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The School of Social Welfare

The University of Kansas School of Social Welfare offers the only comprehensive program in social work in Kansas: the professional degrees of

KU's School of Social Welfare is an excellent place to pursue your interests in professional social work education. It is the oldest school of social welfare in the state and the only one to offer degree preparation from undergraduate through doctoral degrees in social work.

Social work education began at KU in 1937. The Master of Social Work program, established in Lawrence and at the KU Medical Center in Kansas City in 1946, has been continuously accredited since 1948. The Bachelor of Social Work degree has been awarded since 1971. In 1974, the B.S.W. program became one of the first in the nation to receive accredited status. The Council on Social Work Education, the accrediting body for social work education, most recently reaccredited the B.S.W. and M.S.W. programs in 2010. The doctoral program admitted its first students in 1981.

KU’s Master of Social Work program consistently ranks among the top U.S. national public universities, according to U.S. News & World Report’s “America’s Best Graduate Schools”. The School of Social Welfare is recognized internationally as an innovator in social work theory development and in research that makes positive contributions to our communities.

The school is housed on KU’s Lawrence campus in Twente Hall, named for nationally renowned social work educator Esther Twente, who chaired the social work department from 1946 to 1957. The school also offers the M.S.W. program at the KU Edwards Campus in Overland Park, a suburb of Kansas City, and in western Kansas in collaboration with Fort Hays State University and Garden City Community College. The B.S.W. Edwards 2+2 program is offered at Kansas City Kansas Community College.

Mission and Themes

Mission

The threefold mission of the University of Kansas School of Social Welfare is to educate students at the B.S.W., M.S.W., and Ph.D. levels, to conduct scholarly inquiry that contributes to the knowledge base of the profession, and to provide leadership in formulating social policy and developing service delivery strategies and systems.

In the B.S.W. and M.S.W. programs, students learn generalist and advanced-level social work practice methods and skills that advance the empowerment and well-being of individuals, families, and communities. At the Ph.D. level, students are equipped with the necessary skills for critical inquiry and scholarship to become leaders in the social work profession in academic, research, and public policy realms.

Guiding Principles and Themes

The KU School of Social Welfare is committed to practicing educational approaches and conducting scholarship that directly and explicitly enhance the connection of theory and concepts to the needs of clients and the demands of everyday practice. This commitment flows from the values and ethical principles of the profession and is enriched by our commitment to these 4 themes:

  • A focus on people's strengths
  • An understanding of human diversity
  • The promotion of social and economic justice
  • The development of a critical perspective

Strengths

A perspective that recognizes, mobilizes, and supports the inherent strengths of individuals, families, neighborhoods, organizations, and communities to discover and develop their own and communal resources and assets in their struggle for a better quality of life.

Diversity

Understanding, valuing, and engaging the broad range of differences and commonalities that are brought to the interaction among social workers, clients, and the social environment and that reflect clients' culture, ethnicity, race, geography, gender, social class, religion, sexual orientation, and physical and mental abilities — particularly when those differences are the cause for discrimination.

Social and Economic Justice

A commitment to promoting fairness, equality of power, and equity of resources based on a complex understanding of the effects of economic, political, and social structures on people's life chances, particularly related to economic inequality and the allocation of necessary social resources.

Critical Perspective

The capacity to engage in a deliberate and continuing examination of the assumptions underlying the theories, methods, and approaches used by social work in understanding and responding to human needs.

The Programs

At the University of Kansas, students have the opportunity to prepare for professional careers in social work at the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral levels. The curriculum is carefully laid out to bring students from the introductory level through advanced study in clinical social work practice or social work administrative and advocacy practice. Under the umbrella of a practice orientation, the programs are structured to support the essential themes of the school, which focus on people’s strengths, celebrate human diversity, promote social and economic justice, and provide a critical perspective.

Classroom work is one half of professional preparation; field placements are the other half. Placements in social service agencies offer students the opportunity to apply skills learned in the classroom. B.S.W. and M.S.W. students spend time in practicum settings throughout the region. Our students provide more than 250,000 hours of service to underserved populations through practicum experiences.

Learn more about the School of Social Welfare programs.

Professional and Community Education

To help our graduates and other professionals maintain proficiency in practice skills and to expand their capacities, the school offers a wide range of courses and workshops through the Professional and Community Education Program.

These offerings are designed specifically for the practicing professional. Courses are developed in conjunction with the local human services community. They range from management skills to sophisticated clinical strategies. Evening and weekend classes are offered with a variety of credit and noncredit options. For information on the program and its offerings, please contact the program director at 913-897-8550.

Student Profile

The School of Social Welfare currently has more than 500 students, approximately 150 in the B.S.W. program, 350 in the master’s program, and 40 in the Ph.D. program. More than 350 students are enrolled in field practicum settings that reflect the range of practice of professional social work. Many students enter social work as a second career after an extended period away from school.

Student Handbook

During orientation, students who are admitted to degree-seeking status are directed to the student handbook, which contains full descriptions of policies and other details.

