC.

GSMC 857. Biographics. 1 Hour.

The objective of the course is to teach students how to organize and present data in a clear and concise manner at national meetings. Students are taught basic principles of organizing data for presentation and then learn through the actual presentation of data in simulated platform sessions held in the course. Videotapes are made of the presentations, and students are then given a constructive critique of their presentation by the instructor and fellow students. Prerequisites: Permission of instructors. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC.

GSMC 858. Introduction to Faculty Research. 1 Hour.

This course was created to provide students with sufficient introduction to the research conducted at KUMC. To facilitate this point, the course is designed as a seminar series. In each session of the series, three faculty members present a brief 20-minute overview of their research programs. The series will help students to select faculty for research rotations and ultimately help them determine which faculty member they will select as a research adviser for their doctoral research. Prerequisites: Permission of instructors. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC.

GSMC 859. Research Rotations. 1-4 Hours.

The course will introduce students to research methods, experimental design, and the types of biomedical research conducted at KUMC. The first research rotation begins halfway through the first semester; the second and third research rotations will occur in the second semester. It is designed to help students determine which faculty member they will select as a research adviser for their doctoral research. Prerequisites: Permission of instructors. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC.

GSMC 860. Introduction to Molecular Medicine. 1 Hour.

Introduction to Molecular Medicine (1 credit hour/semester) is a two semester course, taught every fall and spring semester, primarily for first year MD-PhD students. This course is taught by the Director of the MD-PhD Program, with contributions from other faculty from the basic science and clinical departments. Through lectures, small group discussion, evaluation of primary literature, analysis of scientific data and presentations/discussions with current KUMC faculty, students will be introduced to the process of investigating the molecular and cellular derangements that underlie human disease. Order of topics mirror, to some extent, the subjects of the first-year modules. There will be particular emphasis on the diverse research methods and models systems used to investigate the molecular basis of disease and understanding how such investigations can be translated to answer clinically relevant questions. Students are evaluated by both group activity and individual preparation and participation. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the MD-PhD Program or Permission of Instructor. LEC.

Health Policy & Management Courses

HP&M 610. The Health Care System. 4 Hours.

This course introduces students to the health care system of the United States. The course stresses the system's historical development, distinguishing features, financing, management, resources, and politics. Requirements include position papers, class discussions, examinations, and site visits to health care facilities LEC.

HP&M 620. Women and Health Care. 3 Hours.

A gender analysis of the organization of health care in the United States, using sociohistorical and sociological perspectives. Considers the health status and health care problems of women in relation to cultural aspects of medicine and health care; the roles of both informal and professional health care providers; the political economy of health care systems; and the relationship between gender and the state. (Same as SOC 617.) Prerequisite: HP&M 601 or permission of instructor. LEC.

HP&M 810. The Health Care System. 3 Hours.

The structure and function of the components of the U.S. healthcare system are introduced in the context of the history, values and social forces that influenced its development and evolution. Students gain exposure to the concepts and vocabulary associated with aspects of the system, including delivery (providers, institutions, services), resources (finance, payment, insurance), population and public health, and outcomes (cost, access, quality). Healthcare outcomes from consumer, clinical, and societal perspectives are explored. LEC LEC.

HP&M 819. Research for Health Care Leaders. 3 Hours.

Introduces epidemiology, survey research, and evaluation research. Examines quantitative and qualitative methods. Focuses on role of research in health policy and health management. Incorporates lecture, discussion, papers and presentations. LEC.

HP&M 822. Health Care Economics. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the core concepts from economics to healthcare with a focus on helping healthcare managers use economic tools in making sound decisions. The demand for healthcare products, the structure of insurance, and the supply of healthcare products are examined. Students will apply a variety of economic analyses to health policy and health system issues. LEC LEC.

HP&M 825. Financial Concepts in Healthcare Management. 3 Hours.

Financial accountability is a critical responsibility of health services administrators. This course presents basic concepts and techniques for effective decision-making and stewardship, including financial statement analysis; strategic financial planning; capital formation; responsibility and cost accounting; operational, capital and cash budgeting; capital project analysis;' and working capital management. LEC LEC.

HP&M 827. Financial Applications in Healthcare Management. 3 Hours.

Administrative applications of economic and financial concepts are applied to support strategic and financial goals. The concept of integrating operational and strategic planning into a strategic financial plan is developed. This course will foster integration and confidence in performing and applying financial analytical procedures such as financial statement ratio analysis; revenue and expense forecasting (budgeting); credit worthiness determination; break-even analysis and working capital management in a variety of healthcare settings including long-term care and public health. Prerequisite: HP&M 825, Financial Concepts in Healthcare Management. LEC LEC.

HP&M 830. Health Care Management. 3 Hours.

This course introduces key concepts and skills for health care managers. Emphasizing self-discovery and professional development, the course examines how to become an informed employee, an effective team member, and a successful manager. Course topics include interpersonal skills, delegation, leadership, performance management, and organizational change. Learning methods include lectures, case analyses, experiential exercises, and discussion. Prerequisites: HP&M 810 or permission of instructor. LEC.

HP&M 831. Reimbursement and Fiscal Policy. 2 Hours.

Reimbursement and fiscal policy practices impact the success and the economic well-being of healthcare institutions, payers and patients. This course develops the student's understanding of complex reimbursement methodologies from the perspective of providers and payers. Students will explore the strengths and weaknesses of the major methods of third party reimbursement, the types of managed care organizations and the payment methodologies employed. Students are also prepared to approach reimbursement policy issues both from the payer and the provider viewpoint. LEC LEC.

HP&M 832. Governance and Health Law. 2 Hours.

A survey course of the law as it affects governance, health care administration and health care generally. This course will develop the student's understanding of health law and its impact on many aspects of health care governance and administration. The student should be able to identify and understand various legal issues they may encounter and when to engage legal counsel's advice. Prerequisite: HP&M 810. LEC.

HP&M 833. Ethics. 2 Hours.

An introduction to the principles and concepts in the ethics of health services administration. The course will help students further develop their skills to recognize and analyze ethical dilemmas, and to explain, justify and evaluate the decisions they make in response to such dilemmas. LEC.

HP&M 837. Health Policy. 3 Hours.

This course examines the development, implementation, and evaluation of federal, state, and local health policy in the United States. Particular attention will be given to (1) the development of public institutions and policy goals; and (2) current policy problems such as cost controls, reimbursement, health services utilization, program assessment and evaluation, public health, and public/private investment and resource planning. Students will be expected to synthesize and integrate knowledge to apply theory and principles in ways consistent with professional practice as a health policy analyst. LEC LEC.

HP&M 838. Rural Health Care. 3 Hours.

Provides students with (a) an understanding of major issues in rural health and the rural environment in which health care providers and administrators provide service; (b) an understanding of the demographics, economics, services and challenges associated with the health care delivery systems in rural America and (c) an overview of federal and state health policy and its effect on rural health systems. Special emphasis will be placed on identifying, understanding, and addressing rural health challenges from administrative and policy perspectives. Prerequisites: None. LEC.

HP&M 840. Organizational Foundations for Leading Change. 3 Hours.

Self-discovery as a foundation for professional development while exploring the concepts of leader, manager, and follower is emphasized. Analysis and prediction of an organization's stages of development and its capacity for linear and social change are introduced through the lens of complexity science. Political, legal, ethical, and other issues that constrain and destabilize organizations and strategies to restore equilibrium are explored. (Same as NRSG 880). LEC LEC.

HP&M 842. Roles, Functions and Care Models. 2 Hours.

This course examines the nature and characteristics of the healthcare workforce needed to deliver direct, indirect, and support services. Healthcare worker roles are analyzed through the lens of key organizational functions and care delivery modalities. Common care delivery models, such as primary, team, and patient-centered care approaches to organizing care delivery are explored in various clinical settings, including acute and long-term care and community and public health entities. Administrative challenges and opportunities for managing a diverse workforce are presented. LEC. LEC.

HP&M 844. Communication for the Healthcare Executive. 2 Hours.

This course focuses on attaining proficient communication skills to deliver high impact messages to stakeholders ranging from board members, to diverse communities of interest, to policymakers and regulators. Verbal and written skill development addresses executive presence to perform communication functions such as conducting an 'ask' from a policymaker or potential benefactor, using storytelling and data to shape critical messages to the media, and communicating value-driven memoranda to internal audiences. The use of emerging technologies to aid in communication effectiveness will also be presented. LEC. LEC.

HP&M 846. Managing Information Systems and Technology. 3 Hours.

This course covers fundamental concepts of management information systems; current and developing health and business information systems of interest to managers in health services organizations; healthcare information system architecture; security and privacy issues; uses of healthcare information for clinical and strategic analysis and decision support; techniques required to develop and evaluate a technological request for proposal; and thoughts on the future of healthcare information systems including bio-informatics, community health systems and web-based access to health information. The course will also cover current information and issues regarding the latest technology applications. LEC LEC.

HP&M 848. Designing Health Care Organizations. 2 Hours.

This class examines how design affects a broad range of health care organizations. It considers designs for jobs, processes, equipment, buildings, and organizations, and explores implications for safety, customer satisfaction, worker satisfaction, productivity, effectiveness, and profitability. Students analyze varied cases that approach design as a management decision-making process. LEC.

HP&M 850. Introduction to Operations. 3 Hours.

Examines performance of health care organizations, sources of variation, methods of measurement, and strategies for improving performance. Considers several approaches to performance improvement and examines tools widely used in operations management. Incorporates lecture, discussion, and fieldwork. (Same as NRSG 882.) LEC.

HP&M 852. Strategic Marketing. 2 Hours.

Provides students with a framework for executive-level, strategic market planning and analysis. Topics covered include: the strategic marketing organization; the impact of organizational culture on strategy development; environmental assignments and competitor analysis; market research; and the impact of the marketing fours (price, positioning, promotion, and product) in health care. LEC.

HP&M 853. Strategic Management. 2 Hours.

Explores internal and external analysis for health care organizations. Examines development, analysis, execution, and monitoring of strategies. Application of critical thinking skills to strategy. Lecture and discussion. Prerequisites: Completion of HP&M Level I courses or permission of instructor. LEC.

HP&M 854. Human Resources and Workforce Development. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is to understand the leadership functions of human resource management in organizations to create a competitive edge through employee empowerment. Core human resource concepts are introduced and applied to optimize human capital within a variety of healthcare settings, including compensation and benefits, employee recognition, and employee/labor relations. National, regional and local strategies and workforce trends are discussed related to best practices for the selection, retention, and management as a healthcare employer of choice. (Same as NRSG 891). LEC LEC.

HP&M 857. Evaluating Outcomes of Healthcare. 3 Hours.

This course will trace the development of the outcomes research movement and provide examples of methodologies, assessment instruments and issues that guide outcomes research. It will also review the methods for linking research findings with clinical practice (i.e., clinical practice guidelines). Obstacles to acceptance of practice guidelines will be discussed. Finally, the translation of outcomes research methodology into programs to improve health quality will be presented. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

HP&M 858. Health and Social Behavior. 3 Hours.

