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The School of Journalism and Mass Communications

Values

The William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications is guided by a set of core values. We value

  • A diverse, collaborative, and dynamic student-centered environment.
  • Excellence in learning, teaching, and mentoring.
  • Free expression and conscientious, ethical journalism as cornerstones of a democratic society.
  • Critical and creative thinking.
  • Meaningful research and creative activity.
  • Imaginative outreach and collaboration on this campus, in Kansas, and in the profession of journalism.

Mission

The mission of the school is to teach students to think critically and creatively while preparing them for careers in journalism, mass communications, and related fields and for graduate study. Graduates will

  • Appreciate the value of freedom of expression and its importance in society.
  • Be able to analyze mass media critically.
  • Have an ethical framework for the practice of journalism and mass communication.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the value of a diverse society, a diverse workplace, and the importance of reflecting that diversity in mass media.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of changing media technologies on society.
  • Demonstrate effective production and presentation skills for the media.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of research for adding new knowledge and an ability to employ research techniques for analysis and interpretation.
  • Demonstrate understanding of how communications organizations function and the important management issues they face.

The school is accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications.

School of Journalism Edwards Campus

Mission

To educate marketers for personal development and professional success.

Vision

To become the degree of choice for marketing communications professionals in the Kansas City area, growing marketers personally and professionally, growing the program enrollment and market awareness, and growing the marketing industry financially and creatively.

Values

  • Academically sound … with a high-quality curriculum taught by expert faculty.
  • Relationship-oriented … in our interactions with our constituents.
  • Attentive … to the unique needs of working adult students.
  • Servant-hearted … in our willingness to go “above and beyond” to assist students and prospects.

Our Promise

To bring KU’s and the William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications’ reputations for academic excellence to greater Kansas City through high-level service and convenience for the working adult marketing professional seeking to further his/her career with an Integrated Marketing Communications Graduate degree.

Facilities

Stauffer-Flint Hall and Dole Human Development Center

The school’s classrooms, laboratories, student media, and faculty offices are in Stauffer-Flint Hall and Dole Human Development Center. The school’s main office, Advising and Records Office, The Agency, and Journalism Resource Center are in Stauffer-Flint, as are the offices of the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications and the Kansas Scholastic Press Association. The Dole Center houses multimedia labs, The University Daily Kansan, the television studio, and KUJH-TV.

Journalism Student Services Center

The Student Services Center, 117 Stauffer-Flint Hall, houses the Recruitment and Retention Coordinator as well as Undergraduate Advising and Records. For prospective student questions about admissions to KU from a high school or transfer institution, please contact (785) 864-4768. For current KU students seeking admission to the School of Journalism, contact (785) 864-4080. Students who need advising, enrollment and graduation planning and assistance should also call (785) 864-4080.

Journalism Resource Center

Professional publications, copies of major national and state newspapers, and reference and research materials are available in the Journalism Resource Center, 210 Stauffer-Flint Hall. Students may check out computers for use in the Resource Center.

KU Edwards Campus 

The KU Edwards Campus in Overland Park consists of three classroom buildings (Regents Center, Regnier Hall and the BEST Building) and a student union building offering comfortable professional accommodations for classes, studying or hanging out with friends. Tiered and flat classrooms, a computer lab, conference rooms, an auditorium, conference space, the Student Success Center and the Hawk’s Nest Study and Open Community Center provide a variety of private and community learning environments. 

Undergraduate Programs

The school offers the Bachelor of Science degree in journalism. The program prepares students for careers in advertising, corporate communications, integrated marketing communications, news, writing and editing, management, and sales in traditional media and emerging and converged media.

The school also offers a minor in journalism.

Courses for Nonmajors

All KU students may take:

JOUR 101Media and Society3
JOUR 150Stand and Deliver3
JOUR 177First Year Seminar: _____3
JOUR 201Current Issues in Journalism3
JOUR 300Visual Storytelling3
JOUR 308Ethics in a Wired World3
JOUR 320Stratcom I: Introduction to Strategic Communication3
JOUR 503History of Journalism and Mass Communication3
JOUR 512The Business of Media3
JOUR 534Diversity in Media3
JOUR 540Sports, Media and Society3
JOUR 590International Journalism3
JOUR 608Ethics and Professional Practice3
JOUR 613International Strategic Communications3
JOUR 618First Amendment and Society3

Junior standing is required for:

JOUR 320Stratcom I: Introduction to Strategic Communication3
JOUR 503History of Journalism and Mass Communication3
JOUR 512The Business of Media3
JOUR 540Sports, Media and Society3
JOUR 613International Strategic Communications3
JOUR 618First Amendment and Society3

Students in professional schools who wish to take any other journalism course should consult their schools and the Journalism Advising and Records Office, 117 Stauffer-Flint Hall.

Internships

Through the Career Center, the school enables students to gain professional experience working as interns. Internships vary in time of year, duration, location, compensation, and required course work or other experience. Many students complete internships during the summer, but they also are available during the school year. Staff members provide further guidance on opportunities and requirements.

Study Abroad

Journalism students study abroad in a variety of locations. Students should work with their journalism advisor and the Office of Study Abroad.

University Honors Program

The school encourages qualified students to participate in the University Honors Program.

Graduate Programs

The William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications offers 3 tracks leading to the Master of Science in journalism – a scholarly thesis-based Mass Communications track in Lawrence, including a joint M.S.J.-J.D. option, a professional Integrated Marketing Communications track at KU’s suburban Kansas City Edwards Campus, and an online Digital Content Strategy program – and a Ph.D. in Journalism and Mass Communications in Lawrence.

The Lawrence-based Mass Communications program focuses on deeper, theoretical understanding of the professions of the media. The student must complete 37 graduate credit hours with at least a B (3.0) average. A student completes a thesis and passes a general examination of his/her thesis.

The Integrated Marketing Communications course of study trains professional communicators to find solutions for business problems and to explore strategic marketing from a managerial perspective. It emphasizes the integration of research, ethics, writing, creativity, innovation, technology, branding, social media, sales and leadership. The curriculum is an advanced series of courses offered to students who show an aptitude for strategic thinking and have a minimum of 2 years of professional experience in marketing communications or other media-related fields. It is offered on the KU Edwards Campus in Overland Park and is designed for part-time, evening study to accommodate working professionals, while maintaining the same standards of academic excellence found in full-time graduate programs on the Lawrence campus.

Our new online master's program in Digital Content Strategy trains graduates to find, use and analyze information and data to solve organizational problems. With certificates in Social Media Strategy and Data Interpretation and Communication, students can become the information expert in his/her organization. The online program is divided into two certificates. The master's degree is earned by completing both certificates, but students may choose to earn just one certificate. Students may work on either of these certificates independently, building credentials before they complete a master's degree. All classes are online. Information Insight I includes a class orientation. The program requires 30 hours of coursework to earn a master's degree.

The Ph.D. program in Journalism and Mass Communications is small and, therefore, selective. We admit 4 to 6 students per year to ensure close work with the faculty. We expect our students’ scholarly and research interests to intersect with those of our faculty. Students who hold a master’s in journalism complete at least 38 hours for the degree. The student completes study of appropriate research skills, designed in consultation with the faculty advisor. The student also must meet KU’s requirements for dissertation hours.

Undergraduate Scholarships and Financial Aid

All students with financial need should apply to Financial Aid and Scholarships. This office awards scholarships to incoming first-year students based on academic merit.

The School of Journalism and Mass Communications has a limited number of scholarships provided by donors who often specify the majors or the geographic areas from which recipients may be selected. Most scholarships from the school are reserved for students already enrolled in journalism courses. To receive a need-based scholarship from journalism, the student must have submitted the FAFSA form and been determined to be eligible. Merit-based scholarships also are offered.