The Profession

Through the long history of the profession, social workers have understood the desperation of the homeless, the despair of the poor, the ostracism suffered by the mentally ill, the pain of those who are abused and neglected, and the humiliation endured by victims of discrimination. By carrying out this special commitment to helping vulnerable groups and individuals, social workers believe that society as a whole is strengthened. At the same time, social workers celebrate differences among people and believe that respecting those differences — whether of race, culture, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or age — enriches the quality of life for all.

Purpose and Objectives of Social Work

Social work is a vital, evolving profession that changes with the world in which we live. The purpose of social work is to promote or restore a mutually beneficial interaction between individuals and society in order to improve the quality of life for everyone. Social workers support the following values:

  • The environment (social, physical, organizational) should provide the opportunity and resources for the maximum realization of the potential and aspirations of all individuals, and should provide for their common human needs and for the alleviation of distress and suffering.
  • Individuals should contribute as effectively as they can to their own well-being and to the social welfare of others in their immediate environment, as well as to the collective society.
  • Transactions between individuals and others in their environment should enhance the dignity, individuality, and self-determination of everyone. People should be treated humanely and fairly.

Social workers focus on person-and-environment interaction. To carry out their purpose, they work with people to achieve the following objectives:

  • Help people increase their competence and problem-solving abilities.
  • Help people obtain resources.
  • Make organizations responsive to people.
  • Facilitate interaction between individuals and others in their environment.
  • Influence interactions between organizations and institutions.
  • Influence social and environmental policy.

Social workers are educated to provide services to individuals, families, groups, and communities; to develop, administer, and evaluate programs and organizations; and to participate in policy formulation and planning at the local, state, and national levels.

NASW Code of Ethics

As a guide to professional conduct, the Code of Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers represents the fundamental values of the profession. The National Association of Social Workers is the largest organization of professional social workers in the world, with a membership of 166,000.

The Code of Ethics identifies 6 values that inform the following principles:

  • Social workers’ primary goal is to help people in need and to address social problems.
  • Social workers challenge social injustice.
  • Social workers respect the inherent dignity and worth of the person.
  • Social workers recognize the central importance of human relations.
  • Social workers behave in a trustworthy manner.
  • Social workers practice within their areas of competence and develop and enhance their professional expertise.

View the entire Code of Ethics or request a copy.

Resources

Area Research Offices

The school supports research and policy development in a number of key areas, providing leadership and resources at the local, state, and national levels:

Faculty

The faculty’s scholarly interests, as reflected in teaching, research, and publications, span a wide range, including health, mental health, child welfare, adult and juvenile justice, gerontology, multiculturalism, women’s issues, history of social work, public policy analysis, homelessness, gender equity, poverty reduction and asset building, and social administration.

School of Social Welfare faculty members hold doctoral degrees in social work, social welfare, psychology, and other fields. In addition, outstanding social work practitioners serve as part-time classroom instructors, and 280 social work practitioners serve as practicum instructors.

Faculty members serve the public interest and the profession of social work as consultants and board members in professional and citizens’ organizations.

Undergraduate Programs

The undergraduate program prepares graduates for generalist social work practice. The program defines generalist practice as maintaining focus on the interface between systems — individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

The B.S.W. Edwards 2+2 program also is offered at Kansas City Kansas Community College. If you are interested, contact the student services coordinator at 913-288-7304 to make an appointment.

University Honors Program

The school encourages qualified undergraduates to participate in the University Honors Program.

Graduate Programs

The Master of Social Work program, established in Lawrence and at the KU Medical Center in Kansas City in 1946, has been continuously accredited since 1948. KU’s M.S.W. program ranked 15th among U.S. national public universities, according to U.S. News & World Report’s “America’s Best Graduate Schools” rankings for 2015.

The doctoral program admitted its first students in 1981. It prepares students to be leaders of the profession through advanced research, scholarship, and teaching.

Financial Aid

To be eligible for financial aid, applicants should complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by February 15 (March 1 is the priority deadline), even before receiving information about acceptance. FAFSA materials can be obtained from all college or university financial aid offices or submitted online. The School of Social Welfare uses the FAFSA need determination level in making awards. For more information regarding financial aid visit the KU Office of Financial Aid & Scholarship.

For Ph.D. students, financial assistance, including tuition and significant salary, is available from the school through teaching and research assistantships in research and training areas such as adult and children’s mental health, aging, child welfare, corrections, social policy, spiritual diversity, or other areas of faculty grants and interests.

Scholarships and Awards

The School of Social Welfare has several sources of financial assistance available to students who meet the various criteria. Awards are made on an annual basis and are applied directly towards tuition and fees in most instances. All students interested in applying are required to submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid by March 1. All recipients are expected to maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0. Students must renew their applications each year they wish to be considered.

Undergraduate University Regulations

For information about university regulations, see Regulations or visit the University of Kansas Policy Library.

For information about school regulations refer to the student handbook.

Change of School

Students are admitted for fall semester only. The priority application deadline is February 1.  No applications will be considered after June 15.  Additional information is available from the B.S.W. program office.

