Graduation requirements and regulations for every academic program are provided in this catalog. Degree requirements and course descriptions are subject to change. In most cases, you will use the catalog of the year you entered KU (see your advisor for details). Other years’ catalogs»

Introduction

In the School of Business, students acquire a rigorous education that prepares them for positions in a dynamic and competitive global environment.

The University of Kansas School of Business is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International.

Undergraduate Programs

The school offers the Bachelor of Science degree in business on the Lawrence campus and the Bachelor of Business Administration on the KU Edwards Campus.

The undergraduate curriculum develops a foundation for lifelong education and growth. The strength of the program is based not only on the quality of the professional course offerings but also on the offerings of other KU divisions, particularly in the social sciences, natural sciences, and humanities. Students acquire a foundation education in business and management with emphasis on analytical skills and obtain a liberal arts and sciences education from their work outside the school.

The school offers advanced electives in various areas of business. Eight undergraduate majors are available:

  • Accounting
  • Business administration
  • Business analytics
  • Finance
  • Information systems
  • Management and leadership
  • Marketing
  • Supply chain management

Business concentrations may be earned in business analytics, entrepreneurship, information systems, international business, human resources and supply chain management. The baccalaureate programs in the School of Business, and independently the accounting program, are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

Resources and Opportunities

Study Abroad

The school encourages students to incorporate study abroad into their programs. Student and Academic Services can help students plan their studies to meet KU requirements while they are abroad. The school works with students and the KU Office of Study Abroad to select programs and courses appropriate to their interests and majors. Contact the Office of Study Abroad, 108 Lippincott Hall, 785-864-3742.

Job Shadowing

One on One, Jayhawks on the Job, allows business students to shadow a business professional during the course of a workday. The program offers students a daylong experience that enhances their understanding of a particular field and the business world, allows an opportunity for students to learn more about themselves and refine their career goals, and provides an opportunity for students to network with business professionals.

Internship Program

Internships offer students the opportunity to build on, apply, and assess the concepts that are developed through the curriculum and to further professional growth through meaningful real-world job experiences. The internship experience provides many benefits, from enhancing your knowledge of an industry or business field to increasing confidence in yourself and your abilities. Internships offer an opportunity to improve your professional skills, familiarize yourself with the business environment, network with business professionals, and refine your personal and career goals and aspirations. The school representative must approve the internship work experience. Not all positions qualify for internship credit.

Library Resources

The Anschutz Library offers a closed reserve service and reference services including a small print collection. The large collection in Watson Library offers additional reference and research materials. The business/economics bibliographer in the reference department can help business students use the library system. Spencer Research Library has an excellent collection on the history of economic thought and a special collection of business papers and records.

Computer Resources

Open Computing Resources

Open computer resources are located in 1057 Capitol Federal Hall and the McCarthy Finance Lab in 2035 Capitol Federal Hall.  The computers are available to business undergraduate and graduate students for classroom assignments and individual research projects.

The Horejsi Family Teaching Lab

Equipped with 30 PCs, the Horejsi Family Teaching Lab located in 3047 Capitol Federal Hall is intended for teaching classes that make heavy use of computers.

Faculty

The school’s faculty consists of 59 professors drawn from first-rank universities throughout the nation. The faculty enjoys a national reputation for research productivity and teaching success.

Graduate Programs

Four graduate degree programs are offered:

Four degree programs are offered jointly with other departments:

  • Combined MBA/J.D. with the School of Law.
  • MBA/Pharm.D. in Pharmacy.
  • MBA with a graduate certificate in petroleum management with the School of Engineering.

General admission requirements and the content of each of these programs are discussed on their pages of the online catalog.

Resources and Opportunities

Study Abroad

The school encourages students to incorporate study abroad into their programs. Student and Academic Services can help students plan study to meet KU requirements while they are abroad. The school works with students and the KU Office of Study Abroad to select programs and courses appropriate to their interests and majors. Contact the Office of Study Abroad, 108 Lippincott Hall, 785-864-3742.

Job Shadowing

One on One, Jayhawks on the Job, allows business students to shadow a business professional during the course of a workday. The program offers students a daylong experience that enhances their understanding of a particular field and the business world, allows an opportunity for students to learn more about themselves and refine their career goals, and provides an opportunity for students to network with business professionals.

Internship Program

Internships offer students the opportunity to build on, apply, and assess the concepts that are developed through the curriculum and to further professional growth through meaningful real-world job experiences. The internship experience provides many benefits, from enhancing your knowledge of an industry or business field to increasing confidence in yourself and your abilities. Internships offer an opportunity to improve your professional skills, familiarize yourself with the business environment, network with business professionals, and refine your personal and career goals and aspirations. The school representative must approve the internship work experience. Not all positions qualify for internship credit.

Library Resources

The Anschutz Library offers a closed reserve service and reference services including a small print collection. The large collection in Watson Library offers additional reference and research materials. The business/economics bibliographer in the reference department can help business students use the library system. Spencer Research Library has an excellent collection on the history of economic thought and a special collection of business papers and records.

Computer Resources

Open Computing Resources

Open computer resources are located in 1057 Capitol Federal Hall and the McCarthy Finance Lab in 2035 Capitol Federal Hall.  The computers are available to business undergraduate and graduate students for classroom assignments and individual research projects.

The Horejsi Family Teaching Lab

Equipped with 30 PCs, the Horejsi Family Teaching Lab located in 3047 Capitol Federal Hall is intended for teaching classes that make heavy use of computers.
 

Faculty

The school’s faculty consists of 59 professors drawn from first-rank universities throughout the nation. The faculty enjoys a national reputation for research productivity and teaching success.

Undergraduate Advising

The Student and Academic Services office, 1160 Capitol Federal Hall, helps students meet their academic goals. Students should take primary responsibility for their academic careers by consulting SAS, becoming familiar with the undergraduate curriculum and graduation requirements, and complying with all guidelines. Advisors help students choose classes and make efficient progress towards graduation. For information, see the school’s website.

Mandatory Advising

Once a student is admitted to the School of Business, he or she must meet with a business advisor at least once a semester. A business advising hold is placed on admitted students’ enrollment each semester and released after the student meets with the advisor.

Graduate Advising

The MBA office in Capitol Federal Hall coordinates advising for MBA and M.S. students. The MAcc office coordinates advising for MAcc students, and the doctoral office coordinates advising for Ph.D. students. Staff members advise students about program requirements, course prerequisites, and program planning. Students based at the KU Edwards Campus typically receive advising sessions over the phone and by email. Advising sessions are optional.

Undergraduate Scholarships and Financial Aid

The school awards scholarships to current business students annually.

To be considered for need-based scholarships, file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 1. A few scholarships are available for incoming first-year students. High school students interested in majoring in business should contact Financial Aid and Scholarships, Strong Hall, 1450 Jayhawk Blvd., Room 50, Lawrence, KS 66045-7518, 785-864-4700, for information about federal and state funded financial aid programs.

Graduate Fellowships and Assistantships

For information about graduate assistantships, contact the School of Business.

Visit the Graduate Studies website for information about funding opportunities for graduate students at KU.

Financial Aid and Scholarships administers grants, loans, and need-based financial aid.

Undergraduate University Regulations

For information about university regulations, see Regulations or visit the University of Kansas Policy Library.

Business Honor Code

Students taking any business course must sign a pledge of academic honesty at the end of all examinations. Upon application to the school, each student must electronically sign an honor code form, available from the School of Business.

Change of School

Admission is competitive. Applications are due February 15 for fall admission and September 15 for spring admission.

Credit/No Credit

A Credit/No Credit option is available to all degree-seeking undergraduates. You may enroll in one course a semester under the option, if the course is not in your major or minor. For more information, visit the KU Policy Library.

Warning: Certain undesirable consequences may result from exercising the option. Some schools, scholarship committees, and honorary societies do not accept this grading system and convert grades of No Credit to F when computing grade-point averages.

Credit/No Credit is allowed for electives only. Required professional (business courses including macro and micro economics) courses may not be taken for Credit/No Credit.

Graduation with Distinction and Highest Distinction

Undergraduates whose KU professional grade-point averages rank in the upper 10 percent of their graduating class graduate with distinction. The upper 3 percent of those awarded distinction graduate with highest distinction.

Honor Roll

Undergraduates with grade-point averages of 3.5 who have completed at least 12 hours with letter grades are recognized on the honor roll or dean's list in the fall and spring semesters. An honor roll notation appears on the transcript.

Maximum and Minimum Semester Enrollment

No student may enroll for more than 20 hours a semester, or more than 9 hours in a summer session without permission from an undergraduate advisor.

Nonresidence Study Before the Last 30 Hours

Before the last 30 hours required for the degree, students may, under certain conditions, take courses at other institutions and transfer the credit to KU. Before enrolling in a nonresidence course, check on how your courses will transfer to KU or complete KU's standard form, Request for Tentative Evaluation of Transfer Credit, in your dean’s office or in College Student Academic Services for students in the College. After completing the course work, you must request that an official transcript be sent to the Office of Admissions, KU Visitor Center, 1502 Iowa St., Lawrence, KS 66044-7576, 785-864-3911. For transcripts to be official, they must be mailed from the college or university directly to KU. Faxed transcripts are not accepted for posting of transfer credit.

Nonresidence credit includes all credits from another college or university taken after initial enrollment at KU, military service courses, and other undergraduate course work not formally offered in the Schedule of Classes.

Majors must submit the Request for Tentative Evaluation of Transfer Credit form before they enroll.

Prerequisites and Corequisites

The student is responsible for checking course prerequisites before enrollment. Course rosters are checked before the start of each semester and again after the last day to add classes online. Students who are enrolled in a course without its prerequisites are administratively dropped without notice during the first four weeks of the semester.

Probation

Placed on Probation
An undergraduate student whose cumulative grade-point average, either overall or at KU (in all courses or professional courses), is lower than 2.2 is placed on probation for the following semester.

Continued on Probation
A student on probation is continued on probation for one more semester if the KU semester grade-point average is at least 2.2, but the cumulative grade-point average, either overall or at KU (in all courses or professional courses), is lower than 2.2.

Returned to Good Standing
A student on probation is returned to good standing if the cumulative grade-point average, both overall and at KU (in all courses and professional courses), is at least 2.2.

Dismissed
A student on probation is dismissed for failure to earn a KU grade-point average of at least 2.2 (in all courses and professional courses) in the next semester of enrollment, or if after two consecutive semesters on probation, the cumulative grade-point average, either overall or at KU (in all courses and professional courses), is not at least 2.2. Students are readmitted through the competitive admission process. Those students are dropped from all courses for the next semester and must complete a Change of School form.

Required Work in Residence

No baccalaureate degree is granted to a student who has not completed at least 30 semester credit hours of residence courses at KU. No exceptions are granted.

Transfer of Credit

CredTran is a transfer course equivalency system that lists more than 2,200 colleges and universities from which KU has accepted transfer courses in the past. If your school or course is not listed, your evaluation will be completed when you are admitted to KU.

Courses completed at other institutions are accepted to fulfill graduation requirements (e.g., in place of specifically prescribed courses), only if they are substantially equivalent as indicated by course description, hours of credit, and prerequisites. For professional courses not listed on CredTran, the student must submit a petition along with a course syllabus to the School of Business. Petition forms are available at www.business.ku.edu/transfercreditevaluation.

Only transfer grades of C- or higher apply toward graduation from the School of Business at KU.

Graduate University Regulations

For information about university regulations, see Regulations or visit the University of Kansas Policy Library.

 

Business Career Services

Business Career Services (BCS) provides a variety of resources including recruiting (on-campus interviews) for full-time and internship positions facilitated through KU Career Connections/Symplicity, an online job and internship database; individual career advising; and a variety of workshops and events—to name a few.

Other BCS services include

  • Individual career advising with trained counselors
  • Business career fair
  • Résumé review
  • Mock interviews and interview preparation assistance
  • Workshops on various career-related topics
  • Online resource libraries
  • Salary information
  • Mobile app, KU Business Career Plus

The faculty and career services staff are committed to providing a strong student-oriented program to help students develop career objectives and target job opportunities. The BCS cannot guarantee jobs, but it will make every effort to bring together the job-seeking candidate and potential employers in accordance with their needs, abilities, and interests. Business graduates have been successful in finding employment in their areas of interest. Positions have been available nationwide, regardless of academic area or business degree.

Students are encouraged to register with the BCS as early as possible. An early start can mean wider access to potential employment opportunities. Registrants’ may include one or more résumés in a web-based database, allowing access by the BCS and employers. This allows the BCS to perform résumé referrals quickly and companies to conduct their own résumé searches. Students can update their résumés at any time from any Internet-linked computer or affiliated app.

Post-graduation plans for graduates are collected and analyzed annually. Information on the number of degrees granted, percentage of graduates employed, and average starting salaries can be found on the School of Business website.

Contact Business Career Services for more information at 785-864-5591, kubuscareer@ku.edu.

Courses

ACCT 200. Fundamentals of Financial Accounting. 4 Hours GE12.

Accounting 200 is an introduction to the concepts of business and the measurement systems used to control and evaluate business activities. This course is designed to be of interest to all students regardless of discipline. Prerequisite: Goal 1, Outcome 2 and Goal 2, Outcome 1. LEC.

ACCT 201. Managerial Accounting I. 3 Hours.

A continuation of Financial Accounting I. A study of concepts of materials, labor, and overhead control; budget administration; cost accounting systems including standard costing; full costing and direct costing; income determination; differential costing; break-even analysis; accounting statement analysis; and use of return on investment as a basis for management decisions. Prerequisite: ACCT 200. LEC.

ACCT 205. Survey of Accounting. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to financial and managerial accounting. It will introduce the concepts of business and the measurement systems used to control and evaluate business activities. It will also explore product costing systems and the use of accounting data as a basis for management planning and decision making. (Not open to students with credit in ACCT 200.) Prerequisite: Goal 1, Outcome 2 and Goal 2, Outcome 1. LEC.

ACCT 300. Special Topics in Accounting: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of accounting topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC.

ACCT 303. Introduction to the Accounting Profession. 1 Hour.

This course will focus on Accounting as a profession. Prospective and current accounting students will be exposed to a variety of topics. These include, but are not limited to, career options in Accounting, the CPA exam, ethics in the profession, current issues in Accounting, professional standards, the Accounting major, and the five-year Accounting program. Prerequisite: ACCT 200 or coenrollment in ACCT 200. LEC.

ACCT 311. Information Systems for Accountants. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of how to understand, analyze, and control computerized information systems, and is designed to provide the computer tools and knowledge so that today's business or accounting student will be tomorrow's successful and complete manager, consultant, accountant, and/or auditor. The topics covered in this course will include computer technology, internal control in a computer environment, computer auditing, systems analysis and design, database systems, networking, electronic commerce, and specific systems applications. Hands on experience will be obtained through projects and various software packages. This course will count as an advanced business elective. Prerequisite: ACCT 201 and IST 202 or IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 320. Intermediate Accounting I. 3 Hours.

A study of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) underlying the preparation and interpretation of general-purpose financial statements with emphasis on the principles of revenue recognition, matching revenues and related costs, and the determination of proper balance sheet valuations of assets and liabilities. The asset side of the balance sheet is the primary emphasis though the entire financial statements are used in examples throughout the course. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ACCT 303. LEC.

ACCT 321. Intermediate Accounting for Finance. 3 Hours.

An intermediate accounting course with emphasis on interpretation of general-purpose financial statements and the related disclosure notes. Includes understanding interrelationships among the various financial statements and analyzing the effects of transactions on the financial statements. Common and significant accounts/transactions will be analyzed, especially those relating to the financing and equity sections of the financial statements. Not open to students with credit in ACCT 320 or ACCT 323 or ACCT 410 or ACCT 411. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 323. Intermediate Accounting I, Honors. 3 Hours.

Interpretation and application of financial accounting standards, with an emphasis on U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and ancillary treatment of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). General coverage of all financial statements, with specific attention placed upon the balance sheet. A primary focus of the course is on the comprehension of foundational principles, concepts, and theories underlying financial reporting. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the School of Business Honors Program, or by consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ACCT 303. LEC.

ACCT 325. Managerial Accounting II. 3 Hours.

An analysis of cost systems and their application in the determination, analysis and control of manufacturing and distribution costs. Emphasis is on managerial planning and control. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 326. Managerial Accounting II, Honors. 3 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course involves an analysis of cost systems and their application in the determination analysis and control of manufacturing and distribution costs. Emphasis is on managerial planning and control. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. Enrollment restricted LEC.

ACCT 330. Introduction to Taxation. 3 Hours.

A study of the major concepts related to taxation with emphasis on the federal income tax for individuals including the implications of being a sole proprietor, partner of a partnership, and a corporate shareholder. Major topics covered include: different types of taxes; formation of the tax law; gross income; deductions; the tax formula; tax credits; filing status; tax treatment for capital gains and losses; and selected nontaxable transactions. Prerequisite: ACCT 320 or ACCT 323. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 331. Introduction to Taxation, Honors. 3 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course is a study of the major concepts related to taxation with emphasis on the federal income tax for individuals including the implications of being a sole proprietor, partner of a partnership, and a corporate shareholder. Major topics covered include: different types of taxes; formation of the tax law; gross income; deductions; the tax formula; tax credits; filing status; tax treatment for capital gains and losses; and selected nontaxable transactions. Prerequisite: ACCT 320 or ACCT 323. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

ACCT 335. Introduction to Income Tax. 3 Hours.

An introduction to basic concepts of income tax and how the tax law is formed. While tax problems of an individual are considered, emphasis is placed on tax factors to consider when conducting a business either as a single proprietor, corporation, or partnership. Not open to students with credit in ACCT 330 or ACCT 331. This course is for non-accounting majors. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 400. Special Topics in Accounting: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of accounting topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 410. Intermediate Accounting II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of the study of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) underlying the preparation and interpretation of general-purpose financial statements. The focus of this course is on the liability and equity sections of the balance sheet, including such topics as loans, bonds, leases, pensions, accounting for income taxes, equity transactions, employee stock options, earnings per share, and cash flows. Application of many of the authoritative accounting pronouncements is illustrated. Prerequisite: ACCT 320 or ACCT 323. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 411. Intermediate Accounting II, Honors. 3 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course is a continuation of the study of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) underlying the preparation and interpretation of general-purpose financial statements. The focus of this course is on the liability and equity sections of the balance sheet, including such topics as loans, bonds, leases, pensions, accounting for income taxes, equity transactions, employee stock options, earnings per share, and cash flows. Application of many of the authoritative accounting pronouncements is illustrated. Prerequisite: ACCT 320 or ACCT 323. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

ACCT 500. Individual Research in Accounting: _____. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in business not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311, MGMT 310 or MGMT 311, MKTG 310 or MKTG 311 and SCM 310 or SCM 311; approval of the Area Director. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 515. Accounting Professional Communications. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to improve the professional communications skills of students interested in pursuing careers in accounting. Topics covered include communication styles, communication approaches for different styles, listening skills, client interactions, appropriate communication channels, receiving feedback, and presentation skills. Prerequisite: ACCT 599 or ACCT 799. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 543. Introduction to Auditing. 3 Hours.

The fundamental concepts of audit risk, evidence accumulation and materiality are applied to financial statement audits using established accounting principles as the criterion for evaluating fair presentation. Audit objectives and procedures are studied in relation to the opinion which the auditor expresses on clients' financial statements. Financial statement audits are compared with other types of engagements performed by public accountants, and with other types of audits, such as compliance and operational audits. Prerequisite: ACCT 311 and ACCT 410 or ACCT 411. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 544. Introduction to Auditing, Honors. 3 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course involves the fundamental concepts of audit risk, evidence accumulation and materiality are applied to financial statement audits using established accounting principles as the criterion for evaluating fair presentation. Audit objectives and procedures are studied in relation to the opinion which the auditor expresses on clients' financial statements. Financial statement audits are compared with other types of engagements performed by public accountants, and with other types of audits, such as compliance and operational audits. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: ACCT 311 and ACCT 410 or ACCT 411. LEC.

ACCT 545. Advanced Taxation. 3 Hours.

Introduction to taxation for corporations, partnerships, S corporations and limited liability companies. The course will also include coverage of property transactions, methods of accounting, tax-related investment decisions, and selected tax issues. Prerequisite: ACCT 330 or ACCT 331. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 599. Internship in Accounting. 1-3 Hours.

Internships provide opportunities for students to combine their academic education with a meaningful experience in the business world. Accounting internships allow students to explore career pathways in accounting, further their professional growth, expand professional networks, and increase the relevancy of their academic course work. The internship course combines job-related activities of the accounting internship position with a set of academic requirements. These requirements include academic assignments as well as a pre- and post-internship seminar held in the semester before and after the semester in which the internship occurs. Internships for credit must be approved by the Director of the Internship Program prior to the internship experience. Students may not receive more than three hours of internship credit from ACCT 599. ACCT 599 may count as an Accounting elective for students majoring in Accounting. Prerequisite: Approval of the internship; two of the following: FIN 310 or FIN 311, MGMT 310 or MGMT 311, MKTG 310 or MKTG 311, SCM 310 or SCM 311. Enrollment restricted. INT.

ACCT 701. Financial Accounting. 2 Hours.

Financial accounting provides information to decision-makers external to the business, such as investors and lenders. The course describes the process through which economic information is captured, validated, and distributed externally in the form of financial statements. It also covers the contents of the major financial statements, focusing on how the various accounts are defined and measured and how the information can be used by external decision-makers. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 705. Financial Statement Presentation and Analysis II. 2 Hours.

This course covers topics in intermediate-level financial accounting and financial statement analysis. Accounting topics are taught from an external decision-maker's perspective. The course is intended to help students read and understand complex financial statements, and to extract key financial information from a mass of detail. Topics will vary over time but can include financial reporting of various liabilities, derivatives and hedging, investments and acquisitions. Topics also can include forecasting financial statements, and valuation of common stock using accounting data. Not open to MAcc students or students with credit in ACCT 320 or ACCT 323, ACCT 410 or ACCT 411, ACCT 721, or ACCT 722. Prerequisite: ACCT 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 706. Accounting. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the creation and application of financial accounting information and financial statements for decision making by corporate stakeholders, and to the use of internal accounting information for decision making by firm management. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 708. Accounting and Finance for Professionals. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to financial and managerial accounting. It also serves as a bridge to basic financial decision-making. It will introduce the concepts of business and the measurement systems used to control and evaluate business activities. It will also explore costing systems and the use of accounting data as a basis for management planning and decision making, using basic tools such as return on investment. Not open to School of Business students. LEC.

ACCT 710. Business Writing for Accountants. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to improve students' professional writing skills. The course will emphasize effectively determining and meeting writing goals; writing with the readers' perspective in mind; employing a writing strategy to increase efficiency and effectiveness when writing; thinking critically about writing; writing clearly, concisely, and effectively within the context of business and accounting; avoiding common grammar errors; writing in a professional tone; reviewing and editing in an effective manner; and drafting email, client letters, and memos in an effective and professional manner using proper format. Not open to students with credit in BUS 105. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 721. Advanced Accounting. 3 Hours.

A series of topics related mainly to financial accounting for corporations. Includes accounting for acquisitions and consolidations, asset impairments and derivative instruments. Also includes accounting for partnership equity. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program or permission of the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 722. Researching Financial Accounting Issues. 3 Hours.

This course develops students' technical research skills within the context of financial accounting as well as their proficiency with professional resources, including the FASB's Accounting Standards Codification. Research topics vary by semester in response to evolving practices. Students will also gain an understanding of regulatory and standard setting processes. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 724. Accounting Theory. 3 Hours.

This course examines the economic drivers, competing interests, and regulatory institutions that determine accounting policy choice and the societal role of accounting. By the end of the course, students will have developed a cognitive framework that will enable them to identify and understand the forces that shape financial reporting, firms' reporting decisions, the behavior of financial regulatory bodies, interactions among agents in the capital markets, the behavior of public accounting firms, as well as other relevant issues. The end-goal of this course is to develop in the participants a more advanced and sophisticated perspective of the economic, political, ethical, and social role of accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 410 or ACCT 411 and Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 726. Advanced Managerial Accounting - Information for Business Decisions. 3 Hours.

Through judicious use of quantitative methods including statistical decision theory, this course provides a conceptual analysis of several prominent managerial accounting topics. This course is intended to assist both public accountants and management accountants to understand management decision-making processes and information requirements thereof. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 728. Financial Analysis. 3 Hours.

The objective of this course is to provide a framework for students to use accounting and other financial information to evaluate businesses and make informed decisions. The framework will include strategic analysis, accounting analysis, financial analysis, forecasting and valuation. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 731. Tax Research. 3 Hours.

