Why study German Studies?

Knowledge of the language and culture of German-speaking Europe provides students with linguistic and transcultural competence that will enable them to participate productively in a rapidly changing world. German is an official language in six central European countries and the most widely spoken language in the European Union. The United States maintains important economic, political, security, and cultural ties with the German-speaking countries. About 50 million people in the United States claim German ancestry.

Our students complete a diverse and challenging program that encompasses not only the German language but also courses that explore literature, the arts, history, business, and politics. Our program is characterized by interdisciplinary flexibility, a variety of co-curricular activities, and personalized academic advising and mentoring. German Studies majors acquire research skills they need to study issues relevant to our field. Many German Studies majors and minors study abroad for a summer, semester, or year, often supported by departmental scholarships, and some complete internships in Germany. All German Studies students have opportunities to make use of the rich resources available at KU, including the Spencer Museum of Art, KU Libraries, Max Kade Center for German-American Studies, Office of Study Abroad, Center for Undergraduate Research, and Career Center. Our students tend to have a second major or a minor in fields such as Global & International Studies, History, Business, Environmental Studies, Music, Microbiology, and Linguistics.

Our graduates have pursued their passion for language and culture in many ways: working for a non-profit organization affiliated with the U.S. Department of State; translating for a medical software company; serving on the human resources team of a global German sporting goods company; working as copy editor of a newspaper; and pursuing graduate work in Germanic Languages & Literatures, social welfare, law, and speech pathology.

Special Collections

The Engel German Library is an endowed departmental library with reference works, standard editions, basic secondary literature, and current German periodicals.

The Max Kade Center for German-American Studies houses collections on German ethnic culture in the United States and fosters scholarship in German-American and transatlantic studies, especially dialect, literary, exile, and interdisciplinary cultural studies. The Center publishes the Yearbook of German-American Studies for the Society of German-American Studies. It also houses the Linguistic Atlas of Kansas German Dialects and the Digital Humanities WWI Immigrant Poetry Project. For further information, contact german@ku.edu.

Undergraduate Program

We offer students a diverse and challenging program in the language and culture of German-speaking Europe, including literature, the arts, history, business, and politics. Our program is characterized by personalized advising, interdisciplinary flexibility, co-curricular activities, and opportunities to conduct independent research and to study and undertake internships abroad. Courses at the 100, 200, and 300 levels emphasize student involvement with the aim of developing students’ use of the German language, including the ability to comprehend, interpret, and produce spoken, written, and multimedia texts in different genres. Cultural topics are integrated into instruction starting in the first semester. At the 400 and 500 levels, survey courses provide students with a broader perspective on German cultural traditions, while other advanced courses often have a thematic focus.

All of our courses except GERM 315: German Literature and the Modern Era are taught in German. Majors have the option of taking two approved courses offered by other departments that are taught in English and include significant content related to German-speaking Europe; minors may take one such course. Courses taken in departments such as the history of art, philosophy, political science, sociology, and theatre will enhance students’ study of the language and culture of German-speaking Europe.

Both the German Studies major and minor can be combined with majors and minors in other departments. Many students take advantage of this opportunity and combine their study of German with linguistics, business, philosophy, European studies, and history, for example.

Courses for reading knowledge are offered in German, and subject to availability, Dutch.

Placement

Students beginning the study of German at KU should take GERM 104. Students who have studied German before should take the online German placement examination and contact the department’s placement officer, Dr. Emily Wallace, Emily.wallace@ku.edu.

Retroactive Credit

Students with no prior college or university German course credit are eligible for retroactive credit as follows:

  • 3 hours of retroactive credit are awarded to a student with 2 or 3 years of high school German who initially enrolls at KU in the third-semester German course (GERM 201) and receives a grade of C or higher.
  • 6 hours of retroactive credit are awarded to a student with 3 or 4 years of high school German who initially enrolls at KU in the fourth-semester German course (GERM 202 ) and receives a grade of C or higher.
  • 9 hours of retroactive credit are awarded to a student with 4 years of high school German who initially enrolls at KU in a German course with GERM 202 as a prerequisite and receives a grade of C or higher.

Students must be actively enrolled at the university when they apply for retroactive credit. There is a flat-rate charge of $50; you will receive a bill from the Bursar’s Office after the credit has been applied to your transcript. To apply for retroactive credit, you must bring the following 3 items to the Undergraduate Advisor:

  • Copy of your high school transcript, available from the Office of Admissions at the Visitor Center
  • A copy of your DPR
  • A note stating that you wish to apply for retroactive credit for the German course(s) that you took in high school.