Graduation with Distinction

The top 10 percent of the graduates of the B.S.W. program each year receive degrees with distinction.

Honor Roll (Dean's List)

Students who have been accepted into the B.S.W. program, enrolled in a minimum of 9 credit hours during the semester, and earned a semester grade-point average in the top 20 percent of their class (junior or senior) qualify for the KU School of Social Welfare B.S.W. Dean’s List.

Guidelines for Conduct

Refer to the student handbook for specific information.

Required Work in Residence

No baccalaureate degree is granted to an undergraduate who has not completed at least 30 semester credit hours of residence courses at KU. No exceptions are granted.

To earn a bachelor’s degree from KU, you must complete the last 30 hours of credit for the degree by resident study. You may petition the B.S.W. program director for a waiver.  Up to 6 hours of work taken at another institution may be accepted as part of the last 30 hours, if the hours are not in required social work courses.  

Student Advancement Policy

Refer to the student handbook for specific information.

Advising

Once a student is admitted to the School of Social Welfare, a member of the School’s faculty is assigned as a professional/career advisor. In addition, an academic advisor will be able to assist students in the enrollment process, filling out enrollment forms and other academic program requirements. Students consult with their academic advisor before enrollment each semester and have their advising hold removed by the B.S.W. program office. Current students can view their advisors on the Kyou portal.

Transfer of Credit

CredTran is a transfer course equivalency system that lists more than 2,200 colleges and universities from which KU has accepted transfer courses in the past. If your school or course is not listed, your evaluation will be completed when you are admitted to KU.

Transfer of credit allows specific course work from other accredited colleges or universities to count toward the B.S.W. degree. Decisions to accept prior credits are made by KU’s transcript evaluator during the admission process. Exceptions must be petitioned through the B.S.W. director. Petitions must be accompanied by a catalog description and a syllabus of the course and submitted at the time of application. Community college equivalents to KU courses are available from the school or through community college counselors. A maximum of 64 credit hours from a community college may be transferred toward the B.S.W. degree.

Prior Work Experience

In accordance with national curriculum policy, prior employment and life experience may not be credited toward classroom course work or practicum requirements.

Leave of Absence and Withdrawal

Refer to the student handbook for specific information

 

Graduate University Regulations

For information about university regulations, see Regulations or visit the University of Kansas Policy Library.

For information about school regulations refer to the student handbook.

 

Guidelines for Conduct

Refer to the student handbook for specific information

Student Advancement Policy

Refer to the student handbook for specific information

Advising

Each student is assigned a faculty advisor who assists with career and academic decision making. Scheduling/enrollment advisors are available at the time of enrollment.

Leave of Absence and Withdrawal

Refer to the student handbook for specific information

Employment Opportunities

Some employment opportunities for social workers include

  • Child protection, foster care, and adoption services.
  • Services in community centers, juvenile courts, and residential treatment centers.
  • Women’s counseling and shelter facilities.
  • Family services, substance abuse, illness, and unemployment services.
  • Community services for the mentally ill.
  • Services for the elderly in home care, nursing homes, and senior centers.
  • Services for offenders and their families in community corrections programs.

Courses

SW 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in social work. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

SW 210. Contemporary Social Topics: _____. 1-3 Hours.

This course provides the opportunity for experimentation with innovative course content and unique learning strategies in accordance with guidelines established by faculty. Subjects offered as topics include Training for Diversity, Organizing in Underserved Communities, etc. LEC.

SW 220. Social Work, Social Welfare and U.S. Society. 3 Hours SF GE3S / S.

An introduction to the field of social welfare and its relationship to the social work profession, charged with carrying out its primary missions. Specific social welfare policies will be analyzed, particularly as those policies affect individuals and families in need. LEC.

SW 303. Human Sexuality in Everyday Life. 3 Hours GE3S.

An introductory course which focuses on assisting students to understand their own and others' sexual development and expression, as found in attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. Physiological, psychological, and social/cultural aspects of human sexuality will be reviewed. The format of the course will include: lectures, discussion, value clarification exercises, and the use of explicit audio-visual materials. LEC.

SW 310. Managing Stress: Principles and Techniques for Coping, Prevention, and Wellness. 3 Hours.

Covers major stress-management techniques, helping others cope with stress, and promoting wellness. Concepts, theories, and models of stress, psychological basis for stress, relationship between personality and stress, family and social stress, job stress, dissatisfaction, and burnout are discussed. LEC.

SW 410. Professional Writing Skills in Social Work. 3 Hours.

Students learn the principles of organizing, developing, writing and revising documentation for different professional social work settings. Student will master basic writing skills and become proficient in several types of social work writing styles. LEC.

SW 420. Social Work in Urban Settings. 3 Hours.

Students gain knowledge about the historical and current relationships between the definition of social problems, the development of social welfare policies, and the delivery of social services in urban settings. Students will learn to access current policies and practices as they impact local communities in the Kansas City area. LEC.

SW 455. Topics in Social Welfare: _____. 1-3 Hours.

