Graduation requirements and regulations for every academic program are provided in this catalog. Degree requirements and course descriptions are subject to change. In most cases, you will use the catalog of the year you entered KU (see your advisor for details). Other years’ catalogs»

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African and African-American Studies Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in African and African-American Studies
Minor in African and African-American Studies
Master of Arts in African and African-American Studies
Graduate Certificate in African Studies
American Studies Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in American Studies
Minor in Latino/a Studies
Minor in American Studies
Master of Arts in American Studies
Master of Urban Planning and Master of Arts in American Studies
Doctor of Philosophy in American Studies
Graduate Certificate in American Studies
Anthropology Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Anthropology
Minor in Anthropology
Master of Arts in Anthropology
Doctor of Philosophy in Anthropology
Applied Behavioral Science Joint Degree: Ph.D. in Behavioral Psychology and Master of Public Health
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Applied Behavioral Science
Minor in Applied Behavioral Science
Master of Arts in Applied Behavioral Science
Doctor of Philosophy in Behavioral Psychology
Graduate Certificate in Community Health and Development
Biology Bachelor of Arts in Biochemistry
Bachelor of Arts in Biology
Bachelor of Arts in Human Biology
Bachelor of Arts in Microbiology
Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry
Bachelor of Science in Biology
Bachelor of Science in Microbiology
Bachelor of Science in Molecular Biosciences
Biotechnology Bacholor of Applied Science in Biotechnology
Chemistry Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry
Minor in Chemistry
Master of Science in Chemistry
Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry
Child Language Doctor of Philosophy in Child Language
Classics Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Classical Antiquity
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Classical Languages
Minor in Classics
Master of Arts in Classics
Clinical Child Psychology Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Child Psychology
Communication Studies Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Communication Studies
Minor in Communication Studies
Professional Communication, Undergraduate Certificate
Master of Arts in Communication Studies
Doctor of Philosophy in Communication Studies
Professional Workplace Communication, Graduate Certificate in
Computational Biology Doctor of Philosophy in Computational Biology
East Asian Languages and Cultures Bachelor of Arts in East Asian Languages and Cultures
Minor in East Asian Languages and Cultures
Master of Arts in East Asian Languages and Cultures
Joint Degree Program in Law and East Asian Languages and Culture
East Asian Studies Master of Arts in Contemporary East Asian Studies
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Doctor of Philosophy in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Botany, or Entomology
Master of Arts in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Botany, or Entomology
Economics Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Economics
Bachelor of Science in Economics
Minor in Economics
Master of Arts in Economics
M.A.-J.D. Degree Program
Doctor of Philosophy in Economics
English Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in English
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Literature, Language, and Writing
Minor in English
Master of Arts in English
Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing
Doctor of Philosophy in English
Environmental Studies Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Environmental Studies
Minor in Environmental Studies
Professional Science Masters in Environmental Assessment
Accelerated Professional Science Masters-Environmental Assessment
Graduate Certificate in Environmental Assessment
Graduate Certificate in Environmental Studies
Graduate Certificate in Science Management
European Studies Co-Major in European Studies
Minor in European Studies
French and Italian Bachelor of Arts in French
Minor in French
Minor in Italian
Master of Arts in French
Doctor of Philosophy in French
Genetics
Geography and Atmospheric Science Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Geography
Bachelor of Science in Geography
Bachelor of Science in Atmospheric Science
Minor in Geography
Minor in Atmospheric Science
Master of Arts in Geography
Master of Science in Atmospheric Science
Master of Science in Geography
Doctor of Philosophy in Atmospheric Science
Doctor of Philosophy in Geography
Geology Bachelor of Arts in Geology
Bachelor of Science in Geology
Minor in Geology
Master of Science in Geology
Doctor of Philosophy in Geology
Germanic Languages and Literatures Bachelor of Arts in German Studies
Minor in German Studies
Master of Arts in German Studies
Doctor of Philsophy in Germanic Languages and Literatures
Gerontology Doctor of Philosophy in Gerontology
Dual-title Ph.D. in Gerontology
Global and International Studies Bachelor of Arts in Global and International Studies
Bachelor of Arts in Jewish Studies
Co-Major in European Studies
Minor in European Studies
Global and International Studies Minor
Minor in Jewish Studies
Minor in Middle East Studies
South Asian Culture, Undergraduate Certificate
Master of Arts in Global and International Studies
Global Master of Arts/Master of Business Administration
Graduate Certificate in Global and International Studies
History Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in History
Minor in History
Master of Arts in History
Doctor of Philosophy in History
History of Art Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in History of Art
Minor in History of Art
Master of Arts in History of Art
Doctor of Philosophy in History of Art
Honors
Humanities Bachelor of Arts in Humanities
Minor in Humanities
Minor in Peace and Conflict Studies
Peace Conflict Studies, Graduate Certificate in
Indigenous Studies Indigenous Studies Minor
Master of Arts in Indigenous Studies
Graduate Certificate in Indigenous Studies
Information Processing Studies
Institute for Leadership Studies Minor in Leadership Studies
Interdisciplinary Studies
Latin American Caribbean Studies Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Latin American Area and Caribbean Studies
Minor in Latin American Area Studies
Master of Arts in Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Brazilian Studies, Graduate Certificate in
Central American and Mexican, Graduate Certificate in
Liberal Arts and Sciences Bachelor of General Studies in Liberal Arts and Sciences
Linguistics Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Linguistics
Minor in Linguistics
Master of Arts in Linguistics
Doctor of Philosophy in Linguistics
Mathematics Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics
Minor in Mathematics
Master of Arts in Mathematics
Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics
Molecular Biosciences M.A. in Biochemistry Biophysics; Microbiology; or Molecular, Cellular, Developmental Biology
Ph.D. in Biochemistry Biophysics; Microbiology; or Molecular, Cellular, Developmental Biology
Chemical Biology, Graduate Certificate in
Museum Studies Master of Arts in Museum Studies
Museum Studies Graduate Certificate
Philosophy Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Philosophy
Minor in Philosophy
Master of Arts in Philosophy
Juris Doctor and Master of Arts in Philosophy
Doctor of Philosophy in Philosophy
Physics and Astronomy Bachelor of Arts in Astronomy
Bachelor of Science in Astronomy
Bachelor of Arts in Physics
Bachelor of Science in Physics
Minor in Astrobiology
Minor in Astronomy
Minor in Physics
Master of Science in Physics
Doctor of Philosophy in Physics
Political Science Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Political Science
Minor in Public Policy in the United States
Master of Arts in Political Science
Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science
Prelaw
Premedical Professions
Psychology Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Psychology
Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Neuroscience
Minor in Psychology
Minor in Social and Behavioral Sciences Methodology
Mind and Brain, Undergraduate Certificate
Master of Arts in Psychology
Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology
Health Psychology, Graduate Certificate in
Religious Studies Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Religious Studies
Minor in Religious Studies
Master of Arts in Religious Studies
Religious Studies, Graduate Certificate in
Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Major in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies
Minor in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies
Master of Arts in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies
Graduate Certificate in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies
Slavic Languages and Literatures Bachelor of Arts in Slavic Languages and Literatures
Minor in Slavic Languages and Literatures
Master of Arts in Slavic Languages and Literatures
Doctor of Philosophy in Slavic Languages and Literatures
Sociology Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Sociology
Minor in Sociology
Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology
Spanish and Portuguese Bachelor of Arts in Spanish
Minor in Brazilian Studies
Minor in Spanish
Master of Arts in Spanish
Doctor of Philosophy in Spanish
Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Speech-Language-Hearing
Minor in Speech-Language-Hearing
Master of Arts in Speech-Language Pathology
Clinical Doctor of Speech-Language Pathology
Doctor of Audiology
Doctor of Philosophy in Speech-Language Pathology or Audiology
Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Human Sexuality
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies in Women's Studies
Minor in Women's Studies
Minor in Human Sexuality
Doctor of Philosophy in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Aims