Scholarship applications are available beginning October 1 on the school's website. The application deadline is December 1. Notices of scholarships awarded by national journalism organizations are posted in Stauffer-Flint Hall and the Dole Center when they are received.

Graduate Fellowships and Assistantships

For information about graduate assistantships, contact the School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

Visit the Graduate Studies website for information about funding opportunities for graduate students at KU.

Financial Aid and Scholarships administers grants, loans, and need-based financial aid.

 

Undergraduate University Regulations

For information about university regulations, see Regulations or visit the University of Kansas Policy Library.

Absences

The school reserves the right to cancel the enrollment of any student who fails to attend the first class or laboratory meeting. Instructors may require a certain level of attendance for passing a course and may drop a student for lack of attendance without the student’s consent.

Change of School

To change from one school to another, you must submit a Change of School form in the dean’s office or the student services office of the school you plan to enter. Follow the deadlines on the form.

Admission is competitive and occurs twice a year. Applications are due February 15 for fall and summer and September 15 for spring admission. 90 percent of available openings are filled by applicants with the highest cumulative grade-point averages. The remaining 10 percent are selected from among applicants who petition by the deadline, provided they have overall grade-point averages of at least 2.5.

Credit/No Credit

A Credit/No Credit option is available to all degree-seeking undergraduates. You may enroll in one course a semester under the option, if the course is not in your major or minor. For more information, visit the KU Policy Library.

Warning: Certain undesirable consequences may result from exercising the option. Some schools, scholarship committees, and honorary societies do not accept this grading system and convert grades of No Credit to F when computing grade-point averages.

Journalism courses or courses in another school's major or minor may not be taken for Credit/No Credit.

Graduation with Distinction and Highest Distinction

Students who rank in the upper 10 percent of their graduating class graduate with distinction. The upper third of those awarded distinction graduate with highest distinction. In addition to a student’s academic record, other factors may be considered.

Honor Roll

Students with grade-point averages of 3.75 who have completed at least 12 hours with letter grades are recognized on the honor roll or dean’s list in fall and spring. Credit/No Credit grades are not accepted. S grades are accepted. An Honor Roll notation appears on the transcript.

Maximum and Minimum Semester Enrollment

The normal enrollment is 15 to 16 hours a semester. A 12-hour enrollment is considered a minimum full-time enrollment. Enrollment in more than 18 hours a semester, or more than 9 hours during the summer session, requires special permission from the assistant dean for student services.

Nonresidence Study Before the Last 30 Hours

Before the last 30 hours required for the degree, students may, under certain conditions, take courses at other institutions and transfer the credit to KU. Before enrolling in a nonresidence course, check on how your courses will transfer to KU or complete KU’s standard form, Request for Tentative Evaluation of Transfer Credit, in your dean’s office or student services office or in College Student Academic Services for students in the College. After completing the course work, you must request that an official transcript be sent to the Office of Admissions, KU Visitor Center, 1502 Iowa St., Lawrence, KS 66044-7576, 785-864-3911. For transcripts to be official, they must be mailed from the college or university directly to KU. Faxed transcripts are not accepted for posting of transfer credit.

Nonresidence credit includes all credits from another college or university taken after initial enrollment at KU, military service courses, and other undergraduate course work not formally offered in the Schedule of Classes.

Majors must submit the Request for Tentative Evaluation of Transfer Credit form before they enroll.

Prerequisites and Corequisites

Course prerequisites are strictly enforced. Students are administratively dropped from courses for which they do not meet prerequisites. Waiver is not granted if the prerequisite course was taken and failed or taken and not completed.

Probation

Students admitted to the school must do the following in order to remain in the school in good standing:

  • Maintain a 2.5 cumulative KU grade-point average and a 2.5 journalism grade-point average.

Students failing to meet the condition above are placed on probation for 1 semester. If a student does not raise his or her cumulative KU and journalism grade-point averages to 2.5, he or she is dropped from the school.

Students who fail to complete JOUR 101 with a 2.0 or better have their admission rescinded.

Repetition of Courses

The School of Journalism and Mass Communications follows the university’s course repeat and grade replacement policy.

Required Work in Residence

No baccalaureate degree is granted to a student who has not completed at least 30 semester credit hours of residence courses at KU. No exceptions are granted.

To earn a bachelor’s degree from KU, you must complete the last 30 hours of credit for the degree by resident study. You may petition the dean for a waiver.

Students must have the permission of the assistant dean for student services. Up to 6 hours of work done at another institution may be accepted as part of the last 30 hours, if the hours are not in required courses in the major. If a student completes more than 6 of the last 30 hours at another college, he or she must complete additional KU course work to graduate. Transfer courses must be completed with a C or higher.

Time Limits

Students are encouraged to complete the undergraduate degree in 4 years or less. Students experiencing a break in enrollment may return within five years of the last class they attended as an enrolled undergraduate journalism student and complete their coursework under the requirements in place at the time they left. They must maintain continuous enrollment to finish their coursework after they re-enroll.

If it has been longer than five years, students may be readmitted under the current degree requirements in place when they return. 

Transfer of Credit

CredTran is a transfer course equivalency system that lists more than 2,200 colleges and universities from which KU has accepted transfer courses in the past. If your school or course is not listed, your evaluation will be completed when you are admitted to KU.

A maximum of 12 hours of journalism course work taken at other institutions may count toward a degree. Other journalism courses do appear on the transcript, but the hours are treated as excess, and an equal number of hours is added to the 120 required for graduation. Courses with grades of D are not accepted for transfer credit.

Graduate University Regulations

For information about university regulations, see Regulations or visit the University of Kansas Policy Library.

 

Journalism Career Center

The Career Center, 120 Stauffer-Flint Hall, helps students find internships and jobs. Each year, leading media outlets, advertising agencies, and corporations in the state and the nation visit campus to interview students. The Career Center also maintains an online database of internships and jobs that is updated frequently.

 

Courses

JOUR 2. Grammar and Usage. 1 Hour.

A student who does not achieve the minimum required score on a 50-question grammar and usage test taken before enrolling in JOUR 302 must complete this one-credit basic skills course, which focuses on the mechanics of journalistic writing. It may be taken concurrently with JOUR 302. Passage of JOUR 002 and of JOUR 302, each with a grade of 2.0 or above, is a prerequisite to JOUR 415, JOUR 419 and JOUR 420. The one credit for JOUR 002 does not count toward the 120 total hours or the total journalism hours required for graduation. LEC.

JOUR 101. Media and Society. 3 Hours GE3S.

Introductory course open to all KU students. The course emphasizes the use of critical and creative thinking as tools to better consider the reliability of information received through newspapers, magazines, radio and television, online media, trade publications, advertising, and business communications. The class also surveys media ethics, economics, technology, and the function and impact of media on a free society. The course is designed for pre-journalism students, students considering journalism as a major, and students from other disciplines who take it as an elective. For students who enter college in Fall 2000 and thereafter, this is a prerequisite for all other journalism courses except JOUR 600. Not open to seniors. Must be completed with a grade of 2.0 or better. May be retaken once. LEC.

JOUR 150. Stand and Deliver. 3 Hours GE22.

The ability to inform or persuade confidently through presentation is an incalculable skill no matter where students choose to direct their careers. This course introduces students to presentation approaches, effective oral communication fundamentals, audience analysis, support technologies and structural development. Students will assess their own communication styles and strengths, understand presentation purposes and types, research, edit and organize material, use graphics concepts and techniques to design formats for value-added content, and practice coherent, relevant and well-articulated stories. Students will apply what they learn in a variety of situations, from individual expository speeches to group business proposals. Open to all undergraduate students. LEC.