This course covers a variety of topics on a rotating basis and provides the opportunity for experimentation with innovated course content in accordance with guidelines established by faculty. These topics may include, but are not limited to, globalization and poverty, special topics in child welfare, mental health, juvenile justice, etc. LEC.

SW 490. Directed Readings. 1-3 Hours.

Individual and supervised readings in selected areas of social welfare. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and approval by dean's office. IND.

SW 510. Fundamentals of Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

Introduces the basic concepts of social work practice including the focus and context of practice, the nature of a social work relationship; basic skills and techniques common to practice such as interviewing, engagement, information gathering, etc. Introduction to problem solving and social work roles. Prerequisite: SW 530, SW 540, and SW 555. LEC.

SW 530. Human Behavior in the Social Environment. 3 Hours AE61.

A study of theoretical frameworks for understanding human behavior. The theories include the developmental stages across the life cycle, abnormal behavior compared to normal, analysis of family and societal processes and their effects on the individual, and individual behavior in relation to social class, ethnicity, and cultural background. Junior social work classification required. LEC.

SW 532. Community and Organizational Dynamics and Human Behavior. 3 Hours AE61.

An analysis of community and organizational life with emphasis on human behavior dynamics. Systems operation and change are considered and related to social functioning, especially as it impinges on social welfare objectives. Junior social work classification required. LEC.

SW 540. Fundamentals of Social Work Research. 3 Hours AE61.

An examination of the basic concepts and principles of scientific inquiry as applied to the social work profession's quest for and utilization of knowledge. Positivistic and naturalistic methods of inquiry are covered. Other content includes conceptualization, operationalization, sample design, ethics, and culturally sensitive research practice. Junior social work classification required. LEC.

SW 541. Social Work Research Seminar. 3 Hours AE61.

Focus is on applying material learned in SW 540 to the critique of empirical work in the social work arena and to the development of a proposal for a practice-based research project. Emphasis on assessing relevance of research to special populations. Content on the interpretation of graphs, tables, and statistical measures provided. Prerequisite: SW 540. LEC.

SW 555. Diversity, Oppression, and Social Justice: Culturally Competent Social Work. 3 Hours AE41.

This course will provide the conceptual, theoretical and empirical knowledge base related to difference, oppression, social justice and empowerment. This knowledge is necessary for culturally competent social work practice in a multicultural society. Junior social work classification required. LEC.

SW 556. Diversity, Oppression and Social Justice. 3 Hours AE41.

This course offers non-social work majors the opportunity to explore conceptual, theoretical, and empirical knowledge related to differences based upon race, class, gender, and sexual orientation. The course explores the interplay of social and cultural identities, societal power relations, and other societal forces as they impact human functioning. Assignments and lectures in this course are geared toward helping students develop an informed world view of human diversity and its impact on our own lives and the lives of others. LEC.

SW 560. Study Abroad. 3 Hours.

This course provides the opportunity for Study Abroad in developed and developing countries such as Costa Rica, India, Ireland, Italy, and South Korea. Junior Social Work classification required. LEC.

SW 601. Field Practicum. 6 Hours AE61.

Students are assigned to social service agencies that provide generalist practice opportunities under the supervision of a qualified field instructor. This provides students with the opportunity to apply and test social work knowledge, values, and skills within an approved practice setting in order to gain competency as beginning social workers. This course is taken for two semesters (fall-spring), with credit being given only after completion of the second semester. Enrollment in this course must be concurrent with enrollment in SW 610 and SW 612. FLD.

SW 610. Social Work Practice Seminar I. 3 Hours.

Focuses on learning and implementing the problem-solving and interaction models of practice to be applied to individuals, families, and small groups. Concurrent with SW 601, practicum; students bring issues with clients to class for discussion. Open only to BSW seniors. Prerequisite: SW 510. LEC.

SW 612. Social Work Practice Seminar II. 3 Hours.

Second of two-course sequence extends the work begun in SW 610. Examines interventive strategies applicable to practice with larger systems. Models of community organization and community development are presented. Concurrent with SW 601, practicum; students work on individualized, agency-related projects. Prerequisite: SW 610. LEC.

SW 620. Social Policies and Program Analysis. 3 Hours.

Conceptual models for the analysis of social welfare problems and policies are developed. The frameworks are applied to the problem of poverty and major policies and programs developed to cope with that problem. In addition the model is used to examine social welfare problems/needs being addressed in the students' practicum agencies. The focus throughout is on the understanding and application of analytic framework. Open only to BSW seniors. LEC.

SW 621. Social Policy Analysis and Advocacy. 3 Hours.

The course builds on SW 620 using the conceptual models to examine a range of social welfare problems/needs, policies and programs. Emphasis is on advancing student's understanding and skills for using the analytic framework and building policy advocacy skills. Attention given to the role of social workers in the legislative process for shaping social welfare policies. Prerequisite: SW 620. LEC.

SW 623. Seminar in Professional Issues. 3 Hours AE51.