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (called the College or CLAS) is KU’s largest academic unit with more than 50 departments and programs. The liberal arts and sciences include disciplines in the humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and natural and mathematical sciences, as well as international and interdisciplinary studies options. The humanities are the study of the constructions or creations of humans over time (literature, religion, philosophy, history, culture, language, etc.). The social sciences are the study of how and why humans behave as they do individually, in groups, or in society (psychology, sociology, anthropology, etc.). The natural sciences involve explanations and predictions of the natural world. Each department lends a unique perspective on the world. Look at each department’s overview page to begin to understand their unique contribution to your education.

Liberal education at the undergraduate level is typically broad rather than specialized. Its aim is to develop a citizenry that is broadly informed and capable of critical appraisal and to provide fundamental knowledge in many fields. The mission of the College, as reflected in KU’s bachelor’s degree requirements, is to provide such an education. The College takes full advantage of KU’s role as a research institution to ensure that the knowledge imparted to students is current and that they learn the skills of inquiry and critical evaluation.

Undergraduate Programs

It is the students’ responsibility to become thoroughly acquainted with all requirements for the degree programs in which they plan to participate. These include all university requirements, as well as the requirements of the College outlined in this section of the catalog. Students are also responsible for understanding the requirements that are unique to individual programs.

In general, the student is subject to the requirements in place at the time of admission as a degree-seeking student.

CLAS Baccalaureate Degrees

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers 4 degrees at the baccalaureate level:

  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.),
  • Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.), and
  • Bachelor of Science (B.S.).
  • Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.S.)

The majority of students in the College earn a B.A. degree. The B.A. degree may be earned with a major in all departments and programs in the College except atmospheric science. The B.A. is the traditional baccalaureate degree, structured to ensure both breadth and depth of knowledge through completion of the KU Core, degree specific requirements in writing, mathematics, foreign language, and laboratory science, as well as course work in the major.

The B.G.S. degree is an option allowing intentional breadth, consisting of the completion of the KU Core and one of two options for degree completion.