A course designed to develop one's ability to use the research tools available and provide comprehensive coverage of the many aspects of tax research. Emphasis is placed on locating authorities, solving tax problems, and communicating the results. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. ACCT 545 or permission of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 732. Taxation for Business Entities. 4 Hours.

A study of federal income taxation for corporations, subchapter S corporations, and partnerships. The tax problems associated with formation, operation, distributions, redemptions, reorganizations, and selected special topics will be analyzed. Prerequisite: ACCT 545 and admission to MAcc. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in ACCT 731. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 733. Tax Planning. 3 Hours.

A study of the fundamentals of Federal estate and gift taxation, the income taxation of estates and trusts, and various aspects of family tax planning. Prerequisite: ACCT 545 and admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 734. Multijurisdictional Tax. 3 Hours.

This course provides an exploration of the taxation of business entities by multiple taxing jurisdictions (interstate and international). The course will cover key state taxation issues including nexus, allocation, and apportionment issues. In addition, students will be provided with an overview of cross-border and international tax issues emphasizing "outbound" investments and activities of U.S. taxpayers. Prerequisite: ACCT 731 and ACCT 732 or permission from instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 740. Fraud Examination and Forensic Accounting - Application. 3 Hours.

This course applies generally accepted fraud examination and forensic accounting methods and processes to investigate financial statement frauds. Students will learn to assess evidence, create hypotheses and develop an argument based on the best persuasive evidence. The course will incorporate actual financial statement frauds, such as WorldCom, and other fraud schemes. The course will also cover topics such as document analysis, witness behavior and interviews, managing chain of custody evidence and obtaining targeted information from IT professionals. Additionally, since fraud examinations and forensic accounting investigations often end up in a court of law, students will learn about litigation projects, specifically, the basics of damages and expert witness testimony. Prerequisite: ACCT 543 or ACCT 544 or permission of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 741. Fraud Examination and Forensic Accounting - Theory. 3 Hours.

Explores various academic approaches to fraud to include factors learned from other disciplines such as sociology and psychology. Students will review the vast body of knowledge gained by practitioners throughout the world and will attempt to apply these factors to the prevention of financial statement and occupational (employee) fraud. Some of the topics covered include: skimming transactions, identity fraud, computer schemes, money laundering, bribery and kickbacks, and corporate espionage. Prerequisite: ACCT 543 or ACCT 544 or permission of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 742. Advanced Auditing. 3 Hours.

Current auditing philosophy, standards, techniques, and professional judgment are extensively investigated and related to auditing activities. Special emphasis is given to the design of audit programs in relation to the client's system of internal control and the effect of such factors as relative risk and materiality. Other topics include auditors' legal liability, professional ethics, the impact of electronic data processing and statistical techniques, and the preparation of auditors' reports and qualifications therein. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 743. Accounting Information System Risks and Controls. 3 Hours.

Students learn how to perform the risk assessments that auditors use to plan a top-down, risk-based assurance engagement. Using auditing standards and internal control frameworks as a guide, students learn how auditors (a) evaluate market conditions, industry practices, and client business activities to assess the risk of financial misstatement, (b) search potential misstatements by analyzing patterns of fluctuations in related financial statement accounts, and (c) assess the effectiveness of internal controls that protect technology-driven financial reporting processes from errors and irregularities. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 745. Specialized Accounting Practices. 3 Hours.

This course is an extension of the study of basic financial accounting practices to include specialized industries that have particular or varied forms of GAAP applications and reporting which are not normally covered in basic financial accounting courses. Topics include accounting for banking, retail, insurance, not-for-profit entities, oil and gas, and financial institutions. Typically, this course should be taken by students in the audit track of the MAcc Program. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 746. International Financial Reporting Standards I. 2 Hours.

International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) have become commonplace in nearly every country in the world. Even in the US, the SEC has sanctioned the use of IFRS for reporting purposes by a specific classification of exchange-listed corporations. In addition, the SEC has made a consistent attempt to converge US and international standards since the beginning of the 21st century. There is no question that US GAAP-trained accountants require a working knowledge of international financial reporting standards. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 747. International Financial Reporting Standards II. 1 Hour.

This course will follow an independent study model with students identifying IFRS topics they wish to study further. Having successfully mastered the basic IFRS materials offered in IFRS I, this course will allow students an opportunity to explore a specific IFRS topic of interest with an in-depth research paper. Topics must be approved in advance. Students will interact with the professor to determine appropriate research material and obtain guidance to their research, the paper and their conclusions. Students are encouraged to work at their own pace in order to obtain the best possible outcome from their research activity. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 749. Internal Auditing. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to improve and enhance your knowledge of internal auditing, information systems auditing, and written and oral communications skills. The course will discuss the role of the Internal Auditor and their relationship with Board of Directors & Audit Committee members; CEO's; Members of Senior Management; Division and/or Operations Managers; External Auditors; Stakeholders and the General Public. Students will develop intellectual curiosity, the ability to spot the unusual, and the tenacity to discover the cause. To have the willingness to scrutinize details, without losing sight of the big picture; understand financial deception in order to detect it and to develop deterrence measures; understand evidence-gathering and investigative procedures; accept that everything you do will be challenged; develop the confidence to handle the challenge and respond; begin the development of your "Professional Skepticism;" apply your computer skills; produce exceptional quality written reports; enhance your verbal presentation skills and refine your time management technique. Prerequisite: ACCT 543 or ACCT 544 or equivalent and Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 750. Corporate Taxation. 3 Hours.

This class will cover two key areas of corporation taxation. The first portion of the class will be focused on understanding basic corporation taxation principles including business income, deductions, and accounting methods. The second focus area of the course will be on the principles of ASC 740 -- Accounting for Income Taxes. This material will include the basic rules applicable to the accounting and auditing of income taxes. Students will understand the basic principles of corporate taxation and the various complexities associated with accounting for income taxes; be able to prepare a fairly complex tax provision using Microsoft Excel; and analyze and interpret the data that will be used to compile a tax provision. Students will understand the tax attributes of various entities; the tax principles of business income, deductions and accounting methods including being able to differentiate between permanent and temporary differences; understand the basic principles of accounting for income taxes including financial statement classification and footnote disclosures; be able to prepare a tax provision and interpret the data utilized in the preparation process; understand the basic principles of FIN 48 -- Uncertainty in Income Taxes; understand other taxation areas of required review or complexity within a corporation including state and local taxes and taxes related to foreign operations. Prerequisite: ACCT 330 or equivalent and Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 799. Internship in Accounting. 1-3 Hours.

Internships provide opportunities for students to combine their academic education with a meaningful experience in the business world. Accounting internships allow students to explore career pathways in accounting, further their professional growth, expand professional networks, and increase the relevancy of their academic coursework. The internship course combines job-related activities of the accounting internship position with a set of academic requirements. These requirements include academic assignments as well as a pre- and post-internship seminar held in the semester before and after the semester in which the internship occurs. Internships for credit must be approved by the Director of the Internship Program prior to the internship experience. Students may not receive more than three hours of internship credit. Enrollment restricted and by permission only. INT.

ACCT 810. Accounting. 2 Hours.

Financial accounting provides information to decision-makers external to the business, such as investors and lenders. The course describes the process through which economic information is captured, validated, and distributed externally in the form of financial statements. It also covers the contents of the major financial statements, focusing on how the various accounts are defined and measured and how the information can be used by external decision-makers. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

ACCT 895. Graduate Seminar in Accounting: _____. 0.5-5 Hours.

A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ACCT 898. Independent Study for Master's Students. 1-6 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of accounting to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH.

ACCT 925. Seminar in Contemporary Accounting Theory II. 3 Hours.

(S) Emphasis upon the economic and social factors affecting the development of accounting thought. Each student will make both oral and written presentations of his/her original investigation and analysis of contemporary controversial issues. Prerequisite: Consent of PhD advisor. LEC.

ACCT 927. Seminar in Management Accounting. 3 Hours.

(V) The objective of this course is to foster a student's conception and resolution of substantive issues in the management accounting area. Thus, the course will provide exposure to selected contemporary research topics. Representative topics that will be discussed are: concept of information, information economics, accounting information for planning and control, design of accounting information systems, variance analysis, and cost allocations. Prerequisite: Consent of PhD advisor. LEC.

ACCT 928. Introduction to Accounting Research. 3 Hours.

Students will gain a broad overview of the empirical/archival financial accounting and auditing literature. The readings for the course focus on the identification of research issues, background and context, hypotheses, data sources, and variables. Students will identify a research topic that interests them and will assess its viability as a project for possible future research. LEC.

ACCT 929. Seminar in Archival-Based Accounting Research. 3 Hours.

Students will gain an understanding of the history and future of significant streams of archival-based accounting research. Students will replicate seminal studies, learn to calculate important variables used in prior literature, and gain an understanding of the various methodologies used in archival-based research. LEC.

ACCT 930. Seminar in Auditing Research I. 3 Hours.

Students will gain in-depth knowledge of specific streams of the empirical/archival auditing literature. Topics may vary over time depending upon the interests of the students and instructor. Possible topics include (but are not limited to): the role of the auditor and audit committee in corporate governance, the auditing environment including regulation, audit quality, the pricing of audit and assurance services, litigation against auditors, and international auditing research. Students are expected to critically analyze and suggest ways to improve and extend the extant literature. The seminar will also include hands on analysis of data used in archival auditing research. LEC.

ACCT 931. Seminar in Auditing Research II. 2-3 Hours.

Students will be introduced to research issues involved in the audit process including modeling and assessing audit risk, independent risk, fraud risk, control risk, assurance risk, and judgement under uncertainty. Topics covered also include key research methods utilized in audit and assurance research, and important lines of research within the audit and assurance literature. Students also will study several important areas within the field of auditing and assurance such as fraud, independence, internal control, audit evidence, and analytical review. LEC.

ACCT 932. Seminar in Financial Accounting Research I. 3 Hours.

Students will gain in-depth knowledge of specific streams of financial accounting research. Topics may vary over tie depending upon the interests of the students and instructor. Possible topics include (but are not limited to): the role of financial reporting in corporate governance and debt contracting determinants and effects of financial reporting standards; the financial reporting environment including regulation; measuring financial reporting quality; the role of financial reporting and analysis in securities pricing; and the inter-relations among financial reporting of taxes and tax reporting to government authorities. LEC.

ACCT 933. Seminar in Financial Accounting Research II. 2-3 Hours.

Students will gain in-depth knowledge of specific streams of financial accounting research. Topics may vary over time depending upon the interests of the students and instructor. Possible topics include (but are not limited to): the role of financial reporting in corporate governance and debt contracting; determinants and effects of financial reporting standards; the financial reporting environment including regulation; measuring financial reporting quality; the role of financial reporting and analysis in securities pricing; and the inter-relations among financial reporting of taxes and tax reporting to government authorities. LEC.

ACCT 934. Seminar in Empirical Tax Research I. 3 Hours.

Students will gain in-depth knowledge and understanding how taxes affect decision-making, asset prices, equilibrium returns, and the financial and operational structure of firms. LEC.

ACCT 935. Seminar in Empirical Tax Research II. 2-3 Hours.

Students will gain in-depth knowledge of empirical tax research including research on book-tax tradeoffs and earnings management, information content of tax information and book-tax differences, impact of GAAP rules regarding accounting for income taxes, how tax accounts reveal tax planning and tax sheltering, debt and taxes, and taxes and asset prices. LEC.

ACCT 995. Doctoral Seminar in Accounting: _____. 2-5 Hours.

A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

ACCT 997. Directed Research in Accounting. 1-5 Hours.

Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH.

ACCT 998. Independent Study for Doctoral Students. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH.

ACCT 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

(V) Individual research work. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. THE.

Courses

BBA 200. Special Topics in Business Administration: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of business topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LBN.

BBA 301. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

This course uses economic theory and methodology to understand and improve managerial decision making. The focus is on the role of markets in determining business and individual opportunities to create value, the behavior of individual markets reacting to supply and demand forces, and the consequences of alternative market structures and business policies. Course content includes demand, production, cost analysis, supply and demand analysis, price and non-price modes of competition, market structure, and economic efficiency. Prerequisite: Completion of ECON 142 or ECON 143 and ECON 144. LEC.

BBA 302. Legal Aspects of Business. 3 Hours GE11.

A course designed to acquaint the student with the basic principles of law that are applicable to business transactions in the modern business world and the legal systems. LEC.

BBA 303. Organizational Behavior. 3 Hours.

This course serves as an introduction to the study of individual and group behavior within the context of an organization. An objective may be the development of the student's potential for becoming an effective organization member and manager of people. Experiential learning methods are utilized to involve the student actively. A wide variety of topics and theories may be covered, generally including motivation, leadership, job design, group dynamics, and formal organizational structure and process. Prerequisite: Completion of ECON 142 or ECON 143, ACCT 200, PSYC 104, or PSYC 105 and completion or co-enrollment in ACCT 201 and college algebra- or calculus-based statistics. LEC.

BBA 304. Marketing. 3 Hours.

A study of marketing from the point of view of the business firm. Topics include the structure of the marketing system, the nature of marketing management, consumer behavior, marketing research, product policy, channels of distribution policy, and analytical techniques useful to marketing management. Prerequisite: ECON 142 or ECON 143, ACCT 200 and PSYC 104 or PSYC 105. Completion or co-enrollment in college algebra- or calculus-based statistics. LEC.

BBA 305. Management Science and Operations Management. 3 Hours.

Introduces some of the most widely used models from management science in business decision making. Topics include decision making under uncertainty, resource allocation models, and production and operations management. Prerequisite: Completion or co-enrollment in IST 202, IST 205 or IST 301, and college algebra- or calculus-based statistics. LEC.

BBA 306. Finance. 3 Hours.

This course consists of the analysis of problems relating to estimating the financial needs of an enterprise and to evaluating the alternative means of providing and utilizing both temporary and permanent capital. The relationship of current financial decisions with financial policy is analyzed from the viewpoint of management and the stockholder. Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 200, and completion or co-enrollment in college algebra- or calculus-based statistics. LEC.

BBA 307. Introduction to International Business. 3 Hours AE42.

This course provides an overview of the key concepts, analytical frameworks and institutions that underlie international business. Particular attention is paid to the cultural and social diversity present in the world as well as the economic theories that explain the benefits of trade and underpin the agreements governing such international transactions. Prerequisite: Completion of ECON 144 or ECON 145. LEC.

BBA 308. Business Policy and Strategy. 3 Hours AE61.

This course exposes students to the role of general management in complex organizations. The cases, conceptual materials, and projects are selected to provide students with opportunities to analyze and formulate strategic decisions that allow businesses to create and sustain competitive advantages. Knowledge and skills gained in previous business courses, including marketing, finance, and quantitative methods, will be applied to problems associated with the totality of organizational strategic activity. Prerequisite: BBA 303, BBA 304, BBA 305, and BBA 306. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 400. Special Topics in Business Administation: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of accounting topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by the instructor. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 401. Marketing Management and Strategy. 3 Hours.

This course builds upon the principles of marketing introduced in BBA 304 (Marketing) by further developing concepts in such areas as product management, pricing, distribution, promotion, market segmentation, product positioning, and strategic marketing planning. The primary focus of the course is the integration of these concepts to achieve specific marketing and segment goals and objectives. An important component of the course is the application of concepts to realistic marketing problems through the use of comprehensive marketing simulations or in-depth cases that capture the dynamics of the marketing environment. Prerequisite: BBA 304. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 402. Human Resources Management. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the ways that firms manage employment relationships, including staffing, training and development, compensation, performance appraisal, labor-management relations, employment law, career management, and job design. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to identify and address these topics from a general management perspective. Prerequisite: BBA 303. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 403. Ethical Decision Making in Business. 3 Hours AE51.

This course is designed to provide students with: (a) a grounding in the psychological and philosophical foundations of business ethics; (b) the ability to recognize ethical problems; (c) an exposure to many of the ethically sensitive issues facing corporations and managers in business today (e.g., layoffs, outsourcing, employee whistle-blowing, employee privacy, employee health and safety, marketing and advertising, environmental issues, discrimination, and the global responsibilities of business); and (d) the tools for analyzing and reaching closure on ethical problems. Students will study the role of ethics in the relation of business to employees, consumers, and society. Students in this course will have the opportunity to engage in stimulating class discussions, justify ethical positions in case study analyses, investigate ethical issues in their own future professional lives, and develop and present their solutions for typical ethical problems faced by managers in organizations. Prerequisite: BBA 303. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 404. Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

In this course the student examines the disciplines which comprise the critical success factors in entrepreneurship and develops a fundamental understanding of the basic skill set required to manage his/her own business. Learning will be achieved by both study and discussion of key entrepreneurial business issues as well as the critical appraisal of new venture business plans as presented in the text. Readings in entrepreneurship and case studies, contained in the text as well as in video presentations, will be used to illustrate the essential entrepreneurial management issues. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 405. Introduction to Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to supply chain management. Students are presented the key concepts of supply chain management, the application of these concepts and are provided with the managerial knowledge of supply chain management through class discussions and case studies. Students discover the impact of information technologies, strategic alliances and logistics on supply chain management and the performance implication of supply chain management. Prerequisite: BBA 304, BBA 305, and BBA 306. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 406. Advanced Finance - Principle and Applications. 3 Hours.

This course covers the theory and professional practice in three areas of finance. (1) The processes investors follow in selecting where to place their savings are detailed. (2) The investment and financing issues faced by firms are investigated. (3) The financial intermediaries that facilitate the flow of funds between investors and firms are studied. Prerequisite: BBA 306. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 407. Information Systems Technology Elective: _____. 3 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of information systems technology topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 408. Accounting Elective: _____. 3 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of accounting topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by the instructor. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 410. Project Management. 3 Hours.

This course develops a systems view of business so students can more effectively integrate project management into their business strategy. A common language and knowledge of project management concepts, principles and practices is developed. Students develop an understanding of what project management involves, how it relates to other functional management areas, and its role in an organization's structure and leadership. Topics are covered in the order they appear in the project lifecycle starting with project selection and bidding and ending with project acceptance and close out. Topics covered in this course include: the importance and role of project management, the contextual nature of projects, logistics issues in project management, and the E-business impact on project management. Prerequisite: BBA 303. Enrollment restricted to student admitted to the BBA program. LEC.

BBA 500. Individual Research in Business. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in business not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. Enrollment restricted. RSH.

BBA 610. Intermediate Financial Accounting I. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) underlying the preparation and interpretation of general-purpose financial statements. The asset side of the balance sheet with be stressed although the complete financial statements will be used throughout the course. Topics include the principles of revenue recognition, matching revenues and related costs, and the determination of proper balance sheet valuations of assets and liabilities. Prerequisite: ACCT 201 or equivalent. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 620. Intermediate Financial Accounting II. 3 Hours.

This course is a continuation of the study of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) underlying the preparation and interpretation of general-purpose financial statements. The liability and equity sections of the balance sheet will be emphasized, including loans, bonds, leases, pensions, accounting for income taxes, equity transactions, employee stock options, earnings per share, and cash flows. The course will also cover the application of many of the authoritative accounting pronouncements. Prerequisite: BBA 610, ACCT 320, or ACCT 323. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 630. Foundations of Taxation. 3 Hours.

This course will cover major concepts related to taxation with emphasis on both the federal income tax for individuals, as well as the federal income tax for partnerships, corporations, S corporations, and limited liability companies. Corequisite: BBA 610. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

BBA 640. Principles of Auditing. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on auditing theory and procedures. The concepts of audit risk, evidence accumulation and materiality will be applied to financial statement audits and auditing objectives and procedures will be studied in relation to the auditor's opinion. The course will compare financial statement audits with other types of engagements performed by public accountants, as well as other types of audits, such as compliance and operational audits. Prerequisite: BBA 610, Corequisite: BBA 620. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Business Administration Major. LEC.

Courses

BE 301. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

This course uses economic theory and methodology to understand and improve managerial decision making. The focus is on the role of markets in determining business and individual opportunities to create value, the behavior of individual markets reacting to supply and demand forces, and the consequences of alternative market structures and business policies. Course content includes demand, production, cost analysis, supply and demand analysis, price and non-price modes of competition, market structure, and economic efficiency. Not open for credit to students in ECON 524. Prerequisite: ECON 142 and ECON 143, and ECON 144 or ECON 145. LEC.

BE 302. Managerial Economics, Honors. 3 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course includes uses of economic theory and methodology to understand and improve managerial decision making. The focus is on the role of markets in determining business and individual opportunities to create value, the behavior of individual markets reacting to supply and demand forces, and the consequences of alternative market structures and business policies. Course content includes demand, production, cost analysis, supply and demand analysis, price and non-price modes of competition, market structure, and economic efficiency. Not open for credit to students in ECON 524. Prerequisite: ECON 142 or ECON 143 and ECON 144 or ECON 145. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

BE 701. Business Economics. 2 Hours.

This course uses economic theory and methodology to understand and improve managerial decision making. The focus is on the role of markets in determining business and individual opportunities to create value, the behavior of individual markets reacting to supply and demand forces, and the consequences of alternative market structures and business policies. Course content includes demand, production, cost analysis, supply and demand analysis, price and non-price modes of competition, market structure, and economic efficiency. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BE 718. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

This course covers principles of microeconomic analysis and methodology used in managerial decision-making. The focus is on the role of markets in determining business and individual opportunities to create value, the behavior of individual markets reacting to supply and demand forces, and the consequences of alternative market structures for business strategy. Course content includes demand, cost and production analysis, supply and demand analysis, price and non-price competition, market structure, the basic elements of game theory, and the economics of information. LEC.

BE 810. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

This course covers principles of microeconomic analysis and methodology used in managerial decision-making. The focus is on the role of markets in determining business and individual opportunities to create value, the behavior of individual markets reacting to supply and demand forces, and the consequences of alternative market structures for business strategy. Course content includes demand, cost and production analysis, supply and demand analysis, price and non-price competition, market structure, the basic elements of game theory, and the economics of information. Cases and problems will be used throughout the course to help students develop the skill of applying economic analysis to the types of problems managers confront in the basic business disciplines of finance, marketing, management of people and organizations, supply chain management and strategy. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

BE 895. Graduate Seminar in Business Economics: _____. 0.5-5 Hours.

A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BE 898. Independent Study for Master's Students. 1-6 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of economics to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH.

BE 917. Advanced Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

(F) This course is designed primarily for doctoral candidates in business administration. It will provide a rigorous analytical approach to developing and understanding an integrated economic model of the business firm and its environment. The student will be expected to learn the theory and understand how it can be applied to solve problems in business. Upon completion of the course the student should also possess an understanding of how economic analysis relates to and can be used in his/her own field of research. Masters students may enroll with consent of instructor. LEC.

Courses

BLAW 300. Special Topics in Business Law: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of business law topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC.

BLAW 301. Legal Aspects of Business. 3 Hours GE11/GE3S.

A course designed to acquaint the student with the basic principles of law that are applicable to business transactions in the modern business world and the legal systems. LEC.

BLAW 302. Legal Aspects of Business, Honors. 3 Hours GE11/GE3S.

Honors treatment of this course involves acquainting students with the basic principles of law that are applicable to business transactions in the modern business world and the legal systems. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

BLAW 400. Special Topics in Business Law: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of business law topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BLAW 500. Individual Research in Business Law. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in business law not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: BLAW 301 or BLAW 302; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BLAW 505. Legal Aspects of the Management Process. 3 Hours.

A course designed to acquaint students with the basic principles of agency relationships, such as partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations, with special emphasis on the problems encountered by managers and directors in operating a corporation. The course should acquaint a student with how to create and operate a corporation in light of current federal and state enactments. Prerequisite: BLAW 301 or BLAW 302. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BLAW 510. Legal Aspects of Real Property Transactions. 3 Hours.

This course will address legal matters of concern to property owners, real estate agents and brokers, developers, renters, property managers, contractors, architects, planners, and lenders regarding real estate transactions. Concentrating on the general subjects of (1) the nature of real property, (2) transfer and financing of real estate, (3) land use and regulations, and (4) landlord and tenant relations, the course will address specific topics such as estates and interests in land, forms of ownership, agency and brokerage, and tax attributes of real estate investments, and will consider pertinent statutes and legal documents frequently used in real estate transactions. Prerequisite: BLAW 301 or BLAW 302. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BLAW 515. Commercial Law. 3 Hours.

An advanced course in legal aspects of business with emphasis on the Uniform Commercial Code. Prerequisite: BLAW 301 or BLAW 302. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BLAW 525. Negotiations and Dispute Settlement. 3 Hours.

This course involves the study of the theory and practice of dispute resolution and negotiation in business mediation (facilitated negotiation). Conflict resolution in the workplace, including grievance procedures, will be considered. Students are required to apply concepts studied through role playing simulations. (Same as MGMT 525.) Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311 and BE 301 or BE 302. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BLAW 701. Introduction to the Legal Environment of Business. 2 Hours.