Seminar in the philosophy, values, and issues in contemporary social work and social welfare. Seminar will address areas such as conception of professional and professionalism, ethics and values, standards, licensing, and professional regulation, accountability and professional responsibility. Senior social work classification is required. LEC.

SW 630. Topics in Social Work Practice: Antisocial, Aggressive Behavior in Childhood and Early Adolescence. 1.5 Hour.

This course explores the theories and methods related to practice with children whose behavior is disruptive, oppositional, aggressive, or otherwise antisocial. Emphasis is placed on using protective and risk factors to design appropriate interventions. Open only to BSW seniors. LEC.

SW 631. Topics in Social Work Practice: Intimate Partner Violence. 1.5 Hour.

This course provides students with a beginning understanding of intimate partner violence including definitions, prevalence, theoretical frameworks, dynamics, and consequences for the individual, the family, the community and society. Students will develop skills required to assess, intervene, and prevent domestic violence cases. Open only to BSW seniors. LEC.

SW 632. Topics in Social Work Practice: Substance Abuse and Social Work Practice. 1.5 Hour.

This course will offer BSW students a very basic understanding of concepts associated with social work practice with people who confront challenges with alcohol and other drugs. Students will learn about substance abuse problems currently prevalent, recognize behavior related to substance abuse disorders and applicability of generalist social work practice models in developing interventions. Open only to BSW seniors LEC.

SW 633. Topics in Social Work Practice: Crisis Intervention. 1.5 Hour.

This course will provide undergraduate social work students with a basic introduction to crisis intervention, including theoretical models, the evolution and use of crisis theory and the design of interventions across a broad range of crisis situations. Open only to BSW seniors. LEC.

SW 690. Professional Education Topics in Social Welfare: _____. 0.5-3 Hours.

Current topics supplementing general social work knowledge of professionals in the field. Subjects offered as topics include: Addictions and Professional Enabling, Dynamics of Change, Computer Skills for Social Services Budgeting, Short Term Social Work Interaction. LEC.

SW 701. Basic Field Practicum. 4 Hours.

Students are assigned to social service agencies that provide generalist practice opportunities that prepare students for entry into the advanced level of either clinical social work practice or social work administration and advocacy practice. All students work under the supervision of a qualified field instructor where they have the opportunity to apply and test social work knowledge, values, and skills. This course is generally taken for two semesters, with credit being given only after completion of the second semester. Open only to first-level M.S.W. students. Enrollment must be concurrent with enrollment in SW 702, SW 710 and SW 711. FLD.

SW 702. Basic Field Practicum. 3 Hours.

Students are assigned to social service agencies that provide generalist practice opportunities that prepare students for entry into the advanced level of either clinical social work practice or social work administration and advocacy practice. All students work under the supervision of a qualified field instructor where they have the opportunity to apply and test social work knowledge, values, and skills. This course is generally taken for two semesters, with credit being given only after completion of the second semester. Open only to first-level M.S.W. students. Enrollment must be concurrent with enrollment in SW 701, SW 710 and SW 711. FLD.

SW 710. Social Work Practice I. 3 Hours.

The first of two-course sequence prepares students to begin to translate theory into strategies of intervention that cut across social work practice with systems of all sizes. Presents an integrating framework of generalist social work based on a strengths perspective and a person-in-environment frame of reference. Course taken concurrently with SW 701 which provides students an opportunity to integrate theory and practice in work with clients. LEC.

SW 711. Social Work Practice II. 3 Hours.

Second of two-course sequence and extends the work begun in SW 710. Focus in the second course is on mastery of the basics of helping relationships and the development of intervention skills for the middle and ending phases of intervention. Content is structured to prepare students to enter the advanced level of the M.S.W. program. Course taken concurrent with SW 701. Prerequisite: SW 710. LEC.

SW 712. Social Work Practice Seminar. 3 Hours.

Introduces advanced standing students to the themes of the school. Special emphasis is given to the Strengths Perspective, a multicultural approach to practice, and developing the skills to critically and reflectively think about one's own practice. Advanced standing status required. LEC.

SW 713. Community and Organizational Practice. 3 Hours.

Students will be exposed to a body of knowledge and skills necessary to practice with communities and organizations. An advocacy perspective will act as the course's unifying theme with client well-being acting as the driving force behind the activities of community and organizational practitioners. LEC.

SW 720. Social Policy and Program Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course provides a broad social context for identifying and analyzing social problems and social policy/program responses. Economic and social justice issues are exemplars for understanding societal dynamics and evaluating related policies. Emphasis is given to the development of conceptual sills in identifying and analyzing needs addressed by programs and policies. LEC.

SW 730. Human Behavior in the Social Environment. 3 Hours.

Course provides foundation knowledge about bio-psycho-social aspects of individual and family behavior. Theoretical perspectives on well being dysfunction, and developmental processes are critically analyzed, especially concerning applicability to social work practice that supports client strengths, diversity, and social justice. A holistic conceptual framework is used to integrate these micro-system perspectives with larger environmental socio-political concerns. LEC.