Healthcare as a cultural and socio-behavioral system is presented. Using research and theory, students explore alternative perspectives on the nature of medicine and healing within comparative health systems, both U.S. and abroad. Students examine at an advanced level how healthcare organizational structures contribute to patient health outcomes and influence employee behaviors. The course reinforces the nature and characteristics of the health professions, particularly medicine and nursing perceptions, and the complex behavioral dynamics of health professionals with organizational leaders. LEC LEC.

HP&M 859. Professional Development. 1 Hour.

Prepares students for an initial professional job search. Explores professional networking, search strategies, resume construction, and interviewing. Reviews professional communication. Incorporates lecture, discussion, and fieldwork. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

HP&M 860. Graduate Internship in Healthcare Services Administration. 1-3 Hours.

Novice and experienced health services administrators function in applied settings. The internship is designed to meet the needs of individual students to advance their career functioning and set in motion a professional development plan. The inexperienced administrator will use the internship as a mid-curriculum opportunity to apply and synthesize in the practice setting knowledge, skills, and abilities. Students who come to the program with mid-level to advanced experience use the practicum to advance their career through exposure to additional experiences that extends their knowledge, skills, and abilities and demonstrates synthesis of program competencies. FLD FLD.

HP&M 861. Capstone Seminar. 2 Hours.

The knowledge, skills, and abilities learned throughout the program are validated in capstone experience. A case study approach will be used to synthesize and apply principles including, but not limited to, change theory and quality improvement, research and information technologies, strategy and communication tools, human resource management, financial and economic analysis, and advanced decision-making and management of organizational behavior. Students will present their cases to peers, faculty, and external reviewers for dialogue, critique, and a plan for professional skills development. IND. RSH.

HP&M 862. Research Practicum in Health Services Administration. 3 Hours.

A course to explore applied research topics associated with specific health services delivery of management problems. Prerequisites: HP&M 821 and HP&M 830. RSH RSH.

HP&M 863. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

This course is designed to meet the needs of students who have a special interest that cannot be met by existing courses. IND IND.

HP&M 868. Field Immersion in Health Systems Issues and Trends. 1 Hour.

This field-based experience exposes students to a range of issues and trends in health care organizations - public and private, profit and non-profit. The aim is to engage students in the realities of health system challenges and problems, which can be informed by health services research. Site visits and contacts with executives and policy leaders serve as the basis for scholarly analysis. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. FLD.

HP&M 869. Field Immersion in Health Systems Data Management. 1 Hour.

This field-based experience exposes students to current managerial realities and trends in information technology and data management within health care and policy settings. The aim is to engage students in information technology roles and functions, data set and performance metrics, available systems of technology support, and the scope of data collection, organization and management issues faced by health systems. Prerequisites: HP&M 868 or permission of the instructor. FLD.

HP&M 870. Research Inquiry I: Defining and Supporting the Research Problem. 1 Hour.

Students select a problem area, critically review and analyze the research literature related to it and develop a research question(s) and working hypotheses. The analysis of the problem integrates field experiences with relevant literature, and translates ideas from the practice and/or policy setting into the context of scholarly inquiry. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. FLD.

HP&M 871. Research Inquiry II: Research Design. 1 Hour.

Students build on a problem area of interest with potential benefit to the health care field and examine methodologies that would support a hypothesis or significant research question. The course guides students in translating their questions into a credible, methodologically defensible research design, including overall strategy, measurement, study population and/or sample. Focus will be placed on critical analysis of design trade-offs and limitations. Prerequisites: HP&M 870 or permission of the instructor. FLD.

HP&M 872. Research Inquiry III: Data Analysis Techniques and Strategies. 1 Hour.

Students learn to assess and choose appropriate analytic techniques, whether qualitative or quantitative, and develop a data analysis and presentation plan. Emphasis is placed on evaluating the relative advantages and disadvantages of various analytic strategies in the context of a specific question and research design. Prerequisites: HP&M 871 or permission of the instructor. FLD.

HP&M 873. Statistical Applications Using Large Data Bases. 3 Hours.

The management of large data sets is a critical analytic skill for health policy and management research. This course exposes students to the various types and configurations of large data sets and provides hands-on analytic experience using an array of statistical techniques and procedures. Attention is placed on the criteria for designing and evaluating, including the trade-offs in selecting one plan over another. Students actually carry out an analysis plan for a variety of data types. Prerequisites: HP&M 819, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

HP&M 874. Statistics for Decision Making. 3 Hours.

Elementary statistical techniques to include descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, and statistical inference of means and proportions; advanced statistical techniques include multivariate analysis of qualitative and quantitative variables using multiple linear and logistic regression. LEC LEC.

HP&M 875. Modeling in Health Services Research. 3 Hours.

Provides an opportunity for students to use a number of common analysis models in health services research. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of appropriate modeling techniques and use of statistical software packages. The course focuses on application of methods to health services research questions, with emphasis on regression design and interpretation. Prerequisites: HP&M 874 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

HP&M 876. Medicare and Medicaid. 3 Hours.

Provides students with an in-depth understanding of the three publicly financed health programs that impact virtually all aspects of the American healthcare system - Medicare, Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs (CHIP). Explores history and evolution of each program, plus specific operational issues such as eligibility, financing, management reporting, state/federal coordination, quality of care and outcomes management and influence of recent legislation. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. LEC LEC.

HP&M 877. Women and Healthcare. 3 Hours.

A gender analysis of the organization of healthcare in the United States, using sociohistorical and sociological perspectives. Considers the health status and healthcare problems of women in relation to cultural aspects of medicine and healthcare; the roles of both informal and professional healthcare providers; the political economy of healthcare systems; and the relationship between gender and state. Prerequisite: HP&M 810, or permission of instructor. LEC LEC.

HP&M 878. Grant Writing. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to take the principles and mechanics learned in introductory epidemiology and biostatistics and apply them in the design of epidemiologic studies. The strategy and data collection for studies will be emphasized rather than the methods of statistical analysis. The student will learn how to develop a proposal/grant that addresses the entire array of concerns regarding such studies and propose a realistic, scientifically justified study. (Same as ANAT 869 and NRSG 889.) Prerequisite: HP&M 819 or HP&M 821, and NRSG 886. LEC.

HP&M 879. Comparative Healthcare Systems. 3 Hours.

Critical examination of the structure and function of healthcare systems in major, advanced, capitalist countries (e.g., Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Germany, and Sweden) in comparison to each other and to the healthcare system of the United States. Patterns in control and financing will be studied in relation to issues of cost, quality, access, and in relation to cultural values. Special attention will be placed on comparative analysis of reform efforts. Prerequisite: HP&M 810 or permission of instructor. LEC LEC.

HP&M 880. Health Care and Social Policies in Sweden. 3 Hours.

Sweden leads the world in major health outcomes despite spending significantly less than the U.S. This course provides students the opportunity to visit Sweden and see the operation of its health care and social welfare system firsthand. Learn about Swedish history and culture as you re-examine many commonly held assumptions about both the U.S. and Sweden. An intensive schedule of site visits and lectures in the Stockholm-Uppsala area, assigned readings, and a major paper. LEC.

HP&M 882. Health Services Research Using Public Payer Data. 3 Hours.

Several contemporary health reforms have rendered analyses of public payer data more feasible and valuable for population health, health services research, and quality improvement. The addition of an outpatient drug benefit to standard inpatient and outpatient service coverage for Medicare, for example, has stimulated a growth industry in comparative effectiveness research and expanded policy research across the health care system. Pending expansion of States' Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act will undoubtedly create the largest public health care insurance program in the United States. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have streamlined researchers' access to national Medicare and Medicaid populations for health srevices and quality improvement projects through contracts with the Research Data Center at the University of Minnesota and the Chronic Condition Warehouse. In addition, Kansas Medicaid has invested in a Data Analytic Interface that offers ready access to our state's employees, Medicaid beneficiaries, and private health insurance claims data for enterprising researchers including tremendous opportunities for state of the art, contemporary policy analyses. This is indeed an exciting and opportune time for students embarking on careers in health services, policy, and population health research. This course is designed to prepare students for real world analyses using standard public payer claims data. LEC.

HP&M 883. Cost-Effectiveness and Decision Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course examines techniques that are used in making clinical and management decisions when outcomes are uncertain. The course begins with a review of probabilistic decision making, then explores methods of analyzing choices with uncertain outcomes, stressing the use of decision trees and sensitivity analysis. The course examines cost minimization analysis, cost effectiveness analysis, and cost benefit analysis. (SAME as PRVM 878). LEC LEC.

HP&M 884. Clinical and Administrative Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course presents advanced techniques in statistical analysis and information management to help understand, process, and use health services data. The three broad areas of health services data will be used: clinical, program, and population-based. Ways in which these data can be used as both management and research tools will be discussed. Implications for improving patient care and delivery of health services will be emphasized. Labs will stress the use of both manipulative techniques such as merging, matching, sorting, and file construction, as well as focus on analysis, using univariate, bivariate, and multivariate techniques. Recent methodology related to outcomes, case-mix, and performance assessment will be presented, and their application to health services administration demonstrated. LEC LEC.

HP&M 885. Instructional Methods in Health Services Education. 1 Hour.

An overview of pedagogical approaches and learning strategies for higher education courses in health policy and management. Content will include course organization, syllabus design, techniques for teaching in the classroom and online, learning styles, strategies for classroom management, and evaluation/grading methods. Prerequisites: HP&M 868 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

HP&M 886. Applied Health Services Research. 3 Hours.

Students in this course apply the full spectrum of the research process to a specific hypothesis or research question, drawn from practical health systems observations and/or supported by critical analysis of the health services research literature. Moving step by step through the research process, students work to develop a complete research plan and proposal suitable to investigate their chosen question. Group discussion and guest researchers provide elaboration for each stage of research plan development. Prerequisites: HP&M 872 and HP&M 873 or permission of the instructor. RSC.

HP&M 887. Practicum in Health Services Education. 2 Hours.

Application of the approaches and methods described in HP&M 885. Students will serve as a teaching assistant for one semester, working with a teaching mentor. In addition to assisting with the class, students will meet regularly with the mentor to critique and analyze content and classroom processes, plan and develop teaching activities, and evaluate learning and performance in the classroom. Prerequisite: HP&M 868 or permission of the instructor. HP&M 887 may be taken concurrently with HP&M 885. LEC.

HP&M 890. Topics in Health Policy and Management. 1-3 Hours.

This course allows exploration of special topics that are not routinely a part of the curriculum. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. IND LEC.

HP&M 901. Doctoral Seminar in Health Policy. 3 Hours.

Students will investigate, review, and critically analyze major concepts, theoretical and methodological approaches and sub-areas in the field of health policy research. The course will cover comparative health policy analyses as well as both micro and macro system perspectives. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. SEM.

HP&M 903. Doctoral Seminar in Health Management. 3 Hours.

Students will investigate, review and critically examine major concepts, theories, issues, methodological approaches and sub-areas in the health services management research literature. Special attention will be placed on using research to develop evidence-based practice and suggesting interventional strategies for complex problems, both micro- and macro-organizational. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. SEM.

HP&M 990. Advanced Topics in Health Policy and Management. 1-3 Hours.

This course allows exploration of special topics that are not routinely a part of the curriculum. Prerequisite: Admission to a PhD program and consent of the instructor. IND. LEC.