Advanced Placement

KU encourages students to take Advanced Placement Examinations in any of the areas under the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) program. KU gives credit only in certain courses with certain scores from the AP examinations.

The results of these examinations must be sent to KU directly from CEEB. Departments may grant advanced placement and/or credit on the basis of the test scores. No college grade is assigned when advanced placement credit is given. Instead, a credit is recorded on the student’s KU record. No fee, beyond that charged by CEEB, is assessed for such college credit or placement. For information on how Advanced Placement scores in English and mathematics affect graduation requirements and initial enrollment in all schools, see the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements page and the English and Mathematics department pages. Contact the Office of Admissions, adm@ku.edu, for further information.

Credit by Examination

KU offers its own program of examinations for advanced credit. Applications are available online. They must be approved by the Undergraduate Advisor and the chair of the department concerned and by the student’s dean or dean’s representative. A report of the examination taken, showing the hours of credit to be granted and the grade awarded, must be signed by the professor giving the examination, the chair, and the dean or dean’s representative.

At the discretion of each academic dean, grades of A, B, C, or D may be used to indicate degrees of achievement, or a grade of Credit may indicate satisfactory performance. No record is made of an unsatisfactory attempt. Credit by Examination grades are not included in the grade-point average that appears on the official transcript.

A fee is charged for each course. For current fee information, contact the Office of the University Registrar, kuregistrar@ku.edu.

Warning: Some medical schools do not accept credit by examination.

Native Speakers

Students who have completed secondary education in a German-speaking country are generally not eligible to enroll in German courses below the 400 level. The department reserves the right to disenroll such students.

Courses for Future Teachers

Candidates for the B.S. in Education majoring or minoring in German should consult the School of Education.

General Information about the Graduate Program

The Department offers the German Studies M.A. and Germanic Languages & Literatures Ph.D., but has suspended matriculation until further notice.

Work toward the M.A. degree consists of a traditional curriculum providing important foundational knowledge. The curriculum includes historical surveys of the major literary periods and genres, of the structure and function of German and Germanic languages, knowledge of disciplinary methodologies employed in the field, development of language capacity, and control of writing and research strategies. Building on the M.A. foundational base, the KU Ph.D. degree program encourages students to develop their particular intellectual interests in collaboration with KU faculty and their areas of specialization. The graduate program focuses on the following areas:

  • German literature
  • Germanic linguistics/philology
  • German second-language acquisition/applied linguistics

More information regarding areas of concentration is available on the Graduate Admission page of the departmental website.

Departmental Funding

The department does its best to provide funding in the form of Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) appointments to incoming graduate students.  GTA appointments are awarded for the academic year and come with:

  • a competitive academic year (9 month) salary
  • a 100% tuition waiver for all courses at KU
  • payment of up to 3 hours of student fees
  • optional University-subsidized group health insurance 

The appointments are guaranteed based on performance for up to 3 years for M.A. students, 5 years for Ph.D. students and 6 years for students who receive both an M.A. and a Ph.D. at The University of Kansas.  GTAs in the department receive thorough training in language instruction, close mentoring, and the opportunity to teach German at a variety of levels, providing them with a strong base of teaching experience upon entering the job market. Additional information about teaching for the department is available on the Graduate Funding page of our departmental website.

Post-comprehensive students completing their dissertations are also eligible to apply for one of the the departmental Max Kade Dissertation Fellowships.

Additional Funding

There are also university fellowships for truly outstanding students. Visit the Graduate Studies website for information about funding opportunities for KU graduate students.

Contact

For inquiries concerning the graduate program, please contact:

Professor William D. Keel, Director of Graduate Studies and/or Cari Ann Kreienhop, Graduate Academic Advisor & Graduate Admissions Administrator.

Courses

DTCH 100. Dutch Reading Course. 3 Hours U.

Special course designed to enable graduate students to develop a reading knowledge of Dutch as a research skill. Enrollment for undergraduate credit is required. Does not satisfy any part of the undergraduate language requirement. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. LEC.

DTCH 101. Dutch Reading Course II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of DTCH 100. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. Prerequisite: DTCH 100 or equivalent. LEC.

DTCH 453. Investigation and Conference: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W.

Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. IND.

Courses

GERM 100. German Reading Course I. 3 Hours U.

Primarily for graduate students in other departments but also open to seniors planning to pursue graduate study. Fundamentals of grammar and reading texts of medium difficulty. Does not count toward undergraduate language requirement. Previous study of German not necessary. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC.

GERM 101. German Reading Course II. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of GERM 100. Advanced grammar and reading advanced texts in the students' respective fields. Does not count toward undergraduate language requirement. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 100 or permission of instructor. LEC.

GERM 104. Elementary German I. 5 Hours AE42 / U / F1.

Introductory German; no previous German required. Development of students' balanced knowledge of the German language and culture, including the ability to understand and produce short spoken, written, and multimedia texts on everyday topics and to interpret, compare, and contrast German and American cultural phenomena. Emphasis on interaction. Not open to native speakers of German. Students who complete this course successfully should take GERM 108. LEC.

GERM 108. Elementary German II. 5 Hours AE42 / U / F2.

Continuation of GERM 104. Further development of students' balanced knowledge of the German language and culture, including the ability to understand and produce short spoken, written, and multimedia texts on everyday topics and to interpret, compare, and contrast German and American cultural phenomena. Emphasis on interaction. Not open to native speakers of German. Students who complete this course successfully should take GERM 201. Prerequisite: GERM 104 or placement by examination. LEC.

GERM 111. Introduction to German I. 3 Hours U.

Introduction to German for special purposes; no previous German required. Provides basic familiarity with the German language, focusing on speaking and reading skills and the essentials of German grammar. Introduction to the culture of the German-speaking world. Three class hours per week; may be delivered by video conference or face-to-face. Does not satisfy any KU language requirement. LEC.

GERM 112. Introduction to German II. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of GERM 111. Further development of basic familiarity with the German language, focusing on speaking and reading skills and the essentials of German grammar. Continued exploration of the culture of the German-speaking world. Three class hours per week; may be delivered by video conference or face-to-face. Does not satisfy any KU language requirement. Prerequisite: GERM 111 or permission of instructor. LEC.

GERM 113. Introduction to German III. 1.5 Hour U.

Continuation of GERM 112. Further development of basic familiarity with the German language, focusing on speaking and reading skills and the essentials of German grammar. Continued exploration of the culture of the German-speaking world. Three class hours per week; may be delivered by video conference or face-to-face. Does not satisfy any KU language requirement. Prerequisite: GERM 112 or permission of instructor. LEC.

GERM 124. German Cinema in Context. 3 Hours HL AE42 / H.

Taught in English. Screening and analysis of German films from the early 20th century to the present. Readings, lectures, and discussions on the films' sources, ideologies, techniques, and artistic achievements. Does not count toward the German major or minor. LEC.

GERM 125. German Cinema in Context (Honors). 3 Hours HL AE42.

Course content similar to GERM 124. Taught in English. Screening and analysis of German films from the early 20th century to the present. Readings, lectures, and discussions on the films' sources, ideologies, techniques, and artistic achievements. Does not count toward German major or minor. LEC.

GERM 128. Introduction to the Arts in German-Speaking Europe. 3 Hours H.

Taught in English. Exploration of the arts in German-speaking Europe: major cultural periods, movements, art forms, and people (artists, architects, composers, writers, filmmakers) from the Middle Ages to the present. Consideration of the arts within the larger European historical and cultural context from which they emerged. Does not count toward the German major or minor. This course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels with additional assignments at the 300-level. Not open to students who have completed GERM 328. LEC.

GERM 130. Today's Challenges in German-Speaking Europe. 3 Hours AE42 / H.

This course explores significant political, social, and cultural challenges facing German-speaking Europe today. Specific issues may include migration, the environment, national identity, European integration, business, remembering the past, and technology. Focus on Germany, Austria, and Switzerland and to a lesser extent Belgium, Luxembourg, and Liechtenstein. Taught in English. Does not count toward the German Studies major or minor. LEC.

GERM 132. The City of Berlin in German Culture. 3 Hours H.

Taught in English. Introduction to Berlin within the context of major German and European historical, social, intellectual, and artistic developments since 1800. Exploration of complex epochs such as the Bismarck, Nazi, Cold War, and post-unification eras through journalism, literature, sociological writings, and film. Does not count toward German major or minor. This course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels with additional assignments at the 300-level. Not open to students who have completed GERM 332. LEC.