JOUR 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours SC GE11.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshman, organized around current issues in journalism or media. First year seminar topics are coordinated and approved through the Office of First Year Experiences. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

JOUR 201. Current Issues in Journalism. 3 Hours.

An in-depth investigation of a current event or issue confronting the various professions of journalism. The class will examine the implications of the event/issue for professional values, ethics, diversity and free expression. Prerequisite: JOUR 101 with a grade of 2.0 or better. LEC.

JOUR 210. Basic Video Production. 2 Hours.

This course instructs and prepares students to work with multiple media- studio and live production. This is a lab-intensive course designed with live newsroom and live in-the-field productions. Students will have the opportunity to learn behind the scene skills; studio and live camera, floor directing, lighting, audio, basic PhotoShop and field producing skills in production of newscasts and other reports. May be taken twice. LAB.

JOUR 300. Visual Storytelling. 3 Hours.

This course is about understanding how an idea becomes something you can see and how the media use visuals in the most efficient and effective ways possible. Students will develop a visual vocabulary and personal aesthetic as they expand their skills in the use of the digital toolbox-including presentation design, and the use of graphics, typography, color, photography (still and video) and audio. They will put their learning into practice through production of visual projects for diverse audiences served by print, online and broadcast media. Must be completed with a grade of 2.0 or better. May be retaken once. Prerequisite: JOUR 101 with a grade of 2.0 or better. LEC.

JOUR 302. Infomania: Information Management. 3 Hours GE11.

This course will help students understand the crucial role that information plays in news and strategic communication. Students will learn not only how to gather information but how to evaluate, analyze and synthesize it. In doing so, they will experiment with a wide range of research tools, sources and techniques, and improve their writing and critical-thinking skills. Must obtain a grade of C (2.0) or higher to advance in the curriculum. May be retaken once. Suggestions: JOUR 300 (or JOUR 310) should be taken prior to JOUR 302. Prerequisite: JOUR 101. Students must be admitted to the School of Journalism or Journalism minor or in an approved concentration in order to enroll in JOUR 302. Not open to seniors. LEC.

JOUR 304. Media Writing. 3 Hours GE21.

This course will emphasize journalistic writing and the role it plays in coherent and engaging stories. It will build on JOUR 300 and JOUR 302, helping students sharpen their writing and interviewing skills for the Web, for print and for broadcast; and sharpen their judgment in choosing information, sources and story forms. Passage of the School's Grammar Basic and subsequesnt proctored grammar exam is required before enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: JOUR 101, JOUR 300 and JOUR 302 each completed with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Must be completed with a grade of 2.0 or above to enroll in courses for which it is a prerequisite and may be retaken once. Students must be admitted to the School of Journalism, journalism minor or in an approved concentration in order to enroll in JOUR 304. LAB.

JOUR 305. Writing for Media, Honors. 3 Hours GE21.

This course will emphasize journalistic writing and the role it plays in coherent and engaging stories. It will build on JOUR 300 and JOUR 302, helping students sharpen their writing and interviewing skills for the Web, for print and for broadcast; and sharpen their judgment in choosing information, sources and story forms. Passage of the School's Grammar Basics and subsequesnt proctored grammar exam is required before enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: JOUR 101, JOUR 300 and JOUR 302 each completed with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Must be completed with a grade of 2.0 or above to enroll in courses for which it is a prerequisite and may be retaken once. Students must be admitted to the School of Journalism, journalism minor or in an approved concentration in order to enroll in JOUR 305. Open only to students in the KU Honors Program. LAB.

JOUR 308. Ethics in a Wired World. 3 Hours AE51.

This course surveys and applies theories, principles and critical-thinking strategies for making ethical decisions related to personal and professional use of media. Students will examine and strive to resolve specific ethics challenges posed by participation in media such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Blackboard, news media websites, dating websites, and more. Course is not open to students, including minors, enrolled in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications. LEC.

JOUR 320. Stratcom I: Introduction to Strategic Communication. 3 Hours.

Students develop an understanding of how organizations develop effective, research-based communication plans to accomplish their objectives. It examines the role of communications in strategic planning and explores career opportunities in professions such as advertising, public relations and sales. JOUR 320 provides insight into how communicators use critical and creative thinking to gather, organize, evaluate and deliver information in a culturally diverse environment. For students entering the Strategic Communication track of the School of Journalism & Mass Communications, JOUR 320 provides the foundation for core courses in research methods, message development and strategic campaigns. Prerequisite: Junior standing or completion of JOUR 101 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Open to non-majors. LEC.

JOUR 409. Special Topics in: _____. 2-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. IND.

JOUR 410. Photojournalism I. 3 Hours.

Study of camera, film, printing, composition, light and lighting, flash, the principles of photojournalism, deadline shooting for sports, general news, spot news, and features. Building a portfolio and laboratory work are included. Prerequisite: JOUR 301 Research and Writing (or JOUR 302 Research and Writing, Honors) or JOUR 304 Media Writing (or JOUR 305 Media Writing, Honors) with a grade of 2.0 or above. LEC.

JOUR 415. Multimedia Reporting. 3 Hours.

Hands-on instruction in the gathering, writing, and presentation of news and information for newspapers, magazines, television, radio, and online media. Student work may appear in campus media. A 75-question test on grammar, usage and AP style will be required as part of the course. Requirement: Must obtain a grade of C (2.0) or higher to advance in the curriculum. Prerequisite: JOUR 302 (Infomania), JOUR 304 (Writing for Media) (or JOUR 301 Research and Writing, JOUR 302 Research and Writing, Honors or JOUR 305 Research and Writing, Honors), and passage of the grammar test or JOUR 002 with a C (2.0) or higher and a satisfactory score on the grammar and usage test taken before JOUR 304 or completion of JOUR 002 with a grade of C (2.0) or above. LEC.

JOUR 419. Multimedia Editing. 3 Hours.

This course emphasizes principles of editing for written and verbal expression, logic, visual presentation, organization, and news judgment for all forms of media: newspaper, magazine, broadcast, and online. Requirement: Must obtain a grade of C (2.0) or higher to advance in the curriculum. Prerequisite: JOUR 302 (Infomania), JOUR 304 (Writing for Media) (or JOUR 301 Research and Writing, JOUR 302 Research and Writing, Honors or JOUR 305 Research and Writing, Honors), and passage of the grammar test or JOUR 002 with a C (2.0) or above also required. LEC.

JOUR 420. Stratcom II: Principles of Advertising and Public Relations. 3 Hours.

This course deepens students' exposure to and understanding of two major disciplines within the broader area of strategic communication: advertising and public relations. Approximately half the course will be devoted to coverage of the principles of advertising; the other half will be devoted to coverage of the principles of public relations. Content will include defining the two professions, exploring their status within the broader area of strategic communication and analyzing current and projected professional activities. Students will gain an understanding of the principles of these evolving, separate but related major professions within strategic communication. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Journalism and JOUR 433 for students who started at KU prior to Fall 2012. For those who started Fall 2012 or after, prerequisites are: Admission to the School of Journalism and JOUR 320. LEC.

JOUR 460. Research Methods in Strategic Communication. 3 Hours.

Students conduct, analyze and apply research to develop strategy and guide decisions related to communication campaigns. In addition to studying qualitative and quantitative research methods as well as basic statistics, students develop critical thinking skills by defining research problems and producing insightful solutions. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Journalism and JOUR 433 for students who started at KU prior to Fall 2012. For students starting Fall 2012 and after, prerequisite is admission to the School of Journalism and JOUR 320. LEC.