HP&M 991. Individual Doctoral Readings. 1-3 Hours.

Individual study of special topics or problems by students working on a doctorate. Prerequisite: Admission to a PHD program and consent of the instructor. LEC.

HP&M 999. Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

THE.

History & Phil of Medicine Courses

H&PM 902. Ethics and the Research Scientist. 1 Hour.

Concepts basic to conducting biomedical research ethically: fraud, plagiarism, and misrepresentation; intellectual property; collection and interpretation of data; conflicts of interest; reporting misconduct by others. Animal research issues. Human research issues, including federal regulatory structure and informed consent. No prerequisites. LEC.

Micro, Molecular Gen & Immun Courses

MICR 801. Principles of Immunology. 1 Hour.

An introductory course in immunology; cells and tissues of the immune system; B and T cells and their receptors; major histocompatibility complex; antigen presentation; regulation of immune responses; immunity and vaccination. Prerequisite: IGPBS courses or permission of instructor. LEC.

MICR 802. Principles of Virology. 1 Hour.

An introductory course in virology; replication of RNA and DNA viruses; viral RNA processing and translation; reverse transcription; virus assembly; viral pathogenesis; viruses as vectors. Prerequisite: MICR 801 or permission of instructor. LEC.

MICR 803. Principles of Bacterial Genetics and Pathogenesis. 1 Hour.

An introductory course in bacteriology; cell structure and function; chromosome and plasmid replication; genetic engineering; bacteriophage; gene regulation; quorum sensing; antibiotics; protein secretion; bacterial pathogenesis. Prerequisite: MICR 801 & MICR 802 or permission of instructor. LEC.

MICR 805. Teaching in Higher Education. 1 Hour.

Theoretical and practical aspects of teaching in a graduate degree program with emphasis on program and curriculum design, student assessment, communicating learning expectations, selecting optimal teaching methods aligned with expectations, understanding diverse learning styles, apprenticeship teaching, developing as a teacher and applying contemporary educational theory to the classroom or research laboratory. Prerequisite: Any graduate degree or current enrollment in a graduate degree program or permission of instructor. LEC.

MICR 808. Immunology. 3 Hours.

Molecular and cellular aspects of immunity. Specific topics will include immunoglobulin and receptor structure/function, attributes of antigenicity, antigen-antibody reactions, immunocompetent cells, cellular interactions, soluble mediators of immune responses and normal and abnormal immune regulation. Prerequisite: Permission of course director. LEC.

MICR 820. Bacterial Genetics and Pathogenesis. 3 Hours.

Genetics of bacteria with emphasis on bacterial pathogens. Topics include: gene regulation, recombination, bacteriophages, transposons, genetic exchange, plasmids, genetics of virulence, bacterial adherence and colonization, immune evasion mechanisms, bacterial toxins, vaccines and antimicrobials, re-emerging bacterial diseases. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

MICR 825. Virology. 3 Hours.

Molecular biology of animal viruses. Aspects of various virus groups to be covered include structure, replication, and host cell responses. Lectures and student seminars. Prerequisite: Permission of the course director. LEC.

MICR 830. Seminar in Microbiology. 1 Hour.

Reports on research and literature. LEC.

MICR 835. Research in Microbiology. 1-6 Hours.

This course is specifically designed to provide supervised research experience in various laboratories in the department. LEC.

MICR 855. Host-Pathogen Interactions. 3 Hours.

1. Understand the basic concepts of host-pathogen interactions, with an emphasis on pathogen adhesion, invasion and intracellular survival, cell death pathways, innate immunity, and extracellular matrices. 2. Discuss the latest trends in host-pathogen interactions through paper discussion. 3. Provide graduate students opportunity to improve their communication skills. 4. Promote the scientific reasoning capabilities of graduate students. Prerequisites: This course is intended for the second-year microbiology graduate students who have taken Principles courses. Any graduate students from other departments may take this course. However, it is highly recommended to see the instructors before enrollment. LEC.

MICR 890. Research for M.A. in Microbiology. 1-10 Hours.

This course is designated for thesis research leading to the M.A. degree. LEC.

MICR 899. Thesis for M.A. in Microbiology. 1-10 Hours.

Restricted to writing of the thesis. THE.

MICR 930. Advanced Topics in Microbiology. 1-8 Hours.

An advanced approach to selected topics in any of the major disciplines in microbiology. Readings and conferences, or advanced laboratory techniques. LEC.

MICR 990. Research for Ph.D. in Microbiology. 1-10 Hours.

This course is restricted entirely to dissertation research. RSH.

MICR 999. Dissertation for Ph.D. in Microbiology. 1-10 Hours.

Restricted to actual writing of dissertation. THE.

Pathology Courses

PATH 800. General Pathology. 7 Hours.

The basic mechanisms of human disease, including cellular pathology, inflammation, diseases of immunity, neoplasia, infectious and circulatory diseases and aging are considered through the mechanisms of lectures, small-group problem based care study and autopsy demonstration. Prerequisite: Courses in cell biology, biochemistry, and physiology, or equivalents. LEC.

PATH 801. Systemic Pathology. 9 Hours.

Human disease is studied by organ systems to include cardiovascular, hematologic, renal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, musculoskeletal, endocrine, and nervous system diseases. The pathobiology of all major diseases occurring within each organ system are considered by lectures, problem based case study and autopsy participation. Since final comprehensive examination at the end of Pathology II will include material from both Pathology I and Pathology II. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pathology LEC.

PATH 802. Special Pathology. 6 Hours.

A detailed study of diseases involving the endocrine, genitourinary, neuromuscular, and skeletal systems. Prerequisite: PATH 800 and courses in histology, biochemistry, and physiology, or equivalent. LEC.

PATH 803. Stem Cell Biology. 2 Hours.

Current concepts in the study of stem cells, and the clinical potential in modern disease treatment. Students will learn concepts of stem cells: origin, regulation of pluripotency, and differentiative potential; experimental isolation and manipulation; and clinical application of isolated stem cells. Current scientific literature will be used to highlight recent advances in stem cell biology. Special emphasis will be placed on the ethical and legal issues surrounding the use of stem cells of both adult and embryonic origin. Prerequisite: Course in cell biology (IGPBS module 4, or equivalent); consent of instructor. LEC.

PATH 804. Selected Topics in Signal Transduction. 1 Hour.

A survey of the basic principles and contemporary literature of signal transduction pathways involved in cancer development and developmental biology. Faculty lecture and student presentations will address selected topics in cellular signal transduction. Student seminars will focus on the scientific content of the publication with emphasis on appropriate presentation of background information, experimental methods, results and potential future directions. Critical discussion of papers will be provided by participating students and faculty. Prerequisite: Course in Molecular Biology (IGPBS module 3, or equivalent). LEC.

PATH 805. Seminars in Pathology. 1 Hour.

Presentation of Pathology Department graduate student research-in-progress. Students will conduct a one-hour seminar in which updates of their current research project(s) in pathology will be reported. The seminars are interactive and students are encouraged to participate in discussion of the presented work. Prerequisite: Completion of the IGPBS core curriculum and status as a second-year graduate student; consent of instructor. RSC.

PATH 806. Epigenetics. 2 Hours.

Current concepts in epigenetic regulation of transcription, including its involvement in disease. Current scientific literature will be used to examine recent advances in the role of epigenetic regulation in transcription and its impact on cellular processes, including growth, differentiation, development, and disease. Students will learn the fundamental concepts of epigenetic regulation and the role of the epigenetic regulation in various gene expression systems. The role of epigenetics in long-range DNA interactions will also be studied, with an emphasis on enhancer, silencer, and locus control region function. Recent advances in the role of epigenetics in disease, including cancer will also be examine. The course will examine current experimental methods to study epigenetics and gene regulation. Prerequisite: Completion of the IGPBS core curriculum or equivalent; consent of instructor. LEC.

PATH 899. Master's Thesis. 1-7 Hours.

THE.

PATH 903. Pathology Techniques Laboratory. 1-3 Hours.

A laboratory course in which students may select no more than three of the following: electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, cell typing, morphometrics, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, DNA probe, autopsy technique. LAB.

PATH 905. Cellular Biology and Pathophysiology of Bone. 3-5 Hours.

Normal bone development, ultrastructure of bone, and the calcification mechanism. Developmental and genetic abnormalities of bone including dwarfism and osteogenesis imperfecta. Metabolic bone diseases including osteoporosis, Paget's disease and osteomalacia. Methods of diagnosis by morphometry of undecalcified bone biopsy. Common primary bone tumors, and the mechanism of bone loss or bone over growth caused by metastatic malignant tumors. There will be practical laboratory portion. Prerequisite: PATH 800 or permission of instructor. LAB.

PATH 907. Infection and Immunity. 1 Hour.

Microbial factors, host reaction, and disease. Emphasis on recovery from infection, response to reinfection, the resultant clearance of microbes, or the development of chronic infection. Hypersensitivity phenomena will also be considered in the light of data from transplantation immunity. Prerequisite: PATH 800. LAB.

PATH 911. Research in Pathology. 1-10 Hours.

RSH.

PATH 912. Advanced Topics. 1-3 Hours.

Offered by arrangement. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and completion of the IGPBS core curriculum or its equivalent. IND.

PATH 913. Introduction to Grant Proposal Writing. 1 Hour.

This course will teach the fundamentals of writing a grant proposal with an emphasis on NIH proposals. This course is open to any graduate students interested in applying for pre-doctoral fellowships, and especially to graduate students in the Department of Pathology who will be conducting their comprehensive qualifying exams in the upcoming year. This course involves a combination of didactic lectures, student coursework and discussion. This course will include different principal investigators from the Pathology Department as guest speakers. Topics will include different sources of funding, grant submission and post-submission review process. However, the core component of this course will involve teaching the basic framework and components of an NIH R01 application. This course is designed to give practical structural guidance in scientific writing at a professional level and does not give guidance on specific research projects. Prerequisites: IGPBS coursework or equivalent, permission of instructor. LEC.

PATH 915. Advanced Pathology. 3 Hours.

A lecture and literature review course in which molecular, subcellular, and supracellular organization and function are considered in normal and disease states. Prerequisite: PATH 800. LEC.

PATH 939. Carcinogenesis and Cancer Biology. 3 Hours.

Multidisciplinary approach. Cancer pathology. Mutagenesis. Genetics. Carcinogen metabolism. Signal Transduction, Apoptosis. Initiation and promotion. Tumor Immunology. Cell proliferation. Protooncogenes and suppressor genes. Hormonal carcinogenesis. Cancer epidemiology. Anglogenesis. Dietary and environmental causation and prevention. Cancer in various organ systems. (Same as PHCL 939 and PTOX 939.) Prerequisite: Completion of one of the following: IGPBS modules 1-4 or equivalent or permission of instructor. LEC.

PATH 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-7 Hours.

THE.

Pharm, Tox, & Therapeutics Courses

PHCL 761. General Principles of Pharmacology. 1 Hour.