A course focused on understanding legal rights and duties and ethical responsibilities in the business environment and identifying and addressing legal risks in business decision making. This is an introductory course which includes an overview of several foundational areas of law that are highly relevant to business. LEC.

BLAW 702. Legal Aspects of Business Transactions: Contracts and Torts. 2 Hours.

A course focused primarily on principles of contract and tort law. Contract law and tort law serve as the foundation for many other areas of law that are relevant in the business environment. Prerequisite: BLAW 301 or BLAW 302 or BLAW 701. LEC.

BLAW 703. Legal Aspects of Business Organizations. 3 Hours.

A course focused on the legal attributes of different forms of business organizations, such as partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. This course includes a study of the basic principles of agency law. It explores the rights and responsibilities of people and entities (such as partners, stockholders, directors, officers, contractors, employers, and employees) functioning in the organizational environment. Also considered are the interests of third parties, including the public, which brings into focus related topics, such as securities regulations, ethics, and corporate social responsibility. Not open to students with credit in BLAW 505. Prerequisite: BLAW 301 or BLAW 302 or BLAW 701. LEC.

BLAW 704. Commercial Law. 3 Hours.

An examination of the Uniform Commercial Code and related legal topics, such as bankruptcy and property law. Not open to students with credit in BLAW 515. Prerequisite: BLAW 301 or BLAW 302 or BLAW 701. LEC.

BLAW 748. Negotiation and Dispute Resolution. 3 Hours.

This course will include a study of the theory and practice of negotiation and dispute resolution in business contexts. It will focus on the use of alternatives to litigation, such as various forms of arbitration, mediation, and, especially, negotiation. In addition to emphasizing negotiation as a means of resolving disputes, attention will be directed at negotiation of transactions. Appreciation of concepts will be promoted through role play simulations. Not open to students with credit in BLAW 525 or MGMT 525. (Same as MGMT 748.) LEC.

BLAW 895. Graduate Seminar in Business Law: _____. 0.5-5 Hours.

A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BLAW 898. Independent Study for Master's Students. 1-6 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business law to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. Enrollment restricted. RSH.

Courses

BUS 101. Business Majors, Careers and Professional Skills. 3 Hours.

This course acquaints students with the nature of business majors and careers. With this knowledge, students can explore, engage and implement their academic and career interests within business. Students are introduced to the curricula requirements, expectations of business students, possible career paths, and the necessary professional skills in the business environment. Prerequisite: Open only to students with fewer than 60 hours. LEC.

BUS 110. The First Year Business Experience I. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to connect students to life at KU and to opportunities within the School of Business. Students will learn academic success, personal success in the transition to college, opportunities for leadership development, problem solving, decision making, and business professionalism. Students will also be provided opportunities to create lasting connections with School of Business staff, advisors, and faculty. Experiential learning activities outside of the classroom will be integrated into the course. This course is offered in the fall term only. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BUS 120. First Year Business Experience II. 1 Hour.

This course will enable students to begin to explore major options in the Business School and career paths in the business world. Topics such as available majors, business professionalism, resumes, cover letters, internships, and team dynamics will be covered. Students will also be provided opportunities to create lasting connections with School of Business staff, advisors, and faculty. Experiential learning activities outside the classroom will be integrated into the course. This course is offered in the spring term only. Prerequisite: Successful completion of BUS 110. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BUS 177. First Year Seminar in Business. 3 Hours GE11.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, organized around current issues in business. Does not contribute to major requirements in business. First year seminar topics are coordinated and approved through the Office of First Year Experiences. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

BUS 200. Business Leadership Seminar. 1 Hour.

This course provides students with structured opportunities to engage in active career and major exploration, support leadership development, build professional skills, and promote self-discovery. The class is held for one hour a week and additional out-of-class activities are required. May be taken more than once; total credit not to exceed four hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the Business Leadership Program. Enrollment is restricted. LEC.

BUS 201. Ethics, Entrepreneurship and Commerical Society. 3 Hours AE51.

This course is an introductory examination of the ethics of commercial activity and the ongoing debate over the moral character of commercial society. We begin with an elementary study of the major schools of ethical theory (deontology, consequentialism, contractarianism, and virtue ethics) and their application to the most basic of commercial activities: the reciprocal acts of buying and selling and the acts immediately preparatory to them, bargaining and negotiation. Then we will consider the two main narratives about the commercial republic emerging from the Enlightenment and the appearance of the commercial republic: the Lockean liberty narrative and the Rousseauist equality narrative. We will discuss the narratives' historical emergence, as well as their continuation in philosophical and public policy debates to the present day. Central to that discussion will be the role of the entrepreneur and of competition in the marketplace. LEC.

BUS 210. The Second Year Business Experience I. 1 Hour.

Students will choose focused learning events that meet their specific career goals and needs through exposure to detailed information about business careers, job search skills, business etiquette, professionalism and leadership. Students will create relationships with business and recruiting professionals while continuing connections with School of Business staff, faculty, and advisors. This course is offered in the fall term only. Prerequisite: Successful completion of BUS 120. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BUS 300. Special Topics in Business: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of business topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC.

BUS 303. Career Planning and Job-Search Strategies. 1 Hour.

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of organizing a personal employment search strategy. Emphasis will be placed on the assessment of individual goals and talents, job markets, evaluation, and employment search strategies. It is highly recommended that students take this course during their junior year. Course is graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Course counts as an activity course. Prerequisite: Junior standing (60 hours completed). LEC.

BUS 305. Business Writing. 3 Hours GE21.

This course explores the theory and practice of written communication in business. Students learn strategies for writing clearly, effectively, and in a professional tone and format within different business contexts that require both expositive and persuasive writing styles. This course focuses entirely on the writing process, including developing ideas, organizing, drafting, revising, and editing. Classes provide students multiple opportunities to write drafts, receive feedback, and revise their work. This is done in the context of analyzing, discussing, and critiquing different forms of business writing. Not open to students who have taken BUS 105. Prerequisite: Goal 2, Outcome 1. LEC.

BUS 330. Directed Study in Business Topics. 1-3 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in business administration not otherwise available to non-business majors. Topics selected will be determined by special interest and objectives of the student in consultation with the faculty member who will supervise the directed study or research. Prerequisite: 3.0 grade-point average, major in a field other than business administration and/or accounting, and permission of instructor offering the directed study and of the director of the undergraduate program. IND.

BUS 399. Internship in Business. 1 Hour.

Internships provide opportunities for students to integrate their academic education with a meaningful experience in the business world. Internships allow students to further their professional growth, explore career pathways, expand professional networks, and increase the relevancy of their academic course work. The internship course combines job-related activities of the internship position with a set of academic requirements. These requirements include academic assignments as well as a pre-and post-internship seminar held in the semester before and after the semester in which the internship occurs. Internships for credit must be approved by the coordinator of the internships prior to the internship experience. BUS 399 is limited to one (1) credit hour per offering, but students may count a maximum of two (2) cumulative credit hours of BUS 399 toward degree requirements. Internships must satisfy specific criteria in order to qualify for academic credit. Contact the Business Career Services Center in 125 Summerfield for information regarding the process of having an internship evaluated for academic credit. Prerequisite: Approval of the internship; two of the following: FIN 310 or FIN 311, MGMT 310 or MGMT 311, MKTG 310 or MKTG 311, SCM 310 or SCM 311. Enrollment restricted. INT.

BUS 400. Special Topics in Business: _____. 1-5 Hours.

A special variable-topic seminar open to seniors and graduate students meeting the requirements established by the faculty members offering the particular seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of management-related topics not adequately covered in any regular course available to students of the School of Business. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

BUS 500. Individual Research in Business. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in business not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311, MGMT 310 or MGMT 311, MKTG 310 or MKTG 311 and SCM 310 or SCM 311; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. IND.

BUS 801. Professional Development Skills. 0.5 Hours.

A series of workshops for graduate business students which provide foundation and supplemental skill development in such areas as leadership training, career development, communications, negotiations, ethical behavior, technology, business writing, and market-based thinking. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

BUS 810. Application and Integration Course. 1 Hour.

The course provides an active learning opportunity to complement classroom learning. Many different enrichment activities can be used to provide an opportunity to apply classroom knowledge to specific situations. Some examples of possible enrichment activities include, but are not limited to case competitions, community consulting activities, communication skills workshops, leadership and team building exercises, intensive simulation. The principal objectives of the course are to enhance "doing" skills and help students turn classroom knowledge into action, to emphasize collaboration and team initiatives, to develop collaborative and cooperative behaviors, and to develop an understanding of how "failure" can ultimately be the best learning tool. Topics will vary depending on the enrichment activity. This course may be repeated for credit. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

BUS 825. Internship Program. 1 Hour.

The Internship Program provides a continuous learning opportunity between the first and second year of MBA studies which compliments the comprehensive, research based in class learning with a full immersion clinical experience. The principal objectives of the course are to acquire a meaningful work related education, witnessing how the classroom instruction translates to practical applications and to develop interpersonal and executional skills. This course provides clinical applications of business problem solving and consulting. The course links the models and theories studied in the classroom with field applications to solve real business problems requiring real time analysis, consideration of practical alternative strategies, determination of sales and profit implications of the recommended course of action. A principal objective is for the student to acquire first-hand industry knowledge and witness varying client management styles. Topics include consulting processes and successful consultant characteristics, hypothesis generation, problem identification and differentiation of root cause vs. symptom, application of market research methods, solution modeling, and presentation of solution. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. INT.

BUS 895. Regionalism - From Concepts to Working Models. 2 Hours.

This seminar course introduces students to the concept of regionalism and progresses through the development of working models for regional approaches to business/economic development and governance. Topics include understanding the complexities related to doing business and governing in the Kansas City region, models of effective leadership necessary to manage and govern in the region, the economic impact of border wars, economic incentive policies that promote small business growth and entrepreneurs, and moving regionalism from concepts to working models. LEC.

BUS 901. Research Issues in Business Administration. 2 Hours.

(FS) A core course for Ph.D. students (with the exception of Finance and Management) majoring in business administration. Provides a workshop format for discussion of the currently prevalent research methodologies and problems being addressed in the areas of accounting, finance, human resources management, information systems, marketing, decision sciences, organizational behavior, and strategic management. All Ph.D. students and faculty are encouraged to attend workshops of interest. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. program. LEC.

BUS 902. Teaching Seminar. 1 Hour.

(F) The objective of this course is to improve the teaching effectiveness of the participants. Highly effective teachers demonstrate their teaching techniques and discuss the reasons underlying their actions. School of Business Ph.D. students are required to take this seminar during the first semester in which they are the instructor of record for a course. LEC.

BUS 903. Responsible Conduct of Research. 2 Hours.

The major objectives of this doctoral level course on the responsible conduct of research are to build students' abilities to analyze ethical issues, and to expose students in advance to various issues that may arise while engaging in the research endeavor. Issues will be covered that arise in such areas as research design, data collection and management, the use of human subjects, data analysis, authorship, publication, peer review, and other aspects of professional practice. LEC.

Courses

DSCI 202. Statistics. 3 Hours.

An introduction to statistical inference techniques with emphasis on the application of these techniques to decision making in a firm. Topics include probability theory, random variables, probability distribution functions, estimation, test of hypothesis, regression, correlation, and introduction to statistical process control. Not open to students with credit in DSCI 301. Prerequisite: MATH 115, MATH 121, MATH 125, MATH 141 or MATH 145. LEC.

DSCI 300. Special Topics in Decision Science: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of decision science topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC.

DSCI 302. Quantitative Methods and Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course will cover quantitative methods and techniques of data analysis that are useful in solving common problems that arise in all the functional areas of business. Upon completion of this course, given a business problem, students will be expected to know how to formulate a mathematical model which is appropriate to the problem, to fit the model to available data, and to interpret the model results to derive actionable insights. Examples of quantitative methods and data analysis that may be taught include: multiple regression, analysis of variance, statistical process control, linear programming, non-linear optimization and decision making under uncertainty. Prerequisite: MATH 115 and DSCI 202 (formally DSCI 301.) LEC.

DSCI 400. Special Topics in Decision Sciences: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of decision science topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 405. Advanced Production and Operations Management. 4 Hours.

A further study of problems encountered in production from a managerial perspective employing the methodology of management science. Topics included in the course are location of facilities, design of product lines, replacement of facilities, quality control, production planning, production and inventory control, and scheduling. This course is in the Management Science and Operations Management area. Prerequisite: SCM 310 or SCM 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 410. Advanced Management Science. 3 Hours.

Decision making under uncertainty and resource allocation models were introduced in DSCI 310. These topics will be covered in greater depth in this course. Applications of these models to complex problems in business will be emphasized. Cases illustrating the use of these models will also be covered. This course is in the Management Science and Operations Management area. Prerequisite: SCM 310 or SCM 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 500. Individual Research in Decision Sciences. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in decision sciences not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311, MGMT 310 or MGMT 311, MKTG 310 or MKTG 311 and SCM 310 or SCM 311; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 701. Statistical Decision Making. 2 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to data gathering and analysis with an emphasis on problem solving for decision making and process improvement in a business setting. The role of numerical data in the understanding of business problems and in the evaluation of planned improvements is studied, along with the study of variation commonly occurring in business processes and methods of reducing this variation. Statistical software is used to supplement data analysis and aid in the problem solving. Topics covered may include statistical methods such as exploratory data analysis, graphical analysis, Pareto analysis, stratification analysis, confidence intervals, correlation, linear regression, and control charts. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 706. Statistics. 3 Hours.

This course covers basic statistical tools for understanding data in organizations. The principal objectives of the course are to learn data analysis techniques and to learn how to apply statistical tools to help understand common problems in organizations. Course content includes data gathering and problem analysis tools, probability distributions and features of distributions (means, standard deviations, Normal distribution, and Binomial distribution), stratification analysis, Pareto analysis, correlation, confidence intervals, simple hypothesis testing, linear regression, and analysis of variance. LEC.

DSCI 710. Business Forecasting Methods and Applications. 3-4 Hours.

A survey of forecasting methods and application. Essential concepts underlying these methods are discussed, including cost and performance characteristics. Criteria for selection of appropriate methods are developed. Issues concerning effective utilization for forecasting in several corporate planning situations are considered. Prerequisite: IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 712. Advanced Statistics I. 2 Hours.

This class covers the process of building statistical models from observed data: including identifying an appropriate model, checking the fit of the model to observed data, and using the model to make inferences. An emphasis is upon development of models that can help answer questions of interest. The class covers multiple regression, variable selection in multiple regression, analysis of variance and logistic regression. Prerequisite: DSCI 701 or an introductory statistics class. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 713. Advanced Statistics II. 2 Hours.

This is a continuation of Advanced Statistics I. The topics covered in this class include time series models, sampling, classification, and clustering models. There will be an emphasis on development of statistical models that can be used to help solve business problems. Prerequisite: DSCI 712. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 714. Data Visualization. 2 Hours.

The ability to accurately and effectively analyze and communicate business data is paramount in today's world of business analytics and big data. Increasingly, professionals are being ask use business data as a crucial component of everyday business decisions--competitive advantage is gained in companies that can analyze and visualize data successfully to help them make business decisions. This course will focus on data visualization through applied, hands-on projects that will help students produce, analyze, and communicate data in a variety of business sectors. A principle focus of the course will be the use of data analysis programs and associated visualization techniques. LEC.

DSCI 715. Managing for Quality Improvement. 3 Hours.

This course will take a closer look at various aspects of the total quality theory and its practices. Particular attention will be paid to the foundations of total quality theory including Deming's 14 principles of management and key tenants of Juran and Crosby. Additional topics include an examination of the continual improvement process in theory and action, strategies for getting started, and issues to address during a transformation into a total quality model of operation. Prerequisite: DSCI 702. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 716. Business Analytics Models. 2 Hours.

This course will cover construction and solution of analytic models for problems in the business domain using spreadsheet software. Examples of analytic models are linear, nonlinear, and integer programming models. Examples of business problems are advertising, workforce scheduling, aggregate planning, blending, production process, financial, transportation, assignment, network flows, and shortest path determination. LEC.

DSCI 717. Business Analytics Projects. 2 Hours.

Business analytic projects are assigned to teams in this class and the teams are charged with identifying the project problem, obtaining data relevant to the problem, developing a model that represents the problem, and using the model and the data to make inferences relevant to the project. The data analysis tools that have been covered in previous classes will be used to help perform these projects. Prerequisite: DSCI 712, DSCI 713, DSCI 716, IST 713, and DSCI 714. LEC.

DSCI 718. Operations and Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

This course covers a wide set of topics to develop both strategic and analytical skills in supply chain management. The course will provide a conceptual framework and a set of analytical tools to analyze, coordinate, and improve organizational processes. Objectives of the course include and introduction to the strategic and operating issues and decisions involved in managing the operational and supply chain processes within and across firms; an understanding of the concept of supply chain coordination by managing information and inventory; and to develop a basic understanding of purchasing, supplier relationship management, and outsourcing. Topics include process and cycle time analysis, lean/JIT production system, six sigma, inventory management, managing information flows in supply chains, and purchasing and supply management. Prerequisite: DSCI 706. LEC.

DSCI 720. Operations Management. 2 Hours.

This course is a survey of the strategic concepts and techniques used in managing the operations function in both the manufacturing and the service sectors. The course has the following principal objectives: to identify different kinds of operations problems and understand their impact on business and to apply basic operations analysis techniques to provide business solutions and to find improvement strategies. Topics covered include process and cycle time analysis, capacity planning, service operation and waiting line management, sales and operations planning, inventory management, and constraint management. Prerequisite: DSCI 701 or DSCI 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 730. Managing Customer Focused Enterprises. 2 Hours.

An introduction to management principles supporting the concept that a primary goal of a business is to meet the needs of its customers. To accomplish this goal, organizations must design, build, and deliver products and services that meet customer needs in a resource effective manner. Topics covered include the role of the customer, the nature of process improvement in meeting customer needs in a cost effective manner, the view of the organization as a system, the reduction of variation in all organizational processes, the nature of continual organizational learning, and the responsibilities of management in this approach. LEC.

DSCI 740. Seminar in Decision Sciences: _____. 3 Hours.

This course will cover theories of decision making under uncertainty and competition. Examples of topics that may be covered are Bayesian decision theory, game theory, habitual domain theory for forming winning strategies and effective decision making. Automated aids for decision making such as expert systems may also be covered. Prerequisite: DSCI 701 and DSCI 702, or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 744. Statistical Process Control and Improvement. 2-3 Hours.

This course deals with process improvement through the reduction and control of variation in business organizations. The result of reduced variation is an improvement of integral organizational functions, a reduction of costs, and a minimization of defects in the market place. Data driven improvement is emphasized. Topics covered include advanced discussion of using control charts for process improvement, and the use of designed experiments in process improvement. Particular emphasis will be given to methods used to analyze a given process, to the use of statistical tools to stabilize an entire process, to understand the natural variability in process output and to reducing process variation. Prerequisite: DSCI 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 746. Contemporary Issues in Operations Management. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the major manufacturing and the operating strategies used by firms today. A partial list of these strategies include quality improvement, theory of constraints, just-in-time, and manufacturing planning and control systems. Pros and cons of each strategy will be discussed. Implementation issues will also be discussed. Prerequisite: DSCI 702. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 795. Special Topics Decision Science: _____. 2-5 Hours.

A variable-topic course open to graduate and selected undergraduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Determined by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 810. Statistics and Decision Tools. 3 Hours.

This course covers basic statistical tools for solving problems in organizations. The principal objectives of the course are to learn a strategy to solve organizational problems, to learn some data gathering and data analysis techniques, to learn how to interpret data and understand variation in data, and to learn how to reduce variation in organizational processes and output. Course content includes data gathering and problem analysis tools, probability distributions and features of distributions (means, standard deviations, Normal distribution, and Binomial distribution), stratification analysis, Pareto analysis, correlation, confidence intervals, simple hypothesis testing, linear regression, and analysis of variance. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

DSCI 895. Graduate Seminar in Decision Sciences: _____. 0.5-5 Hours.

A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

DSCI 898. Independent Study for Master's Students. 1-6 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of decision science to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH.

DSCI 920. Probability for Business Research. 4 Hours.

(F) This course covers the basic theory of probability and its use for research in the business disciplines. The course is designed primarily for Ph.D. students in the business school. Prerequisite: Doctoral standing and two semesters of calculus, or consent of instructor. LEC.

DSCI 921. Statistics for Business Research. 4 Hours.

(S) This course covers the basic theory of statistics and its use for research in the business disciplines. The course is designed primarily for Ph.D. students in the School of Business. Prerequisite: DSCI 920. LEC.

DSCI 922. Advanced Regression. 3 Hours.

This course presents various statistical tools for undertaking quantitative research in business. The regression model under the full ideal conditions is discussed, along with methodological issues that arise when these ideal conditions are violated, as often occurs in business research. A high degree of theoretical rigor is maintained, along with an emphasis on practical applications through the use of assignments that require data analysis. Prerequisite: DSCI 921 or consent of instructor. LEC.

DSCI 934. Seminar in Probability and Statistics:_____. 3 Hours.

(V) This course will cover advanced topics in probability and statistics with application to various business disciplines. Topics covered may vary and will depend on the instructor. Examples of topics that may be covered are time series models, stochastic processes, uncertainty in artificial intelligence, multivariate statistics, etc. Prerequisite: DSCI 920 and DSCI 921, or consent of instructor. LEC.

DSCI 935. Seminar in Optimization: _____. 3 Hours.

(V) This course will cover basic and advanced topics in optimization theory and applications. Examples of topics that may be covered are linear programming, nonlinear programming, dynamic programming, multiple-criteria decision making, habitual domain theory for forming winning strategies and effective decision making and game theory. Prerequisite: Linear algebra and real analysis or consent of instructor. LEC.

DSCI 936. Management Science Research Seminar. 1 Hour.

The seminar will discuss current research in management science topics such as artificial intelligence, statistics, optimization, decision making, decision support systems, and production/operations management. Topics covered will reflect the research interests of the instructor and participants. Participants are required to lead the discussion for at least one paper of their choice. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC.

DSCI 995. Doctoral Seminar in Decision Sciences: _____. 2-5 Hours.

A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

DSCI 997. Directed Research in Decision Science. 1-5 Hours.

Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH.

DSCI 998. Independent Study for Doctoral Students. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH.

DSCI 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

(V) Individual research work. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. THE.

Courses

ENTR 177. The Entrepreneurial Mindset. 3 Hours GE11.

Entrepreneurs are passionate, creative, idea people. They ask the tough why not questions, they seek and seize opportunities, they rarely accept the status quo, and throughout history entrepreneurs have developed innovative answers to the most challenging issues in technology, business and society. This course will allow students to become rigorous, versatile and agile thinkers by flexing their own critical thinking muscles through an examination of the entrepreneurial mindset. What made entrepreneurs like Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Mary Kay, Mark Zuckerberg, and Oprah so wildly successful? Are there common characteristics that you may want to adopt to increase the likelihood of your own success? We'll look at them, and look at ourselves to see if and how to apply their innovative techniques to our own pursuits. Maybe starting the next Apple Computer company is in your future. LEC.

ENTR 300. Special Topics in Entrepreneurship: _____. 1-5 Hours.

LEC.

ENTR 301. Starting Your Own Business. 2-3 Hours AE61.

In this course the student examines the disciplines which comprise the critical success factors in entrepreneurship and develops a fundamental understanding of the basic skill set required to manage his/her own business. The course will emphasize the Entrepreneurial Process in which each of the following disciplines will be introduced so that the student understands meaning, interrelationship and the application of the subject matter. First the student will be introduced to entrepreneurship and the personal attributes which historically have produced successful entrepreneurs. Further, the student will learn how to evaluate business opportunities via Feasibility Analysis which encompasses industry and competitor analysis, developing an effective business model, building a new venture team, developing an effective marketing plan, assessing the new ventures financial strengths and preparing the proper ethical and legal foundation for the new business. Finally, on completion of the course the student will possess a beginning comprehension for getting financing for the new venture and preparing for the challenges of business growth. Prerequisite: Goal 1, Outcome 2 and Goal 2, Outcome 1. LEC.

ENTR 302. Financing Your Own Business. 2-3 Hours.

This course introduces the non-business student to the language of business, accounting, and its applications in the financial management of new and small business environments. Students will learn how to account for the various activities of the start-up and early stage new venture as well as the importance, utility and construction of financial statements. Further, students will acquire the ability to construct financial projections for a start-up firm and monitor the financial performance of the growing business with a focus on cash flow management. Finally, students will be introduced to various remedies in the event that performance does not meet expectations. Prerequisite: Goal 1, Outcome 2 and Goal 2, Outcome 1. LEC.

ENTR 303. Marketing Your Own Business. 2-3 Hours.