JOUR 488. Laboratory in Media Production. 2 Hours.

This course offers students an opportunity to work with multiple media-studio and live production. This is a lab-intensive course designed with live newsroom and/or live in-the-field productions. Students will serve as producers/anchors and directors for programing at KUJH, Media Crossroads and other media. No student may earn more than four hours total in JOUR 506, JOUR 507, and/or JOUR 508, and no student may earn more than eight hours combined for course work in JOUR 210, JOUR 488, JOUR 507, and JOUR 508. Excess hours of practicum will add hours to the total number of hours needed to meet graduation requirements. Limit of two hours enrollment in JOUR 488 in a student's total course work. Prerequisite: JOUR 210 or instructor permission. LAB.

JOUR 499. Honors Research Essay. 3 Hours.

Independent study ending in an essay developed from substantial original research and prepared under the direction of a School of Journalism faculty member who is a specialist in the area of the student's interest. Open only to those seniors already in the honors program and in their last semester in residence. Prerequisite: 3.7 minimum GPA in Journalism; 3.5 minimum overall GPA (all courses -in residence and other); and consent from supervising faculty member. RSH.

JOUR 500. Topics in Journalism: _____. 2-3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Eight hours of journalism. If a section is designated Advanced Media, the prerequisite is JOUR 415 and JOUR 419, each with a grade of 2.0 or above. LEC.

JOUR 503. History of Journalism and Mass Communication. 3 Hours.

A survey of the history of the American media emphasizing appreciation and understanding of the technological, social, and cultural trends affecting newspapers, magazines, radio, and television broadcasters, and online media. The class may focus on one segment of journalism history, which will be listed in that semester's timetable. The course may be repeated when the focus varies. Prerequisite: Junior standing. LEC.

JOUR 504. Professional Presentation Skills. 1 Hour.

This course helps students in News/Information and Strategic Communications articulate ideas to individuals and large groups. The curriculum will include preparing, organizing and delivering presentations in formal and informal settings. It also will cover presentation technology, as well as message organization and body language. Prerequisite: JOUR 415 or JOUR 435 (or JOUR 560) with a grade of 2.0 or better. LEC.

JOUR 505. Professional Development. 1 Hour.

Preparation in skills needed in seeking internships and permanent employment, including resume and application letter writing, interviewing and professional presentations. Prerequisite: JOUR 415 or JOUR 435 (or JOUR 560) with a grade of 2.0 or higher. LEC.

JOUR 506. Directed Studies in Journalism. 1-3 Hours.

Undergraduate research project. Students must submit a written proposal to be approved by the instructor before enrollment. Proposal form can be found on Journalism School website or advising office and must be received by Journalism advising office by the 16th day of the semester. Limit of three hours enrollment in a student's total course work. Prerequisite: 2.5 grade point average overall and in Journalism. IND.

JOUR 507. Practicum in Journalism (Professional). 1-3 Hours.

Practical experience in a supervised professional setting for which the student does not receive pay. Students enrolled receive credit for professional experience in advertising, public relations, news-editorial, radio, television, photojournalism, and related fields. Supervision is provided by the employer offering the professional experience. Credit hours will be graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Enrollment requires consent of instructor. Students also must be registered with the Journalism Career Center. Limit of three hours enrollment in JOUR 507 in a student's total course work. No student may have more than four hours total in JOUR 506, JOUR 507, and JOUR 508. A student may not turn a paid internship into a credit internship. Prerequisite: Having completed either JOUR 415 or JOUR 435 (or JOUR 560) with a grade of 2.0 or above, having completed at least eleven hours of journalism, having a grade point average of 2.5 or above, both overall and in journalism, reporting to a journalism or communications professional, working at least forty hours for one credit, at least eighty hours for two hours of credit, receiving no pay for these hours, and completing a 4-5 page report accompanied by work samples. FLD.

JOUR 508. Practicum in Journalism (Academic). 1-2 Hours.

Practical experience in journalism in a supervised academic setting for which the student does not receive pay. Students enrolled in the course receive credit for practical experience in advertising, public relations, magazine, news-editorial, radio, television, and photojournalism. Supervision is provided by the instructor offering the practicum. Letter grades are earned. Enrollment requires consent of instructor. Limit of two hours enrollment in JOUR 508 in a student's total course work. No student may have more than four hours total in JOUR 506, JOUR 507, and JOUR 508. Prerequisite: 2.5 grade point average, both overall and in journalism. FLD.

JOUR 512. The Business of Media. 3 Hours.

The course primarily covers how media organizations make and spend their money, the role and responsibility of the government in regulating media and an examination of the economic and social implications of the changing media environment. The course is strongly based on current events but also covers the historical perspective. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Open to anyone in the university with junior standing. LEC.

JOUR 534. Diversity in Media. 3 Hours AE41.

A study of mass media images and portrayals of race, class, and gender in society. The course examines media representations of African-Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans, as well as media images of masculinity and femininity. The course also explores media images of groups traditionally under-represented in the media, including gays and lesbians, the elderly, the poor, and the disabled. Students study media portrayals in journalism, entertainment, public relations and advertising. The course encourages students to think critically about media images and analyze the role mass media play in reinforcing cultural stereotypes. Prerequisite: 8 hours of Journalism. LEC.

JOUR 540. Sports, Media and Society. 3 Hours.

The role of mass media in shaping and influencing sports and popular culture. Students will think critically about currently accepted media and sports practices, particularly at the Division I college level. Guest speakers represent media and athletics. Discussion, presentation, paper and essay exam. Prerequisite: Junior standing. LEC.

JOUR 550. Digital Media. 3 Hours.

This course will allow students to go deeper into one area of news, build their portfolios and prepare for internships. Each section has a separate emphasis: multimedia broadcast, multimedia reporting, or editing/production. The Multimedia Broadcast section will advance the student's understanding of reporting, writing, shooting and editing video for online and KUJH-TV. The section produces content for KUJH-TV newscasts and for an online audience. The Multimedia Reporting section will provide an immersive reporting opportunity for students in the News and Information track. It allows students to report stories for the University Daily Kansan and Kansan.com. Reporting students will produce depth stories and cover breaking news as it happens. This section prepares students for internships and advanced media courses. In the Editing/Production section, students will work for the University Daily Kansan and Kansan.com, editing stories, writing headlines and cutlines, creating packages, working on search engine optimization and social media, and building graphics. The course gives students hands-on experience with editing on deadline for digital and print, as well as a deeper understanding of news and current production processes. Requirement: Must obtain a grade of C (2.0) or higher to advance in the curriculum. Prerequisite: JOUR 415, and JOUR 419 each with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. LEC.

JOUR 560. Message Development. 3 Hours.

Students exercise both critical and creative thinking to develop the multi-media writing skills expected of strategic communicators. Students begin addressing clients' needs by applying research on product or service benefits, brand identity, competition and audience motivations. The research informs the writing of a strategic message planner or creative brief, which students employ to write and produce messages in many forms. Examples of messages created in JOUR 560 include print, video and radio advertising; social media messages; sales letters and other business writing; and such public relations writing as news releases. Combining strategy, design, and writing and production skills, students begin to build a professional portfolio throughout this class. JOUR 560 prepares students for internships and lays the groundwork for the campaigns class. Prerequisite: For students starting at KU prior to Fall 2012: JOUR 101 and JOUR 301, each with a grade of 2.0 or above, and a satisfactory score on the grammar and usage test taken before JOUR 301 or completion of JOUR 002 with a grade of 2.0 or above. For students starting at KU Fall 2012 and after: JOUR 300 (or JOUR 310) with a C (2.0) or higher, JOUR 302 (Infomania), JOUR 304 (Writing for Media) (or JOUR 301 Research and Writing, JOUR 302 Research and Writing, Honors or JOUR 305 Research and Writing, Honors), JOUR 320, JOUR 420, JOUR 460 and passage of the grammar test or JOUR 002 with a C (2.0) or higher. May be taken concurrent with JOUR 420 and JOUR 460. Only open to Journalism majors. LEC.