General principles of pharmacology, including pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse effects, pharmacotherapeutics plus miscellaneous agents (antacids, cathartics, biologicals). Open to advanced B.S. students and graduate students in Nursing, Allied Health, and other health related programs. Independent study program with use of computer assisted instruction, textbooks, syllabi, consultation with staff and exams as primary teaching instruments. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an Incomplete grade. Prerequisite: An Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC.

PHCL 762. Pharmacology of the Autonomic Nervous System. 1 Hour.

General principles of the autonomic nervous system, cholinergics, muscarinics, nicotinics, neuromuscular blockers, beta adrenergics, alpha adrenergics, and miscellaneous ANS agents. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an incomplete grade. Prerequisite: PHCL 761 and an Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC.

PHCL 763. Cardiovascular-Renal Pharmacology. 1 Hour.

Antihypertensives, antiarrhythmics, vasodilators, cardiac glycosides, serotonin, histamine, polypeptides, diuretics, antilipidemics. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an incomplete grade. Prerequisite: PHCL 761 and an Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC.

PHCL 764. Pharmacology of the Central Nervous System. 1 Hour.

General principles of the central nervous system, stimulants, hallucinogens, depressants (hypnotics and sedatives), general and local anesthesia, antiparkinson agents, tranquilizers, analgesics and anticonvulsants. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an Incomplete grade. Prerequisite: PHCL 761 and an Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC.

PHCL 765. Chemotherapy. 1 Hour.

Principles of chemotherapy, sulfonamides, penicillins, aminoglycosides, anticancer and antifungal agents, antimalarials, broad spectrum antibiotics, antiparasitic agents, and antiseptics. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an Incomplete grade. Prerequisite: PHCL 761 and an Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC.

PHCL 766. Blood-Endocrine Pharmacology. 1 Hour.

General principles of endocrine function and use, thyroid drugs, insulin, sex hormones, oxytocics, adrenal steroids, antiinflammatory agents, blood drugs, anticoagulants and vitamins. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an incomplete grade. Prerequisite: PHCL 761 and an Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC.

PHCL 767. Toxicology. 1 Hour.

General principles of toxicology, clinical toxicology, solvents, metals, gases and dusts, corrosives, plant and animal toxins, pesticides, radiation, miscellaneous. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an incomplete grade. Prerequisite: PHCL 761 and an Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC.

PHCL 809. Seminar in Pharmacology. 1 Hour.

Weekly meetings. LEC.

PHCL 846. Advanced Neuroscience. 5 Hours.

Team taught, in-depth neuroscience course focusing on normal and diseased brain function at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Lectures and discussions will emphasize current issues in neuroscience research. (Same as ANAT 846, PHSL 846 and NURO 846). Prerequisite: Permission of course director. LEC.

PHCL 848. Molecular Mechanisms of Neurological Disorders. 3 Hours.

An in-depth coverage of pathogenic mechanisms in neurological diseases; cellular and molecular responses to brain injury and disease, neuroinflammatory diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis), neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion diseases), neurogenetic diseases (e.g., lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders, Down's syndrome and fragile X), trauma, stroke, and viral diseases (e.g., HIV encephalitis). (Same as ANAT 848, NURO 848, and PHSL 848.) Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846, PHCL 846 or PHSL 846) or an equivalent course and consent of instructor. LEC.

PHCL 880. Essentials of Pharmacology. 4 Hours.

Introduction to Pharmacology for Graduate Students. Autonomic, Cardiovascular and Renal, Endocrine, Neuro, Antivirals Pharmacology. Autacoids; Workshop; Historical and Contemporary Methods used to Elucidate Mechanisms of Drug Action. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Interdisciplinary Program in Biomedical Sciences or permission of the Instructor. LEC.

PHCL 890. Research in Pharmacology. 1-10 Hours.

For graduate students beginning their research training. RSH.

PHCL 898. Principles of Pharmacology. 1 Hour.

Chemical fundamentals in structure, actions and metabolism of drugs and toxicants. Included are molecular features of drugs and toxicants, steroisomerism, receptor theory, dose-response relationships, agonists and anatgonists, absorption, pharmacokinetics and structure-activity relationships. LEC.

PHCL 899. Thesis in Pharmacology. 1-10 Hours.

For students in a master's program in pharmacology. THE.

PHCL 924. Clinical Pharmacology. 5 Hours.

Designed to give practical and theoretical experience with drug trials in humans. Includes animal experimentation when warranted. Clinical principles of drug therapy will be emphasized. IND.

PHCL 939. Carcinogenesis and Cancer Biology. 3 Hours.

Multidisciplinary approach. Cancer pathology. Mutagenesis, Genetics, Carcinogen metabolism. Signal Transduction, Apoptosis, Initiation and promotion. Tumor Immunology. Cell proliferation. Protooncogenes and suppressor genes. Hormonal carcinogenesis. Cancer epidemiology. Dietary and environmental causation and prevention. Cancer in various organ systems. (Same as PATH 939 and PTOX 939.) Prerequisite: Completion of one of the following: IGPBS modules 1-4 or equivalent or permission of instructor. LEC.

PHCL 990. Research for Dissertation in Pharmacology. 1-10 Hours.

Prerequisite: PHCL 890. RSH.

PHCL 999. Dissertation in Pharmacology. 1-10 Hours.

Prerequisite: Open to students of advanced standing enrolled in the doctoral program in Pharmacology. THE.

PTOX 830. Introduction to Clinical and Translational Cancer Research. 3 Hours.

Instruct students in developmental steps used in translating a basic science experiment with clinical applications into a proof of concept application and human trial. Multidisciplinary approach; lectures from faculty in Pharmacology, KU Cancer Ctr, KUMCRI. Curriculum: Levels of evidence-clinical impact, Pre-Clinical modeling, In-Vitro studies & Animal models, Cancer Drug Development-pharmacokinetics & toxicity, Pre-Clinical Proof of Concept & FDA, Creating a Pilot Study, Biostatistics 101, Phases of Clinical Trials, Data Collection, Support Staff, Regulatory and DSMBs, IRB and HIPPA, Funding Study: Grants & Parma, Advertising study & meeting accrual goals, Goals of Phase I study, Goals & Objectives of Phase II Efficacy study, Phase 3 Multicenter Study: Value of Numbers & Utilizing Cooperative Groups. Prerequisite: Completion of first 2 years of Med School or graduate school, or enrollment in MD/PhD program. Students no meeting one of these criteria will require permission from course instructor. LEC.

PTOX 887. Toxicologic Pathology. 4 Hours.

Introductory pathology course for graduate students preparing for a career in basic toxicology research. Topics to be presented and discussed include: cell injury, inflammation, repair and regeneration, immunopathology, neoplasia, tumor pathology, respiratory pathology, liver pathology, neuropathology, miscellaneous organ pathology, and lab animal clinical chemistry. LEC.

PTOX 889. Research in Toxicology. 1-10 Hours.

Introductory pathology course for planning on being research toxicologists. Topics to be presented and discussed: cell injury, inflammation, repair and regeneration, immunopath, neoplasia, tumor pathology, respiratory pathology, liver pathology, neuropathology, miscellaneous organ pathology, and lab animal clinical chemistry. LEC.

PTOX 898. Principles of Toxicology. 1 Hour.

Chemical fundamentals in structure, actions and metabolism of toxicants and drugs. Included are molecular features of toxicants and drugs, stereoisomerism, receptor theory, dose-response relationships, agonists and antagonists, absorption, pharmacokinetics, and structure-activity relationships. LEC.

PTOX 899. Thesis in Toxicology. 1-10 Hours.

For students in a master's program in toxicology. THE.

PTOX 917. Disposition of Xenobiotics. 2 Hours.

Principles of absorption, biotransformation, and excretion of xenobiotics. Prerequisite: PHCL 888 or departmental permission. LEC.

PTOX 918. Toxicology. 4 Hours.

Selected topics in environmental, forensic, and industrial toxicology. LEC.

PTOX 939. Carcinogenesis and Cancer Biology. 3 Hours.

Multidisciplinary approach. Cancer pathology. Mutagenesis. Genetics. Carcinogen metabolism. Signal Transduction, Apoptosis. Initiation and promotion. Tumor immunology. Cell proliferation. Protooncogenes and suppressor genes. Hormonal carcinogenesis. Cancer epidemiology. Angiogenesis. Dietary and environmental causation and prevention. Cancer in various organ systems. (Same as PATH 939 and PHCL 939.) Prerequisite: Completion of one of the following: IGPBS modules 1-4 or equivalent or permission of instructor. LEC.

PTOX 940. Techniques in Industrial Toxicology. 2 Hours.

A unique course where students are exposed to and have practical experience in techniques used for risk-assessment of chemicals. The course is taught with extensive input by industrial toxicologists who use these techniques on a daily basis. This course is offered at a local industrial setting. Prerequisite: PHCL 888; PTOX 917, PTOX 918, and PTOX 938, or departmental permission. LEC.

PTOX 990. Research for Dissertation in Toxicology. 1-10 Hours.

Prerequisite: PTOX 889. RSH.

PTOX 999. Dissertation in Toxicology. 1-10 Hours.

Prerequisite: Open to students of advanced standing enrolled in the doctoral program in toxicology. THE.

Physiology Courses

PHSL 784. Faculty Research Programs. 1 Hour.

The new student will be introduced to the faculty research programs. Each faculty member will present his/her research interests using one or more of the following formats: laboratory demonstrations, computer simulations and lectures. The objectives are to assist the new student in selecting his/her area of dissertation research and acquainting the new student with the department research resources. LEC.

PHSL 834. Reproductive Physiology. 5 Hours.

All aspects of reproductive physiology including an in depth study of ovarian and testicular development/function, neuroendocrine development/function, implantation, placentation, puberty, pregnancy and fertility regulation are covered. Historical and current scientific literature will be used to support a graduate level text and didactic lectures. Prerequisite: a general endocrinology/physiology course, an equivalent course and/or consent of instructor. LEC.

PHSL 835. Integrative Physiology of Exercise. 3 Hours.

To understand how the major physiological systems of the body respond to exercise with an emphasis on integration and function. Historical and current scientific literature will be used to generate discussion and support didactic material. Fundamentals of exercise physiology will be covered, but a background in exercise physiology is not required. Prerequisite: a general physiology course, an equivalent course and/or consent of instructor. LEC.

PHSL 838. Advanced Topics. 1-3 Hours.

Special studies designed and arranged on an individual basis to allow a student to pursue a particular subject through reading, special laboratory work, and conferences with a senior staff member. LEC.

PHSL 840. Advanced Genetic Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on principles that underlie genetic analysis, including mutation, complementation, recombination, segregation, and regulation. The genetics of commonly used model organisms such as yeast, flies, worms and mice will be examined, classic genetic screens performed to study phage assembly, cell cycle regulation, sex determination and X-chromosome inactivation will be discussed and modern-day techniques used to study inheritance and gene function in various systems will be analyzed. Human genetic analysis will also be covered, including population genetics, techniques for gene mapping, inherited diseases, genetic testing and gene therapy. Through reading and discussion of scientific literature and problem-based homework and exams, students will learn how to evaluate and interpret genetic data as well as develop and design genetic strategies to solve current biological problems. Prerequisite: Completion of IGPBS Core Curriculum or equivalent, or permission of Course Director. LEC.