SW 740. Social Work Research. 3 Hours.

An examination of professionally relevant aspects of the nature of science: the nature of knowing, a constructed reality, the logic of explanation and inquiry, the nature of concepts, hypotheses, and assumptions. The content will include such issues as sampling, measurement reliability and validity, developing survey questions, types of qualitative and quantitative research, and an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. LEC.

SW 755. Studies: _____. 1-3 Hours.

This course provides the opportunity for experimentation with innovative course content in accordance with guidelines established by faculty. LEC.

SW 801. Advanced Field Practicum-Clinical Practice. 4 Hours.

Students are assigned to social service agencies that provide opportunities for advanced level clinical social work practice. All students work under the supervision of a qualified field instructor where they have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice and develop beginning competence in clinical social work practice. This course is generally taken for two semesters, with credit being given only after completion of the second semester. Open only to Advanced-level M.S.W. students. Enrollment must be concurrent with enrollment in SW 801, SW 810 and SW 811. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. FLD.

SW 802. Advanced Field Practicum-Clinical Practice. 3 Hours.

Students are assigned to social service agencies that provide opportunities for advanced level clinical social work practice. All students work under the supervision of a qualified field instructor where they have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice and develop beginning competence in clinical social work practice. This course is generally taken for two semesters, with credit being given only after completion of the second semester. Open only to Advanced-level M.S.W. students. Enrollment must be concurrent with enrollment in SW 801, SW 810 and SW 811. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. FLD.

SW 803. Advanced Field Practicum-Clinical Practice. 2-6 Hours.

Students are assigned to social service agencies that provide opportunities for advanced level clinical social work practice. All students work under the supervision of a qualified field instructor where they have the opportunity to integrate theory and practice and develop beginning competence in clinical social work practice. This course is generally taken for two semesters, with credit being given only after completion of the second semester. Open only to Advanced-level M.S.W. students. Enrollment must be concurrent with SW 810 and SW 811. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. FLD.

SW 804. Advanced Field Practicum-Social Work Administration. 4 Hours.

Students are assigned to social service agencies that provide practice opportunities in social work administration. All students work under the supervision of a qualified field instructor where they have the opportunity to develop beginning competence in social work administration. This course is generally taken for two semesters, with credit being given only after completion of the second semester. Open only to Advanced-level M.S.W. students. Enrollment in fall semester must be concurrent with enrollment in SW 840, SW 841, and SW 849 and in Spring semester enrollment must be concurrent with enrollment in SW 805, SW 842, and SW 843. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. FLD.

SW 805. Advanced Field Practicum-Social Work Administration. 3 Hours.

Students are assigned to social service agencies that provide practice opportunities in social work administration. All students work under the supervision of a qualified field instructor where they have the opportunity to develop beginning competence in social work administration. This course is generally taken for two semesters, with credit being given only after completion of the second semester. Open only to Advanced-level M.S.W. students. Enrollment in fall semester must be concurrent with enrollment in SW 840, SW 841, and SW 849 and in spring semester enrollment must be concurrent with enrollment in SW 804, SW 842, and SW 843. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. FLD.

SW 806. Advanced Field Practicum-Social Work Administration. 2-6 Hours.

Students are assigned to social service agencies that provide practice opportunities in social work administration. All students work under the supervision of a qualified field instructor where they have the opportunity to develop beginning competence in social work administration. This course is generally taken for two semesters, with credit being given only after completion of the second semester. Open only to Advanced-level M.S.W. students. Enrollment in fall semester must be concurrent with enrollment in SW 840, SW 841, and SW 849 and in spring semester enrollment must be concurrent with enrollment in SW 842, SW 843 and SW 846. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. FLD.

SW 810. Clinical Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

Clinical social work practice occurs in a variety of settings, from large public and private agencies and institutions through many types of individual and group private practice situations. This course is designed to teach advanced knowledge and skills that transcend contextual factors in order to produce a variety of positive client outcomes in a range of practice situations. In addition, this course focuses on the commitment of social work practitioners to provide services to those groups who, by reason of class, race, sex, or other characteristics, are not ordinarily well served by the many institutions in this society. Course taken concurrently with SW 801 which provides an opportunity to integrate theory and practice in work with clients. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 811. Topics in Advanced Clinical Social Work: _____. 3 Hours.

The organizing theme of the advanced clinical selective emphasizes application of advanced theoretical and practice principles to client systems. This advanced selective provides students with the opportunity to critically consider the themes of the school as they relate to the need for assessment, diagnostic, and process evaluations with a variety of client systems. Every student will engage in activities designed to solidify their professional identity as clinical practitioners as they enter the workforce. Topics offered may include solution-focused brief therapy; family therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy. Prerequisite: Completion of SW 810. LEC.

SW 830. Social Work in Child and Family Settings. 3 Hours.

An in-depth examination of social work in child and family settings. Students demonstrate the capacity to integrate research, policy, direct practice, and human behavior in considering the issues central to this area of practice. Students will also be able to explain how diversity issues manifest themselves at both the policy and direct practice levels. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 832. Social Work in Health Care and Mental Health Settings. 3 Hours.