JOUR 580. Environmental Journalism. 3 Hours.

Environmental communications have expanded from discussions about land conservation to explorations of the ways in which the natural world encompasses and touches every aspect of our lives, from national security to economy prosperity, conservation to civil rights, public health to personal well-being. Using food and agriculture as the primary lenses of exploration, this class will explore the continuum of issues that relate to the environment and the types of media in which they manifest (ranging from press releases to audio podcasts). Prerequisite: Eight hours of journalism. LEC.

JOUR 585. Multimedia Sports Journalism. 3 Hours.

The course would be a hands-on, in-your-face, portfolio-building opportunity for students who want to venture into sports journalism. It would allow students to write sports stories, do live play-by-play, develop video stories and cover live events. It will also introduce them to sports journalism beyond the playing field. Must obtain a grade of C or higher to advance in the curriculum. It is suggested JOUR 550 is completed prior to JOUR 585 but a student can enroll in JOUR 585 with instructor permission. Prerequisite: JOUR 101, JOUR 300 (OR JOUR 310), JOUR 302 (Infomania), JOUR 304 (Writing for Media) (or JOUR 301 Research and Writing, JOUR 302 Research and Writing, Honors or JOUR 305 Research and Writing, Honors), JOUR 415, JOUR 419, all of which must be passed with a C (2.0) or higher. Students must be admitted to the School of Journalism in order to enroll in JOUR 585. LEC.

JOUR 590. International Journalism. 3 Hours NW AE42.

This course explores print, broadcast and online media in industrialized and developing nations. It examines how government rules and restrictions affect press freedoms, examines the effects of technology on access to information, explores how the U.S. media cover news in foreign countries, explores how foreign media cover news events in the United States, and examines coverage of critical current events. The goal of the course is to make students aware of the effects of mass media in a global economy. Prerequisite: Eight hours of Journalism. LEC.

JOUR 600. School Journalism and Publications. 3 Hours.

(Open only to education majors and journalism teachers in elementary and secondary schools.) A study of the use of publications in the teaching of secondary school journalism, and an analysis of problems in supervising school newspapers, magazines, and yearbooks. The course covers staff organization, writing and editing, make-up, typography, advertising, and illustration. Students learn through lectures, projects, practice assignments, and directed study of newspapers, yearbooks, and current teaching materials. LEC.

JOUR 608. Ethics and Professional Practice. 3 Hours AE51.

This course surveys techniques of moral analysis, argument, and decision-making for use by practitioners in both news and persuasive journalism. It employs classical ethical theory, moral reasoning models, and critical-thinking skills to resolve ethical choices through case studies involving reporters, editors, broadcasters, and practitioners in advertising, marketing, and public relations. Prerequisite: Eight hours of Journalism. LEC.

JOUR 610. Photojournalism: Still and Video. 3 Hours.

Students will produce publishable work on a daily basis, with expectations for frequent publication. Each student will learn to differentiate between appropriate uses of still versus video imaging and produce work accordingly. They will also gain deeper understanding of the practice of image editing through in-class production exercises and on-deadline work. Must obtain a grade of C (2.0). Prerequisite: For students who began at KU prior to Fall 2012, JOUR 410, JOUR 415, and JOUR 419 all with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. For students who began at KU Fall 2012 and after: JOUR 410 and JOUR 550 all with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Students must be admitted to the School of Journalism, and be in good academic standing in order to enroll in JOUR 610. LEC.

JOUR 611. Sales Strategies. 3 Hours.

Students learn how to identify consumer, client, news source or employer needs and how to use their product, service or other skills to solve that need in today's evolving media world. This requires delivering the solution in a way the audience understands best, which is a fundamental to every strategic message or interaction with a news source. Even though students work in a media sales context, the purpose of the course is not to turn out professional media sales people, but to enhance strategic communication abilities. Prerequisite: Junior standing. LEC.

JOUR 612. Visual Design and Production. 3 Hours.

This course approaches design as a visual problem-solving process. Students create a digital portfolio that uses advanced storytelling techniques and showcases digital media competency. The process explores a number of possible solutions, encouraging students to expand their perspectives and to explore innovative and creative approaches. The resulting portfolio builds a bridge from student work to professional practice. Prerequisite: For students starting prior to Fall 2012, students must be admitted to the School of Journalism and have at least junior standing to enroll in this course. For students starting Fall 2012 and after, completion of JOUR 300 (or 310) with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Must be admitted to the School of Journalism to take JOUR 612. LEC.

JOUR 613. International Strategic Communications. 3 Hours.

This course examines the process by which professional promotional communicators operate in a global multicultural environment. It aims to instill an appreciation for the challenges in crossing cultures, beginning with research and continuing through examining or creating culturally appropriate messages to be delivered in country-specific ways. The course covers differences among cultures and their communication styles, economic systems, demographics, politics, regulatory environment, research practices and media systems. Through case studies and projects, this course gives students a framework from which to sort through the challenges of global marketing communications. Prerequisite: Junior standing. LEC.

JOUR 614. Case Studies in Strategic Communications. 3 Hours.

This course examines how organizations have developed opportunities, strengthened relationships and solved problems through the process of research, planning, communication and evaluation. By studying cases, students will learn how professionals past and present have responded to changing needs. Cases will highlight both the diversity and the integration of professions and professional practices within strategic communication. Prerequisite: JOUR 420 (or JOUR 513 or JOUR 523.) Open to non majors with permission of the instructor. LEC.

JOUR 615. Social Media in Strategic Communication. 3 Hours.

This course examines significant changes in strategic communication approaches brought about by the networked information society. Students will study effective ways for organizations to identify social technographics of key audiences, create social media content, disseminate messages and evaluate social media-based strategic communication initiatives. This course combines theoretical and hands-on approaches to issues. Students will work in groups to analyze, evaluate and develop social media strategies for organizations chosen for their case study research. Prerequisite: JOUR 460 (or JOUR 568) or consent of the instructor. Open to non majors with permission of the instructor. LEC.

JOUR 616. Financial Basics for Communicators. 3 Hours.

An overview of how business and markets operate; balance sheets, income statements and statements of cash flows; how to create and interpret budgets, particularly for non-profit organizations; key documents and regulations of business; how to use various tools of analysis, and how to make personal finance decisions. Each student follows one public company for the semester and explores various aspects of its operations. Prerequisite: Junior standing and completion of JOUR 415 Multimedia Reporting or JOUR 560 (or JOUR 435) with a grade of C (2.0) or better. Open to non majors. LEC.

JOUR 617. Multimedia Management and Leadership. 3 Hours.

The course addresses challenges faced by managers and leaders in traditional and non-traditional environments. The course explores a range of management and leadership concepts, including organizational culture, organizational change, functions of managers, leadership theory, motivation and reinforcement. Also explores in some detail the new world of work and what it means to be a "contingent employee" or "free agent." Prerequisite: At least one course designated as Advanced Media or JOUR 460 (or JOUR 568). Open to non majors with permission of the instructor. LEC.

JOUR 618. First Amendment and Society. 3 Hours.