This course focuses on the marketing development of new business ideas for small businesses including creating an environment conducive to innovation, recognizing business opportunities, assessing the industry and its potential customer segments, barriers to entry and competitive set. In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the primary marketing tools available to the entrepreneur to drive customer awareness, initial and repeat purchase and the ability to fully integrate each of those tools into a cohesive, integrated marketing plan, all on an extremely limited budget as typifies start up businesses. Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand how to plan an entrepreneurial marketing program, implement it and evaluate its performance. This includes market analysis, segmentation, the marketing mix of product, price, promotion and distribution and marketing strategy, both long term and annually. Prerequisite: ENTR 301 and ENTR 302. LEC.

ENTR 304. Launching Your Own Business. 3 Hours.

This course provides the student with an opportunity to prepare a complete go-to-market business plan for a new venture which leverages the students' major area of study so that following graduation the student has the option of pursuing self employment in the launch of their own business. The students' expertise from their area of major study will be combined with the entrepreneurial skills acquired from the prior three courses in this Certificate sequence. Ideally, this course will originate from the students' school of origin, either selected from a roster of existing qualifying courses or independent study with a faculty member in the students' field of major study. In the event that the students' school of major study cannot provide the teaching resources for independent study, it will be provided by the School of Business, Center for Entrepreneurship. If the faculty at the students' school of origin wants to develop a specific course which completes the Certificate requirements, course preparation funding has been arranged via a grant from the Kauffman Foundation. Prerequisite: ENTR 303. LEC.

ENTR 400. Special Topics in Entrepreneurship: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of entrepreneurship topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ENTR 410. Introduction to Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

In this course the student examines the disciplines which comprise the critical success factors in entrepreneurship and develops a fundamental understanding of the basic skill set required to manage his/her own business. Learning will be achieved by both study and discussion of key entrepreneurial business issues as well as the critical appraisal of new venture business plans as presented in the text. Readings in entrepreneurship and case studies, contained in the text as well as in video presentations, will be used to illustrate the essential entrepreneurial management issues. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ENTR 430. Corporate Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

This course explores challenges to entrepreneurship and innovation in large established organizations and how entrepreneurial principles can be applied to drive competitive advantage. Applications include exploration and development of new products, business processes, markets, customers, and organizational structures. The course emphasizes experiential learning through the study of large companies that have successfully implemented entrepreneurial practices. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ENTR 450. Advanced Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

This course builds upon the foundation created by the Introduction to Entrepreneurship course. It will provide the student with two learning opportunities: first, it details the critical success factors of starting a new venture, growing it and finally harvesting it profitably; secondly, this course will provide hands-on instruction regarding the development of a complete and compelling business plan. Students will work as teams on the development of a business plan for the purposes of commercializing an innovative business concept or KU lab-sourced technology. These student teams will also present and defend their business plans at various venues including intercollegiate competitions for the purposes of improving their team interaction skills, their presentation capabilities. Prerequisite: ENTR 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ENTR 470. Entrepreneurial Marketing. 3 Hours.

The course focuses on the development of new business ideas for new or established organizations, creating an environment conducive to innovation, recognizing business opportunities, assessing the industry, potential customers, market segment, barriers to entry and competitor set. The development of each of these subjects will lead to a feasibility analysis which each student will prepare for his/her chosen new venture. This course will also examine the development of the optimal sales and distribution. Additionally, the course will provide an understanding of how to translate the product/service idea to the business concept and marketing positioning. Lastly, students will acquire an understanding of the primary marketing tools available to the entrepreneur to drive customer awareness, initial and repeat purchase and the ability to fully integrate each of those tools into a cohesive, integrated marketing communications program. Prerequisite: ENTR 410 and MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ENTR 480. Management of Small Business. 3 Hours.

This course looks at the unique aspects of owning and managing a small business, family business or franchise, with the owners having close control over operations and management decisions. Students will examine the startup options of buying, starting, or franchising; operations and human resources management; the unique factors of the family business; marketing, including setting prices, choosing a location, developing competitive advantage, positioning, and promotion with limited resources; financial statements, accounting systems, financing, cash flow and the working-capital cycle; and exit through selling, bequeathing, or dissolving the business. Prerequisite: ENTR 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

ENTR 490. Social Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

This course emphasizes the idea that every new venture should seek not only a return to its stakeholders, but also a return to society. Students will be exposed to a variety of entrepreneurial ventures that demonstrate the establishment of both economic sustainability and social benefit as a part of new venture success, whether it be in a for profit or nonprofit venture. A variety of stimuli will be employed to generate discussion and allow for experiential learning including: an online new venture simulation game, analysis of social entrepreneurship oriented business cases, and development of a new venture social impact project. Prerequisite: ENTR 410, ENTR 301 or instructor approval. LEC.

ENTR 500. Individual Research in Entrepreneurship: _____. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in entrepreneurship not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Enrollment restricted. RSH.

ENTR 701. Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

Entrepreneurs are uniquely critical thinkers, they have distinguished themselves by not accepting the status quo, asking the why not questions, developing innovative answers to many challenging issues in science, technology, social issues and commerce. This course will allow students to become rigorous, versatile and agile thinkers by flexing their own critical thinking muscles through an examination of the entrepreneurial mindset and learn how to apply that capability to starting a new business, either their own business or a new business opportunity for a larger organization. This will be accomplished by learning the entrepreneurial process including a lean startup approach, validating the opportunity and the business model via direct customer feedback, projecting the market value of the opportunity with sales, profits forecasting and preparing a commercialization plan that provides a comprehensive opportunity development roadmap. Prior business knowledge is not required; however an open mind that embraces innovative problem solving is essential. Not open to KU School of Business students. LEC.

ENTR 702. Financing Your Own Business. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the non-business student to the language of business, accounting, and its applications in the financial management of new and small business environments. Students will learn how to account for the various activities of the start-up and early stage new venture as well as the importance, utility and construction of financial statements. Further, students will acquire the ability to construct financial projections for a start-up firm and monitor the financial performance of the growing business with a focus on cash flow management. Finally, students will be introduced to various remedies in the event that performance does not meet expectations. Not open to students in the School of Business. LEC.

ENTR 703. Marketing Your Own Business. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the marketing development of new business ideas for small businesses including creating an environment conducive to innovation, recognizing business opportunities, assessing the industry and its potential customer segments, barriers to entry and competitive set. In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the primary marketing tools available to the entrepreneur to drive customer awareness, initial and repeat purchase and the ability to fully integrate each of those tools into a cohesive, integrated marketing plan, all on an extremely limited budget as typifies start up businesses. Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand how to plan an entrepreneurial marketing program, implement it and evaluate its performance. This includes market analysis, segmentation, the marketing mix of product, price, promotion and distribution and marketing strategy, both long term and annually. Not open to students in the School of Business. LEC.

ENTR 704. Launching Your Own Business. 3 Hours.

This course provides the student with an opportunity to prepare a complete go-to-market business plan for a new venture which leverages the students' major area of study so that following graduation the student has the option of pursuing self employment in the launch of their own business. The students' expertise from their area of major study will be combined with the entrepreneurial skills acquired from the prior three courses in this Certificate sequence. Ideally, this course will originate from the students' school of origin, either selected from a roster of existing qualifying courses or independent study with a faculty member in the students' field of major study. In the event that the students' school of major study cannot provide the teaching resources for independent study, it will be provided by the School of Business, Center for Entrepreneurship. If the faculty at the students' school of origin wants to develop a specific course which completes the Certificate requirements, course preparation funding has been arranged via a grant from the Kauffman Foundation. Not open to students in the School of Business. Prerequisite: ENTR 703. LEC.

ENTR 830. Advanced Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

This course in entrepreneurship shows the student how to start, grow and harvest a business. Students learn how diverse business disciplines integrate to form an optimal go-to-market plan for a given new business opportunity which maximizes likelihood of success and investor return. They learn how to commercialize a technological or social business opportunity and apply the models and theories acquired from other classes to clinical practice. Topics include identifying new venture opportunities, writing the business plan, validating the market opportunity, developing the business model and go-to-market strategy, preparing financial projections and new venture valuations, raising equity capital, understanding deal structures and terms, negotiating the term sheet, raising debt capital, and presenting the business plan to investors. This course is open to those with admission to a graduate business program. LEC.

ENTR 850. Advanced Entrepreneurship. 4 Hours.

This course will focus on identifying and evaluating the business opportunity, the strategies to be developed and implemented as well as entrepreneurial capabilities required for marketplace success. Development of a robust and compelling business concept will be emphasized. Analyses of the industry, competition, the new business points of strategic leverage, creation of an effective business model and funding strategies will be studied. Financing the new venture, sourcing and structuring the required deal capital will be explored and attention to managing rapid growth and exit strategies will be provided. LEC.

ENTR 895. Graduate Seminar Entrpreneurship: _____. 0.5-5 Hours.

A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

ENTR 898. Independent Study for Master's Students. 1-6 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of entrepreneurship to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH.

Courses

FIN 101. Personal Finance. 3 Hours GE11/GE12.

This course will provide the tools to help you better understand and improve the financial decisions you'll make throughout your life. You will learn how to analyze the financial effects of spending and investing decisions and how to use credit well, including credit cards. You will develop an understanding of the basics of mortgages, purchase (rent) versus lease (buy) decisions, savings, investments, and insurance. You will acquire an appreciation of the time value of money that provides a foundation for reasonable financial planning. Given the basic tools and terminology you'll learn, the course will help you develop solutions to various practical financial problems that you will face. Not open to students who have taken FIN 301. This course is open to all university students. LEC.

FIN 300. Special Topics in Finance: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of finance topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC.

FIN 301. Personal Finance. 3 Hours GE11/GE12.

This course will provide the tools to help you better understand and improve the financial decisions you'll make throughout your life. You will learn how to analyze the financial effects of spending and investing decisions and how to use credit well, including credit cards. You will develop an understanding of the basics of mortgages, purchase (rent) versus lease (buy) decisions, savings, investments, and insurance. You will acquire an appreciation of the time value of money that provides a foundation for reasonable financial planning. Given the basic tools and terminology you'll learn, the course will help you develop solutions to various practical financial problems that you will face. Not open to students who have taken FIN 101. This course is open to all university students. LEC.

FIN 302. Finance Scholars I: Introduction to Financial Institutions. 1 Hour.

This course acquaints students with the financial institutions. Topics include a review of major international, national, regional money center institutions, investment management and other related institutions. The management and key revenue generators for these institutions will also be discussed. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 303. Finance Scholars II: Financial Careers and Institutions. 1 Hour.

This course acquaints students with the careers in financial institutions. Topics include: careers in major international, national, and regional money center institutions; ethical issues related to financial careers; a comparison of recruiting practices in investment banks, investment management, and corporate finance positions. Placement and recruiting practices in those institutions would be reviewed. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 305. Survey of Finance. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to help the student develop a basic understanding of Finance. Topics covered include (1) financial instruments and the markets in which they are traded, (2) financial planning and analysis, (3) the cost and time-value of money, and (4) the fundamentals of investor decision-making. (Not open to students with credit in FIN 310.) Prerequisite: Goal 1, Outcome 2 and Goal 2, Outcome 1 and ACCT 200 or ACCT 205. LEC.

FIN 310. Finance. 3 Hours.

This course consists of the analysis of problems relating to estimating the financial needs of an enterprise and to evaluating the alternative means of providing and utilizing both temporary and permanent capital. The relationship of current financial decisions with financial policy is analyzed from the viewpoint of management and the stockholder. Prerequisite: Prior completion of ACCT 200; ECON 142 and prior completion or co-enrollment in DSCI 202 or DSCI 301. LEC.

FIN 311. Finance, Honors. 3 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course consists of the analysis of problems relating to estimating the financial needs of an enterprise and to evaluating the alternative means of providing and utilizing both temporary and permanent capital. The relationship of current financial decisions with financial policy is analyzed from the viewpoint of management and the stockholder. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Prior completion of ACCT 200; ECON 142 and prior completion or co-enrollment in DSCI 202 or DSCI 301. LEC.

FIN 400. Special Topics in Finance: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of finance topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 410. Investment Theory and Applications. 3 Hours.

This course emphasizes the theoretical and practical aspects of investments. Financial instruments such as common stocks, bonds, options, futures, and mutual funds are analyzed in a theoretical context using efficient market theory, capital market theory, option pricing, and stock valuation models. Experience in practical applications is generally obtained through the use of case studies. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 411. Investment Theory and Applications, Honors. 3 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course emphasizes the theoretical and practical aspects of investments. Financial instruments such as common stocks, bonds, options, futures, and mutual funds are analyzed in a theoretical context using efficient market theory, capital market theory, option pricing, and stock valuation models. Experience in practical applications is generally obtained through the use of case studies. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

FIN 413. Financial Markets and Intermediaries. 3 Hours.

Explores the financial institutions that create credit and liquidity for businesses and other borrowers, the financial instruments that facilitate credit and liquidity creation, and the markets in which those instruments are sold or traded. Special emphasis is paid to commercial banks, but non-depository intermediaries such as finance companies, mortgage banks, insurance companies and investment banks are also discussed. Presents and analyzes the workings of money markets, bond markets, commercial loan markets, mortgage markets and foreign exchange markets. Throughout the course, the determination of interest rates, as well as the sources and implications of credit risk, liquidity risk and interest rate risk, are central to the discussion. The course closes with an introduction to risk management at financial intermediaries using on-balance sheet (e.g., loan underwriting, asset-liability management) and off-balance sheet (e.g., asset securitization, interest rate, foreign exchange and credit derivatives) tools. (Not open to students with credit in FIN 430). Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 415. Corporate Finance. 3 Hours.

Building on the concepts of present value, the focus of this course is on the theory of and methods for corporate asset selection. The course includes coverage of important technical issues such as risk analysis, evaluation of mutually exclusive projects, capital rationing, and leasing. Some attention usually will be devoted to the topic of project financing. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 416. Corporate Finance, Honors. 3 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course builds on the concepts of present value. The focus of this course is on the theory of and methods for corporate asset selection. The course includes coverage of important technical issues such as risk analysis, evaluation of mutually exclusive projects, capital rationing, and leasing. Some attention usually will be devoted to the topic of project financing. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

FIN 418. Modeling and Risk Analysis. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the concepts, methodologies, and applications of risk analysis and modeling. This course is designed primarily to develop practical modeling skills with spreadsheet software. To accomplish this, material from across the finance discipline will be covered as well as material from the supply chain management discipline. Examples from corporate finance, investments, financial derivatives, real estate, personal finance, and supply chain management methods will be used to demonstrate modeling. (Same as SCM 418.) Not open to students with credit in FIN 460 or SCM 418. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 420. International Finance. 3 Hours.

The economic determinants of exchange rates are discussed. This is followed by an examination of the financing problems faced by the multinational corporation and the international portfolio manager, arising from the international nature of their environment. Topics include spot, forward, futures, and options markets in foreign currency, international risk management, purchasing power parity, interest rate parity, covered interest arbitrage, and contemporary issues in international financial management. Prerequisite: FIN 413. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 422. Financial Modeling. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the concepts, methodologies, and applications of financial modeling and risk analysis. This course is designed primarily to develop practical financial modeling skills with spreadsheet software. To accomplish this, material from corporate finance, investments, financial derivatives, real estate, personal finance, and supply chain management methods will be used to demonstrate modeling. Perquisite: FIN 415 or FIN 416. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 425. Futures and Options. 3 Hours.

This course examines the use of forwards, futures, SWAPs options, and related financial derivatives for hedging arbitrage, and speculative purposes in the global environment. The course focuses on understanding how firms can manage interest rate risk, exchange rate risk, and commodity price risk using these derivatives. The emphasis is on understanding the motivation issues, and the techniques behind financial engineering with these derivatives, as practiced by firms and individuals to maximize value in global markets. Prerequisite: FIN 410 or FIN 411. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 428. Real Estate Investment. 3 Hours.

Students study real estate as an investment asset class. Students first study home pricing, mortgage financing, the buy-versus-rent decision, and other aspects of residential real estate. Then students study investment fundamentals of income-producing commercial property segments (multifamily, office, industrial, and retail). Students apply economic concepts and analytical models for valuing income-producing properties. Finally, students investigate investment vehicles for portfolio investment in real estate such as REITs, real estate-sensitive industrial sectors, mutual funds, and ETFs. (Not open to students with credit in FIN 400: Real Estate Investment). Prequisite: FIN 413. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 432. Prediction Markets. 3 Hours.

This course introduces prediction markets, a tool firms can use to harness the wisdom of the crowd to improve forecasts and generate ideas. This course shows how these markets are related to traditional financial derivatives and investigates their applications in political, athletic, and corporate settings. The course will involve a major project in which students critically analyze the experience of a specific real-world market and participation in a live prediction market which has been set-up for this course. (Not open to students with credit in FIN 400: Prediction Markets). Prerequisite: FIN 410 or FIN 411. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 435. Commercial Bank Management. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of commercial banking. The primary focus is the value maximization of the bank, given the legal, technological, macro-economics, and competitive constraints facing bank managers. The course emphasizes bank investment decisions (e.g., underwriting loans), financing decisions (e.g., generating deposits, capital adequacy), and risk-management decisions (hedging interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, and foreign exchange risk). Ongoing changes in financial markets, information technology, and government regulations, and the importance of these changes for banking business strategies, are stressed throughout the course. Prerequisite: FIN 413. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 445. Fixed Income. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to bond markets and bond derivatives. Bonds and associated financial derivatives include securities that promise a fixed income stream and by extension all securities whose valuation and hedging are related to interest rates. The objective of this course is to provide students with a guide to financial markets, institutions and instruments associated with debt funds and help them to understand the determinants of the general level and structure of interest rates. The focus of this course is on the concepts and tools that are useful to understand and interpret real world issues related to debt markets. Prerequisite: FIN 410 or FIN 411 and FIN 413. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 448. Business Valuation. 3 Hours.

Apply finance principles to measure and manage the value of companies using a professional's step-by-step approach. In this course, students estimate free cash flows, economic value added, and cost of capital. They also forecast accounting statements, compare absolute and relative valuation techniques, and evaluate restructuring opportunities and potential flexibility options. Prerequisite: FIN 415 or FIN 416. Corerequsite: ACCT 321 or ACCT 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 450. Applied Portfolio Management, Honors. 4 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course provides the student with practical portfolio experience. Students actually and collectively manage funds in an endowment account of the benefit of the University and the School of Business. Experienced instructors, speakers, and financial analysts from Wall Street give the class a hands-on real life experience in analyzing and managing securities. The student will be familiarized with many different applied valuation procedures such as cash flows and growth models in an event driven context, as well as market capitalization techniques. Individual securities and stock options are analyzed on a continuing basis. Prerequisite: FIN 410 or FIN 411. Enrollment by application only. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

FIN 454. Portfolio Strategy. 3 Hours.

Investors construct portfolios by choosing allocations across asset classes and by selecting funds or managers within each asset class. This course will (1) examine methods to forecast return and risk across asset classes, including fixed income, equities, real assets, venture capital, buyouts, and hedge fund strategies, (2) describe ways to evaluate the performance of fund managers relative to appropriate benchmarks, and (3) consider optimal allocations among fund managers in various asset classes. Prerequisite: FIN 410 or FIN 411. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 462. Mergers and Acquisitions. 3 Hours.

This is a course about corporate "deals" - corporate transactions that change who owns a business or who controls it. Naturally, the course covers classical mergers and acquisitions, including the financial, strategic and regulatory issues. However, it also covers corporate governance and control, IPO's (initial public offerings), financial distress, and venture capital and private equity. Finally, deals require deal-makers - the investment bankers. We'll touch on aspects of investment banking, an industry that majors in finance and MBA's often work in or have contact with. Prerequisite: FIN 415 or FIN 416. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 466. Entrepreneurial Finance. 3 Hours.

The entrepreneurial finance course will focus on valuing and financing young high-growth potential private companies (start-ups). The objective is for the students to learn how to make investment and financing decisions (and how to distinguish good from bad investments) in an environment characterized by very high degrees of uncertainty and information asymmetry. We will address this topic from two distinct perspectives: the perspective of users (entrepreneurs) and suppliers (venture capitalists and other private equity investors) of capital. In the beginning of the semester we will first take the perspective of the individual entrepreneur (or manager). We will focus on identifying good ideas (evaluating projects using different valuation techniques), separating them from bad ideas, and placing a quantitative value on these opportunities. This part will review different valuation methods used to value start-up companies. We will also deal with issues such as forecasting cash flows of a start-up firm and ways to grow the firm using internal resources. Then we will turn our attention to the next step in the entrepreneurial process - raising capital to take advantage of good opportunities. Specifically we will consider venture capital (independent venture capitalists, angels, and corporate venture capitalists) as a source of financing for start-ups. This part will provide overview of the venture capital industry (players, organizational forms, contracting) and introduce students to the challenges of structuring venture capital deals. In addition, we will cover other ways of raising capital to aid the growth of the entrepreneurial firm. The focus will be on the private debt market as well as other alternative sources of financing for start-up firms (SBA loans, SBICs, mezzanine financing, L/Cs, etc.). Finally, we will study the ways to harvest the ventures (IPOs, acquisitions, LBOs). Prerequisite: FIN 415 or FIN 416. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 468. Corporate Financial Policy. 3 Hours.

The course will have three primary objectives. First, students will review basic valuation methods, including instruction on the location of relevant resources. Some advanced valuation techniques will be examined, e.g., APV, multiples and capital cash flow. Finally, students will work to apply these techniques to particular corporate financial decisions. Prerequisite: FIN 415 or FIN 416. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 492. Honors Topics and Problems in Finance: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This honors topics seminar is open only to students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

FIN 500. Individual Research in Finance. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in finance not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 600. Advanced Portfolio Management. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to give students increased practical portfolio experience. Students actually and collectively manage funds in an endowment account of the benefit of the University and the School of Business. Students will analyze portfolio decisions and determine the risk/reward profile of the portfolio. The student will apply many different valuation models to current and potential equity holdings in the portfolio. Individual securities and stock options are analyzed on a continuing basis. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 701. Financial Management. 2 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the problems associated with the financial management of business firms. The focus is on the practices followed by managers in raising and investing capital so as to maximize value. Prerequisite: ACCT 701. LEC.

FIN 702. Business Finance for Supply Chain Management. 2 Hours.

Adopting the perspective of the CFO, this course focuses on the problems and opportunities, analytic methods, and solutions in the businesses' (1) working capital management, (2) long-term capital investments, and (3) financing. The unifying theme involves balancing expected return and risk in order to maximize the financial value of the enterprise. LEC.

FIN 706. Finance. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the challenges associated with the financial management of firms. The focus is on the practices followed by managers in raising and investing capital so as to maximize value. Topics include cash planning, working capital management, operating and financial risks, valuation of real and financial assets, and the cost of capital. Prerequisite: ACCT 706. LEC.

FIN 710. Investments I. 2 Hours.

This course covers financial instruments and markets used by investment professionals and the key concepts used in the construction and management of equity portfolios. Emphasis is placed on understanding and managing investment risk, on the concept of market efficiency, and the role of financial markets and institutions in shaping the investment environment. Topics include financial instruments; financial markets and institutions; risk and return; portfolio optimization; asset pricing models; and behavioral finance. Prerequisite: FIN 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 711. Investments II. 2 Hours.

This course covers bonds, bond markets, options, futures, and derivative securities. Emphasis is placed on the features, risks and valuation of fixed income and derivative securities. Topics include types of bonds and bond terminology; valuation of bonds; derivatives including options, futures and swaps; and risk, return and diversification. Prerequisite: FIN 710. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 712. Business Investment. 2 Hours.

This course examines the tools for assessing the value of projects and capital investments, and the use of these tools in financial decision-making in public and private corporations. Topics to be covered include estimating the cost of capital, computing and discounting projected cash flows, capital budgeting, real options, and the intersection between business investment and strategy. Prerequisite: FIN 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 713. Business Financing. 2 Hours.

This course examines how firms finance their projects and investments, and how those corporate financing decisions impact firm value. Topics covered include capital structure, payout policy, security issuance, mergers and acquisitions, and corporate governance. Prerequisite: FIN 712. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 720. Advanced Investments. 2 Hours.

This course covers asset pricing models used by investment professionals to evaluate the performance of actively managed portfolios, such as mutual funds and hedge funds. Emphasis is placed on understanding managerial risk-taking and risk-adjusted performance. Topics include the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM); multi-factor models; statistical analysis of portfolio returns; benchmark portfolios; the risk and assessment of portfolio performance; and the theory of active portfolio management. Prerequisite: FIN 711. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 722. Prediction Markets. 2 Hours.

Prediction markets are a type of derivative market which can be used to make forecasts about upcoming events. Research has shown that they leverage the incentives of financial markets and the wisdom of crowds to effectively pool large amounts of information and make accurate, real-time forecasts. The class will explore the theoretical underpinnings of prediction markets and how they have been applied to topics ranging from politics to athletics. The main focus will be on applications within firms. We will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of prediction markets, using as the basis of our discussion cases from real-world applications. Prerequisite: FIN 711. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 725. Business Valuation. 2 Hours.