PHSL 842. Comprehensive Human Physiology. 5 Hours.

Advanced course on modern human physiology. The course focuses on organ systems of the human body including nervous, cardiovascular, endocrine, digestive, respiratory, reproductive and urinary systems. This course emphasizes the use of modern experimental approaches that take advantage of cellular and molecular technologies. Prerequisite: NONE LEC.

PHSL 844. Neurophysiology. 3 Hours.

Somatosensory, motor and cognitive function of the brain will be discussed using a combination of lecture and student presentation formats. Current issues and evidence underlying accepted concepts and mechanisms will be emphasized. (Same as NURO 844. ) Prerequisite: Introductory course in neuroscience and consent of instructor. LEC.

PHSL 846. Advanced Neuroscience. 5 Hours.

Team taught, in-depth neuroscience course focusing on normal and diseased brain function at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Lectures and discussions will emphasize current issues in neuroscience research. (Same as ANAT 846, PHCL 846 and NURO 846). Prerequisite: Permission of course director. LEC.

PHSL 847. Developmental Neurobiology. 2 Hours.

Development of the nervous system from early induction to the development of learning and memory. Topics include: Induction; Cellular Differentiation; Axon Growth and Guidance; Target Selection; Cell Survival and Growth; Synapse Formation; Synapse Elimination; and Development of Behavior. (Same as ANAT 847 and NURO 847.) Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846; NURO 846; PHSL 846) or consent of instructor. LEC.

PHSL 848. Molecular Mechanisms of Neurological Disorders. 3 Hours.

An in-depth coverage of pathogenic mechanisms in neurological diseases: cellular and molecular responses to brain injury and disease, neuroinflammatory diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis), neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion diseases), neurogenetic diseases (e.g., lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders, Down's syndrome and fragile X), trauma, stroke, and viral diseases (e.g., HIV encephalitis). (Same as ANAT 848, NURO 848, and PHCL 848.) Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846, PHCL 846 or PHSL 846) or an equivalent course and consent of instructor. LEC.

PHSL 850. Research. 1-10 Hours.

Original laboratory investigation conducted under the supervision of a senior staff member. RSH.

PHSL 851. Seminar. 1 Hour.

Student participation (attendance and presentation) in weekly Departmental seminar series. The topics examined in these seminars are dictated by the interests of students and staff. Prerequisite: student must have passed their oral comprehensive exam. LEC.

PHSL 899. Master's Thesis. 1-5 Hours.

Preparation of the formal thesis based on library research or independent research and in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master's degree. Credits will be given only after the thesis has been accepted by the student's thesis committee. THE.

PHSL 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-10 Hours.

Preparation of the Dissertation based on original research and in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree. Credits will be given only after the dissertation has been accepted by the student's dissertation committee. THE.

Preventive Medicine Courses

PRVM 800. Principles of Epidemiology. 3 Hours.

Basic concepts of epidemiology and methods for identification of factors influencing health and disease in human populations. Considerations are centered on physical, biological, psychosocial and cultural factors in relation to infectious and non-infectious diseases; interactions between agent, host, and environmental factors as determinants of health and disease; application of the epidemiologic approach to health services; retrospective and prospective analysis of morbidity and mortality data. LEC.

PRVM 802. Principles of Epidemiology Lab. 1 Hour.

This course is an additional supplement to the Principles of Epidemiology course. We will review articles and discuss the major principles of epidemiology through the use of the medical literature. This course is designed for students to obtain practical training in epidemiologic concepts and methods. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PRVM 800. LEC.

PRVM 803. Introduction to Clinical Research. 1 Hour.

Course will provide a comprehensive overview to clinical research. The student will gain an understanding of how to develop clinical research questions including protocol design and the factors that should be considered in initiating a clinical research study. This will include biostatistical considerations, the recruitment of study participants, regulatory issues, and data management, and defining measures and instruments. Students will gain knowledge of how to define clinical research among the various institutional entities involved with clinical research at the University of Kansas Medical Center such as the Research Institute (RI), General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) and the Human Subjects Committee (HSC). Additionally, one component of the course will focus on how to apply for funding (grantsmanship), critical appraisal of research studies, and how to present research data. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC.

PRVM 805. Public Health Seminar. 1 Hour.

This course will focus on public health practice. Guest lectures from national, state, and local public health agencies will present problems and how these problems are being addressed. Topics are expected to vary somewhat from year to year, depending on the priorities of the agencies. However, topics might include such issues as smoking prevention, automobile accidents, foodborne outbreaks, cryptosporidum outbreaks, lead poisoning in children, asthma in children, sexuality transmitted diseases, diabetes, cancer control, nutrition, cardiovascular diseases, bioterrorism, legal issues and administration of public health. This course is the same as Public Health Grand Rounds. FLD.

PRVM 806. Special Topics:. 1-4 Hours.

In-depth, individualized investigation of special problems in community health. Designed especially for students with limited background in community health. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. RSH.

PRVM 807. Introduction to Field Epidemiology. 3 Hours.

This course presents an overview of the methods used in epidemiologic field investigations. It provides students with a comprehensive review of the basic components of an outbreak investigation, an introduction to public health surveillance, and an overview of specific types of investigations in which a field epidemiologist might become involved, including traceback studies, environmental health assessments, noninfectious health event investigations, contact tracing, and forensic epidemiology. In addition, resources that often come into play in outbreak investigations are presented, such as public health laboratories, the incident command system, and geographic information systems. Prerequisite: PRVM 800. RSH.

PRVM 808. Clinical and Translational Research Seminar. 1 Hour.

This seminar will present locally and nationally recognized clinicians and researchers to discuss various areas of clinical research. The course is designed to expose students to a variety of ongoing research and features speakers from a variety of disciplines including physicians, epidemiologists, biostatisticians behavioral scientists, nursing faculty, nursing students, medical students, allied health faculty and others. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 809. Introduction to Public Health. 3 Hours.

An introduction to contemporary public health principles and practice addressing the history, philosophy, and scope of public health practice with emphasis on current organization and administration of programs, recent developments and trends, public health law and regulations and the interface of public and other health related systems. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 810. Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology. 3 Hours.

This will be a study of Cardiovascular Disease risk factors, expression, treatment, and prevention from a population-based standpoint. Participants will gain knowledge of cardiovascular disease prevalence, incidence, risk factors, outcomes, and prevention strategies. The goal of this course is to understand major aspects of cardiovascular epidemiology and current strategies for primary and secondary prevention of major cardiovascular diseases. Attention will be given to physiologic mechanisms leading to atherosclerosis; traditional and novel coronary heart disease risk factors; prevention methodologies for cardiovascular disease, and the role of lifestyle, dietary, and genetic factors in the development of cardiac and vascular diseases. The course will be evidence- and outcomes-based, with reference to landmark studies and major publications. Relevant historical breakthroughs and current controversies in CVD will be discussed using recent publications from the lay press and peer-reviewed journals. Emphasis will be placed on coronary artery disease and its clinical manifestations. Participants will learn to critically assess public health measures undertaken to recognize, manage, and treat atherosclerotic disease processes. LEC.

PRVM 811. Introduction to Pharmacoepidemiology. 3 Hours.

Pharmacoepidemiology is the application of the principles of epidemiology to the study of medications and their effects of health. Evaluating a drug's effects commences when a chemical entity becomes a drug candidate, intensifies through clinical trials, and continues after products reach the market. These studies are critical for supporting the proper use of medications in terms of efficacy, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness. This course provides a broad introduction to the principles of pharmacoepidemiology with a focus on applications in the medical literature. Prerequisite: PRVM 800. LEC.

PRVM 812. Introduction To One Health. 2 Hours.

"One Health" encompasses the complex interrelationships among humans and animals, humans and the environment, and animals and the environment. Incorporates original videos of leading subject matter experts and researchers, case studies, and scientific readings. It addresses zoonotic diseases (those that may be transferred between humans and animals) and environmental issues that impact human, animal, and ecosystem health. Topics include disease surveillance, the human-animal bond, the built environment, disaster response, sanitation, rural/suburban/urban interface, and food safety and security. Prerequisites: Two courses in the biological sciences. Course Format: This is an interactive online course led by the instructor. LEC.

PRVM 814. Health Literacy. 3 Hours.

This is a graduate-level course designed to teach students about literacy and its implications on public health practice and research in the United States, with a focus on health literacy. Students will be introduced to the different types of literacy, including health, prose, quantitative, document, and computer, and how to evaluate them. In addition, students will learn how to lower literacy levels of health education materials for practical application. Cultural competency in literacy will also be discussed, with a focus on culturally competent health communication and education. LEC.

PRVM 815. Surveillance and Control of Infectious Disease. 3 Hours.

This course is concerned with the public health aspects of infectious diseases of importance in the United States. Emphasis will be given to surveillance and control of reportable diseases transmitted via person to person spread, arthropod vectors, lower animals, and common sources. Special considerations are given to characteristics of the agent, host, and environment that influence transmission and selection of control strategies. Instruction is by lecture, seminars and problem-solving sessions. Prerequisite: PRVM 800 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 816. International Health. 3 Hours.

This course is divided into seven sections: 1) Global health introduction, 2) Health inequalities and the socio-economic context of disease, 3) Maternal and child health, the health of special populations, 4) The spread of infectious diseases, and HIV/AIDS, malaria, TB, 5) Globalizations and emerging infectious diseases, and nutrition, 6) Environmental health ,and the health of effects of environmental change, 7) Global health payers and players, and global health priorities. Prerequisite: PRVM 800 Principles of Epidemiology or permission of the department/instructor. LEC.

PRVM 817. Gender, Race, Class, and Health. 3 Hours.

This graduate-level course examines the intersection of gender, race, and class and its effects on individual and public health. The theoretical orientation of this course is informed by Black feminist scholarship on intersectionality: that is, the intersecting oppressions of gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation. This theory is extended to contemporary public health and social problems through an examination of applied public health studies and interventions. Students' work will be grounded in theory, but they will learn to apply theory in fieldwork-based exercises and critical analysis of public health problems. LEC.

PRVM 818. Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health. 3 Hours.

The course provides an overview of social and behavioral aspects of public health including the relevance of psychological and social factors for health, the principles of health behavior change, the application of these principles in various health domains, and an introduction to health behavior and health promotion interventions. The course begins with the rationale for studying social and behavioral aspects of health and examines select social and behavioral factors (e.g. gender, socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity) as they relate to physical well-being. The course also focuses on well-established theories of health behavior and examines the role of psychological and social factors in specific health topics (e.g. obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disease, smoking). Prerequisite: None. LEC.

PRVM 819. An Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Health. 2 Hours.

This course will provide students with an overview of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) applied in the context of health (public health, allied health and health care). Students will be introduced to GIS and health applications used locally, nationally and internationally. They will learn about pertinent data, how to visualize the data, how to design maps that represent the data, how to use spatial data, how to geocode data, and how to prepare and analyze data. Real-life examples will be used throughout the course and students will gain hands-on experience using a GIS application. Students will also be kept abreast of any new GIS resources and trends or developments in GIS as relates to health. Prerequisite: Basic computer skills. LEC.

PRVM 820. Introduction to Oral Public Health. 3 Hours.