An examination of the history and philosophy of freedom of speech and press and the limitations imposed upon those rights by statute, common law, and court decisions resolving conflicts with other constitutional rights. Critical-thinking skills and case analysis focus on the roles, rights, and responsibilities of the news and persuasive media in a free society. This course is open to all students at the University of Kansas. It emphasizes the importance of freedom of expression in a free society. Students study key media law court decisions and explore free speech issues more broadly to embrace the philosophical thinking that led to the development of the First Amendment. Prerequisite: Junior standing. LEC.

JOUR 619. Thriving Through Workplace Change. 1 Hour.

This course gives students insights into the rapidly changing world of work where freelance, contract, consulting and other forms of "contingent" or "free agent" activities are becoming more common. The course provides an oversight of entrepreneurial thinking, freelancing, networking, brand building and other components of contingent work. It also provides an overview of basics of personal finance such as taxes, insurance, budgets, investing, etc. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Open to non-journalism majors. LEC.

JOUR 620. TV News-Advanced Media. 3 Hours AE61.

This course instructs and prepares students to work with multiple media-writing, reporting, web, graphics and live elements-to tell stories on the appropriate media platform. This is a lab-intensive course designed with live newsroom and live in-the-field reporting. Students will also have the opportunity to use producer and directing skills in production of newscasts and other reports. Classroom discussions will concentrate on refining and developing the skills you've learned in previous broadcast news courses, and on discussion and critical evaluation of professional standards and ethics. We will hold critique sessions of your lab work. We try to maintain flexibility in the class discussion topics in order to make them relevant to your lab work and to current issues in broadcast journalism. Requirement: Must obtain a grade of C or higher to advance in the curriculum. Prerequisite: JOUR 550 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Students who started at KU prior to Fall 2012 only need to complete JOUR 415 and JOUR 419 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher as a prerequisite. Only open to Journalism majors. Students must be in good academic standing to take this course. LEC.

JOUR 621. Data Reporting and Visualization-Advanced Media. 3 Hours.

This class will advance the student's understanding and use of data driven journalism and its effective presentation. It will expand their knowledge of the skills necessary to be a data driven journalist and guide them in the creation of a stories and complementary visuals based on database analysis. Everyone in the class will learn the basic coding skills that the field requires, use those skills to acquire data, and create multiple data driven journalism stories, some of which will be used in media. Requirement: Must obtain a grade of C or higher (2.0). Prerequisite: JOUR 550 with a C (2.0) or better. Students who started at KU prior to Fall 2012 only need to complete JOUR 415 and JOUR 419 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher as a prerequisite. Only open to Journalism majors. Students must be in good academic standing to take JOUR 621. LEC.

JOUR 630. Depth Reporting-Advanced Media. 3 Hours.

This is an enterprise reporting class designed to give students hands-on experience covering important issues that impact individuals and communities in Kansas and beyond. Students will produce multimedia stories that include government, social and cultural issues, business, human interest, and non-profit agencies. Requirement: Must obtain a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Prerequisite: JOUR 550 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Students who started at KU prior to Fall 2012 only need to complete JOUR 415 and JOUR 419 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher as a prerequisite. Only open to Journalism majors. Students must be in good academic standing to take this course. LEC.

JOUR 635. Statehouse Reporting-Advanced Media. 3 Hours AE61.

The purpose of this class is to provide students with an immersive public affairs reporting experience at the State Capital in Topeka while covering the important statewide issues of the day. Students will be assigned to cover the statehouse for specific media outlets and assist those media in fulfilling their public-service missions to their communities. Requirement: Must obtain a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Prerequisite: JOUR 550 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Students who started at KU prior to Fall 2012 only need to complete JOUR 415 and JOUR 419 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher as a prerequisite. Only open to Journalism majors. Students must be in good academic standing to take this course. LEC.

JOUR 636. Documentary-Advanced Media. 3 Hours.

The study of the field and functions of non-broadcast television: the use of video by business, educational, medical, governmental, and non-profit organizations. Students plan and produce typical video materials, such as training tapes, employee orientations, community relations, new product demonstrations and self-paced instructional programs, designed for both internal and external audiences. Must earn a C (2.0) or higher. Prerequisite: For students who began at KU prior to fall 2012: JOUR 415 or JOUR 560 (or JOUR 435) with a grade of C (2.0) or above. For students who begin at KU Fall 2012 and after: JOUR 550 with a grade of C (2.0) or above. Only open to Journalism majors. Students must be in good academic standing in order to enroll in JOUR 636. LEC.

JOUR 640. Strategic Campaigns. 3 Hours AE61.

Students produce a campaign to solve a strategic communications problem for an established organization. Students work with an actual client to develop a campaign from the initial research to the final recommendation. By applying the knowledge, experience and skills gained in previous courses, students confirm their readiness to enter the profession. Prerequisite: Senior standing, good standing in the School of Journalism and JOUR 420, JOUR 460, and JOUR 560. LEC.

JOUR 645. Multimedia Writing and Production. 3 Hours.

This graduate-credit course will cover the information gathering, writing, graphic, audio and video production techniques needed to succeed in the upper-level skills classes. Students will produce both news and strategic messages in print, radio, TV and Web formats. LEC.

JOUR 650. Magazine Journalism-Advanced Media. 3 Hours AE61.

Students in the course will produce different kinds of articles (departments and longer stories that fit key categories in magazines, including service articles, profiles and informational articles) for a real magazine. The magazine could be in print, online or take some other form. Students will gain an understanding of different parts of a magazine, the difference between departments and articles, and how to report and write short articles and longer substantive stories. Must obtain a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Students must be in good academic standing in order to enroll in JOUR 650. Only open to Journalism students. Prerequisite: JOUR 550 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Students who started at KU prior to Fall 2012 only need to complete JOUR 415 and JOUR 419 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher as a prerequisite. Only open to Journalism majors. Students must be in good academic standing to take this course. LEC.

JOUR 690. Media Innovation-Advanced Media. 3 Hours AE61.

The primary goal of this course is to challenge students to identify the critical aspects of journalism that should be carried forward into a future media environment. By studying the concepts of innovation, entrepreneurial planning and the information needs of multiple audiences, students will be able to work together to develop strategies for new media enterprises suitable for implementation in the immediate future. The course will require students to integrate principles, theories and methods learned in other journalism courses through an immersive learning experience. The course will also introduce students to entrepreneurial practices and critical thinking in a collaborative and multi-format, small-group news laboratory. Requirement: Must obtain a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Suggestion: Senior standing required. Only open to Journalism majors. Prerequisite: JOUR 550 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Students who started at KU prior to Fall 2012 only need to complete JOUR 415 and JOUR 419 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher as a prerequisite. Only open to Journalism majors. Students must be in good academic standing to take this course. LEC.

JOUR 691. Community Journalism-Advanced Media. 3 Hours.

Students work at a community newspaper, television station or online operation; and either cover the news, produce or edit the news. Instruction includes newsroom coaching and evaluation by professional journalists. Classroom instruction covers such issues as analyzing media content, diversifying story sources, and practical ethical decisions faced by the students. Instructors also meet with students for individual conferences. Students must complete a written project and present it to the class and to the news professionals. Must obtain a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Prerequisite: JOUR 550 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. Students who started at KU prior to Fall 2012 only need to complete JOUR 419 with a grade of C(2.0) or higher as a prerequisite. Only open to Journalism majors. Students must be in good academic standing to take this course. FLD.

JOUR 699. Reporting and Editing for Print and Online-Advanced Media. 3 Hours.

An intense eight-week reporting and editing experience on The University Daily Kansan and its web site kansan.com. A three-hour class session each week will focus on the proper concepts and techniques of reporting and editing. Students will be required to research and make presentations on various aspects of reporting and editing. Students also will meet one-on-one on an ongoing basis with the instructor to review work. Prerequisite: JOUR 415 and JOUR 419, each with a grade of 2.0 or above. LEC.