GERM 148. Germanic Mythology, Religion, and Folklore. 3 Hours H/W.

Taught in English. Introduction to the pagan myths and beliefs of Teutonic antiquity and their survival in the popular traditions of Germanic countries, within the framework of comparative mythology, archaeology, and anthropology. Does not count toward the German major or minor. LEC.

GERM 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in German. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

GERM 201. Intermediate German I. 3 Hours AE42 / U / F3.

Continuation of GERM 108. Further development of students' balanced knowledge of the German language and culture, including the ability to understand and produce short spoken, written, and multimedia texts in different genres and to interpret, compare, and contrast German and American cultural phenomena. Emphasis on interaction. Not open to native speakers of German. Students who complete this course successfully should take GERM 202. Prerequisite: GERM 108 or placement by examination. LEC.

GERM 202. Intermediate German II. 3 Hours AE42 / U / F4.

Continuation of GERM 201. Further development of students' balanced knowledge of the German language and culture, including the ability to understand and produce short spoken, written, and multimedia texts in different genres and to interpret, compare, and contrast German and American cultural phenomena. Emphasis on interaction. Not open to native speakers of German. Students who successfully complete this course should take GERM 301. Prerequisite: GERM 201 or placement by examination. LEC.

GERM 203. Introduction to Business German: Deutsch im Berufsalltag. 3 Hours AE42 / H / F4.

Continuation of GERM 201; completes language proficiency sequence. Further development of students' balanced knowledge of the German language and culture, including the ability to understand and produce short spoken, written, and multimedia texts on the topics related to professional communication and to interpret, compare, and contrast German and American business cultural phenomena. Emphasis on interaction. Recommended for students planning to take GERM 352 and GERM 462. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 201 or placement by examination. LEC.

GERM 220. Study Abroad Topics in Germanic Languages and Cultures. 1-5 Hours U.

This course is for elementary- and intermediate-level instruction in a Germanic language and/or culture while studying abroad. Transfer credits must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad, with permission from the departmental undergraduate advisor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

GERM 222. Study Abroad Topics in German Studies: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W.

This course is for elementary- and intermediate-level German Studies courses taught in German taken while studying abroad. Transfer credits must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad, with permission from the departmental undergraduate advisor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

GERM 233. Introduction to German Conversation. 3 Hours H.

Students learn basic techniques and strategies, expand vocabulary and idiomatic usage, and improve accuracy in grammar and pronunciation. Prerequisite: Only open to students in the KU Summer Language Institute in Eutin, Germany and GERM 108. Corequisite: GERM 201 and GERM 202. LEC.

GERM 301. High Intermediate German I. 3 Hours AE42 / H/W.

Continuation of GERM 202. Further development of students' use of German through reading and discussion of literary and non-literary texts (spoken, written, multimedia, combined with intensive grammar review. Introduction to expressive functions of German with emphasis on spoken and written communication. Not open to native speakers of German. Students who complete this course successfully should take GERM 302. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or placement by examination. LEC.

GERM 302. High Intermediate German II. 3 Hours AE42 / H/W.

Continuation of GERM 301. Refinement and expansion of students' use of German. Reading and discussion in German of literary and non-literary texts (spoken, written, multimedia), combined with continued intensive grammar review. E mphasis on better understanding German grammatical structures and acquisition of vocabulary. Not open to native speakers of German. Students who complete this course successfully should take GERM 401. Prerequisite: GERM 301 or placement by examination. LEC.

GERM 315. German Literature and the Modern Era. 3 Hours H.

Introduction in English to German writers 1750-present. Discussion of themes such as technology, modern and postmodern developments, gender, war, politics, and culture in German-speaking Europe. Readings include works in translation by influential German writers. Open to first-year students and non-majors. GERM 315 is required for admission to all courses beyond GERM 402 except GERM 462. LEC.

GERM 320. Border Crossings in German Culture. 3 Hours HT AE42.

Taught in English. Exploration of writers, filmmakers, and artists who have emigrated from, or migrated to German-speaking Europe. Emphasis on both their transnational impact and their representations of border crossings. Topics may include exile communities before, during, and after World War II and multiculturalism in contemporary Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Does not count toward German major or minor. LEC.

GERM 324. Magic, Monsters and the Occult in German Literature. 3 Hours HL AE42.