This course applies finance principles to measure and manage the company value. In this course students estimate free cash flows, economic value added, and cost of capital. They forecast accounting statements and compare absolute and relative valuation techniques. Prerequisite: FIN 701 or ACCT 810 and ACCT 720. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 726. Financial Statement Analysis. 2 Hours.

This course covers topics in financial accounting and financial statement analysis. Accounting topics are taught from an external decision-maker's perspective. The course is intended to help students read and understand complex financial statements, and to extract key financial information from a mass of detail. Topics will vary over time but can include analyses of cash flows, quality and persistence of earnings, income recognition, restructuring, other special charges and off-balance sheet financing. Prerequisite: ACCT 701 or ACCT 810. Not open to MAcc students or students with credit in ACCT 320, ACCT 410, ACCT 721, or ACCT 722. Enrollment Restricted. LEC.

FIN 728. Fair Valuation. 3 Hours.

Apply finance principles to value entire businesses as well as their assets and liabilities, primarily based on financial reporting and tax accounting standards. The course begins with conducting valuation research, reorganizing financial statements, and interpreting financial ratios. Then values are estimated using the income (discounted cash flow) method, the market (multiples) method, and the asset (adjusted cost) method. In addition, the valuations of typical intangible assets including goodwill are addressed, and option valuation techniques for contingent items are introduced. The course also examines discounts for lack of control and for lack of marketability. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 701 or equivalent. LEC.

FIN 735. International Finance. 2 Hours.

Markets for foreign exchange and foreign exchange derivatives are examined. This is followed by an exploration of financial decisions faced by multinational corporations and international portfolio managers, and how such decisions are affected by global economics conditions and various international risk factors. Topics can include managing foreign exchange exposure, financing the global firm, foreign direct investment and political risk, multinational capital budgeting, and international portfolio theory and diversification. Prerequisite: FIN 701 or ACCT 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

FIN 749. Advanced Topics in Finance. 2 Hours.

A variable-topic course open only to graduate students who have completed the Advanced Core courses in Finance (FIN 710, FIN 711, FIN 712, FIN 713.) Topics can include derivatives and risk management, alternative investment strategy, entrepreneurial finance, fixed income, real estate finance, or other similar topics in finance, investments or valuation. LEC.

FIN 751. Corporate Finance. 3 Hours.

This course explores how businesses evaluate investment opportunities, deploy capital to enhance firm value, and raise capital to support business investment and growth. Principal objectives include: understanding the application of discounted cash flow techniques to evaluate investment opportunities and potential acquisitions; understanding alternative valuation techniques and their use in the analysis of real options; understanding how both young and mature firms raise capital from financiers and financial markets, as well as the factors that affect how firms choose to raise capital; and understanding the interaction between a firm's financing structure and its investment and payout policies. Topics include discounted cash flow techniques, real options analysis, capital structure, dividend payout policy, security issuance, mergers and acquisitions, and corporate governance. Prerequisite: FIN 706 or equivalent. LEC.

FIN 752. Financial Institutions and Markets. 3 Hours.

This course explores the financial institutions that create credit and liquidity for businesses and other borrowers, the financial instruments that facilitate credit and liquidity creation, and the markets in which those instruments are sold or traded. Current issues in conjunction with historical and evolutionary developments are a hallmark of this course. Throughout the course, the determination of interest rates, as well as the sources and implications of credit risk, liquidity risk and interest rate risk, are central to the discussion. The course closes with an introduction to risk management at financial intermediaries using on-balance sheet (e.g., loan underwriting, asset-liability management) and off-balance sheet (e.g., asset securitization, interest rate and credit derivatives) tools. Prerequisite: FIN 706 or equivalent. LEC.

FIN 753. Investments. 3 Hours.

This course introduces theoretical concepts and analytical tools essential to investment management by individual investors and portfolio managers. The goal of this class is to provide a structure to address investment problems in a systematic manner. Topics include security risk and return; portfolio theory; valuation of financial instruments such as bonds, common stocks, and options; asset allocation; and performance evaluation of portfolios and portfolio managers. Prerequisite: FIN 706 or equivalent. LEC.

FIN 754. Advanced Topics in Finance. 3 Hours.

A variable-topic course open only to graduate students who have completed the Foundations and Pillar certificate courses. Topics can include international finance, derivatives and risk management, alternative investment strategy, entrepreneurial finance, fixed income, real estate finance, or other similar topics in finance, investments or valuation. Prerequisite: FIN 706 or equivalent. LEC.

FIN 810. Financial Management. 2 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the problems associated with the financial management of business firms. The focus is on the practices followed by managers in raising and investing capital so as to maximize value. Prerequisite: ACCT 810. LEC.

FIN 820. Macroeconomics and Financial Markets. 3 Hours.

This course explores the national and global macro economies and the influence of financial markets on decision-making by firms and individuals. Understanding, analyzing, and forecasting economic indicators are key aspects of this course. The objectives of this course are to understand economic indicators and observe their impacts on national and global economies, to appreciate how financial markets aggregate economic information into interest rates and securities prices and thus influence decision-making by firms and individuals, to use data to construct forward-looking economic models, to understand and use economic indicators in short-run business decision-making and long-run business planning, and to appreciate how government policies can enhance or impair the functioning of markets and the behavior of firms and individuals. Topics in the course include economic growth, employment and labor markets, inflation, exchange rates, monetary policy, fiscal policy, capital markets, credit markets, economic indicators, trend analysis and forecasts, the language of the economics, and the financial press. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. Prerequisite: ACCT 810 and FIN 810. This course is only open to Full Time MBA Students. LEC.

FIN 821. Business Investment and Valuation. 3 Hours.

This course explores how businesses evaluate investment opportunities and deploy capital to enhance firm value. Principal objectives include identification of incremental cash flows and growth options generated by business investment, application of discounted cash flow techniques to evaluate investment opportunities and firms, understanding of alternative valuation techniques and their use in the analysis of real options, understanding interactions between a firm's financing structure and its investment policies, and identification of managerial incentives and how a firm's governance structure affects investment policy and firm valuation. Topics include incremental cash flow identification, discounted cash flow techniques, real options analysis, leverage, cost of capital, corporate governance. Prerequisite: ACCT 810 and FIN 810. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

FIN 830. Investments. 3 Hours.

This course introduces theoretical concepts and analytical tools essential to investment management by individual investors and portfolio managers. The goal of this class is to provide MBA students with a structure to address investment problems in a systematic manner. Topics include factors that affect security risk and return, portfolio theory, valuation and selection of financial instruments such as bonds, common stocks, and options, asset allocation in a portfolio framework, and performance evaluation of portfolios and portfolio managers. Principal objectives are to apply financial theory and develop analytical models that explain security risk and return in a portfolio framework, to explain risks and returns associated with alternative asset allocation strategies, to evaluate the performance of portfolios and portfolio managers, and to value securities such as bonds, stocks, and options. Prerequisite: FIN 821. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

FIN 831. Financing Business Growth. 3 Hours.

This course evaluates alternative means of financing business operations and capital investment. The principal objectives are to evaluate the effects of alternative financial structures on a firm's risk, cost of capital, and valuation; to understand how young entrepreneurial firms raise capital from financiers and financial markets, including sources such as angel investors, bank loans, venture capital, private equity, and initial public offerings; to understand how mature firms raise capital via seasoned equity issuance, corporate bonds, and leases, and how financial terms affect mergers and acquisitions, and to appreciate how firms engage in financial restructuring, including bankruptcy, subsequent to financial distress. Topics include leverage and financial risk, venture capital, private equity, public equity, bond financing, leasing, financial distress. Prerequisite: FIN 821. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

FIN 832. Derivatives and Risk Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on understanding how firms manage interest rate risk, exchange rate risk, and commodity price risk using derivative instruments such as forwards, futures, swaps, and options. The emphasis is on the motivation, issues, and techniques behind financial engineering with these derivatives, as practiced by firms and individuals to maximize value in global markets. The principal objectives are to identify sources of risk to businesses and financial institutions, including commodity price risk, interest rate risk, and exchange rate risk; to understand institutional features and pricing of derivative instruments such as forwards, futures, swaps, and options; to use derivative instruments and other risk management tools to hedge financial and operational risks for both financial and non-financial firms and to appreciate the limitations of risk management and hazards such as "model risk" and counterparty risk. Topics include financial and operating risk assessment; valuation of forwards, futures, swaps, and options; use of derivative instruments and other risk management tools to hedge financial and operational risk; limitations and hazards of risk management. Prerequisite: FIN 821. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

FIN 840. Applied Portfolio Management. 4 Hours.

This course provides the student with practical portfolio experience. Students actually and collectively manage funds in an endowment account for the benefit of the University and the School of Business. Experienced instructors, speakers, and financial analysts from Wall Street give the class a hands-on real life experience in analyzing and managing securities. The student will be familiarized with many different applied valuation procedures such as cash flows and growth models in an event driven context, as well as market capitalization techniques. Individual securities and stock options are analyzed on a continuing basis for inclusion or exclusion in the portfolio. Prerequisite: FIN 410 or FIN 411 or FIN 710 or ACCT 810. Enrollment by application only. LEC.

FIN 898. Independent Study for Master's Students. 1-6 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of finance to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH.

FIN 901. Current Research in Finance. 2 Hours.

This course provides a seminar format for a discussion of the currently prevalent research topics, methods, and problems being addressed in the area of finance. All first year PhD students in finance will enroll in this course their first semester in the doctoral program. LEC.

FIN 918. Macroeconomics for Research in Business. 3 Hours.

(S) This course is designed primarily for doctoral candidates in business administration. The basic Classical and Keynesian macroeconomic models are explored, along with extensions of these models. Concentration is placed on the role of monetary, fiscal, and trade policies, and the dialogues concerning stabilization policy, the unemployment-inflation tradeoff, wealth effects, rational expectations, and international policy issues. The focus is on a comparative static analysis of equilibrium, and the stability of equilibrium. Prerequisite: ECON 522 and MATH 115 and (MATH 116 or MATH 121), or consent of instructor. LEC.

FIN 937. Seminar in Business Finance. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to develop the students' analytical abilities. Course material is of a theoretical and empirical nature. Advanced topics in financial management of business firms are covered. Special emphasis is given to long-term financing topics. Prerequisite: FIN 705 (BUS 751) and FIN 706 (BUS 752). LEC.

FIN 938. Seminar in Investments. 3 Hours.

A study of advanced topics in investments, capital markets, and portfolio theory. Special emphasis is given to the theory of efficient markets. The course is designed to cover recent analytical and empirical literature in the investment area. Prerequisite: FIN 710 (BUS 753). LEC.

FIN 939. Seminar in Financial Institutions. 3 Hours.

A survey of the academic literature in financial institutions. The reading list will vary depending on the instructor. May include both seminal theoretical papers and/or recent empirical studies on the role and importance of financial institutions in market economies. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC.

FIN 995. Doctoral Seminar in Finance: _____. 2-5 Hours.

A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

FIN 997. Directed Research in Finance. 1-5 Hours.

Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH.

FIN 998. Independent Study for Doctoral Students. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH.

FIN 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

(V) Individual research work. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. THE.

Courses

IBUS 300. Special Topics in International Business: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of international business topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC.

IBUS 400. Special Topics in International Business: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of international business topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 410. Introduction to International Business. 3 Hours AE42.

This course provides an overview of the international business environment and explores its implications for firms and managers. Students will analyze the political, economic, legal and socio-cultural forces that shape the conduct of business in and across divergent cultural and institutional settings and examines theories and trends in international trade and investment from the perspective of a manager doing business across borders. Prerequisite: ECON 144 or ECON 145. Enrollment restricted or permission of the instructor. LEC.

IBUS 415. Business in Latin America. 3 Hours.

This course analyzes the unique aspects of the Latin American business environment and the major managerial issues that are likely to confront firms and individuals doing business in the region. The first part of the course develops analytic skills for assessing country environments. The second part of the course focuses on making corporate and managerial decisions in the Latin American context. Prerequisite: Corequisite: IBUS 410 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 425. Business in China. 3 Hours.

This course analyzes the unique aspects of the Chinese business environment and the major managerial issues that are likely to confront firms and individuals doing business in the country. The first part of the course develops knowledge about the country and skills for assessing it as a place for business. The second part of the course focuses on the performance of key management functions in the Chinese context such as marketing, finance, supply chain and human resource management. Prerequisite: Corequisite: IBUS 410 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 462. Comparative and Cross-Cultural Management. 3 Hours AE42.

This course examines in depth how culture, in all its aspects, is the major determinant of successful organizational performance and management practices in the global workplace. This is accomplished by comparing and contrasting various cultural norms and values, and demonstrating how those differences impact business in the areas of communication (verbal and nonverbal), relationship building, the role of the manager, the functioning of teams and group dynamics, negotiation, conflict resolution, and decision making. Students will also examine the influences of culture on legal and governmental considerations in business, organization structures and corporate culture. The basis for cultural norms and comparisons used in this course are drawn from all areas of the world. The emphasis is on developing the awareness and skills necessary for managing multicultural diversity in both domestic and international settings. Prerequisite: Corequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 480. International Management. 3 Hours AE42.

This course provides an overview of the essential managerial issues that firms and individuals will confront and must master to successfully operate in the international business setting. This is accomplished by introducing the student to an array of practical concepts, analytical frameworks and vital managerial techniques that will be useful to the international manager. Specific topics covered include the role of culture in global business, ethics and social responsibility in a multicultural setting, strategy development and organizational structure models for multinational operations, methods for analyzing and evaluating potential foreign markets and modes for foreign market entry. Also covered is the impact of a global scope of operations on basic management functions including marketing, finance, supply chain and human resource management. Prerequisite: Corequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311, MKTG 310 or MKTG 311 and FIN 310 or FIN 311 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 500. Individual Research in International Business. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in international business not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311, MGMT 310 or MGMT 311, MKTG 310 or MKTG 311 and SCM 310 or SCM 311; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 701. International Business. 2 Hours.

This course aims to provide an understanding of the basic concepts, institutions, and practices of international business, and their implications for business decision making. Topics include the causes and consequences of globalization, the political, economic, legal and socio-cultural differences across countries, and the institutional arrangements governing cross-border flows of trade, investment and intellectual property. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 718. International Business. 3 Hours.

This course examines the basic concepts, institutions, and practices of international business, and their implications for business decision-making. The main objectives of this course include developing an understanding of cross-national differences in political, economic, legal, and socio-cultural systems. The course will place special emphasis on understanding the unique institutions of emerging economies and their implications for doing business in these countries, and the effects of differences in culture on the practice of managements in different parts of the world. Topics include the principal theories of government policies on, and international institutional arrangements for international trade and foreign direct investment. The course will examine the key factors affecting a firm's foreign market entry decisions. LEC.

IBUS 720. Business in China. 2 Hours.

The course analyzes the unique aspects of the Chinese business environment and the major managerial issues that are likely to confront firms conducting business in the country. The first part of the course reviews the country's geography, history and culture, and examines its contemporary political process, economic structure, financial system, and legal and social institutions. The second part of the course examines important strategic and operational issues such as market entry, contract negotiation, supply chain management, marketing strategies and techniques, and human resource management. Prerequisite: IBUS 701 or IBUS 820. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 721. Business in Latin America. 2 Hours.

This course analyzes the business environment of Latin America and the managerial practices that have evolved in this unique context. Using cases, readings, lectures and videos, the course seeks to cover a broad set of countries, industries and companies as it examines the conduct and performance of business in Latin America. Prerequisite: IBUS 701 or IBUS 820. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 730. International Business Strategy. 2 Hours.

This course examines the important managerial issues arising from a firm's expansion into the international arena and introduces analytical frameworks and management techniques that are essential for an international manager. Specific topics covered include foreign market entry decisions, strategies and organizational structures for managing a multinational corporation, and management of various functional areas (such as production, marketing, finance and human resources) in an international setting. Prerequisite: MGMT 704 and IBUS 701 or IBUS 820. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 731. Comparative and Cross-Cultural Management. 2 Hours.

This course explores how culture, in all of its aspects, is a major determinant of organizational practices and performance. We analyze how and why organizational communication and practices vary from one culture to another, as well as why certain values and cultural contexts might make particular management styles more successful than others. Finally, we will investigate the possibilities for transferring certain practices between cultures. Prerequisite: IBUS 701 or IBUS 820. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 740. Business Practices in China. 2 Hours.

This course provides students an opportunity to learn about business in China by observing it in practice. Students will travel to China to visit a variety of companies and meet with their managers to learn about the unique opportunities and challenges faced by companies operating in China. Company visits will be selected to include both manufacturing and services firms and to reflect a variety of ownership structures (foreign subsidiaries, locally-owned companies, joint-ventures, etc.). Lectures from faculty at a Chinese host institution will provide specific information on the local business environment and cultural, historical and institutional context. Prerequisite: IBUS 701 or IBUS 820 and IBUS 720. (Please note: This course involves travel abroad and required PRIOR completion of both IBUS 701 and IBUS 720.) Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 741. Business Practices in Latin America. 2 Hours.

This course provides students an opportunity to learn about business in Latin America by observing it in practice. Students will travel to a Latin American country to visit a variety of companies and meet with their managers to learn about the unique opportunities and challenges faced by companies operating in Latin America. Company visits will be selected to include both manufacturing and services firms and to reflect a variety of ownership structures (foreign subsidiaries, locally-owned companies, joint-ventures, etc.). Lectures from faculty at a Latin American host institution will provide specific information on the local business environment and cultural, historical and institutional context. Prerequisite: IBUS 701 or IBUS 820 and IBUS 721. (Please note: This course involves travel abroad and required PRIOR completion of both IBUS 701 and IBUS 721.) Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 820. International Business. 3 Hours.

This course aims to provide an understanding of the basic concepts, institutions, and practices of international business, and their implications for business decision making. The main objectives of this course include developing an understanding of cross-national differences in political, economic, legal and socio-cultural systems. The course will place special emphasis on understanding the unique institutions of emerging economies and their implications for doing business in these countries, and the effects of differences in culture on the practice of managements in different parts of the world. Topics include the principal theories of, government policies on, and international institutional arrangements for international trade and foreign direct investment. The course will examine the key factors affecting a firm's foreign market entry decisions. Students will apply these theories to the analysis of a country's business environment and the formulation of international business decisions. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

IBUS 895. Graduate Seminar in International Business: _____. 0.5-5 Hours.

A variable-topic seminar opens only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IBUS 898. Independent Study for Master's Students. 1-6 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business management to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH.

IBUS 950. Research in International Management and Strategy. 3 Hours.

This seminar surveys the literature, classic and contemporary, that forms the theoretical basis of the international business field. Topics covered include but are not limited to: (1) institutional issues such as the international framework of trade and investment, crosscountry governance differences, and the role of NGOs; (2) firm-level strategic issues such as choice of market entry modes, international entrepreneurship, and management of multinational enterprises; and (3) group- and individual-level organizational issues such as international staffing and cross-cultural management. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

Courses

IST 202. Introduction to Information Systems. 3 Hours.

This course introduces essential components of information systems from an organizational perspective. The course covers the role of information systems in organizations, the technical foundations of information systems, the design and management of information systems, and the effect of information systems on organizations. The course also exposes students to software tools used to solve business problems. Not open to students with credit in IST 301. Prerequisite: ACCT 200 or coenrollment in ACCT 200. LEC.

IST 204. Excel Essentials for Business. 1 Hour.

This course focuses on the fundamental Excel functions and tools that are used by business professionals. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of Excel features such as data tables, formulas and functions, and charts. After learning about these essential Excel topics, students will apply their knowledge of Excel by solving many different business problems. This course covers material that must be mastered in order to pass the Microsoft Excel Specialist® exam. Not open to students with credit in IST 310 or IST 321. LEC.

IST 205. Survey of Information Systems. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the use of information systems in business. Topics will include components of information systems, types of information systems, development of information systems, and uses and benefits of information systems. Relevant technology issues such as security, privacy and ethics will also be introduced. In addition to content on information systems, the course will cover the basic principles of Microsoft Office. (Not open to students with credit in IST 202 or 301.) Prerequisite: Goal 1, Outcome 2 and Goal 2, Outcome 1. LEC.

IST 312. Information Systems for Managers. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of how to understand, analyze, and design computerized information systems, and is designed to provide the computer tools and knowledge so that today's business student will be tomorrow's successful and complete manager and/or consultant. The topics covered in this course include computer technology, internal control in a computer environment, strategic information systems planning, systems analysis and design, database systems, networking, and various software packages. This course will count as an advanced business elective. Not open to students with credit in ACCT 311. Prerequisite: ACCT 201 and IST 202 or IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 320. Fundamentals of Software Development. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to software development concepts and techniques. Students will develop an understanding of the software development process through hands-on programming assignments and projects. The course emphasizes problem solving, initiative, and teamwork within an information systems framework. Not open to students with credit in BSAN 320. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 321. Spreadsheet and Database Applications. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on analyzing business data and solving business problems with spreadsheet and database management software. The main objective of the course is to expose students to tools that will help them transform data into decisions. Students are expected to master intermediate and advanced spreadsheet skills such as logical functions, PivotTables, and macros. Additionally, students will build a database that will then be manipulated, queried, and exported to Microsoft Excel in order to perform data analysis and modeling. Prerequisite: ACCT 200. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 325. Systems Analysis and Design. 3 Hours.

This will take students through the entire systems development life cycle from the first contact with a customer through analysis and design to the implementation of the customer's system. It will introduce the student to the field of systems analysis and design, basic systems analysis tools, and the procedures for conducting systems analysis. Topics covered will include the role of the systems analyst in the organization, concepts, philosophies and trends in systems analysis and design, and tools and techniques for such analysis. Not open to students with credit in BSAN 325. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 326. Database Management Systems. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts and implementation of the database development process and relational database systems. The student will be exposed to database development issues, SQL methodology, and entity-relationship models. Not open to students with credit in BSAN 326. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 330. Fundamentals of Business Computer Networking. 3 Hours.

This course introduces business students to the terms and concepts of networking in the business environment. This course balances practical application and network theory. It examines common architecture models, transmission media, network topologies, and protocols in both local area network (LAN) and wide area network (WAN) environments. The course also delves into the operating characteristics of the Internet and various applicable protocol suites. Conceptual learning is supported by team exercises and projects. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301. Prerequisite or Corequisite: IST 320. Enrollment restricted LEC.

IST 400. Special Topics in Information Systems Technology: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of information systems technology topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 401. Management of Integrated Information Systems/ERP. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. We explore process integration of business-wide functions (controlling, production planning, demand management, sales and distribution) as required and supported by ERP implementations. The objectives of the course include: (1) understanding processes and data needs of different business functions; (2) understanding alternative information systems solutions and the challenges of independent information systems and; (3) understanding ERP systems as solutions to business process integration. Not open to students with credit in SCM 404. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 405. Contemporary Information Technology Topics. 3 Hours.

This course examines a wide range of innovative information technologies (IT) which have both technical and strategic implications for businesses. These IT innovations affect all functions of businesses. Topics include Web 2.0, Web 3.0, next generation Web, social networking technology, virtual world, pervasive computing, ubiquitous computing, unified communications (unification), IT utility, on-demand computing, gird computing, Web services, service-orientation architecture, business intelligence, data mining, search technology and applications (Google), next generation Web search, virtualization (server, hardware), storage fabrics, open source, IT outsourcing, personal technology, healthcare IT, green IT, security and privacy, Internet policy, regulation global control, and the gap between IT and business (goals and strategies). This course is available to all undergraduate and graduate students in the business school. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 410. IT Project Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides initial exposure to concepts related to the project management discipline generally, while focusing on management of information technology projects in particular. The course is organized to emphasize core project management knowledge areas developed by the Project Management Institute, and it stresses the benefits of a disciplined, formal project management methodology. Students completing the course will gain an appreciation for the complex nature of projects and be better prepared to be an effective member of project teams encountered in many types of organizations. Not open to students enrolled, or with credit in MGMT 472, Project Management. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 435. Information Security. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to a wide range of topics associated with managing the security of information systems and related data in a business environment. Topics addressed include cryptography and security of operating systems, databases, networks. . . both wired and wireless, and telecommunications systems. Security issues are examined related to application development and to the use of the Internet as a business medium. Other elements of security are reviewed: physical security, disaster recovery and business resumption planning, change control, and so forth. On successful completion of the course, each student will be better able to: a. Understand and appreciate risks associated with business information systems infrastructures and the dynamic nature of these threats. b. Evaluate various risks associated with information systems. c. Envision controls that might mitigate these risks. d. Possess the ability to effectively articulate the threats and need for appropriate controls to others, be they higher management, peers, or subordinates. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 492. Honors Topics and Problems in Information Systems and Technology: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This honors topic seminar is open only to students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

IST 495. Foundations in Business Analytics. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the key business, computational and data competencies needed by business analysts for effective data-driven decision making. The course focuses on how structural as well as unstructured "big data" can be used to help decision makers improve organizational competitiveness. Students will learn fundamental skills for business analytics: data manipulation, data visualization and statistical methods to gain experience with different software tools used for data analysis and reporting. Not open to students with credit in BSAN 440. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 500. Individual Research in Information Systems Technology. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in information systems technology not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311, MGMT 310 or MGMT 311, MKTG 310 or MKTG 311 and SCM 310 or SCM 311; approval of the Area Director. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 701. Managerial Information Systems. 2 Hours.