This course is a comprehensive introduction to oral public health in general as it relates to public health in general, within the context of the U.S. healthcare system. Course content includes: Basic organizational arrangements of health services in the U.S., concepts of public health and dental public health, public health problems and oral public health problems in the context of social and community factors and social determinants of health behavior, oral public health developments from a historical perspective, oral health/dental care financing and decision making; assessments of oral health status and need for care; population-based programs for oral disease prevention/health promotion, oral/dental public health research methodology and the practice of oral public health. LEC.

PRVM 821. Research Methods in Public Health. 3 Hours.

This is an introductory behavioral research methods, course. Students will learn about research designs, hypothesis formation, measurement, sampling, ethical issues in research, and pragmatic and research issues with evaluating behavioral interventions. Students will also learn how to critically evaluate and develop behavioral randomized clinical trials. Prerequisites: None. Social and Behavioral Aspects of Health and an Introductory statistics course are recommended but not required. LEC.

PRVM 822. Migration and Health. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to enhance students' understanding of the immigration progress and its implications on health. This course will address a wide range of health issues experienced by immigrants in the U.S. and will analyze resources, disparities, and cultural factors having an impact on immigrants' health. This course will also review partnerships and strategies developed to address the health of immigrants in the U.S. Prerequisite: Completion of PRVM 818 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health and PRVM 863 Health Disparities is recommended. Instructor or program approval is required. LEC.

PRVM 823. Field Experience in Community Health Education. 1-3 Hours.

Internships with community agencies, community preceptors in areas of concentration. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. FLD.

PRVM 825. Child and Family Health. 3 Hours.

Family, maternal, and child health problems will be addressed. Topics will include prenatal care (maternal health and habits); fetal growth factors, well baby care (immunizations, nutrition, growth, development, behavior); developmental disabilities; adoption; adolescence; child abuse; family as a support system; long-term medical and social outcomes of chronic illness/disability in children. Subjects are covered through lecture, discussion and field visits under the supervision of a pediatrician. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 826. Epidemiology for Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

Epidemiology for Advanced Nursing Practice is a 3 credit hour graduate level course designed to synthesize basic epidemiology with clinical nursing concepts. The course is a core course required for the Doctor of Nursing Practice degree in which basic concepts of epidemiology and methods for identification of factors influencing health and disease in human populations are discussed. Considerations are centered on: 1) Physical, biological psychosocial and cultural factors in relation to infectious and non-infectious diseases; 2) Interactions between agent, host, and environmental factors as determinants of health and disease; 3) Application of the epidemiologic approach to clinical nursing; and 4) Measures of disease occurrence and risk. Prerequisites: None. LEC.

PRVM 827. Public Health Administration. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an overview of the core functions of public health: assessment, policy development, and assurance together with an introduction to the leadership and management skills necessary to provide leadership in public health. It uses both theoretical and practical material to develop basic administrative competencies necessary for practice in community and public health. Assignments are designed to provide practice in applying course materials. LEC.

PRVM 828. Public Health Program Development and Management. 3 Hours.

Framed within the context of the core public health functions, assessment, policy development, and assurance, this course provides students with an overview of the planning process within a community setting. This course will use both theoretical and practical material to develop basic competencies in planning, implementing, and evaluating health programs; however, the predominant focus will involve the planning process and operations of a public health program. Assignments are designed to provide practice in applying course materials. Prerequisites: PRVM 818 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health, PRVM 800 Principles of Epidemiology, PRVM 827 Public Health Administration. LEC.

PRVM 830. Environmental Health. 3 Hours.

This course will identify specific health effects of environmental contaminants and discuss principles of prevention. Specific problem areas will include air and water pollution, solid waste disposal, food preservation, radiation, industrial hygiene, occupational skin and lung diseases, chemical carcinogens accidents, an agricultural health and safety. A number of guest lecturers and field trips will be utilized. LEC.

PRVM 832. Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology. 3 Hours.

Epidemiological concepts applied to problems in environmental and occupational health will be discussed. This course will focus on studies of workplace and environmental exposures, exposure assessment and monitoring, hazardous exposures and adverse health effects, and approaches to prevention. Specific health effects of exposure to toxic chemical and physical agents will be discussed, as well as reading, evaluating, and interpreting epidemiologic studies. Prerequisites: PRVM 800 Principles of Epidemiology and PRVM 830 Environmental Health or permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 834. Community Health Education and Promotion. 3 Hours.

Designed to teach students the core concepts in community health education and promotion, students will be introduced to the scientific and practical knowledge necessary to develop successful research and implement programs. Students will learn models of analysis, management of health promotion in the workplace, health education diagnosis, planning, and evaluation. A variety of examples will be used, including the Centers for Disease Control model, and other commonly recognized approaches to community health promotion. Prerequisites: PRVM 818 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health or permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 835. Evaluation Methods in Public Health. 3 Hours.

Principles and procedures to evaluate health promotion and disease prevention programs. Includes data collection methods, instrument scale development, measurement, and evaluation designs. Case studies of disease prevention literature on evaluation will be analyzed. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 836. Epidemiology in Aging. 3 Hours.

An overview of the aging process, review of current knowledge of epidemiology of selected diseases, such as dementia and osteoporosis, and falls that primarily affect aging individuals. Emphasis on epidemiologic designs, methods, and issues (e.g., low response rate and measurements) that are pertinent to research on aging individuals. Prerequisite: PRVM 800, BMTR 811/PRVM 804, or permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 837. Children's Environmental Health. 3 Hours.

Web-based course. Children rely on adults to protect them from hazards. Are we doing as much as we should? Are certain health problems in children related to environmental contamination? This course reviews and applies concepts in epidemiology, toxicology, reproductive health, and childhood development. Important children's health problems such as asthma, attention deficit disorder, and others are addressed. Students apply principles of health communication in a project designed to prevent environmental health problems among children. Prerequisite: PRVM 800 Principles of Epidemiology. LEC.

PRVM 838. Reproductive Epidemiology. 3 Hours.

Epidemiologic concepts applied to problems in reproductive health of men and women. Critical analysis of epidemiologic studies on sociocultural, individual and pregnancy-specific risk factors to reproduction. Field trips will be used to explore methods to reduce adverse reproductive health outcomes in populations (worksites, managed care organizations, local health departments). Literature synthesis skills are used in a project focused on preventing adverse reproductive outcomes in a defined population. LEC.

PRVM 839. Community-oriented Primary Care Epidemiology. 3 Hours.

Overview of how population-based epidemiological concepts are applied to primary care settings, within the framework of community-oriented primary care (COPC). Community and clinic populations will be emphasized. Epidemiology theory and primary care research applications will be taught. Prerequisite: PRVM 800 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 840. Clinical Epidemiology. 3 Hours.

Application and elaboration of epidemiologic principles in the context of clinical decision-making; design and interpretation of studies relating to diagnosis, prognosis, prevention, and therapeutics; techniques of economic analysis and meta-analysis; use of clinical epidemiology to develop practice guidelines. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 841. Advanced Epidemiology I: Methods in Cross-Sectional and Case-Control Studies. 3 Hours.

This course will concentrate on concepts and application of various statistical techniques in the analysis of epidemiological data. Students will be oriented toward application of SAS in data analysis and interpretation of data from cross-sectional and case-control studies. Prerequisite: Principles of Epidemiology (PRVM 800), Fundamentals of Biostatistics I (BIOS 714), and Management of Public Health Data (PRVM 875) or Statistical Computing SAS Base (BIOS 820.) LEC.

PRVM 842. Advanced Epidemiology II: Methods in Longitudinal Studies. 3 Hours.

This course will concentrate on concepts and application of various statistical techniques in the analysis of epidemiological data. Students will be oriented toward application of SAS in data analysis and interpretation of data from longitudinal studies and controlled clinical trials. Prerequisite: Principles of Epidemiology (PRVM 800), Fundamentals of Biostatistics I (BIOS 714), Advanced Epidemiology (PRVM 841), and Management of Public Health Data (PRVM 875) or Statistical Computing SAS Base (BIOS 820.) LEC.

PRVM 843. Obesity and Public Health. 3 Hours.

Obesity is becoming epidemic and pandemic throughout the world. What are the personal public health consequences of this phenomenon? Are we as focused as we should be on the effects of this growing problem? This course reviews the basic definition of obesity and defines its known personal and public health effects: including issues of bias and stigmatization. The course further examines the epidemiology, and future predicated consequences of obesity and then examines personal models of treatment followed by examination of public health efforts to date. Finally, proposed interventions and areas for research are discussed and evaluated. Students apply principles of behavioral change and communication to develop proposed public health approaches to ameliorating the obesity problem in children and adults. Prerequisite: PRVM 800: Principles of Epidemiology and PRVM 818: Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health, or permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 844. Organization, Financing and Delivery of Health Care.. 3 Hours.

This course will demonstrate an understanding of the difference between health care and medical care and the place of medical care in the economic system; the role of social values and economic principles in societal decision making and the utilization of health care services; the role of NEED in the utilization of health care services; the public and private financing of the health care system; the organization of resources and types of managed care systems; the unique payment and the reimbursement mechanisms in the health care system; and the role of government in the health care system. LEC.

PRVM 845. Cultural Competency in Public Health. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with a broad range of contemporary research and writtings in the area of cultural competence in public health as it relates to health disparities and health interventions. Specific attention will be paid to examining self-awareness, developing cross-cultural competence, and identifying and utilizing culturally appropriate strategies in health promotion and prevention. Students emerge from this course with an understanding of how culture operates as a critical variable in health behaviors, planning health promotion and disease prevention strategies, and in addressing health disparities. LEC.

PRVM 846. Health Economics. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to explore the application of economic theories, principles and concepts to the U.S. medical care system. Students will demonstrate an understanding of: the difference between health care and medical care and the place of medical care in the economic system; the role of social values in economic principles and societal decision making; the determinants of supply and demand of medical care services with particular attention to the relationship between supplier and demand and need and demand; complements and substitutes as they apply to medical care services; the unique nature of the medical care product; the interrelatedness of markets; the principles of and demand for health insurance and its role in the demand for medical care services; the role of government in the medical care system. LEC.

PRVM 847. Seminar in American Indian Health Disparities. 1 Hour.

This is a graduate-level course designed to teach students about current research being done around the country to address health disparities faced by American Indian communities. Students will attend a weekly one-hour seminar on-line and will be given readings to accompany each lecture. Lectures will be done by faculty at various universities, as well as members of community organizations and/or tribes who are conducting research. Students may take the course multiple times; each seminar will be unique in terms of topics and accompanying readings, as well as lecturers. Some semesters may focus on a particular health topic for the full semester, e.g. - cancer or diabetes. This course is designed to be a seminar series that changes each time it is taught. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. SEM.

PRVM 849. Qualitative Methods in Public Health. 3 Hours.

Qualitative research has diverged from its anthropology roots to become commonplace in marketing, business, clinical and public health settings. This course is focused to basic qualitative methodologies with applications in public health, health services research, health behavior, and quality improvement. This course reviews and gives real practice with strategic planning, choice of methods, logistics, and integration with quantitative methods. Students will receive hands-on experience with logistics and actual data collection using several methods. Students will present and discuss recent journal articles reporting qualitative studies in weekly "journal club" fashion. Students will present the results of their qualitative research in an oral class presentation and poster, and in an abstract submitted to a local, regional or national conference. Prerequisite: PRVM 800 or permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 850. Cancer Epidemiology. 3 Hours.