Taught in English. Reading and discussion of fictional and non-fictional works by German writers that address topics such as magic, monsters, the occult sciences, the Faust legend and pact with the devil, and the vampire. Consideration of the works' influence on other nations' literatures. Does not count toward the German major or minor. LEC.

GERM 325. Magic, Monsters, and the Occult in German Literature, Honors. 3 Hours HL / H.

Taught in English. For centuries German scientists, philosophers and poets have produced groundbreaking literature that has featured magic, monsters and the occult sciences. German poets introduced popular themes, such as the Faust legend and the pact with the devil, and they introduced one of the most popular monsters into literature - the vampire. In this course we read and discuss fictional and nonfictional works by German authors that address these themes, and we discuss the influence that these works have had on other nations' literatures. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC.

GERM 328. The Arts in German-Speaking Europe. 3 Hours HL AE42.

Taught in English. Exploration of the arts in German-speaking Europe: major cultural periods, movements, art forms, and people (artists, architects, composers, writers, filmmakers) from the Middle Ages to the present. Consideration of the arts within the larger European historical and cultural context from which they emerged. Does not count toward the German major or minor. This course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels with additional assignments at the 300-level. Not open to students who have completed GERM 128. LEC.

GERM 330. Topics in: _____. 3 Hours H.

Taught in English. Interdisciplinary study of selected aspects of the society or culture of German-speaking Europe or of the European experience. Does not count toward the German major or minor. LEC.

GERM 332. Berlin in German Culture. 3 Hours HL AE42.

Taught in English. Introduction to Berlin within the context of major German and European historical, social, intellectual, and artistic developments since 1800. Exploration of complex epochs such as the Bismarck, Nazi, Cold War, and post-unification eras through journalism, literature, sociological writings, and film. Does not count toward German major or minor. This course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels with additional assignments at the 300-level. Not open to students who have completed GERM 132. LEC.

GERM 333. German Conversation and Idioms. 3 Hours H.

Intensive practice in conversational German with instruction in proper pronunciation as well as an introduction to idiomatic usage. Only for students in the KU Summer Language Institute in Holzkirchen, Germany. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent fourth -semester German course. LEC.

GERM 334. Review of German Grammar. 3 Hours H.

Intensive review and practice of select topics in German grammar. Offered only for the KU Summer Language Institute in Holzkirchen, Germany. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent fourth-semester German course. LEC.

GERM 335. Love and the German Middle Ages. 3 Hours H.

Taught in English. Introduction to German conceptions of love, marriage, and adultery in medieval and early modern German-speaking Europe. Exploration of the German contribution to discourse of love through theoretical, literary, and legal texts, as well as through visual and material culture. Examination of German discourse within the broader European context, and of similarities, differences, and continuities between medieval and modern constructs. Does not count toward German major or minor. LEC.

GERM 336. The German Transatlantic Experience. 3 Hours AE41 / U.

Introduction to the migration of German-speaking Europeans to North America, 17th century-present. Consideration of European and North American factors motivating migration, the journey to the New World, the experiences of immigrants and their descendants, and the ways in which German-speaking Europeans shaped the multicultural history of America. Taught in English. LEC.

GERM 350. Studies in German Language, History, and Culture. 3 Hours SC / H.

Students visit museums and cultural sites in Cologne, Berlin, Munich, and other locations, with a focus on the 20th century. Discussion and written assignments in German. Offered only for the KU Summer Language Institute in Holzkirchen, Germany. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent fourth-semester German course. LEC.

GERM 353. German Conversation. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Further development of practical conversational skills for students with intermediate proficiency in German. Discussion of topics from everyday German life and current affairs, based on German newspapers and magazines. May be repeated but counts only once toward the major or minor. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 202. LEC.

GERM 362. German and Germany in Global Business Culture I. 3 Hours H/W.

High-intermediate content-based course with focus on the language skills needed to engage actively with the German business world, including applying for internships and jobs. Introduction to common cultural practices in the German business environment. Use of multimedia sources to explore current events and issues in Germany and their significance within a global business context. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or the equivalent. LEC.

GERM 375. Topics in Film of German-Speaking Europe: _____. 3 Hours H.

Examination of topics such as Expressionism, Turkish-German culture in contemporary German film, popular filmmaking, post-unification film, German literature as film, German film and national identity. Topics and periods vary. Prerequisite: GERM 302. LEC.