Content as in SW 830 focused on health care and mental health. LEC.

SW 833. Social Work and Aging. 3 Hours.

Content as in SW 830 focused on aging. LEC.

SW 834. Social Work in Schools. 3 Hours.

Content as in SW 830 focused on schools. LEC.

SW 840. Program Design and Grant Writing. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the effective construction of social programs, and the acquisition of agency resources through grant writing and fundraising. Topics include the design and analysis of social programs and the process of preparing a fundable grant proposal. Prerequisite: Completion of social welfare foundation level requirements. LEC.

SW 841. Advanced Policy and Programs. 3 Hours.

The focus is on the development of skills to stay abreast of and knowledgeable about critical federal and state policies, regulations, and funding structures and streams in students' chosen field of practice. Students will also learn how to research the literature on best practice and effective programs. All of these skills and consequential knowledge will be used to inform program design, resource acquisition, financial management, personnel management, outcome management, and other administrative functions. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 842. Using Outcomes for Administrative and Advocacy Practice. 3 Hours.

Emphasis is on the use of information to improve human service program performance. Includes content for the design, implementation, and evaluation of information systems. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 843. Program Management and Supervision. 3 Hours.

Introduction to client centered human service management including the variety of tasks, roles, and functions of managers. Builds knowledge and skills in effective employee supervision and human resource management including the development of a diverse workforce. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 846. Advanced Community and Advocacy Practice. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to build on the content of the foundation course on community and organizational practice by further developing the theories, methods, and skills of community and advocacy practice. The course will help students know and further develop the analytical and empirical skills needed to effectively manage and advocate with and on behalf of different human service communities. Throughout the course, skill-based exercises are presented to aid in understanding theoretical concepts. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 849. Managing Financial Resources. 3 Hours.

Focus on the use of resources needed to operate a client centered program. Includes budgeting techniques and their application; use of budgets for decision making, and problems of reallocation. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 852. Social Work with Groups. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of social work in the wide range of groups in which social workers participate as workers and co-workers. Focus on the social worker's tasks and behaviors in establishing group services and in facilitating work in the group from the time of its formation to its termination as a service entity. Prerequisite: Completion of foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 855. Study Abroad. 3 Hours.

This course provides the opportunity for Study Abroad in developed and developing countries such as Costa Rica, India, Ireland, Italy and South Korea. LEC.

SW 860. Loss and Grief. 3 Hours.

Examines the multiple faces of loss and grief throughout the human life cycle. Examines personal and societal attitudes toward death and dying and the processes of dying and grieving. Course includes exploration of assessment and interventions that enable individuals and their families to cope with loss. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 861. Intimate Partner Violence. 1.5 Hour.

This advanced practice course addresses the seriousness and extent of the problem, contributing factors, consequences for the individual, the family, the community, and society. Prevention and intervention practice models will be discussed within a clinical and strengths framework with a focus on developing skills for assessment, intervention, and prevention of violence with individuals and families. LEC.

SW 862. Intrafamilial Sexual Abuse. 1.5 Hour.

This course will focus on sexual misuse that occurs within the family system. Students will obtain a comprehensive understanding of sexual misuse that occurs within the family system and develop assessment and helping skills needed when working with abusive families. Theoretical, assessment, and helping aspects of intrafamilial sexual abuse will be examined. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 863. Mental Health and Psychopathology. 3 Hours.

Theories of mental health and psychopathology are compared concerning etiology, classification, assessment, and treatment of distress and mental disorders. Theories and practices are evaluated critically for their usefulness in a strengths approach to social work in mental health settings. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 866. Social Work Practice with Children and Adolescents. 3 Hours.

Developmental norms and processes in childhood and adolescence and related implications for assessment and intervention methods in work with children and adolescents. Topics include countertransference issues in work with children, working with parents and children, intervention tools, stress in childhood, special issues, and concerns in adolescence, sexual abuse of children. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 868. Crisis Intervention and Suicide Risk Reduction. 3 Hours.

Principles of planned short term intervention generally and of crisis intervention specifically are addressed. The use of and application of crisis theory, crisis intervention, and suicide risk reduction are examined. Evidence based practices regarding the effects of crises including disasters on individual, family, and community well-being are considered. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 869. Social Work with Clients with Alcohol and Drug-Related Problems. 3 Hours.