Epidemiology of major malignant disease is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the identification of populations at risk, etiologic factors and foreseeable methods of prevention. Relevant information on tumor biology, immunology, and viral, chemical and physical carcinogenesis is presented. Problems unique to epidemiologic investigation of cancers are discussed. Epidemilogical methodology is stressed. Prerequisite: PRVM 800. LEC.

PRVM 851. Public Health Policy and Law. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare public health leaders to live and work in a world of laws, and to play an active and effective role in policy making and analysis. Students will understand the source of national, state, and local statutes and regulations and understand the role of common law. Students will understand the policy process at the national, state, and local level, and develop skills analyzing legislation and influencing policy decisions. Students will understand the rule making process at the national and state level. LEC.

PRVM 852. Health Care for Special Populations. 3 Hours.

This course examines the health and social needs of population groups with higher-than-average risk of disease, disability, and negative social outcomes. Such groups include low-income racial and ethnic minorities, urban adolescents, people in jails/prisons, the homeless, drug users, sex workers, immigrants, and people living with HIV/AIDS. The course utilizes the disciplines of social epidemiology and medical sociology to explore the individual, community, and structural-level determinants of health and implications for health care. LEC.

PRVM 853. Responsible Conduct of Research. 1 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to engage research trainees in reading about, considering, and discussing the responsible conduct of science. The course is designed as an option for meeting current federal regulations, which require that all NIH training grants provide training in the responsible conduct of research. This course provides a concise overview of key subject areas in the responsible conduct of research. It is designed to make students aware of relevant guidelines, policies and codes relating to ethical research, as well as to provide the skills for identifying and resolving ethical conflicts that may arise in research. LEC.

PRVM 854. Population and Community Mental Health. 3 Hours.

Social and social-psychological processes that shape the experience of mental health and illness and the consequences of disorders for individuals, families, and communities will be examined. Theories of systems, evidence-based treatment, epidemiologic research, diverse populations, mental health consequences of disaster and terrorism, and systems of care and change. Students will become familiar with the role of mental health risk and protective factors in the promotion of well-being. Through critical review and discussion of selected readings in this area, students will consider the implications of mental health and illness as a community or public health issue. Students will be evaluated on critical thinking and evaluation skills through written assignments and projects designed to demonstrate their ability to identify and integrate key elements of mental health theory and research. RSC.

PRVM 855. Seminar in Women's Health. 3 Hours.

Seminar in Women's Health is a 3 credit elective, graduate level course focusing on gender issues that are relevant in treatment approaches to various health issues, the differing health status of minority women, the evolvement of women's health to include the entire life span and areas other than reproduction, the changing implications of health care and policy and men in women's health. No prerequisite. LEC.

PRVM 856. Community-Based Participatory Research. 3 Hours.

This is a graduate-level course designed to teach students the basic methods of conducting and evaluating community-based participatory research (CBPR). Students will be introduced to the five phases of CBPR, including partnership formation and maintenance, community assessment and diagnosis, defining the issue, documentation and evaluation of partnerships, and feedback, interpretation, and evaluation of partnerships. In addition, students will learn how to find funding mechanisms and journals that are appropriate for CBPR, as well as some of the key factors in writing about CBPR. Students will be introduced to a variety of examples of well-done CBPR and will learn what makes it different from other types of research done in community settings. PREREQUISITES: Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health or permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 857. Motivational Interviewing in Public Health Settings. 1 Hour.

The course is designed to introduce participants to Motivational Interviewing, its concepts, and to the subsequent skills required for helping people to change. This course will be cross-listed with DN 857. LEC.

PRVM 858. Public Health in Film. 2 Hours.

The Public Health in Film course will allow students the opportunity to address multiple public health issues throughout time via educational films and public health documentaries and discussion. Specific issues will include, but will not be limited to: polio, leprosy, cholera, tuberculosis, the bubonic plague, influenza, bioterrorism and natural disasters. LEC.

PRVM 859. Tobacco and Public Health. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an overview of tobacco as a public health problem and tobacco politics. Students will learn about the pharmacology of nicotine, the mechanisms leading to tobacco addiction and biologic factors that affect pharmacology and tobacco use such as the menstrual cycle and comorbid illnesses such as depression and others. Public health approaches to preventing tobacco use initiation will be studied, including which initiatives are most effective. State-of-the-art methods to assist smokers to quit will be reviewed, including pharmacologic interventions, counseling by health professionals and education/motivation support. Barriers to obtaining services will be explored, such as educational needs among various types of helth professionals, and access to care in rural areas or among clients with certain types of health insurance. LEC.

PRVM 860. Community Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Comparative analysis of the demographic, geographic, and economic structure of various types of communities in Western and non-Western societies. Relationships between these compositional elements of a given community, its food and nutrition resources and services, and the nutritional status of its members. Development of alternative strategies for resource expansion and/or for delivering appropriate nutritional services to target communities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

PRVM 862. Terrorism, Emergency Preparedness and Response. 3 Hours.

Through lectures, tabletop exercises, and invited speakers, the course content will include the following topics: terminology and core competencies, public health infrastructure, collaboration and communication, roles and responsibilities, psychological effects of terrorism, agricultural and zoonotic bioterrorism, law enforcements and public health, epidemiology of BT diseases (including agent specific lectures), burn injuries, risk communication, Strategic National Stockpile (SNS), National Incident Management System (NIMS), public health law as related to bioterrorism, and public health laboratory response related to bioterrorism. LEC.

PRVM 863. Health Disparities in Public Health. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to enhance students' understanding of the biopsychosocial factors that contribute to disparities in health and health care. This course will also review strategies developed to reduce health disparities. Prerequisite: PRVM 818 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health is recommended. LEC.

PRVM 864. Global Public Health Impact of HIV/AIDS. 3 Hours.

Historically reviews the HIV pandemic to evaluate lessons learned in prevention and treatment of the disease and successes and failures of public policies to reduce the impact of HIV in various countries. Critically analyzes HIV prevention interventions (voluntary counseling and testing, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, promotion of safer sex practices, clean needle exchange, methadone or buprenorphine programs, treatment with antiretroviral therapy, pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis, vaccine and microbicide development) and challenges with their implementation. LEC.

PRVM 867. Ethical Issues in Public Health. 3 Hours.

Lectures and small group discussions explore public health ethics, social justice and autonomy as they relate to public health practice and health policy. Current issues in health policy are discussed including: the right to health and health care, bioterrorism, and health inequalities, poverty and power. Weekly small group discussions include cases on MCHP, obesity and "fat taxes," resource allocation, and disparities in infant mortality. Student evaluation is based on class participation, a small group project, and a final paper based upon a case study addressing ethical issues relevant to the student's area of public health specialization. LEC.

PRVM 868. Seminar in Outcomes Management and Research. 1 Hour.

Political, economic, and methodologic issues that affect health care quality and outcome measurement will be discussed and analyzed in this seminar. Visiting faculty experts in outcomes research and management will present models for health care outcomes assessment and evaluation. (Same as HP&M 876 and NRSG 888.) LEC.

PRVM 870. Environmental Health Law and Policy. 3 Hours.

This is a survey course that will provide a broad, practical understanding of some important local, state, and federal environmental statutes, regulations, and case law. This course will cover the fundamentals of environmental law, examining the history, development, and current status of environmental law and federalism in the United States. Environmental Law is designed to introduce the student to a variety of important environmental challenges addressed by environmental laws and policy issues surrounding environmental problems as well as the legal complexities of environmental regulatory and administrative schemes. Prerequisite: PRVM 830 Environmental Health. LEC.

PRVM 871. Environmental Monitoring and Exposure Assessment. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the various techniques and analytical methods to monitor and measure environmental contamination in air, water, and soil in both indoor and outdoor environments. Students will learn to use measurement devices and instrumentation typically used to measure and analyze these environmental contaminants. They will also learn to interpret the data and model contaminant levels in the environment and will use this data to model likely human exposures. Environmental Monitoring and Exposure Assessment is critical to the assessment of environmental hazards and identifying exposure risk to individuals and populations. The course will focus on standard sampling and analytical techniques that have been developed to assess contaminant levels, quality assurance, data analysis, pathways of exposure and the fate and transport of environmental contaminants. The course will also briefly discuss biomarkers as a tool to estimate exposure, dose or body burden, and the information they provide will be compared to and contrasted with measures of contaminant levels in the environment. Prerequisite: PRVM 830 Environmental Health. LEC.

PRVM 872. Grant Writing. 3 Hours.

This course combines instruction and practical exercises to move the participant step-by-step through all stages of planning programs, identifying funding sources, and writing grant proposals. Upon completion of the course, the student will have developed a quality proposal and be able to demonstrate skills in preparing grants. These will include: Development of fundable idea, Researching appropriate funding opportunities from foundations, corporations, and governmental sources; Finding grant information on the Internet; Reviewing federal grant applications, including NIH, NSF, and HRSA applications; Development of proposal elements and crafting a quality grant application; Review of certification and assurances required on grant applications; Review of evaluation and program outcome requirements on grant applications; Working with other participants in small groups to act as internal grant reviewers, responding to reviewers, and resubmitting grants. LEC.

PRVM 873. Scientific Writing. 2 Hours.

Includes the mechanics of how to write clearly, focusing on mechanics, structure, and style. Students will practice specific strategies for writing effectively, with in depth attention paid to how ideas are distributed through well written sentences and paragraphs. Also includes editing and revision of writing for publication and grant submission. LEC.

PRVM 874. Toxicology and Risk Assessment. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce students to basic toxicological concepts. Students will be provided opportunities to use these concepts to describe the underlying biochemical or physiological basis for health effects related to exposure to environmental toxicants and will practice interpreting the findings from student in the literature and critiquing studies. In the second part of the course students will learn the basic components of a health-based risk assessment and will practice applying these concepts by conducting a risk assessment. Prerequisites: PRVM 800 Principles of Epidemiology and 830 Environmental Health and one semester of college-level biology. Completion or concurrent enrollment in PRVM 832 Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology is recommended. Additional biology and chemistry courses may be helpful. LEC.

PRVM 875. Management of Public Health Data. 3 Hours.

A 3 credit hour graduate level course concerning basic computing skills necessary for any advanced epidemiologic or administrative quantitative methods. This course covers basics of variable and dataset creation, building, maintenance and basic descriptive (not interpretive) analysis. The course is designed to be of use to students entering a variety of research, administrative and public health settings in public health, clinical and other fields. Software covered will include SAS, SPSS, Epi Info, KIPHS, Microsoft-EXCEL and ACCESS. The course can stand alone, or prepare students for Biostatistics and Epidemiology courses. Public data presentations will be stressed to prepare students to communicate about data with the lay public. LEC.

PRVM 876. Health Services Research Using Public Payer Data. 3 Hours.