GERM 400. Introduction to German Literary Masterpieces. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

For students enrolled in the KU Summer Language Institute in Germany. Selected works of major German Language writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 302. LEC.

GERM 401. Advanced German I. 3 Hours H / FP.

Continuation of GERM 302. Expansion and refinement of proficiency in German (speaking, listening, reading, writing), increased understanding of German grammatical structures, development of a more sophisticated vocabulary, and introduction to stylistics through discussion and analysis of literary and nonliterary texts. Students successfully completing GERM 401 may take all other GERM courses at the 400 and 500 levels. Prerequisite: GERM 302. LEC.

GERM 402. Advanced German II. 3 Hours H / FP.

Continuation of GERM 401. Development of advanced proficiency in German through analysis and discussion of literary and nonliterary texts and practice in advanced composition. Emphasis in both discussions and papers on style and rhetoric and on developing skill in textual analysis. Focus on advanced German grammar and on style and idiomatic expression in spoken and written German. Prerequisite: GERM 401. LEC.

GERM 411. German Culture 1150-1750. 3 Hours AE61 / H / FP.

Exploration of major cultural periods and movements within the framework of historical and political change, with investigation of themes such as nation and national identity, founding myths, geography, and language. Study of forms of culture in German-speaking Europe, including visual art, music, literature, architecture, and the press. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

GERM 412. German Culture 1750-Present. 3 Hours AE61 / H / FP.

Exploration of major cultural periods and movements 1750-present within the framework of historical and political change, with investigation of themes such as nation and national identity, founding myths, geography, and language. Study of forms of culture in German-speaking Europe, including visual art, music, literature, architecture, and the press. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

GERM 421. Exiles, Migrants, and Refugees in German Literature and Film. 3 Hours H.

What does it mean to cross a border in today's world? This course explores different examples of "border crossing" in German-speaking Europe and in their broader European and transatlantic context. Engaging with literature, film, and works of art from the 20th to 21st centuries, we will address topics such as fictional representations of America; exile literature before and during World War II; the Berlin Wall and divided Germany; and migration and multiculturalism in contemporary Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. This course is taught in German. Prerequisite: GERM 302. LEC.

GERM 453. Investigation and Conference: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W.

Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. Not open to native speakers of German. IND.

GERM 462. German and Germany in Global Business Culture II. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Advanced content-based course with focus on the language skills needed to examine the German social market economy, legal forms of companies, and the business planning process. Use of multimedia sources to explore current German business and economic issues in international, transatlantic, and global contexts. Team research project and presentation. Prerequisite: GERM 362 or permission of instructor. LEC.

GERM 475. Topics in German Studies: _____. 3 Hours H / FP.

Exploration of cultural forms such as literature, film, philosophy, social institutions, linguistics, the arts, and the press. Examination of how cultural meaning is produced and interpreted. Topics vary, and course may address topics across a narrow or broad time frame. May be repeated if content varies. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

GERM 480. Literature and Culture of German-Speaking Europe 1150-1750. 3 Hours AE61 / H / FP.

Exploration of medieval and early modern literature within the framework of major cultural movements and historical, political, and economic change. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

GERM 481. Literature and Culture of German-Speaking Europe 1750-1830. 3 Hours AE61 / H / FP.

Exploration of literature within the framework of major cultural movements and historical, political, and economic change. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

GERM 482. Literature and Culture of German-Speaking Europe 1830-1918. 3 Hours AE61 / H / FP.

Exploration of literature within the framework of major cultural movements and historical, political, and economic change. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

GERM 483. Literature and Culture of German-Speaking Europe 1918-Present. 3 Hours AE61 / H / FP.

Exploration of literature within the framework of major cultural movements and historical, political, and economic change. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

GERM 501. Advanced German III. 3 Hours H / FP.

Focus on usage-based grammar of contemporary German. Extensive reading and analysis of grammatical structures in context and integration of form, meaning, and use. Exploration of grammatical structures using contemporary electronic textual analysis tools. Prerequisite: GERM 402. LEC.

GERM 550. German Language Seminar: History of the German Language. 3 Hours H / FP.

Introduction to basic concepts of German philology and historical linguistics and exploration of the development of a national German language. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

GERM 560. German Language Seminar: Structure of the German Language. 3 Hours H / FP.

This course provides an overview of the structure of modern standard German. Students will explore different levels of the linguistic system of German (including phonology, morphology, and syntax) and complete practical exercises. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

GERM 575. Topics in Genre: _____. 3 Hours H / FP.