This course provides a broad, managerial level introduction to fundamental information technology concepts and terminology and the application of those concepts in business organizations. It addresses a variety of topics including: the Internet, intranets, and extranets; relational database theory; hardware, software, and networking concepts; the system development life cycle, project management; eBusiness/eCommerce; knowledge management; enterprise resource planning; ethical considerations related to information technology advances; and organizational considerations related to information systems. The course focuses on the knowledge and expertise required for managers to successfully leverage information systems assets in a business setting. LEC.

IST 702. Systems Development. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the practical issues of system development. A main objective of the course is to teach students system development through programming projects. In addition, the course examines the software engineering issues involved in system development, including usability and design issues, and alternative systems development processes. To enhance the quality of the system developed, the course also looks into software testing and evaluation issues. This course is not open to students with credit in IST 320. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301 or IST 701 or concurrent enrollment in IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 704. Database Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides insight to the managerial and organizational issues that surround the development and implementation of database systems in organizations. Students will undertake a project that allows them to experience the database development process while learning and practicing modern data modeling techniques. Students will also study the value that databases have to the organization and the impact that databases have on decision-making processes. Students also will study strategic issues that impact database development and will research the latest advances in database management systems and other emerging technology to gain insight on how these advances will impact the future of database development. This course is not open to students with credit in IST 326. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301 or IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 706. Systems Analysis and Design. 3 Hours.

This course develops skills with regard to the Analysis and Design activities typically encountered in an organizational software development environment. It emphasizes structured project planning, analysis and design techniques, including Project Estimation Methods, Data Flow Diagrams, Entity-Relationship Diagrams, and the application of CASE (Computer-Aided Software Engineering) Tools. The teaching methods will combine classroom experience with an analysis and design case study using role-play techniques to simulate an actual analysis and design scenario. This course is not open to students with credit in IST 325. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301 or IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 708. Strategic Information Systems Planning. 3 Hours.

This course has two objectives. The first objective is to give graduate students an understanding of the need for high level IT strategy in organizations. This is accomplished through case analysis, the experiential learning of strategic concepts and through interaction with IT executives. IT strategy is explored at the executive levels of an organization. The second objective of the course is to give students experience working on projects/research and presenting materials as is done in developing IT strategy for real organizations. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301 or IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 709. Business Computer Networking. 3 Hours.

This course has two objectives. The first objective is to give graduate students an understanding of the need for high level IT strategy in organizations. This is accomplished through case analysis, the experiential learning of strategic concepts and through interaction with IT executives. IT strategy is explored at the executive levels of an organization. The second objective of the course is to give students experience working on projects/research and presenting materials as is done in developing IT strategy for real organizations. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301 or IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 712. Information Security. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce, at a managerial rather than highly technical level, a range of topics associated with security of information systems and related data in a business environment. Topics addressed include selected cryptography concepts and the security of operating systems, databases, networks--both wired and wireless, and telecommunications systems. The course also considers security issues related to application development, including management of the change control process, and to the use of the Internet as a business medium. Students will also address physical security, disaster recovery, business resumption planning, and managerial planning and techniques involved in creating a security conscious organization. This course is not open to students with credit in IST 335. Prerequisite: IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 713. Data Management. 2 Hours.

Businesses today collect and manage large volume of data in a variety of types, forms, and sources for myriad uses. To provide necessary skills to data scientists and analysts, this course introduces traditional data management concepts and techniques as well as contemporary information retrieval and processing innovations. Topics include database fundamentals, database query techniques, data marts and data warehouse, information retrieval and Web search, NoSQL movement and practices, data management for analytics, distributed data management and cloud computing, and other emerging trend and techniques. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 715. E-Commerce: An Integrative Perspective. 3 Hours.

This course examines how organizations and individuals exploit the Internet and other emerging information technology to conduct business in an information era. This course combines practice and theory to examine successes, failures, and common practices when using information technology for e-commerce activities. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301 or IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 720. Developments in Software Technology. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to object-oriented (OO) technology and the object paradigm. We explore the object paradigm, its benefits and limitations. Specifically, we study a state-of-art technique for OO modeling. We also apply this technique to the analysis and design of a system, and implement the concepts with OO programming. Students will gain practical experience in OO analysis, design, and implementation through projects with an OO programming language. Prerequisite: IST 702. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 725. Contemporary Information Technology Topics. 3 Hours.

This course examines a wide range of innovative information technologies (IT) which have both technical and strategic implications for businesses. These IT innovations affect all functions of businesses. Topics include Web 2.0, Web 3.0, next generation Web, social networking technology, virtual world, pervasive computing, ubiquitous computing, unified communications (unification), IT utility, on-demand computing, grid computing, Web services, service-oriented architecture, business intelligence, data mining, search technology and applications (Google), next generation Web search, virtualization (server, hardware), storage fabrics, open source, IT outscoring, personal technology, healthcare IT, green IT, security and privacy, Internet policy, regulation, global control, and the gap between IT and business (goals and strategies). This course is not open to students with credit in IST 405. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301 or IST 701. LEC.

IST 730. IT Project Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides initial exposure to concepts related to the project management discipline generally, while focusing on management of information technology projects in particular. The course is organized to emphasize core project management knowledge areas developed by the Project Management Institute, and it stresses the benefits of a disciplined, formal project management methodology. Students completing the course will gain an appreciation for the complex nature of projects and be better prepared to be an effective member of project teams encountered in many types of organizations. This course is not open to students with credit in IST 410. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301 or IST 701. LEC.

IST 799. Internship in Information Systems. 1-3 Hours.

Internships provide opportunities for students to combine their academic education with a meaningful experience in the business world. Accounting internships allow students to explore career pathways in accounting, further their professional growth, expand professional networks, and increase the relevancy of their academic coursework. The internship course combines job-related activities of the accounting internship position with a set of academic requirements. These requirements include academic assignments as well as a pre- and post-internship seminar held in the semester before and after the semester in which the internship occurs. Internships for credit must be approved by the Director of the Internship Program prior to the internship experience. Students may not receive more than three hours of internship credit. Enrollment restricted and by permission only. INT.

IST 895. Graduate Seminar Information Systems: _____. 0.5-5 Hours.

A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

IST 898. Independent Study for Master's Students. 1-6 Hours.

(V) Individual study of selected current problems in the field of information systems to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH.

IST 995. Doctoral Seminar in Information Systems: _____. 2-5 Hours.

A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

IST 997. Directed Research in Information Systems. 1-5 Hours.

Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH.

IST 998. Independent Study for Doctoral Students. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH.

IST 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

(V) Individual research work. THE.

Courses

MGMT 300. Special Topics in Management: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of management topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC.

MGMT 305. Survey of Management and Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to acquaint students with traditional business management ideas, recent management thinking, and the contemporary application of both to the management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. A survey of a wide variety of topics is offered, generally including goal setting, strategy formulation and implementation, managerial decision making, structure and design of organizations, corporate culture, organizational change and development, human resources management, managing diversity, leading, motivation, communication, teamwork, quality control, management control systems, operations and service management, entrepreneurship and small business management, managerial ethics, corporate social responsibility, and management in the global environment. (Not open to students with credit in MGMT 310 or MGMT 311.) Prerequisite: Goal 1, Outcome 2 and Goal 2, Outcome 1. LEC.

MGMT 310. Organizational Behavior. 3 Hours.

This course serves as an introduction to the study of individual and group behavior within the context of an organization. An objective may be the development of the student's potential for becoming an effective organization member and manager of people. Experiential learning methods are utilized to involve the student actively. A wide variety of topics and theories may be covered, generally including motivation, leadership, job design, group dynamics, and formal organizational structure and process. Prerequisite: Completion of ECON 142 or ECON 143, ACCT 200, PSYC 104 or PSYC 105, and prior completion or co-enrollment in ACCT 201 and DSCI 202 or DSCI 301. LEC.

MGMT 311. Organizational Behavior, Honors. 3 Hours.

This course serves as an introduction to the study of individual and group behavior within the context of an organization. An objective may be the development of the student's potential for becoming an effective organization member and manager of people. Experiential learning methods are utilized to involve the student actively. A wide variety of topics and theories may be covered, generally including motivation, leadership, job design, group dynamics, and formal organizational structure and process. Honors students will be held to especially high expectations in terms of analyzing, evaluation, and creating, with systematic and continuous emphasis on personal and professional development. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the School of Business Honors Program, or by consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: Completion of ECON 142 or ECON 143, ACCT 200, PSYC 104 or PSYC 105, and prior completion or co-enrollment in ACCT 201 and DSCI 202 or DSCI 301. LEC.

MGMT 400. Special Topics in Management: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of management topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 405. Ethical Decision Making in Business. 3 Hours AE51.

This course is designed to provide students with: (a) a grounding in the psychological and philosophical foundations of business ethics; (b) the ability to recognize ethical problems; (c) an exposure to many of the ethically sensitive issues facing corporations and managers in business today (e.g., layoffs, outsourcing, employee whistle-blowing, employee privacy, employee health and safety, marketing and advertising, environmental issues, discrimination, and the global responsibilities of business); and (d) the tools for analyzing and reaching closure on ethical problems. Students will study the role of ethics in the relation of business to employees, consumers, and society. Students in this course will have the opportunity to engage in stimulating class discussions, justify ethical positions in case study analyses, investigate ethical issues in their own future professional lives, and develop and present their solutions for typical ethical problems faced by managers in organizations. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 410. Human Resources Management. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the ways that firms manage employment relationships, including staffing, training and development, compensation, performance appraisal, labor-management relations, employment law, career management, and job design. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to identify and address these topics from a general management perspective. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311. Sports Management majors may petition for entry to the course with completion of the following prerequisite: MGMT 305, ECON 142, or ECON 143, and an introductory statistics course (DSCI 202 or DSCI 301), HSES 310, MATH 365, PSYC 300). Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 413. Recruiting and Selecting Effective Employees. 3 Hours.

What makes for a great employee? The answer will depend on the fit between the person and the organization. One size does not fit all. This course covers policies and procedures for recruitment, selection and staffing to enhance organizational effectiveness. Students learn about individual differences, how to measure these differences, and how to ensure the organization's recruitment and selection processes are reliable, valid, legal and "fair." Topics will include (i) conducting a job analysis for creating job descriptions, (ii) recruiting candidates, and (iii) setting up selection procedures through initial screening and resume review, the employment interview, general and specific ability tests, personality tests, assessment centers, performance tests, integrity testing, and drug testing. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 416. Training, Development, and Management Careers for Individuals and Organizations. 3 Hours.

The course introduces students to effective approaches for developing training and career management processes that support continuous learning and organizational adaptation. Topics include analyzing training needs, developing training with clear objectives, evaluating outcomes rigorously, and individual and organizational strategies for careers and work/life balance. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 419. Managing Performance and Compensation. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on principles and practices in designing and administering performance management and reward systems. Employee performance measurement at both the individual and group levels is reviewed. Using performance measurement information for administrative decision-making and employee development is discussed. The impact of reward systems on employee recruitment, satisfaction and individual and firm-level performance is examined, including establishing pay structures, individual and group-based pay-for-performance plans, executive pay issues, government influences, and employee benefits. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 431. Legal Environment for Managing Employees. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is how the legal environment affects the management of employees. The topics covered include laws on employment discrimination, employment-at-will, and negligent hiring, the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the National Labor Relations Act, the Fair Labor Standards Act, and the Family and Medical Leave Act. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 434. International Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

Whether a company has a domestic or an international footprint, there is little doubt that it is impacted by global competition for markets and for talent. This course increases students' understanding of core HRM activities as they are conducted in a global context. These activities include staffing, performance management, training and development, compensation, and labor relations. These topics are examined in the light of cultural and institutional differences. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 437. Developing Management Skills. 3 Hours.

This course enhances leadership and other people-related skills of students in order to strengthen their capacity to manage others effectively. The course begins by focusing on self-awareness and self-management. Students also learn systems for classification of people on the basis of personality, behavior and attitudes. Other topics covered include communication skills, time management, techniques for controlling stress, problem solving, reading people's emotions and intentions more effectively, effective team leadership, coaching and counseling, delegation and empowerment, conflict resolution, motivation, and effective discipline techniques. The focus of the course is on skill acquisition and development. Other pedagogy involves readings, personality and behavior inventories, role-playing, and case analyses. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 455. The Role of the General Manager: Leadership and Management. 3 Hours.

The course focuses on the principles and methods that general managers use to implement strategies, both at the business unit and corporate levels. While stressing the complex nature of the general manager's job, the organization's mission, environment, technology, and strategy are discussed as the primary drivers of designing effective organization structures, processes, and management systems. Change processes for realigning the organization's strategy, structure, processes, and culture are further emphasized, highlighting the role of the general manager as the architect of change. Topics covered include: organization design, transaction costs, behavior and ouput control; strategic leadership; design of information and reward systems; organizational change and cultural change processes. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 470. Leadership in Business Organizations. 3 Hours.

This course provides the opportunity to learn and practice the behaviors common to business leaders; these include establishing direction, aligning others behind that direction, motivating and inspiring, and generally promoting organizational change and transformation. Experiential learning will be used to develop skills by having students lead learning teams through a variety of classroom-based exercises and one service learning project of their choosing. Creation of a personal leadership development plan will be a major component of a portfolio of assessments, analyses, and reflections that the student will build throughout the course. A key goal will be establishing a leadership development mindset that will drive students' future personal and professional development efforts. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 472. Project Management. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to examine business from a project management perspective, to develop a systems view of business rather than a functional view and to lay the foundation for future leaders to more effectively integrate project management into their business strategy. Further, to establish a common language for and a common knowledge of project management concepts, principles and practices. This course is intended to help students gain an understanding of what project management involves, how it relates to other functional management areas, and its role in an organization's structure and leadership. This course is made up of topical lectures, article/video analysis, open discussion, in-class experiential exercises and a team-based outside class project. In order to foster good project management habits, topics will be covered in the order they appear in the project lifecycle starting with project selection and bidding and ending with project acceptance and close out. Topics covered in this course include: the importance and role of project management, the contextual nature of projects, logistics issues in project management, and the E-business impact on project management. Not open to students enrolled, or with credit, in IST 410, IT Project Management. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311 and SCM 310 or SCM 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 485. Business Consulting. 4 Hours.

Business Consulting teaches the skills necessary to become consummate consultants and presents students with live projects incorporating real business challenges requiring real time analysis, consideration of practical alternative strategies, exploration of sales and profit implications of the selected strategy and delivery of a full rationalized recommendation to real clients. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 492. Honors Topics and Problems in Management: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This honors topics seminar is open only to students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

MGMT 498. Business Policy and Strategy. 3 Hours AE61/GE11.

The course exposes the student to the role of general management in complex organizations. The cases, conceptual materials, and projects are selected to provide the student with decision-making opportunity in major areas of managerial concern: environmental opportunities and constraints, formulation of business policy, and policy implementation mechanisms. Knowledge and skills gained in previous business courses, including marketing, finance, and quantitative methods, will be applied to problems associated with the totality of organizational activity. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311; MGMT 310 or MGMT 311; MKTG 310 or MKTG 311 and SCM 310 or SCM 311 and Senior standing (90 hours completed). Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 499. Business Policy and Strategy, Honors. 3 Hours AE61/GE11.

Honors treatment of this course exposes the student to the role of general management in complex organizations. The cases, conceptual materials, and projects are selected to provide the student with decision-making opportunity in major areas of managerial concern: environmental opportunities and constraints, formulation of business policy, and policy implementation mechanisms. Knowledge and skills gained in previous business courses, including marketing, finance, and quantitative methods, will be applied to problems associated with the totality of organizational activity. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311; MGMT 310 or MGMT 311; MKTG 310 or MKTG 311 and SCM 310 or SCM 311 and Senior standing (90 hours completed). LEC.

MGMT 500. Individual Research in Management. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in management not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311, MGMT 310 or MGMT 311, MKTG 310 and MKTG 311 and SCM 310 or SCM 311; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 525. Negotiations and Dispute Settlement. 3 Hours.

This course involves the study of the theory and practice of dispute resolution and negotiation in business mediation (facilitated negotiation). Conflict resolution in the workplace, including grievance procedures, will be considered. Students are required to apply concepts studied through role playing simulations. (Same as BLAW 525.) Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or MGMT 311 and BE 301 or BE 302. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 701. Organizational Behavior. 2 Hours.

This course focuses on human behavior in organizations. It helps the student learn to think systemically and critically about organizations, to appreciate knowledge building in the organization sciences, and to apply that knowledge in the work setting. Topics covered may include: individual differences and motivation, work and group design, leading and decision making, organization design and culture, and organization change and development. LEC.

MGMT 704. Strategic Management. 2 Hours.

Strategic Management has as its primary objective the development of an understanding of the role of general management from both a conceptual and operating standpoint. The course is based on the strategic management framework emphasizing the evaluation of an organization's strategic situation and the formulation of viable alternative strategies required to deal with the challenges facing the organization. Attention is focused on the development of organizational objectives and the formulation of strategies at the business and operating levels. Prerequisite: MGMT 701, FIN 701, and MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 705. Ethical Decision Making in Business. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with: (a) a grounding in the psychological and philosophical foundations of business ethics; (b) the ability to recognize ethical problems; (c) an exposure to many of the ethically sensitive issues facing corporations and managers today in each of the functional areas of business (management, accounting, finance, information systems, and marketing); and (d) the tools for analyzing and reaching closure on ethical problems. Students will study the role of ethics in the relation to the individual, manager, organization, and global business environment. Students in this course will have the opportunity to engage in stimulating class discussions, justify ethical positions in case study analyses, investigate ethical issues in their own future professional lives, and develop and present their solutions for typical ethical problems faced by managers in organizations after fully exploring the ethical dimensions of both sides of a given issue. Prerequisite: MGMT 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 706. Managing People. 3 Hours.

This course addresses topics, challenges and processes associated with business-related people issues. The principal objectives are to increase understanding of human and group behavior in organizations; to learn how to effectively motivate and lead individuals and groups; to increase effectiveness in managing oneself and others in team settings; and to increase understanding of human resource policies and practices that help create and sustain competitive advantage through people. Course topics include individual differences, motivation, groups, leadership, strategic HR, employment law, staffing, compensation, performance management, and training and development. LEC.

MGMT 710. Leadership Philosophy and Practice. 2 Hours.

This course emphasizes an exploration of ideas about leadership that are practice-oriented. The material covered is based primarily on ethnographic and clinical inquiry rather than social scientific research. A central theme of this material, some of which is philosophical in nature, is the focus on learning and the role of reflection in both the leadership process itself and in the process of developing leaders. Varieties of topics are covered, including foresight, intuition, practical reason, critical thinking, reflective practice, and ethical judgment. A key goal is to move the student into a position where he or she can begin to take control of their own leadership development process. The course is structured so as to give students the opportunity to reflect on their experiences, analyze those experiences using the conceptual material, and then enter into systematic dialogue on these issues with other students and the instructor. The ultimate product of this learning process is the creation of a detailed personal leadership development plan. Prerequisite: MGMT 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 711. Human Resources Management. 2 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the rationale and tools for creating a sustainable competitive advantage through human resources. The management of human resources - people and their human capital - is approached from the perspective of the practicing manager as opposed to that of the human resources specialist. The major topics covered include staffing, training and development, performance management, compensation and benefits, job design, facets of employment law, and employee (labor-management) relations. Prerequisite: BE 701, DSCI 701 and MGMT 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 712. Economic, Environment, and Social Sustainability in Business. 2 Hours.

This course introduces students to conducting business and pursuing organizational goals sustainably. It includes principles (scientific, economic, and cultural) to guide decision-making for sustainability, metrics to assess sustainability [e.g. the integrated or triple bottom line], and the application of sustainability concepts to business functions. Aspects of global environmental sustainability [energy, water, agriculture, resource use and waste] are considered. The use of cases, discussion of best practices, and attention to relevant skills help students gain familiarity with sustainable business practices and develop their capabilities to contribute to firm efforts to operate more sustainably. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 713. Managing People: Applications and Skills. 2 Hours.

The goal of this course is to increase the capacity of the student to manage others effectively. It begins by focusing on self-awareness and self-management. Students also learn systems for classification of people on the basis of behavior and attitudes. Topics covered may include time management, problem solving, reading people, coaching and counseling, delegation and empowerment, conflict resolution, motivation and discipline. The focus is on skill acquisition and the learning approaches including readings, inventories, role playing and case analysis. Prerequisite: MGMT 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 718. Business Law and Ethics. 3 Hours.

This course has two purposes: 1) to provide a foundation for understanding the relation between law and business and 2) to address ethical decision-making and the management of ethics in the workplace. Topics include classifications of law; legal processes; emerging legal issues; alternative dispute resolution; recognition of ethical issues; ethical analysis frameworks; and the management of ethical responsibilities in a global business environment. LEC.

MGMT 719. Strategic Management. 3 Hours.

The principal objectives of this course are to learn how to perform strategic analyses of competitive contexts external to the firm, how to leverage firm specific resources and capabilities for competitive advantage, how to exploit specific strategic perspectives such as game theory and real options, and to learn how to make more effective strategic decisions within the firm. Topics include: industry analysis, firm level strategy, resources and capabilities, intangible resources, firm structure, industry evolution, game theory, real options, managerial discretion, and multinational strategy. Prerequisite: BE 718. LEC.

MGMT 722. Corporate Strategy. 2 Hours.

The objective of this course is to help students build an understanding of how competitive strategy may lead to the creation and persistence of competitive advantage in diversified firms. In contrast to the core Strategic Management (MGMT 704) course, which is designed to address how firms develop competitive advantage in a single market, this course analyzes how advantage can be created through the configuration and coordination of activities across multiple markets. Examples of corporate strategies include vertical integration, cooperative alliances, corporate diversification, mergers and acquisitions, and so forth. Prerequisite: MGMT 704 or MGMT 830. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 725. Strategic Management of Technological Innovation. 2 Hours.

This course focuses on the dynamics of industries driven by technological innovation. It strives to help students think strategically about appraising and managing technological innovation and new product deployment. Specific topics covered include how innovations emerge, their type and pattern of diffusion, and their meaning to businesses and society. In depth coverage is given to dominant designs and industry standards, decisions on entry timing of new technologies, resource allocation among multiple attractive innovation projects, and capturing the value created by innovations. Prerequisite: MGMT 704 or MGMT 830. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 727. Strategy Implementation. 2 Hours.

The course focuses on the principles and methods of implementing strategies, both at the business unit and corporate levels. Strategy is discussed as the primary driver of organization structure, processes, systems, culture and skills in successful organizations. The role of the general manager as the architect of implementation is highlighted. Topics covered include: different forms of structure, behavior and output controls; organization design, information systems design, reward systems and organizational culture. Prerequisite: MGMT 704 or MGMT 830. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 728. Managing Strategic Direction and Change. 2 Hours.

This course focuses on executive actions needed to create and sustain high performance of firms. The vision, credibility, and human skills that executives need to set strategic direction are explored extensively. A major part of the course covers strategic and organizational change practices that can be used to motivate employees to alter their patterns of behavior to meet the shifting needs of the firm's strategy. Emphasis is placed on theories of effective change implementation, mutual engagement and shared diagnosis, organizational redesign, reinforcing new behaviors, organizational culture and change, and the political dynamics of strategic change. Prerequisite: MGMT 704 or MGMT 830. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 732. Recruiting and Selecting Effective Employees. 2 Hours.

Building on selected fundamental principles from psychology, economics, and sociology, this course emphasizes the importance of sound measurement practices for the acquisition of effective human talent by organizations. Topics covered include job analysis for selection procedure development, legal and fairness issues, recruitment, initial screening, employment testing, and the employment interview. Prerequisite: MGMT 701 or MGMT 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 734. Compensation and Rewards. 2 Hours.

This course focuses on principles, policies and practices in designing and administering compensation and reward systems. It covers frameworks and applications useful for achieving organizational effectiveness through pay systems that help promote a competent and committed workforce. Topics include: developing pay structures, formulating and implementing pay level strategies, assessing and managing employee performance, pay-for-performance issues, legal issues, executive compensation and employee benefits. Prerequisite: MGMT 701 or MGMT 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 738. Developing People and Careers. 2 Hours.