Several contemporary health reforms have rendered analyses of public payer data more feasible and valuable for population health, health services research, and quality improvement. The addition of an outpatient drug benefit to standard inpatient and outpatient service coverage for Medicare, for example, has stimulated a growth industry in comparative effectiveness research and expanded policy research across the health care system. Pending expansion of States' Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act will undoubtedly create the largest public health care insurance program in the United States. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have streamlined researchers' access to national Medicare and Medicaid populations for health srevices and quality improvement projects through contracts with the Research Data Center at the University of Minnesota and the Chronic Condition Warehouse. In addition, Kansas Medicaid has invested in a Data Analytic Interface that offers ready access to our state's employees, Medicaid beneficiaries, and private health insurance claims data for enterprising researchers including tremendous opportunities for state of the art, contemporary policy analyses. This is indeed an exciting and opportune time for students embarking on careers in health services, policy, and population health research. This course is designed to prepare students for real world analyses using standard public payer claims data. LEC.

PRVM 877. Health Communication. 3 Hours.

This course is focused on community health education and promotion, especially designing and evaluating health communication programs for populations with shared risks, exposures or behaviors. Ways in which the general public receives and assigns meaning to health messages will be reviewed. The strengths and weaknesses of specific health communication initiatives will be analyzed in terms of theoretical constructs, costs and outcomes. Students apply public health principles by designing a substantive health communication piece or educational material. Prerequisite: PRVM 800: Principles of Epidemiology and PRVM 818: Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health. Permission of instructor may be granted in lieu of these prerequisites. LEC.

PRVM 878. Cost-effectiveness and Decision Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course examines techniques that are used in making clinical and management decisions when outcomes are uncertain. The course begins with a review of probabilistic decision making, then explores methods of analyzing choices with uncertain outcomes. stressing the use of decision trees and sensitivity analysis. The course examines cost minimization analysis, cost effectiveness analysis, and cost benefit analysis. (Same as HP&M 872) LEC.

PRVM 879. Financial and Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

This graduate-level course covers principles and skills for financial and human resource management within public health organizations. It focuses on non-profit and public settings. Financial management topics include the principles and purposes of accounting, concepts related to finance, and financial strategic planning. Human resource management topics include job design and hiring, performance management, retention, compensation/benefits, legal issues, and termination. The focus of the course is twofold: 1) understanding the concepts behind financing and in gaining skills in interpreting and using financial information; 2) gaining skills in human resources management and resource development. The course is designed for people who are interested in public health administration, but should be useful to anyone with an interest in public health leadership in any setting. Prerequisite: Departmental permission. LEC.

PRVM 880. Seminar in American Indian Health. 3 Hours.

This is a graduate-level course designed to teach students about current issues in American Indian health, as well as provide a basic historic context for understanding these issues. Students will read current literature from the academic journals and will be exposed to research being done today in American Indian communities, some of which has not yet been published. In addition, students will gain an understanding of what health disparaties exist in American Indian communities and some of the reasons why they exist, including access issues and other barriers to care, from both Western and Native points of view. Students will be exposed to some of the difficulties in conducting health research in Native communities and some of the more successful techniques to overcome barriers. Prerequisites: None. LEC.

PRVM 881. Performance Improvement in Public Health. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an overview of performance improvement and management integrated within the core public health functions: assessment, policy development and assurance. It uses both theoretical and practical material to develop basic competencies necessary for performance management in community and public health settings. Key topics will include assessment tools and models, continuous quality improvement, evidence-based practice, performance improvement methods (epidemiologic measurement, measures of central tendency, problem identification and analysis, control charts) and the development of team-based problem solving and resolution. Prerequisite: PRVM 800 Principles of Epidemiology, PRVM 875 Management of Public Data; PRVM 827 Public Health Administration is preferred. LEC.

PRVM 891. Public Health Internship. 1-3 Hours.

Students will complete a 192 hour internship in a community setting (12 hours/week for the 16 week semester) during PRVM 891 Public Health Internship. The internship is a service-learning experience for which students should consider the contribution their activities will make to the internship setting as well as activities that will be undertaken to meet the student's learning objectives. Prerequisites: MPH core and required courses. One of the MPH core courses may be taken concurrently with PRVM 891. LEC.

PRVM 893. Public Health Capstone. 1-3 Hours.

The public health capstone is a 192 hour (12 hours/week for the 16 week semester) culminating experience that requires students to synthesize and integrate knowledge and/or apply theories and principles learned to an area of public health. The capstone is meant to be taken at the end of the student's degree program, and is designed to give the student an opportunity to apply their skills to a variety of problems or issues in public health. The capstone should be primarily focused on addressing concentration specific competencies. While the exact activities and outcomes of the capstone will differ across concentrations all capstones, regardless of concentration, must include a written report and an oral defense. Prerequisites: All MPH core and required courses, nine of the 12 concentration credits completed, PRVM 891 Public Health Internship, last semester of enrollment. LEC.

PRVM 899. Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

Preparation of a formal thesis based on the research conducted on a community health problem. After the thesis has been completed, the student will be given an oral examination on the research methods and content. Prerequisite: PRVM 890 and departmental approval. (This course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.) THE.

PRVM 920. Microsystems in Healthcare Operations. 3 Hours.

Competencies necessary for studying clinical microsystems and examining their influence on patient safety, satisfaction, and other clinical outcomes are developed in this course. Microsystems will be determined, deconstructed, analyzed for best practice, and re-constituted for the purpose of improved organizational performance. The roots of quality improvement are traced and quality improvement application within a microsystem environment is explored. Key topics include: assessment tools and models, continuous quality improvement theory, evidence-based practice, performance improvement methods (measurement, statistics, problem identification and analysis, control charts) and the development of team-based problem solving and resolution. Students examine productivity and cost indicators, strategic and operational planning, healthcare finance, relationship-building, collaboration techniques, and leadership principles. Prerequisites: BIOS 704 or BIOS 714, PRVM 800, PRVM 818, PRVM 827 preferred or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with NRSG 920. LEC.

Neuroscience Courses

NURO 710. Advanced Neurobiology. 3 Hours.

The course will build an in depth knowledge about basic mechanisms of synaptic communication among nerve cells and their targets, and the structure and function of nervous systems. Topics will include nervous system development and synapse formation, structure and function of neurons, physiological and molecular basis of synaptic communication between neurons, mechanisms of synaptic plasticity involved in learning and memory, sensory systems (vision, auditory, vestibular, motor reflexes and pain), processing of neural information at cellular and system levels, synapse regeneration and diseases of the nervous system. Prerequisite: BIOL 435 (Introduction to Neurobiology), or consent of instructor. LEC.

NURO 775. Chemistry of the Nervous System. 3 Hours.

A detailed study of the molecular aspects of nerve transmission will be covered with special emphasis on the uptake, storage, release, biosynthesis, and metabolism of specific neurotransmitters. Drugs affecting these processes and current research on receptor isolation and receptor mechanisms will be discussed from a chemical viewpoint. (Same as BIOL 775, CHEM 775, MDCM 775, P&TX 775, and PHCH 775.) Prerequisite: BIOL 600 or equivalent. LEC.

NURO 799. Neuroscience Seminar Series. 2 Hours.

Presentations of research papers by faculty, post-doctoral research associates, and graduate students. All graduate students in the Neuroscience program participate in this seminar series throughout their period of training. Each student has to present a seminar once every semester. Presentations by students are evaluated by other graduate students and faculty at the end of each seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Neuroscience program. LEC.

NURO 800. Neuroscience Teaching Principles. 2 Hours.

This course is to be used by graduate students fulfilling the teaching requirements for the Ph.D. in Neuroscience. The student will function as a discussion leader and lecturer in a limited number of class sessions. Each student will meet with faculty whom he or she is assisting in preparation of presentation materials and tests. Each student will be evaluated by the faculty mentor and by the students in the class taught. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Neuroscience. LEC.

NURO 801. Issues in Scientific Integrity. 1 Hour.

Lectures and discussion on ethical issues in the conduct of a scientific career, with emphasis on practical topics of special importance in molecular-level research in the chemical, biological, and pharmaceutical sciences. Topics will include the nature of ethics, the scientist in the laboratory, the scientist as author, grantee, reviewer, employer/employee, teacher, student, and citizen. Discussions will focus on case histories. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Same as MDCM 801, P&TX 801, PHCH 801 and PHCH 802.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Neuroscience program. LEC.

NURO 804. Interdisciplinary Seminar on Ethics in Science and Engineering. 1-3 Hours.

The course will cover basic techniques of moral reasoning, especially as applied to ethical issues in the physical sciences and engineering. Topics covered will include the ethical conduct of research, the federal and professional guidelines for different kinds of research, and the ethical dimensions of publication and professional life. Emphasis will be on practical applications, cases and student involvement. (Same as GS 804, MDCM 804, P&TX 804, and PHCH 804.) Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the program or division of Pharmacy to enroll in this class. LEC.

NURO 825. Research in Neuroscience. 1-10 Hours.

Original investigations at an advanced level in the areas of neuroscience. The research by each student will be performed in the laboratory of one of the faculty mentors of the graduate program in Neuroscience. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Neuroscience program. LEC.

NURO 844. Neurophysiology. 3 Hours.

Somatosensory, motor and cognitive function of the brain will be discussed using a combination of lecture and student presentation formats. Current issues and evidence underlying accepted concepts and mechanisms will be emphasized. (Same as PHSL 844.) Prerequisite: PHSL 846 or equivalent and consent of instructor. LEC.

NURO 846. Advanced Neuroscience. 5 Hours.

Team-taught, in-depth neuroscience course focusing on normal and diseased brain function at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Lectures and discussions will emphasize current issues in neuroscience research. (Same as ANAT 846, PHCL 846, and PHSL 846.) Prerequisite: Permission of the course instructor. LEC.

NURO 847. Developmental Neurobiology. 2 Hours.

Development of the nervous system from early induction to the development of learning and memory. Topics include: Induction; Cellular Differentiation; Axon Growth and Guidance; Target Selection; Cell Survival and Growth; Synapse Formation; Synapse Elimination; and Development of Behavior. (Same as ANAT 847 and PHSL 847.) Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846; NURO 846; PHSL 846) or consent of instructor. LEC.

NURO 848. Molecular Mechanisms of Neurological Disorders. 3 Hours.

An in-depth coverage of pathogenic mechanisms in neurological diseases; cellular and molecular responses to brain injury and disease, neuroinflammatory diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis), neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion diseases), neurogenetic diseases (e.g., lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders, Down's syndrome and fragile X), trauma, stroke, and viral diseases (e.g., HIV encephalitis). (Same as ANAT 848, PHCL 848, and PHSL 848.) Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846, PHCL 846 or PHSL 846) or an equivalent course and consent of instructor. LEC.

NURO 899. Neuroscience Master's Thesis. 1-11 Hours.

Hours and credit for this course to be arranged with the mentor. Independent investigation of a research problem in neuroscience, but of limited scope. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Neuroscience program and consent of mentor/instructor. THE.

NURO 999. Neuroscience Doctoral Dissertation. 1-11 Hours.

Hours and credit for this course to be arranged with the mentor. Conduct of original investigation in neurosciences. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Neuroscience program post-oral comprehensive examination and consent of mentor/instructor. THE.