Study of the definition, style, form, and content of a specific literary genre in German-language literature and the social, cultural, political, and economic factors that led to its emergence. Consideration of the genre's suitability for particular writers or periods. Topic and period vary. May be repeated if content varies. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

GERM 579. Investigation and Conference: _____. 1-3 Hours AE61 / H/W / FP.

Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work required. Prerequisite: GERM 315 and GERM 401. LEC.

GERM 580. Senior Capstone Course: German-Speaking Europe Today. 3 Hours AE61 / H / FP.

Focus on synthesizing students' knowledge of the history, culture, and politics of German-speaking Europe 1945-present. Consideration of scholarly articles, journalism, essays, literary texts, film, and the arts on topics including cultural identity in post-unified Germany; European integration; current debates and controversies; political parties and leading political figures; role of literature, film, music, visual arts, media, and popular culture; role of universities. Required of all German majors in senior year. Prerequisite: GERM 315, GERM 401, and senior standing. LEC.

GERM 598. Research for Departmental Honors. 3 Hours H / FP.

Research for a departmental honors project, on a topic chosen in conjunction with the faculty advisor. Emphasis on independent study and writing. Open to students with previous coursework in German at the 400 level, an overall 3.0 GPA, and at least a B+ average in advanced work in German. Prerequisite: GERM 315, GERM 401, senior standing, and permission of Undergraduate Advisor. LEC.

GERM 599. Departmental Honors Project. 3 Hours H / FP.

Continuation of GERM 598. Course consists of completion of Departmental Honors project. Quality of project determines whether student receives credit only or Honors in German. Prerequisite: GERM 598. LEC.

GERM 616. Topics in German Literature: _____. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W.

Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works on a particular topic or theme (e.g., nature, women, art and literature, etc.). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416, and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC.

GERM 618. Topics in German Language and Linguistics: _____. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W.

Readings and discussions in German in an area of specialized language or linguistic study (e.g., lexical fields, modern German dialects, etc.). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416, and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC.

GERM 620. Topics in German Culture and Folklore:_____. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W.

Readings and discussions in German on some aspect of German culture or folklore, including Landeskunde (study of contemporary Germany). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416, and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC.

GERM 626. Idiomatic Usage in Modern Colloquial and Literary German. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W.

Practical exercises in the systematic study of idioms and synonyms, designed to foster a more discriminating and effective usage of German. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC.

GERM 630. Advanced German Grammar. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W.

Recommended for students intending to teach German. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC.

GERM 700. Introduction to Graduate Studies in German. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the skills required of students enrolled in graduate degree programs in German Studies; areas covered include 1) introduction to literary theory and criticism, 2) bibliography and research methods, including database management software, 3) preparation and presentations of a research/conference paper, 4) technology training, including web design, on-line portfolio, and digital humanities, and 5) professional ethics and awareness of the academic market and alternative careers. We will also be working on practical, professionally useful goals, such as how to (better) make use of technology, how to create a CV and modify it for different positions, how to write an abstract, and how to produce a conference paper. Course requirements will include a variety of smaller assignments and two larger projects, a web-based professional portfolio and an 8 to10-page conference paper. LEC.

GERM 701. Introduction to the Study of Literature. 3 Hours.

Introduction to methods of literary research and presentation of seminar papers. Exercises in the use of basic guides to the study of German language and literature, in the documentation of scholarly research, and in the writing of interpretive essays, based on reading and discussion of selected works from different periods of the departmental "Basic Reading List. LEC.

GERM 710. Workshop for M.A. Students. 1 Hour.

Discussion of policies in the M.A. program, examinations, thesis proposals, writing of theses, grant proposals, conference presentations, publications of scholarship, and entrance into the academic job market. Required of all M.A. students in the first year in the program. Does not count toward completion of 30 hours of course work for the M.A. RSH.

GERM 712. The Structure of Modern Standard German. 3 Hours.

A comprehensive introduction to the structure and usage of contemporary German, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, text linguistics, semantics, pragmatics, and language variation. Students will listen to lectures, read texts on German linguistics, participate in discussions, and work extensively on linguistic problems involving German. LEC.

GERM 716. Topics in German Literature: _____. 3 Hours.