JOUR 700. Advanced Topics in Journalism: _____. 2-3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Journalism or related field or permission of instructor. Other prerequisites may be listed with the specific course. LEC.

JOUR 720. Military and the Media. 3 Hours.

This uniquely structured class enrolls up to 16 advanced Kansas University students and 16 U.S. Army majors from Fort Leavenworth's Command and General Staff College (CGSC). Class goals are to increase the understanding by the military and the media of each other's functions and roles in a democracy. Kansas University and CGSC students work collaboratively on assignments leading to a multimedia project. The course is taught at Lawrence and at Fort Leavenworth and requires some extended class periods. Contact the instructor for more information. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Journalism or related field or permission of instructor. LEC.

JOUR 801. Research I: Theory. 3 Hours.

A comprehensive review of the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of media research and practices. This seminar offers a range of perspectives and covers various interpretative, cultural, and critical approaches to understanding mass communication in various contexts. Each student drafts a literature review about a topic of the student's choice. LEC.

JOUR 802. Research II: Methods. 3 Hours.

An introduction to methodological approaches to the study of media. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies are reviewed. The class emphasis is on learning appropriate research tools to scientifically learn about messages, media, and audiences. Each student devises a research project during the course. Prerequisite: JOUR 801. LEC.

JOUR 803. Survey of Mass Media and Popular Culture. 3 Hours.

Covers the activities, functions, and operations of both traditional mass media and new media. The course provides a combination of historical context, current events, and a future perspective. Topics include the business and economics of the media, the role of the media, and rights and responsibilities. Prerequisite: JOUR 802. LEC.

JOUR 804. Mass Communication Methodology I-Qualitative. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of qualitative methodological approaches to the study of media. The class emphasis is using interpretative research tools and techniques from narrative analysis, to ethnography, historical analysis, to critical cultural approaches to learn about messages, media, and audiences. Each student devises a research project during the course. Prerequisite: JOUR 900, JOUR 801 and JOUR 802 or permission of instructor. LEC.

JOUR 805. Mass Communication Methodology II-Quantitative. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of quantitative methodological approaches to the study of media. The class emphasis is using social scientific research tools and techniques ranging from content analysis to conducting surveys to experimental designs to learn about messages, media, and audiences. Special focus will be on learning to use SPSS and statistical techniques. Each student devises a research project during the course. Prerequisite: JOUR 900, JOUR 801 and JOUR 802 or permission of instructor. LEC.

JOUR 815. Investigation and Conference. 1-3 Hours.

Specialized work by qualified students under direction of the graduate faculty. Investigation and research studies. Prerequisite: Ten hours of graduate work in journalism. RSH.

JOUR 818. Advanced Studies in First Amendment. 3 Hours.

Case studies and explorations in First Amendment theory and practice. Course will have one of two main foci: First Amendment practice such as censorship, libel, privacy; or Administrative Law such as FCC, FTC, FEC practice. Students will produce an original research paper. Course may be repeated once. LEC.

JOUR 819. Writing for Marketing Communications. 3 Hours.

A writing-intensive course focusing on articles and other works about marketing communication, management, general business and related subjects. Students read and discuss a core of designated work as well as works they select on their own. Students write reports, executive summaries and analytical briefings in which they synthesize these readings and apply marketing and management concepts to their own written work. LEC.

JOUR 820. Marketing Fundamentals for Communicators. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of marketing theory and process and how these theories relate to Integrated Marketing Communications. Specific focus will be spent on the marketing environment, the marketing mix, market segmentation, planning, execution and measurement. As part of the class, students will learn the components of a marketing plan and how to develop a plan based on specific quantifiable corporate objectives. LEC.

JOUR 821. Integrated Marketing Communications and Sales Strategies. 3 Hours.

The concept of integrated selling strategies and how these strategies logically lead to execution in various forms of message delivery systems. Through case studies of specific business cases, students develop insights into potential buyer segments and develop rationales for the most effective way to reach buyers. Students not only offer solutions to cases but also explore ways to measure the impact of each technique and medium used. LEC.

JOUR 822. Database Development and Management. 3 Hours.

A course in creating, updating, and effectively using databases in marketing communications. Students learn the process of designing a database, what information to include and how to acquire information, and how to organize and execute marketing communications programs using a database. LEC.

JOUR 823. Branding in Marketing Communications. 3 Hours.

Cases and topics in the development and execution of branding in marketing communications plans. The course emphasizes how organizations define actual brand problems and attempt to solve them. LEC.

JOUR 824. Creative Process. 3 Hours.

An examination of the creative process and techniques of creative problem solving. The course gives students numerous opportunities to solve a variety of marketing communications problems. Students have an opportunity to visit with individuals who practice creativity in their professional lives and individuals who study creativity as scholars. LEC.

JOUR 825. Relationship Marketing. 3 Hours.

An exploration of the principles of relationship marketing and their application to marketing communications. Special emphasis is on the development of relationship messages, the use of databases for constituent management, and a review of appropriate marketing communications media. LEC.

JOUR 826. Innovation in Management of Communications. 3 Hours.

Students shall demonstrate their knowledge of Innovation Theory through papers, presentations and an essay exam. The class will emphasize Management Innovation but will also cover marketing, process and product innovation. The course is very current events oriented. LEC.

JOUR 827. Marketing Ethics. 3 Hours.

An examination of the ethical issues, philosophies, and decision-making systems that affect marketing communications. Through studies of specific business cases, students gain insight into the cultural, legal, and social decisions that affect an organization's future. LEC.

JOUR 828. Financial Fundamentals for Communicators. 3 Hours.

This course covers a wide range of financially-related concepts from the perspective of the communications function. Topics include: financial markets; finding and using key Securities and Exchange Commission filings; understanding the balance sheet, income statement and cash flows; financial analysis; investor relations; impact of Sarbanes-Oxley; corporate governance issues; building and using budgets; and impact of these concepts for not-for-profits. LEC.

JOUR 829. Marketing Communications Research. 3 Hours.

Students learn how marketing and media research help determine the success of an organization's marketing planning and strategic communications processes. Students study and conduct primary and secondary research - both qualitative and quantitative - including focus groups, ethnography and surveys. Prerequisite: JOUR 820 or permission of instructor. LEC.

JOUR 831. Technologies in Marketing Communications. 3 Hours.

Explores new and emerging technologies and their impact on the delivery of marketing messages. Students will work with the instructor on identifying areas of relevance to them, and on identifying ways to keep up with changes in technology, innovation and audiences. LEC.

JOUR 832. Leadership and Management in Marketing Communications. 3 Hours.

This course examines cases and topics of leadership as a process in a marketing communication organization. As a manager's duties evolve from performing tasks to managing relationships and strategic organizational outcomes, the capacity to lead becomes critical to personal and organizational success. Topics will focus on the role of leadership and vision, strategy, communication, ethics, social responsibility, group dynamics, and change. LEC.

JOUR 833. Social Media and Integrated Marketing Communications. 3 Hours.

Developments in information technology and online social networking have posed opportunities and challenges for those who practice and research marketing, advertising or public relations. This course combines theoretical and hands-on approaches to developing and implementing effective ways for organizations to analyze, create and share social media content, engage key audiences via relevant digital channels, and integrate social media initiatives into overall communication strategies. Students will use various platforms and tools to conduct social media analytics, evaluate social media campaigns, and develop social media planning for the organization chose for their case study. LEC.

JOUR 834. International and Multicultural Marketing Communications. 3 Hours.