This course is designed with an emphasis on effective talent management for practicing managers and includes individual and organizational perspectives. Topics include assessing training needs; designing, developing, delivering and evaluating training and development investments; and career management planning, strategies and progression, including succession planning. Prerequisite: MGMT 701 or MGMT 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 740. Appraising and Managing Employee Performance. 2 Hours.

This course covers the measurement/appraisal of employee performance at the individual and small work group/team levels, and the use of appraisal information in administrative decision-making, employee coaching, employee counseling, and individual/team performance improvement. Prerequisite: MGMT 701 or MGMT 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 741. International Human Resources Management. 2 Hours.

This course introduces students to the major issues associated with managing people in the context of the global marketplace. The focus is on understanding human resource issues that are unique to international business and strategies for effectively addressing them. These issues include staffing, performance management, compensation and labor relations. These topics are considered in the context of factors such as culture, socio-politics, legal regulations, and education. Prerequisite: MGMT 701 or MGMT 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 748. Negotiation and Dispute Resolution. 3 Hours.

This course will include a study of the theory and practice of negotiation and dispute resolution in business contexts. It will focus on the use of alternatives to litigation, such as various forms of arbitration, mediation, and, especially, negotiation. In addition to emphasizing negotiation as a means of resolving disputes, attention will be directed at negotiation of transactions. Appreciation of concepts will be promoted through role play simulations. Not open to students with credit in BLAW 525 or MGMT 525. (Same as BLAW 748.) LEC.

MGMT 751. Strategic Organizational Design and Change Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the principles and methods of implementing strategies. Strategy is focused upon as the primary driver of organization structure, processes, systems, culture, and skills in successful organizations. A major part of the course covers strategic and organizational change practices that can be used to motivate employees to meet the shifting needs of the firm's strategy. Emphasis is placed on theories of effective change implementation, mutual engagement and shared diagnosis, organizational redesign, reinforcing new behaviors, organizational culture and change, and the political dynamics of strategic change. Prerequisite: MGMT 706 and MGMT 719. LEC.

MGMT 752. Developing Effective Management and Team Skills. 3 Hours.

This course enhances skills to improve students' capacity and ability to manage others effectively. The focus of the course is on skill acquisition and development. Topics covered include negotiation and conflict resolution in organizations, communication skills, and collaborative team skills, along with other skills managers use in their day-to-day work. The course promotes self-awareness and reflection upon individual traits and abilities through self-assessments. Other pedagogy involves readings, personality and behavior inventories, and case analyses. Prerequisite: MGMT 706. LEC.

MGMT 753. Leadership Philosophy and Practice. 3 Hours.

This course will emphasize an exploration of ideas about leadership that are practice-oriented. The central themes of this material, some of which is philosophical in nature, are the focus on learning and the role of reflection in the leadership process and the process of developing leaders. A variety of topics are covered, including foresight, intuition, practical wisdom, critical thinking, reflective practice, ethical judgment, and articulating relationally responsive understandings of alternative futures. Students are provided the opportunity to reflect on and narrate their leadership-related crucible experiences, analyze those experiences using the conceptual material, and then enter into systematic dialogue on these issues with other students and the instructor. The ultimate product of this learning process will be the creation of a personal leadership development plan. Prerequisite: MGMT 706. LEC.

MGMT 754. Managing Internationally. 3 Hours.

This course explores the important managerial issues arising from a firm's expansion into the international arena and examines the analytical frameworks and management techniques that are essential for an international manager. Topics covered include strategies and organizational structures for managing a multinational corporation and management of various functional areas (such as production, marketing, finance, and human resources) in an international setting. Considerable attention is paid to how and why organizational communication and practices vary from one culture to another, as well as why certain values and cultural contexts might make particular management styles more successful than others. Prerequisite: IBUS 718 and MGMT 719. LEC.

MGMT 810. Managing People. 3 Hours.

This course addresses topics, challenges and processes associated with business-related people issues. The principal objectives are to increase understanding of human and group behavior in organizations; to learn how to effectively motivate and lead individuals and groups; to increase effectiveness in managing oneself and others in team settings; and to increase understanding of human resource (HR) policies and practices that help create and sustain competitive advantage through people. Course topics include individual differences, motivation, groups, leadership, strategic HR, employment law, staffing, compensation, performance management, and training and development. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

MGMT 820. Business Law and Ethics. 3 Hours.

This course has two purposes: to explore the relationship between law and business and provides a foundation for further understanding of business relevant laws and to address ethical decision-making and the management of ethics in the work place. Topics include classifications of law, federalism, court systems, civil judicial process, alternative dispute resolution, ethical analysis tools, recognition of ethical issues, organizational dimensions that impact ethical behavior, and the management of ethical responsibilities in a global business environment. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

MGMT 830. Global Strategic Management. 3 Hours.

Global Strategic Management is a capstone Strategic Management course infused with applications to global business. The principal objectives of the course are to learn the basics of strategic decision making and how strategy integrates functional area policies in organizations; to understand how industries affect firm strategies; to understand how firms develop resources and capabilities for competitive advantage; to examine key strategic decisions or areas such as vertical integration, diversification, technology and market entry; and to understand how globalization affects core aspects of strategic business decisions. Topics include firm strategy, industry analysis, resources and capabilities, cost and differentiation advantage, organizing for competitive advantage, strategic change, technology-based competition, multinational strategy, vertical integration, and diversification. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

MGMT 831. Consulting Practicum. 3 Hours.

This course provides clinical applications of business problem solving and consulting. The course objectives are to link models and theories with field applications to solve real business problems; to acquire first-hand industry knowledge and witness varying client management styles; to learn time management skills and acquire a practical `tool kit' for diverse business problem solving; to apply problem solving techniques in both corporate and client consulting environments; and to enhance team interaction and leadership capabilities. Topics include consulting processes and successful consultant characteristics, hypothesis generation, problem identification and differentiation of root cause vs. symptom, market research methods, solution modeling, prep and presentation of solution, keys to consulting effectiveness. This course is open to those with admission to a graduate business program. LEC.

MGMT 885. Business Consulting. 4 Hours.

Through experiential learning using live consulting assignments, students will achieve understanding clarity of the linkage between models and theories studied in the classroom and application in the field; direct interaction with clients at sophisticated corporate organizations; and first hand experience in addressing significant business challenges with impactful and strategically correct solutions. Students will enhance their team and leadership skill capabilities through interaction with other team members. This course is not open to students with credit in MGMT 485. LEC.

MGMT 895. Graduate Seminar in Management: _____. 0.5-5 Hours.

A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MGMT 898. Independent Study for Master's Students. 1-6 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business management to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH.

MGMT 901. Current Research in Management. 1 Hour.

This course provides a workshop format for a discussion of the currently prevalent research topics, methods, and problems being addressed in the areas of human resources management, organizational behavior, and strategic management. All first year PhD students in HRM, OB, and SM will typically enroll in this course their first and second semesters in the doctoral program. Students will enroll in this course with their respective faculty advisors, who will work out a schedule of research seminars that each student must attend and participate in during the semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Business PhD Program in HRM, OB, or SM, or permission of the Management Area Director. LEC.

MGMT 905. Philosophy of the Behavioral and Organizational Sciences. 3 Hours.

An advanced introduction to the philosophy of science relevant to the behavioral and organizational sciences. Introduces the student to contemporary philosophical thought concerning the nature of scientific knowledge and its acquisition. Students will be exposed to classic works in the 20th century movement of thought in the philosophy of science and the philosophy of social science. Subject matter will include the study of logical positivism, anti-positivist responses such as falsificationism, epistemological anarchism, and Kuhnian relativism, to contemporary neo-pragmatist, postmodernist, and constructivist developments related to the indeterminacy of knowledge. The method of the course is philosophical; critical thinking, critical discussion, and dialectical exchange will be encouraged. The course is oriented to the interests of social scientists, rather than philosophers. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MGMT 906. Behavioral Research Methods. 4 Hours.

This course is designed to develop in students an ability to analyze research reports critically and to provide skills in designing, performing, and reporting original behavioral research. Methodologies ranging from naturalistic field studies to laboratory experiments are reviewed along with various data collection strategies. Students prepare and defend an original research proposal. Recommended to be taken early in the program for Human Resource Management, Organizational Behavior, and Strategic Management doctoral students. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MGMT 916. Seminar in Organization Theory. 3 Hours.

This course provides an advanced survey of theories about organizations as entities, their properties, and major processes. Topics include structures, structural change, organizational forms, decentralization, effectiveness, adoption and diffusion processes, concepts and theories of processes, interdependence and recent developments in organizational design and change. Major organization theories are also covered. Students are expected to write a serious research paper. This course is primarily for School of Business Ph.D. students but other advanced graduate students may enroll with the permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Doctoral standing or masters students with at least one undergraduate or M.B.A. level behavioral science course or consent of instructor. LEC.

MGMT 950. Personnel Selection and Effective Work Performance. 3 Hours.

This seminar focuses on staffing organizations to produce effective performance of work. It covers work performance, recruitment, and virtually all aspects of personnel selection. Topics include but are not limited to the following: measurement issues (reliability, validity, decision-making strategies); validity generalization; legal issues (discrimination, adverse impact); job and work analysis; evaluation of job applicant training and work experience; weighted application blanks and biodata; ability testing; personality assessment; performance tests and assessment centers; other methods of assessment (integrity testing, drug testing, graphology). Typically reading assignments include a substantial textbook plus articles from research journals (e.g., Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology). Typically students are required to write a substantial paper on a major aspect of personnel selection approved by the Professor. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MGMT 951. Training, Developing, and Managing Careers in Organizations. 3 Hours.

This seminar focuses on the development and maintenance of human capital and career management. A multi-level perspective is adopted and issues are considered from individual and organizational perspectives within the context of an HR system addressing contemporary workplace challenges. Theoretical and empirical readings will be drawn from OB, HR, and other relevant social sciences. Topics and themes include the processes of (a) training design, from needs assessment, through development, delivery and evaluation, and (b) career development and management. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MGMT 952. Strategic Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

This seminar focuses on macro-level perspectives on managing people for organizational effectiveness. Theoretical and empirical readings will be drawn from the OB, HR, strategy and other relevant literatures (e.g., services marketing) that explore themes related to: (a) human/social capital and firm success; (b) employee attitudes/behavior and firm success; (c) HR policies/practices and firm success; and (d) contingency perspectives applied to the above, including factors such as national culture, industry, competitive strategy and employee groups. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MGMT 953. Designing Effective Work Environments in Organizations. 3 Hours.

This seminar focuses on conceptual and empirical research in organizational behavior that seeks to understand how to achieve organizational effectiveness through establishing positive conditions for employees to flourish. The implications of these conditions for the motivation and ethical behavior of individuals will be discussed. Readings will address the following topics: Person-Organization Fit, Work Design, Work Teams, Leadership, Psychological Engagement, Decision-Making, Ethics, and Cross-cultural Dimensions of organization behavior or of the preceding topics. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MGMT 954. Individual and Interactionist Perspectives of Organizations. 3 Hours.

This seminar focuses on conceptual and empirical research in organizational behavior that seeks to understand how the interaction between individuals and organizational facets influences their sense-making and identity. The implications of these processes for employees' well-being, performance, and careers will be discussed. Readings will address the following topics: Social Cognitive Theory, Self-efficacy, Employee Attachment and Job Attitudes, Individual Differences, Careers, Employee Well-being, Emotions, Attribution Theory, Sense-making processes, Identity, Organizational Culture, and Cross-cultural Dimensions/Globalization. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MGMT 955. Creativity, Innovation, and Change in Organizations. 3 Hours.

This seminar focuses on theoretical and empirical research that seeks to understand the behavioral aspects of creativity and innovation in organizations. Central to this understanding is how organizations develop and change over time. Readings will include articles on the following topics: Expectancy theory, Goal setting, Intrinsic Motivation, Creativity, Innovation, Organizational Development, Learning, and Change Processes, Power and Politics, Organizational Citizenship Behaviors; and Cross-Cultural Dimensions. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MGMT 956. Economic Theories of Strategic Management. 3 Hours.

This seminar surveys the scholarly literature in Strategic Management that is based on economic modeling of human and firm behavior. Topics include but are not limited to Industrial Organization Economics, Transaction Costs Economics, Property Rights Theory, Agency Theory, Resource-Based View and Dynamic Capabilities, and Real Options Theory. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MGMT 957. Behavioral Theories of Strategic Management. 3 Hours.

This seminar surveys the scholarly literature in Strategic Management that is based on behavioral, psychological and sociological theories. Topics include but are not limited to the Behavioral Theory of the Firm, Behavioral Models of Strategic Decision Making, Strategy Formation, Strategic Leadership including CEO's, Boards and Top Management Teams, Organizational Demography, Cognition in Strategic Decision Making, Power & Politics in Strategy Development. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MGMT 995. Doctoral Seminar in Management: _____. 2-5 Hours.

A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

MGMT 997. Directed Research in Management. 1-5 Hours.

Students will research selected topics in the field of management under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH.

MGMT 998. Independent Study for Doctoral Students. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH.

MGMT 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

(V) Individual research work. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. THE.

Courses

MKTG 101. Enlightened Consumption. 3 Hours GE11.

An introduction to consumer behavior and its application to issues related to individual and societal well-being. Some of the topics include consumption and sustainability, how to detect and resist persuasion tactics, how to be a smart consumer and save money, and consumer rights. Students will learn to think critically about consumer decision-making and view consumer behavior not only from a personal vantage point but also from a broader societal perspective. This course is designed to be of interest to all undergraduate students regardless of discipline. LEC.

MKTG 300. Special Topics in Marketing: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of marketing topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC.

MKTG 305. Survey of Marketing. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to marketing from the perspective of the business firm. Topics included are the marketing system, consumer and industrial behavior, market segmentation and positioning, product policy, channels of distribution, pricing strategy, sales management, and marketing communications. (Not open to students with credit in MKTG 310 or MKTG 311.) Prerequisite: Goal 1, Outcome 2 and Goal 2, Outcome 1. LEC.

MKTG 310. Marketing. 3 Hours.

A study of marketing from the point of view of the business firm. Topics include the structure of the marketing system, the nature of marketing management, consumer behavior, marketing research, product policy, channels of distribution policy, and analytical techniques useful to marketing management. Prerequisite: Completion of ECON 142 or ECON 143, ACCT 200, and PSYC 104 or PSYC 105. Prior completion or coenrollment in DSCI 202 or DSCI 301. LEC.

MKTG 311. Marketing, Honors. 3 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course involves a study of marketing from the point of view of the business firm. Topics include the nature of marketing management, consumer behavior, marketing research, product policy, channels of distribution policy, marketing communications, pricing, and analytical techniques relevant to marketing management. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Completion of ECON 142 or ECON 143, ACCT 200, and PSYC 104 or PSYC 105. Prior completion or co-enrollment in DSCI 202 or DSCI 301. LEC.

MKTG 400. Special Topics in Marketing: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of marketing topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC.

MKTG 411. Introduction to Consumer Behavior. 3 Hours.

A study of the buyer's information acquisition, evaluation, purchasing, and post-purchasing evaluation process. Emphasis is placed upon social psychological theories and their implications on the understanding and prediction of consumers' behavior. The student, from the standpoint of the marketing manager, will apply behavioral science concepts to the problems of planning, pricing, and promotion decisions. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 412. Introduction to Consumer Behavior, Honors. 3 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course involves study of the buyer's information acquisition, evaluation, purchasing, and post-purchasing evaluation process. Emphasis is placed upon social psychological theories and their implications on the understanding and prediction of consumers' behavior. The student, from the standpoint of the marketing manager, will apply behavioral science concepts to the problems of planning, pricing, and promotion decisions. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. LEC.

MKTG 415. Marketing Research for Managers. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of marketing research and analytical approaches to marketing problems. The material is presented from an applied point of view and is designed to familiarize the student with those aspects of marketing research with which the marketing manager is likely to interact. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 420. Integrated Marketing Communications. 3 Hours.

This course will deal with the use of advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, and public relations as elements in a promotional program. The perspective of the course will be distinctly managerial. Therefore, the emphasis will be upon the efficient use of an organization's resources to accomplish communication goals through effective promotional strategy. A good part of the course will be spent examining the communication process; the nature of the receiver and how information is processed; determination of promotional objectives; promotional budget; media decisions, and measuring the effectiveness of the promotional campaigns. The goal of the course is to enable the students to better evaluate and devise a marketing communications program for any given product, service, or idea. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 425. Sales Force Management. 3 Hours.

Managing a sales force is a key marketing activity and a natural progression of a successful career in professional selling. Several factors contribute to the success of the sales force in meeting a firm's objectives. These include sales force structure, sales force sizing, territory alignment, market segmentation and selection, compensation, and pricing policies . Accordingly, the primary objective of this course is to familiarize you with the concepts, methodologies, and tools for making sound decisions in these areas. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 430. New Product Management. 3 Hours.

This course deals with the strategies, techniques, and methods used to develop and market a new product. An important aspect of the course deals with anticipating and managing change that can affect a firm's marketing opportunities and response. Also emphasized is the need for a disciplined process of development. Subjects examined include innovative thinking, identification, and development of marketing opportunities, marketing mix strategies, and implementation. Prerequisite: MKTG 310, MKTG 311 or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 435. Marketing Strategy. 3 Hours.

The emphasis of this course is strategic marketing analysis and planning. Concepts and methods for the strategic analysis of product-market definition, segmentation, product positioning, and new product planning are examples of individual subjects that are covered. However, the primary objective is to integrate various topics into a strategic planning framework. An important component of the course is the application of concepts to realistic marketing problems through the use of comprehensive marketing simulations or in-depth cases that capture the dynamics of the marketing environment. Students will learn how to identify markets, assess company strengths and weaknesses, target market segments, analyze competition, and develop specific functional strategies in such areas as product development, pricing, distribution, and promotion. Prerequisite: MKTG 411 or MKTG 412 and MKTG 415. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 440. Global Marketing. 3 Hours AE42.

Today businesses compete in a global environment. As such, marketing managers must recognize the global nature of their markets and must develop the knowledge background, sensitivity, and skills required to successfully operate in this dynamic setting. This course examines the array of activities required to select, gain entry, and compete in a location other than the "home" country. Also examined is the influence that culture, environment, government regulation, and economic systems can have upon marketing mix decisions (product, price, promotion, distribution) related to localization, standardization, and local adaptation. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 443. Digital Marketing and Social Media. 3 Hours.

This course aims to provide the theoretical knowledge and practical insights for integrating social media and digital marketing into the traditional marketing mix, understanding and engaging social media consumers, and monitoring and measuring the results of these efforts. Students will learn how to manage digital and social media, be able to understand the psychology of online consumers, the impact of digital and social media on traditional marketing strategy, review the digital and social media marketing process, critically evaluate the various social media platforms and online content, and successfully measure the impact of digital marketing efforts. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. LEC.

MKTG 445. Services Marketing. 3 Hours.

This course prepares students for careers, which will entail managing businesses in the service sector. This sector includes accounting management consulting, engineering services, environmental services, health care, research, architectural, hotel and restaurant, charitable, and many others. It provides the foundation a student needs so that he or she can move beyond providing technical support to the client and towards managing and developing the business. For a marketing or management student, it provides the foundation they need to be able to find a job, hit the ground running, and advance in a marketing (management) position with companies in the service sector. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 446. Services Marketing, Honors. 3 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course prepares students for careers, which will entail managing businesses in the service sector. This sector includes accounting, management consulting, engineering services, environmental services, health care, research, architecture, hotel and restaurant services, charitable institutions, and many others. It provides the foundation a student needs so that he or she can move beyond providing technical support to the client and towards managing and developing the business. For a marketing or management student, it provides the foundation they need to be able to find a job, hit the ground running, and advance in a marketing (management) position with companies in the service sector. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

MKTG 448. Managing Brands. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills required to design a strategic brand management plan. Emphasis is placed on building, measuring, and managing brand equity. Some topics covered in the course include developing a brand strategy, designing and implementing brand marketing programs, measuring and interpreting brand performance, and growing and sustaining brand equity. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. LEC.

MKTG 450. Internet Marketing. 3 Hours.

This course examines how the power of today's digital technologies can be harnessed to enhance and deploy the marketing function. The course begins with an overview of the key forces shaping the digital environment. It then examines several topics that define and characterize marketing in this new environment. Illustrative topics include web business models, traffic driving strategies, one-to-one marketing, personalization, closed-loop marketing, online support, dynamic pricing, channel redesign, and m-commerce. Throughout, emphasis is placed on linking key concepts to best practices in the field. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 453. Retailing, Distribution Channel and Supply Chains. 3 Hours.

This course exposes students to the many facets of retailing and provides a basic understanding of retailing concepts. At the completion of the course, students will understand the challenges of starting, managing, expanding, and succeeding in retailing. The course covers major functions that comprise the retailing task, including the decision tools used, planning, strategy formulation, implementation and control in retail management. The content of the course should be useful for students interested in working in the retail sector, desiring to work for companies that interface with retailers and/or for those with a general management and entrepreneurial interest. Not open to students with credit in SCM 453. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 455. Pricing. 3 Hours.

The primary objective of this course is to examine the concepts and tools required to effectively manage the pricing function. Both strategic and tactical aspects of pricing will be covered with a view to identify profit-boosting practices across a range of professional contexts - as product managers, business unit managers, management consultants, and entrepreneurs. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 458. Marketing, Supply Chains, and Geographic Information Systems. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to engage students in critical discussions, analysis and use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in a variety of business sectors. Additionally, the course will introduce students to GIS systems used to make business decisions through hands-on and applied assignments. Upon completion, student will understand how GIS and related systems are applied to and utilized by businesses, as well as how to employ basic GIS programs to help solve a variety of business problems. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 458 or GEOG 458. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 460. Practicum in Advertising and Promotional Plan Development. 3 Hours.

The course is an experiential approach to promotional campaign development with an emphasis on promotional strategy as a single component of the total marketing strategy. Student teams work with actual businesses to address the business's individual marketing needs. Students conduct environmental and industry analysis and primary and secondary market research to identify target markets, develop a marketing strategy, promotional objectives, product positioning, brand development and ROI measures for a promotional strategy. Students then complete media planning, creative execution, and budgeting and present the project to the business. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311 and at least two of the following three courses: MKTG 411 or MKTG 412, MKTG 415 or MKTG 416, or MKTG 435. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 465. Customer Relationship Management. 3 Hours.

This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the strategy and tactics of customer relationship management (CRM). Particular emphasis is given toward identifying the key strategic principles inherent in the customer-centric focus that underlies a successful CRM program. Topics include: Fundamentals of CRM strategy, marketing metrics, customer profitability analysis, choice modeling, techniques for evaluating model performance and applications of CRM to marketing campaign management. Students will be instructed on how to implement the CRM techniques using various software tools and real-world data. (Same as SCM 425.) Not open to students with credit in BSAN 465 or MKTG 465 or SCM 425. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311; SCM 310 or SCM 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 500. Individual Research in Marketing. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in marketing not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the readings and research. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311, MGMT 310 or MGMT 311, MKTG 310 or MKTG 311 and SCM 310 or SCM 311; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 701. Marketing Management. 2 Hours.

This course examines the marketing function of the firm, primarily from a managerial perspective. The topics examined include: marketing concepts, segmentation, and decisions related to positioning, products, pricing, distribution, and promotion. LEC.

MKTG 706. Marketing. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to equip students with basic concepts associated with the marketing function. Principal objectives are to discuss the role of marketing in an organization, to describe the processes of buyer behavior and the impact of these processes on marketing decisions, to develop an understanding of approaches used to segment markets and factors influencing the selection of target markets, to develop an understanding of elements of the marketing mix (product, price, communications, channels) and factors affecting decisions in these areas, and to integrate these concepts into an effective marketing strategy. LEC.

MKTG 714. Discovering &Evaluating New Product Opportunities. 2 Hours.

Rapid shifts in technology and consumer preferences make new products critical to a firm's portfolio. This course highlights the value of a disciplined approach in bringing new products and services to market. Specific topics covered include models for opportunity identification, understanding customer preferences and perceptions, and gauging market demand. Multidimensional scaling, factor analysis, clustering, preference regression and conjoint analysis are some techniques used in this course. Prerequisite: MKTG 701 or MKTG 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 715. Consumer Behavior. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to review behavioral science concepts applicable to understanding behavior of consumers in the marketplace. It investigates the specific processes of consumer decision-making and purchasing, and the implications these have for marketing strategy. Topics covered include: effect of internal and external factors on consumer decision making, information processing, learning and memory, attitude formation and change, post-purchase behavior, ethical/social issues, effects on marketing strategy. Prerequisite: MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 716. Global Marketing. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a set of conceptual and managerial tools to students for undertaking marketing of products and services on a global scale. The topics covered in the course include economic and financial dimensions in global marketing, social and cultural aspects of the global market environment, regional market characteristics, political and legal issues in global marketing. A significant portion of the course is devoted to the study of competitive analysis and competitive strategy for the global markets, marketing information systems, various strategies for entering global markets, organization, planning and control of global marketing, and marketing mix decisions (product, price, promotion, and distribution) in a global setting. Prerequisite: IBUS 701 and MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 717. Integrated Marketing Communications. 2 Hours.