Intensive study of a selected topic in German literature. May be repeated. Offered only in conjunction with GERM 616 when taught by a Max Kade Distinguished Visiting Professor. Graduate students will be assigned additional work. LEC.

GERM 721. Introduction to Middle High German Literature. 3 Hours.

The elements of Middle High German as required for reading medieval texts in the original. Intensive reading and literary study of at least one text in full. LEC.

GERM 734. Age of Goethe. 3 Hours.

Reading and discussion of major literary works in the period; combined with lectures and background readings on literary, cultural, and political history. LEC.

GERM 736. Post-Romantic Nineteenth Century. 3 Hours.

Reading and discussion of major literary works in the period; combined with lectures and background readings on literary, cultural, and political history. LEC.

GERM 738. Twentieth Century. 3 Hours.

Reading and discussion of major literary works in the period; combined with lectures and background readings on literary, cultural, and political history. LEC.

GERM 751. Topics in German Studies: _____. 3 Hours.

Course covers key topics in German Studies and represents the expertise of faculty in the department as well as department-affiliated faculty. Topics will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor to allow flexibility for in-depth analysis of particular topics. May be repeated as topics vary. LEC.

GERM 753. Investigation and Conference: _____. 1-6 Hours.

To be taken only in exceptional cases. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. RSH.

GERM 756. Studies in Enlightenment Literature: _____. 3 Hours.

LEC.

GERM 764. Studies in the Literature of the 19th Century: _____. 3 Hours.

LEC.

GERM 766. Studies in Literature since 1890: _____. 3 Hours.

LEC.

GERM 800. Seminar: Teaching German as a Second Language. 3 Hours.

Introduction to selected aspects of second-language acquisition, foreign-language pedagogy, and contrastive grammar, with the major concentration on practical guidance in teaching elementary German, in test preparation and grading, and in the use of equipment. LEC.

GERM 801. Practicum in GTAs. 1 Hour.

Discussion of matters relating to the teaching of German in specific courses. Required of all GTAs in each semester of teaching, unless enrolled in GERM 800. Does not count toward completion of 30 hours of course work for the M.A. or 27 hours of course work for the Ph.D. IND.

GERM 822. Survey of Medieval German Literature. 3 Hours.

Text-oriented study of the literature of 750-1500 with selected readings in the original and in translation. Prerequisite: GERM 721. LEC.

GERM 823. Readings in Middle High German Epics: _____. 3 Hours.

Reading and literary analysis of one of the following: Nibelungenlied, Erec and Iwein, Tristan, Parzival. Prerequisite: GERM 721. LEC.

GERM 855. Introduction to German Applied Linguistics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to theories and topics in German applied linguistics. SEM.

GERM 860. Introduction to Modern German Dialects. 3 Hours.

Introduction to modern German dialects, methods of dialect research and aspects of linguistic assimilation and loss as well as a survey of German-American dialects. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required. SEM.

GERM 899. Master's Thesis. 3 Hours.

May not be repeated. THE.

GERM 900. Workshop for Ph.D. Students. 1 Hour.

Discussion of policies in the Ph.D. program, research specializations, examinations, dissertation proposals, writing of dissertations, grant proposals, conference presentations, publication of scholarship, and entrance into the academic job market. Required of all Ph.D. students in the first year in the program. Does not count toward completion of 27 hours of course work for the Ph.D. LEC.

GERM 901. Gothic. 3 Hours.

Reading of selected Gothic texts. Historical and descriptive study of Gothic phonology and grammar, with an introduction to comparative Germanic grammar. Prerequisite: GERM 711. LEC.

GERM 903. Old High German. 3 Hours.

Reading and discussion of selected prose texts and poetic documents; phonological and grammatical features of the Old High German dialects. Prerequisite: GERM 711. LEC.

GERM 904. Gothic and Its Closest Relatives. 3 Hours.

A survey of the earliest Germanic languages with an emphasis on the comparative phonology and grammar of Gothic, Old High German, and Old Saxon as well as the reading of selections of major texts in those three language. LEC.

GERM 953. Investigation and Conference: _____. 1-6 Hours.

To be taken only in exceptional cases. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. RSH.

GERM 960. Seminar on Writers of the Age of Goethe: _____. 3 Hours.

LEC.

GERM 962. Seminar in Romanticism: _____. 3 Hours.

LEC.

GERM 967. Seminar in Special Topics: _____. 3 Hours.

LEC.

GERM 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-10 Hours.

THE.