The speed and scope of modern marketing communication have made the world a much smaller place. This course explores how international companies use advertising, public relations, promotion, personal selling and other methods to communicate in a global multicultural environment. Students gain a broader understanding of the characteristics of people in different countries and cultures, especially how they rely on media for information about products and services to meet their needs. LEC.

JOUR 840. Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours.

Research in the issues and development of media. Seminars focus on topics of current and historical interest. Students develop projects and presentations in special areas of interest and expertise. Course may be repeated under different topics. LEC.

JOUR 848. Advanced Mass Communication Ethics and Legal Issues. 3 Hours.

This course examines at the doctoral level the ethical and legal issues for mass communication research and practice. A special focus would be on human subjects protocols in research and the role of the scholar and the professional in maintaining ethical standards in the academy and in applied work in mass communications industries. Prerequisite: JOUR 900, JOUR 801 and JOUR 818 or permission of instructor. LEC.

JOUR 850. Capstone in Marketing Communications. 3 Hours.

In this capstone course, students use the skills they have developed in the marketing communications program to create a strategic integrated marketing communication plan for a client. The process involves the use of techniques such as research, branding, advertising, public relations, promotion, as well as other activities. Through the project, students demonstrate their knowledge of marketing communications and work with team members to meet an organization's strategic marketing communication needs. Prerequisite: JOUR 820, JOUR 828, JOUR 829 and 30 hours or permission of instructor. LEC.

JOUR 851. Professional Skills I. 3 Hours.

This course offers the opportunity for a student group of students to develop an individualized project to enhance professional communications skills. The student or group works in conjunction with a graduate faculty advisor to develop a suitable project, presenting a proposal for approval to the School's Graduate Director. The proposal must specify the nature of the project, the products to be delivered, a timeline for completion, and expected impact. Prerequisite: Admission to a KU graduate program. IND.

JOUR 852. Professional Skills II. 3 Hours.

This course offers the opportunity for a student or group of students to develop an individualized project to enhance professional communications skills. The student or group works in conjunction with a graduate faculty advisor to develop a suitable project, presenting a proposal for approval to the School's Graduate Director. The proposal must specify the nature of the project, the products to be delivered, a timeline for completion, and expected impact. Prerequisite: Admission to a KU graduate program; satisfactory completion of JOUR 851. IND.

JOUR 855. Financial Management and Media. 3 Hours.

This course covers a wide range of financially-related concepts from the managerial perspective. Topics include: risk and return, financial markets; understanding the balance sheet, income statement and cash flows; financial analysis; the Securities and Exchange Commission; investor relations; corporate governance; building and using budgets. Limited to graduate students or instructor permission. Lecture, discussion, case studies. LEC.

JOUR 860. Information Insight I. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the broad concepts and theories of information, media and audiences. The goal is to ground students in the broad concepts of the master's program and to push them to identify their direction and goals for a certificate or for a degree. During the summer after the in-person session, students will complete additional online coursework, including modules and readings that build a foundation for subsequent courses. LEC.

JOUR 861. Data Collection I. 3 Hours.

This course helps students understand secondary research methods, shows students how to delve into library resources with a deep search component, and gives students a framework for understanding research credibility. Prerequisite: Successful completion of JOUR 860. LEC.

JOUR 862. Data Collection II. 3 Hours.

This course explores primary research methods for creating and expanding databases. Students explore such areas as tools, processes and best practices for primary data collection. Prerequisite: Successful completion of JOUR 861. LEC.

JOUR 863. Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course gives students a framework for basic statistics to explore relationships, solve problems, and answer questions. They gain an understanding of how to apply descriptive and predictive statistics to interpret and communicate results of data meaningfully. Prerequisite: Successful completion of JOUR 862. LEC.

JOUR 864. Data Visualization and Presentation. 3 Hours.

This course helps students use digital resources to communicate results of data analysis effectively to appropriate audiences. Students learn to evaluate, interpret and present the results of data analysis using a variety of media. Prerequisite: Successful completion of JOUR 863. LEC.

JOUR 865. Analyzing Audiences. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on identifying appropriate audiences for media and information, as well as gathering information and analyzing audiences using primary and secondary sources. It includes creating, analyzing and interpreting analytics for websites, mobile technology and other forms of media. Prerequisite: Successful completion of JOUR 860. LEC.

JOUR 866. Social Media Strategy. 3 Hours.

This course provides a broad overview of the social media landscape, examining the development and use of various platforms, best practices in the use of social media, and the tools available for managing social media and social media analytics. It will take a strategic approach, focusing on social media as a conduit for larger content strategy, covering such areas as content marketing, content curation, behavioral targeting, and segmenting target markets on social networks. Students create a social media plan for themselves or their organization. Prerequisite: Successful completion of JOUR 860. LEC.

JOUR 867. Social Media Metrics. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the evaluation, tools and best practices in integrating social media metrics into a strategic plan. Students will gain the following skills: Measure social media effectiveness through the use of appropriate metrics; Analyze social media metrics; Choose the best way to evaluate social media messages; Explore various types of software for evaluating social media; Apply best practices to social media evaluation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of JOUR 860. LEC.

JOUR 868. Information in Context. 3 Hours.

This writing-intensive course explores the many ways that disciplinary focus influences the meaning and understanding of information. It helps students approach problem-solving in an interdisciplinary way, and allows them to understand how context can open new paths to understanding and meaning. Prerequisite: Successful completion of JOUR 860. LEC.

JOUR 869. Information Insight II. 3 Hours.

Students enroll in this course upon completion of their second certificate, working to complete a capstone project and then completing a one-week residency. It allows students to present the research from their projects, get feedback from faculty members and peers, and revise the projects for submission. Prerequisite: Successful completion of JOUR 860, JOUR 861, JOUR 862, JOUR 863, JOUR 864, JOUR 865, JOUR 866, JOUR 867, JOUR 868. LEC.

JOUR 898. Master's Professional Project. 3 Hours.

Suggested course description: The student completes an appropriate, Master's-level professionally based project. The student must present a proposal outlining the project and signed by both the student and advisor prior to enrolling. Prerequisite: PRE 710 or PRE 711, JOUR 801, JOUR 802, JOUR 803, JOUR 818 and JOUR 855. LEC.

JOUR 899. Master's Project/Thesis. 3 Hours.

The student, with the guidance of a master's project/thesis committee, completes execution of the project or thesis. In addition, the student completes the final, general examination and the presentation/defense of the project or thesis. Prerequisite: EPSY 710, EPSY 711, JOUR 801, JOUR 802, JOUR 803, JOUR 818 and JOUR 855. THE.

JOUR 900. Proseminar in Mass Communication. 1 Hour.

"Portal" course introducing doctoral students to the history of mass communication ideas and issues, the mission of the program and ethical guidelines for graduate studies. The course also introduces the School faculty and their interests. Students take Proseminar in the first semester of matriculation specifically to prepare for the coursework to come. Proseminar also will introduce students to the culture of tenure-track faculty to launch them on the path to becoming ethical and productive citizen-scholars. Limited to Journalism PhD students. LEC.

JOUR 901. Introduction to Doctoral Studies. 3 Hours.

This course is a portal to doctoral education. Students learn about the structure, function and culture of higher education and the role of doctoral studies in academe. The course examines issues such as tenure, promotion, finances, expectations of the professoriate and the role of professors in academe. The course presents human subjects protocols in research and the role of the scholar and the professional in maintaining ethical standards in the academy and in applied work in mass communications industries. Prerequisite: Admission to Journalism PhD program or permission of instructor. LEC.

JOUR 999. Dissertation. 1-9 Hours.

The student, with the guidance of a dissertation committee, completes execution of the dissertation. In addition, the student completes the final examination and the presentation/defense of the dissertation. THE.