Focus is on developing value consciousness and multidimensional understandings in relation to drug use and abuse. Patterns of drug use, sociocultural attitudes toward drug use and definitional issues in the drug field will be examined. Explanatory theories and contemporary interventions, including the applicability of generalist social work practice models are presented and critically assessed. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 870. Spiritual Aspects of Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

This course provides a framework of knowledge, values, and skills for spiritually-sensitive social work practice. In order to prepare students to respond competently and ethically to diverse spiritual perspectives, a comparative, critically reflective approach to content is employed. The role of religion and spirituality in supporting or impeding individual strengths and social justice is considered. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 872. Cultural Diversity in Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

Provides students with a framework of knowledge, values, and practice methodology for culturally competent social work practice. Emphasizes themes of oppression and empowerment, culture-specific strengths and resources, and multicultural/transcultural perspectives. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 873. Social Work with Gay, Lesbian, Transgendered and Bi-Sexual Clients. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic knowledge, values, and skills needed to work effectively with people who are gay, lesbian, and bisexual. The course will reflect a person-environment perspective, focusing on strategies that empower lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals to develop personal and environmental resources from a strengths perspective. Throughout the course, attention will be given to issues of diversity within the lesbian and gay population. Prerequisite: Completion of all foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 874. Social Work Practice with Women. 3 Hours.

Expands knowledge and practice skills in working with women in diverse social work practice settings. Critical examination of traditional and feminist practice approaches to problems that frequently confront women. Prerequisite: Completion of foundation requirements. LEC.

SW 875. Readings and Investigations: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Opportunity for scholarly investigation in an area of special interest. Students pursue independent study in an area of social work practice through the guidance of a selected faculty member. RSH.

SW 890. Current Issues in Professional Social Work Education: _____. 0.5-3 Hours.

Course provides opportunity for innovative course content designed for the social work professional. Subjects offered include: Psychopathology: A Biopsychosocial Approach, Ethics and the Social Worker, Mediation, Solution Focused Practice, Strengths-based Management, Outcome-based Measurement of Practice. LEC.

SW 955. Study Abroad. 3 Hours.

This course provides the opportunity for Study Abroad in developed and developing countries such as Costa Rica, India, Ireland, Italy, and South Korea. LEC.

SW 978. Research Design and Methods. 3 Hours.

This class is an in-depth introduction to the process of conducting research. This introduction provides the essential context for the qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research courses. LEC.

SW 979. Methods of Qualitative Inquiry. 3 Hours.

This course provides a detailed overview of knowledge and skills in qualitative inquiry. It examines issues in the philosophy of science and paradigms for qualitative inquiry in social work. It emphasizes principles and procedures for qualitative inquiry design, including an introduction to data collection, analysis, report writing, while attending to criteria for establishing trustworthiness. LEC.

SW 980. History and Philosophy of Social Work. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to examine the underlying conceptual frameworks of social work practice-their history and present manifestations. This course rests on the definition of social work practice that includes the interaction of knowledge, value, and skill around professional purpose and in the context of professional sanction. LEC.

SW 981. Advanced Quantitative Research Methods I. 3 Hours.

This course, which includes a lab, focuses on quantitative research methodology and related inferential statistics, emphasizing mastery of specific methodological and statistical knowledge and skills. The course will address the following topics: the framing of research questions; the selection of appropriate research methods and designs; the selection of appropriate statistics for data analysis; the principles of analysis; interpretation of findings; and the presentation of results. LEC.

SW 982. Social Welfare Policy. 3 Hours.

This seminar helps doctoral students learn to analyze social welfare policies and programs. After comparing and contrasting various policy analysis frameworks, students learn to analyze the ways in which social conditions, values, and ideologies shape the definitions of social problems as well as the development, implementation, and evaluation of social welfare policies that impact those problems. LEC.

SW 983. Advanced Quantitative Research Methods II. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this advanced research methods course is to help equip professionals to design and carry out research with direct implications for social work practice and social welfare policy. Building on the experience in SW 978 and SW 981, this course will focus on more advanced topics in research design and both experimental and correlational statistical analyses. LEC.

SW 984. Social Work Practice: Identifying and Improving "Best Practices. 3 Hours.

The main focus of this seminar is on developing skills for conduction multi-dimensional, value critical inquiry about "best practices" relevant to social work practice, and applying the results of that inquiry toward extending and improving current "best practices". LEC.

SW 985. Theory for Research: _____. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to interdisciplinary theory for applied social research, focusing on: (1) the roles and uses of theory in social inquiry (2) theory building and theory testing (3) induction and deduction (4) the articulation of common or related theoretical traditions in various social science disciplines. LEC.

SW 987. Teaching Social Work: Philosophy and Methods. 3 Hours.

The purpose of the course is to prepare doctoral students for effective teaching of Social Work courses at all levels of higher education. Doctoral students need practical skills, a theoretical base, experience, and confidence in order to improve their teaching performance. LEC.

SW 988. Mixed Methods in Social Science Research. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of mixed methods research, consisting of the history and philosophy of mixed methods research, the emerging literature on it, purposes and characteristics of mixed methods research, types of research problems addressed, the specification of mixed methods purpose statements and research questions, types of major mixed methods designs, data collection and analysis strategies, and reporting and evaluating results. LEC.

SW 990. Graduate Research. 1-9 Hours.

Individual research preparatory to defense of dissertation prospectus. (By arrangement with doctoral chair.) RSH.

SW 998. Doctoral Applied Research and Education Studies. 1 Hour.

This course provides the opportunity for doctoral students to learn about research or teaching through direct application of research or teaching skills under the mentorship of faculty. RSH.

SW 999. Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

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