The goal of this course is to enable the student to evaluate and devise a product/service marketing communications program. Emphasis will be placed on the efficient use of resources to accomplish communication goals through effective promotional strategy involving advertising, personal selling, sales promotion and publicity. Topics covered include the communication process, determination of promotional objectives, promotional budgeting, media planning, measuring effectiveness and ethical issues. Prerequisite: MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 721. Advanced Topics in Managing Products and Brands. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to explore various marketing issues in managing a portfolio of products in a global marketplace, across multiple product lines. While the course will review marketing strategies concerning pricing, promotions, product liability, and protection of intellectual property rights, it will especially focus on such concepts as brand identity/ personality brand extension/ leveraging, co-branding, brand loyalty, brand equity, product and brand strategies over the lifecycle of products and brands, and organizational requirements for building successful brands. Prerequisite: MKTG 701 or MKTG 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 722. Marketing Strategy. 2 Hours.

The emphasis of this course is strategic marketing analysis and planning. Topics examined include (a) Situation and SWOT analyses and how these lead to an understanding of the firm's sustainable competitive advantage, (b) methods for the identification of segmentation within consumer and business markets, (c) the selection of target segments based upon competitive advantage and value, (d) positioning and differentiation within target segments, and (e) the development of brand strategy and action plans based upon segment positioning and differentiation. An important component of the course is the application of concepts to realistic marketing problems that captures the dynamics of marketing environments. Prerequisite: MKTG 701 or MKTG 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 723. Marketing Research. 2 Hours.

This course engages students in a broad examination of marketing research as practiced in marketing organizations today. Topics include defining business problems and establishing research objectives, choosing among research approaches (survey, qualitative, and secondary designs), gathering data (questionnaires, focus groups/interviews, and online), analyzing research data, and generating actionable results for business decision-making. The emphasis is on practical applications for the marketing professional. Prerequisite: DSCI 701 or DSCI 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 724. Pricing of Products and Services. 2 Hours.

The objective of this course is to prepare students for addressing strategic and tactical pricing issues and identifying profit-boosting changes in pricing practices. Pricing issues will be examined from various perspectives (e.g., product managers, business unit managers, management consultants, and entrepreneurs). The course will focus on teaching key economic, analytical and behavioral concepts associated with costs, customer behavior and competition. The course will employ economic, analytical, and behavioral concepts to illustrate how pricing decisions can be deployed to capture additional value. It will cover basic topics such as measurement of price sensitivity, segmented pricing, role of costs, and life cycle pricing as well as advanced topics such as dynamic pricing, pricing structures, and pricing under competition. Prerequisite: MKTG 701 or MKTG 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 751. Consumer Behavior. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to review behavioral science concepts applicable to understanding behavior of consumers in the marketplace. It investigates the specific processes of consumer decision-making and purchasing, and the implications these have for marketing strategy. Topics covered include: effect of internal and external factors on consumer decision making, information processing, learning and memory, attitude formation and change, postpurchase behavior, ethical/social issues, effects on marketing strategy. Prerequisite: MKTG 706 or equivalent. LEC.

MKTG 752. Integrated Marketing Communications. 3 Hours.

The goal of this course is to enable the student to evaluate and devise a product/service marketing communications program. Emphasis will be placed on the efficient use of resources to accomplish communication goals through effective promotional strategy involving advertising, personal selling, sales promotion and publicity. Topics covered include the communication process, determination of promotional objectives, promotional budgeting, media planning, measuring effectiveness and ethical issues. Prerequisite: MKTG 706 or equivalent. LEC.

MKTG 753. Global Marketing. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a set of conceptual and managerial tools to students for undertaking marketing of products and services on a global scale. The topics covered in the course include economic and financial dimensions in global marketing, social and cultural aspects of the global market environment, regional market characteristics, political and legal issues in global marketing. A significant portion of the course is devoted to the study of competitive analysis and competitive strategy for the global markets, marketing information systems, various strategies for entering global markets, organization, planning and control of global marketing, and marketing mix decisions (product, price, promotion, and distribution) in a global setting. Prerequisite: IBUS 718 and MKTG 706 or equivalent. LEC.

MKTG 754. Digital and Social Media Marketing. 3 Hours.

This course aims to provide the theoretical knowledge and practical insights for integrating social media and digital marketing into the traditional marketing mix, understanding and engaging social media consumers, and monitoring and measuring the results of these efforts. Students will learn how to manage digital and social media, be able to understand the psychology of online consumers, the impact of digital and social media on traditional marketing strategy, review the digital and social media marketing process, critically evaluate the various social media platforms and online content, and successfully measure the impact of digital marketing efforts. Specific topics to be discussed include: Search Engine Marketing, Google AdWords, Google Analytics and Facebook Insights. Prerequisite: MKTG 706 or equivalent. LEC.

MKTG 810. Marketing Management. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to equip students with basic concepts associated with the marketing function. Principal objectives are to discuss the role of marketing in an organization, to describe the processes of buyer behavior and the impact of these processes on marketing decisions, to develop an understanding of approaches used to segment markets and factors influencing the selection of target markets, and to develop an understanding of elements of the marketing mix (product, price, communications, channels) and factors affecting decisions in these areas. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

MKTG 895. Graduate Seminar in Marketing: _____. 0.5-5 Hours.

A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

MKTG 898. Independent Study for Master's Students. 1-6 Hours.

(V) Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business management to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH.

MKTG 950. Advanced Marketing Research. 3 Hours.

This course deals with measurement tools typically used in marketing such as conjoint analysis, multi-dimensional scaling, questionnaire construction, formative and causal indicators of constructs, scale development and testing, reliability and validity issues, and design of complex lab and field experiments. The goal of the course is to equip students with measurement tools to conduct research in academic and applied settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MKTG 951. Consumer Behavior. 3 Hours.

This seminar provides an overview of the current theories and methodological approaches associated with consumer behavior research. Main topics of the course include attention and information search, consumer memory structure, consumer knowledge, inference making, motivation/goal, consumer attitude and persuasion, judgment and decision making, self-perception and regulation, culture's influence on consumer behavior, and affect/emotion/mood. The content will be based on literature from multiple disciplines including marketing, psychology, sociology, and economics. Students will be required to critically analyze and synthesize the literature, with a view to formulate research proposals on issues that interest them. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MKTG 952. Introduction to Marketing Models. 3 Hours.

There is a rich tradition of using models to represent and analyze various marketing phenomena. An illustrative list of topics include: examining first-mover advantages, understanding response to price, analyzing new pricing formats, compensation design, interaction between marketing investments and stock market response, consumer surplus analysis, allocation of marketing resources, and decision support systems. Against this backdrop, the objectives of this course are two-fold: (i) to provide a non-technical overview of various modeling approaches employed in marketing, and (ii) apply one or more of these approaches to generate new research. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MKTG 953. Marketing Communications. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on fundamentals of marketing communications with a heavy emphasis on message-memory. Some of the topics covered in this course include memory (e.g., elderly adults). Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MKTG 954. Pricing and Strategy. 3 Hours.

This seminar exposes students to the various analytical approaches to understand and model pricing phenomena by examining the classic as well as contemporary works on pricing. The students will learn how to model strategic interactions in the marketplace using game theory and other analytical tools as well as theories such as auction theory, prospect theory, and mental accounting. Some of the topics covered in this course include price discrimination mechanisms, price as a competitive tool (e.g., entry deterrence), price as a promotional strategy, role of price in channel structure and strategy, and effect of price on consumer choice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MKTG 955. Product Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on understanding products and the product development process. Readings are drawn from the literature in marketing, management, decision theory and psychology. Some topics covered in the course include creation and diffusion of innovations, modeling consumers' perceptions and preferences, brand equity and branding, entry order, sales forecasting, and global product development. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MKTG 956. Current Topics in Behavioral Marketing Research. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on theories and current topics in behavioral research in marketing. The primary goals of this course are: (1) to familiarize students with current topics and issues in behavioral marketing, with particular regard to psychological processes underlying consumers' choices and preference in everyday life, (2) to improve critical thinking about behavioral aspects of marketing, and (3) to help students develop meaningful and testable research ideas and to design experiments to test these ideas. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MKTG 957. Managerial Issues in Marketing. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to examine issues that influence managerial decision-making such as product management, behavioral pricing, marketing communications, and marketing models. Instructor's research interest would dictate the emphasis on a particular topic. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MKTG 958. Consumer Judgment and Decision Making. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to develop a solid foundation for critical thinking and research on judgment and decision making aspects of consumer behavior, marketing, and business in general. This graduate seminar may cover a wide range of behavioral research topics relevant to the study of judgment and decision making, such as utility theory, prospect theory, costly signaling theory and conspicuous consumption, sex differences in behavior and consumption, and hormonal influence on consumption. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MKTG 959. Affect, Cognition and Hedonic Consumption. 3 Hours.

This seminar takes a comprehensive look at the current and prior research on affect and cognitive processes, and specifically examines various aspects of consumption, both pleasant and unpleasant. Topics covered in this course include-but are not limited to-positive emotions, mindfulness, and various social, emotional, and cognitive determinants of consumer satisfaction, happiness, and well-being. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MKTG 960. Emotion and Motivation. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of recent research on emotions and motivations, with an emphasis on how they effect consumer behavior. The course explores questions such as "Do emotions lead us to make irrational decisions?", and "What are fundamental human motivations?" Through the course, students will gain a better understanding of perspectives within the field of motivations and emotion, research that has been conducted on various types of motivations, and how motivation theory is applied to marketing. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC.

MKTG 995. Doctoral Seminar in Marketing: _____. 2-5 Hours.

A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

MKTG 997. Directed Research in Marketing. 1-5 Hours.

Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH.

MKTG 998. Independent Study for Doctoral Students. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH.

MKTG 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

(V) Individual research work. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. THE.

Courses

MSCM 820. Marketing Intelligence. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to marketing research. The emphasis will be on providing an understanding of the value of marketing research and the tools to engage in the process. The objectives are to understand research planning, types of research and design, to determine appropriate sampling, data collections methods and research methodologies, to understand, apply and interpret fundamental concepts of data analysis and analysis software. Topics covered will include the research process, understanding data sources, qualitative research, measurement and scaling issues, questionnaire design, analysis of data, and the research report. Prerequisite: DSCI 810. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

MSCM 830. Understanding Customers. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to review behavioral science concepts applicable to understanding behavior of consumers in the marketplace. It investigates the specific processes of consumer decision making and purchasing, and the implications these have for marketing strategy. The course will cover the internal and external factors that affect consumer decision-making processes; the steps consumers go through before, during and following the purchase decision; theories of attitude formation, methods of attitude-measurement and attitude change. Topics include the effect of external factors (cultures, social class, reference groups, family), effect of internal factors (needs, motives, personality), the extended decision-making process, information processing, learning and memory, attitude formation and change, low-involvement decision making, post-purchase behavior, ethical/social issues, effects on marketing strategy. Prerequisite: MSCM 820. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

MSCM 831. Distribution Channels and Global Operations. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the theory and practice of designing distribution channels and global supply chains. The objectives of the course are to provide an understanding of different channels of distribution and the complexities of global operations along with their associated risks and rewards. The course will address topics in transportation, fulfillment, and facility location to support global supply chains. It will develop the ability to design logistics systems and formulate integrated supply chain strategy. The topics also include channels of distribution, , warehousing, and global operations management. Prerequisite: SCM 820. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

MSCM 832. Marketing Services and Managing Customer Relationships. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to fill the knowledge gap between managing products and managing services. It will help students understand the unique needs and challenges faced by service companies (and those manufacturing companies that rely on services for their differential advantage) in a complex global environment. The primary objective is to provide a set of conceptual and managerial tools for effective management and marketing of services. Broad topics include services characteristics, managing customer expectations, understanding service consumption behavior, service strategy, segmentation & positioning, creating service offerings, service quality, managing demand for services, service pricing. Topics pertaining to customer relationships include acquiring and retaining customers, customer profitability & lifetime value, customer satisfaction measurement, relationship marketing, and service recovery. Topics pertaining to managing service employees include empowering service employees, employees as living brands; globalization of services; and ethical issues in services marketing. Prerequisite: MSCM 820. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

Courses

SCM 305. Survey of Decision Making in Business. 3 Hours.

An introduction to decision making under the uncertainty encountered in business and in everyday life. Covers selected topics in probability, statistics, economics, and operations research, and their application to complex problems in financial management, marketing, operations management, supply chain management, and quality management; as well as risks affecting everyday life, such as personal decisions in regard to career, marriage, and wealth management. (Not open to students with credit in SCM 310.) Prerequisite: Goal 1, Outcome 2 and Goal 2, Outcome 1. LEC.

SCM 310. Management Science and Operations Management. 3 Hours.

Introduces some of the most widely used models from management science in business decision making. Topics include decision making under uncertainty, resource allocation models, and production and operations management. (Formerly DSCI 310). Prerequisite: Prior completion or co-enrollment in DSCI 202 or DSCI 301 and IST 202 or IST 301. LEC.

SCM 311. Management Science and Operations Management, Honors. 3 Hours.

Honors treatment of this course introduces some of the most widely used models from management science in business decision making. Topics include decision making under uncertainty, resource allocation models, and production and operations management. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program, the Business Honors Program, or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Prior completion or co-enrollment in DSCI 202 or DSCI 301 and IST 202 or IST 301. LEC.

SCM 400. Special Topics in Supply Chain Management: _____. 1-5 Hours.

This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of supply chain management topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 401. Introduction to Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the student to supply chain management. Students are presented the key concepts of supply chain management, the application of these concepts and are provided with the managerial knowledge of supply chain management through class discussions and case studies. Students discover the impact of information technologies, strategic alliances and logistics on supply chain management and the performance implication of supply chain management. Prerequisite: SCM 310 or SCM 311, FIN 310 or FIN 311, and MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 402. Procurement and Supplier Management. 3 Hours.

This course involves the study of supply management. Topics covered include the purchasing process, the role of the procurement function within the company, and the evaluation, selection and development of suppliers. The course is also designed to emphasize the importance of negotiations and managing contracts. Prerequisite: SCM 401. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 403. Logistics, Transportation and Warehouse Management. 3 Hours.

This course discusses the area of physical distribution management of supply chains. Attention is given to managerial responsibilities such as network design, transportation methods, inventory management, warehousing, packaging, and materials handling. Prerequisite: SCM 401. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 404. Management of Integrated Information System/ERP. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. We will evaluate the functions, processes and data requirements of business functions in an integrated framework. The objectives of the course include (1) understanding data needs of different business functions; (2) understanding alternative information systems solutions and the problems in independent information systems and; (3) understanding ERP systems as solutions to integration. Not open to students with credit in IST 401. Prerequisite: IST 202 or IST 301. Enrollment restricted LEC.

SCM 410. Capstone in Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

Integrating and apply the theories, concepts, and methods taken in previous supply chain management courses through the use of readings, case studies, projects, and industry speakers. Prerequisite: SCM 401 and IST 202 or IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 415. Data Analysis and Forecasting. 3 Hours.

This course is concerned with the analysis and interpretation of data encountered in business and economics. One goal of the course is to develop skills in the analysis of data that can be used to solve problems students are likely to encounter on the job. The course attempts to develop an attitude toward data analysis that can be usefully applied in a wide variety of real life situations. A variety of statistical tools are covered. In particular, the multiple regress model is covered with an emphasis on how the model can be used in situations involving economic data. Data analysis techniques are illustrated with examples and case studies using computers. This course is in the management sciences and operations management area. Not open to students with credit in BSAN 415. Prerequisite: SCM 310 or SCM 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 416. Supply Chain Modeling and Optimization. 3 Hours.

Design, develop, and use computer decision models for analysis of supply chain operations; computer intensive coursework emphasizing spreadsheet applications. Prerequisite: SCM 401. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 418. Modeling and Risk Analysis. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the concepts, methodologies, and applications of risk analysis and modeling. This course is designed primarily to develop practical modeling skills with spreadsheet software. To accomplish this, material across the finance discipline will be covered as well as material from the supply chain management discipline. Examples from corporate finance, investments, financial derivatives, real estate, personal finance, and supply chain management methods will be used to demonstrate modeling. (Same as FIN 418.) Not open to students with credit in FIN 418 or FIN 460. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or FIN 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 420. Customer Focused Operations Service Management. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to build the conceptual framework which drives an organization striving to operate in a customer-focused mode. This requires an integration of basic principles of marketing and operations in order to define the value-added in each of an organization's products and/or services, to use this information to define the value-added in work, and to use this definition to improve the actual work. To do this effectively, requires leadership, empowerment, focused data, and a system view. The basic principles of each requirement will be discussed as well as their integration into a unified whole. Not open to students with credit in BSAN 420. Prerequisite: SCM 310 or SCM 311 and MKTG 310 or MKTG 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 425. Customer Relationship Management. 3 Hours.

This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the strategy and tactics of customer relationship management (CRM). Particular emphasis is given toward identifying the key strategic principles inherent in the customer-centric focus that underlies a successful CRM program. Topics include: Fundamentals of CRM strategy, marketing metrics, customer profitability analysis, choice modeling, techniques for evaluating model performance and applications of CRM to marketing campaign management. Students will be instructed on how to implement the CRM techniques using various software tools and real-world data. (Same as MKTG 465.) Not open to students with credit in BSAN 465 or MKTG 465 or SCM 425. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or MKTG 311; SCM 310 or SCM 311. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 453. Retailing, Distribution Channel and Supply Chains. 3 Hours.

This course exposes students to the many facets of retailing and provides a basic understanding of retailing concepts. At the completion of the course, students will understand the challenges of starting, managing, expanding, and succeeding in retailing. The course covers major functions that comprise the retailing task, including the decision tools used, planning, strategy formulation, implementation and control in retail management. The content of the course should be useful for students interested in working in the retail sector, desiring to work for companies that interface with retailers and/or for those with a general management and entrepreneurial interest. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 453. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. LEC.

SCM 458. Marketing, Supply Chains, and Geographic Information Systems. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to engage students in critical discussions, analysis and use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in a variety of business sectors. Additionally, the course will introduce students to GIS systems used to make business decisions through hands-on and applied assignments. Upon completion, student will understand how GIS and related systems are applied to and utilized by businesses, as well as how to employ basic GIS programs to help solve a variety of business problems. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 458 or GEOG 458. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. LEC.

SCM 500. Individual Research in Supply Chain Management. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected topics in supply chain management not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. RSH.

SCM 701. Introduction to Supply Chain Management. 2 Hours.

This overview course covers a wide set of topics to develop a strategic view of supply chain management and to illustrate its interdisciplinary nature. The course has the following principal objectives: to introduce the strategic and operating issues and decisions involved in managing the operational and supply chain processes within and across firms; to understand the global and interdisciplinary nature of supply chain management; to understand the concept of supply chain coordination by managing information and inventory. Topics covered in the class include supply chain functions, forecasting and demand management, inventory management, managing information flows in supply chains, globalization and outsourcing, and supply chain technologies. Prerequisite: Corequisite: DSCI 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 702. Procurement and Supplier Management. 2 Hours.

This course involves the study of supply management. Topics covered include the purchasing process, the role of the procurement function within the company, and the evaluation, selection and development of suppliers. The course is also designed to emphasize the importance of negotiation and managing contracts. Prerequisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC.

SCM 703. Transportation, Logistics Systems. 3 Hours.

This course discusses the area of physical distribution management of supply chains. Attention is given to managerial responsibilities such as network design, transportation methods, inventory management, warehousing, packaging and materials handling. Prerequisite: Corequisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC.

SCM 704. Information Systems for Supply Chain Management. 2 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. We will evaluate the functions processes and data requirements of business functions in an integrated framework. The objectives of the course include (1) understanding data needs of different business functions; (2) understanding alternative information systems solutions and the problems in independent information systems and; (3) understanding (ERP) systems as solution to integration. Prerequisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC.

SCM 705. Project Management. 2 Hours.

An introduction to formal project management methods and practices presented in a fashion that builds upon experiences of the students in the class. At the end of the class, each student should: understand the formal project management discipline and methodology, appreciate at a high level different approaches to project management and when each might most effectively be applied, understand the importance and benefits of standard methodologies, be able to adapt such methods to unique situations, and learn the key features of some project management software. LEC.

SCM 706. Change Management. 2 Hours.

This course provides students an understanding of the processes driving change in the business world as well as the strategic implementation required of leaders that enables them to effectively manage their organizations in a changing environment. It is concerned with the development of specific actions, decisions and communications in times of change. The course is specifically designed to focus on changes in the environment for business, but in a way that business professionals and/or non-business people can be equally effective in the learning environment. Prerequisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC.

SCM 710. Capstone in Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

Integrating and applying the theories, concepts, and methods taken in previous supply chain management courses through the use of readings, case studies, project and industry speakers. Prerequisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC.

SCM 720. Procurement and Supplier Management. 2 Hours.

This course provides the students with an understanding of procurement, strategic sourcing and supplier management. The course has the following principal objectives: to introduce the basic concepts, terminology, tools of purchasing; to provide a conceptual framework of the trends and developments in global sourcing; to understand the techniques of negotiations; and to develop understanding of supplier relationship management. Topics covered in the course include purchasing process, policy, and procedures, purchasing law and ethics, supply management, supplier selection and evaluation, supplier relations management, global sourcing, and negotiations. Prerequisite: SCM 701 or SCM 820. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 721. Logistics and Distribution Management. 2 Hours.

This course addresses the theory and practice of designing distribution channels and logistics systems. The course has the following principal objectives: to understand how logistics management generates value to customers; to establish a sound foundation in transportation, fulfillment, and facility location to support global supply chains; and to develop the ability to design logistics systems and formulate integrated supply chain strategy, so that all components are not only internally synchronized but also tuned to fit corporate strategy, competitive realities and market needs. Topics covered include transportation & fulfillment, inventory management, facility location, warehousing, and global logistics. Prerequisite: SCM 701 or SCM 820. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 722. Information Systems for Supply Chain Management. 2 Hours.

This course examines information technology (IT) applications in the field of supply chain management, focusing on such issues as the breadth of IT tools and products available to support the planning, implementation and operation of supply chains, the process by which specific applications are selected by companies, and the implementation process. Among the other topics addressed in the course are the integration of IT systems between internal and external supply chain partners and the IT problems typically facing a company post acquisition. Prerequisite: SCM 701 or SCM 820. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 723. Lean Six Sigma. 2 Hours.

This course addresses the theory and practice of continuous process improvement through lean thinking and six sigma quality improvement. The course has the following principle objectives: to understand the process associated with continuous improvement in manufacturing and service organizations; to understand common tools that are useful in continuous improvement in manufacturing and service organizations; and to gain experience in the practice of continuous improvement. Topics covered include using the scientific method in continuous improvement; tools to understand and reduce variability like control charts, capability analysis, stratification analysis, Pareto analysis, etc; and tools to implement lean thinking like Kanban (pull systems), Takt time (process pacing to customer demand), one piece flow, Jodoka (error proofing), Heijunka (product leveling). Prerequisite: DSCI 701 or DSCI 810. Enrollment restricted. LEC.

SCM 820. Operations and Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

This introductory course covers a wide set of topics to develop both strategic and analytical skills in supply chain management. The course will provide a conceptual framework and a set of analytical tools to analyze, coordinate, and improve organizational processes. Objectives of the course include an introduction to the strategic and operating issues and decisions involved in managing the operational and supply chain processes within and across firms; an understanding of the concept of supply chain coordination by managing information and inventory; and to develop a basic understanding of purchasing, supplier relationship management, and outsourcing. Topics include process and cycle time analysis, lean/JIT production system, six sigma, inventory management, managing information flows in supply chains, and purchasing and supply management. This course is open only to students in the full-time MBA program. LEC.

SCM 895. Graduate Seminar in Supply Chain Management: _____. 0.5-5.5 Hours.

A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. LEC.

SCM 898. Independent Study for Master's Students. 1-6 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of supply chain management to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH.

SCM 995. Doctoral Seminar in Supply Chain Management. 2-5 Hours.

A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

SCM 998. Independent Study for Doctoral Students. 1-5 Hours.

Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. LEC.

SCM 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

Individual research work. Graded on a satisfactory progress/limited progress/no progress basis. THE.