The B.S. degree is offered by all natural science areas except human biology, as well as economics and behavioral neuroscience. In addition to the KU Core, students complete general education degree and major requirements determined by each program offering the degree and may be different for each B.S. degree in the College. With fewer required non-science general education degree requirements, the B.S. permits more depth in the major. It requires additional work in supporting science areas.

View the list of College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Departments & Programs.

Two Degrees

Double Degrees in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

The following combinations of degrees are allowable within the College as long as the student has completed at least 15 hours unique to each major:

  • 2 (or more) B.S. degrees. These must be different B.S. degrees, not different concentrations within the same B.S. degree.
  • B.A. and B.S. degrees as long as the degrees are in different majors. Students may not, for example, earn both a B.A. and a B.S. in mathematics.
  • B.G.S. and B.S. degrees as long as the degrees are in different majors. Students may not, for example, earn both a B.G.S. and a B.S. in economics.
  • Students may complete the requirements for more than one emphasis area or concentration in a major or degree program but should be aware that they are not completing a second degree or major. The following example illustrates this point:    A student who completes all requirements for both the traditional English option and the creative-writing option is earning one degree, either the B.A. in English or the B.G.S. in English.
  • Students may earn a B.A. or a B.G.S. with more than one major but not more than one B.A. or B.G.S. degree from the College.
  • Students normally may not earn a B.A. degree and a B.G.S. degree. Exceptions to this must be approved by the Committee on Undergraduate  Studies and Advising (CUSA). Requests for exceptions should be discussed with the director of College Student Academic Services.

Double Degrees in the College and a Professional School

Students who wish to work simultaneously for a degree from the College and a degree from one of the professional schools may do so, with the expectation that all general education requirements are met for both degrees.

The College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Online Degree Completion Programs

For students who are unable to take their coursework on the Lawrence or Edwards campuses, the College offers an online degree completion program leading to the Liberal Arts & Sciences, Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) degree. More information is available on The College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Online website, or students may contact us directly at thecollegeonline@ku.edu.

KU Edwards Campus Undergraduate Programs

Students who would like to complete a bachelor’s degree in the Kansas City area may choose from 4 CLAS undergraduate majors offered on the KU Edwards Campus in Overland Park. Contact the CLAS undergraduate advisor, 864-8659 (from Lawrence) or 913-897-8659 (outside of Lawrence), about each of these degrees.

  • Literature, Language, and Writing
    B.A. and B.G.S. degrees are offered. See requirements for the major under English.
  • Molecular Biosciences
    The B.S. degree is offered. See requirements for the major under Biology Undergraduate Program.
  • Public Administration
    B.A. and B.G.S. degrees are offered. See requirements for the major under Public Administration.
  • Applied Science - Biotechnology
    The B.A.S. or Bachelor of Applied Science is offered.  See requirements for the major under Biotechnology.
     

Special Opportunities in the College

KU Language Across the Curriculum

KULAC is a pioneering program that seeks to equip students with real competency in a second language through a curriculum of courses and discussion sections taught in world languages in fields like business, history, politics, and the environment. KULAC classes allow you to study subjects that meet your interests (and graduation requirements) while sharpening your language skills, including the specialized vocabulary used in your career. Employers are looking for graduates who combine a disciplinary specialty with a second language proficiency and a knowledge of other cultures. KULAC makes it possible for you to develop these skills without slowing progress toward your degree. KULAC courses are open to any student who has completed at least two years of college-level classes in the relevant language. Courses are taught in Spanish, French, German, Italian, and Russian. There are new offerings each semester. For more information, consult the Center for Global and International Studies.

UKanTeach

UKanTeach prepares future secondary (6th- through 12th-grade) math and science teachers by encouraging students to learn to teach while pursuing a 4-year bachelor’s degree. UKanTeach invites all KU students to take LA&S 290 (1 hour), the first course in the UKanTeach sequence. This career-exploration course allows students to design lessons and teach them in local schools. First-year students through seniors may enroll. Through course work and classroom experiences, students quickly learn whether they are suited to teaching.

Students pursuing any related undergraduate degree at KU can add the UKanTeach requirements to their major and earn a teaching license along with their degree.

The teaching licenses available in the UKanTeach program and some majors and interests commonly paired with each licensure area:

Total hours120
Hours in CLAS and/or School of the Arts100
Junior/senior hours (courses numbered 300 or above)45
Hours in residence at KU (all must be taken at the junior/senior level)30
KU cumulative grade-point average2.0
Grade-point average in KU junior/senior hours in the major2.0
Grade-point average in KU hours in the minor2.0

If you know that you want to teach secondary mathematics or science (or if you want to explore the idea), the UKanTeach program can help you accomplish this while you continue to pursue your bachelor’s degree at KU.

UKanTeach advisors would be happy to meet with you to discuss the program in more detail and show you how UKanTeach can fit into your plan to graduate.

Degree Requirements

Early and Continuous Enrollment in English and Math (All Undergraduate Degrees)

Undergraduate students enrolled in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Students are expected to make timely progress towards completing their degree requirements. In an effort to have students remain compliant with the requirements of the KU Core and the College, students are required to complete the Written Communication and Quantitative Literacy requirements of both the KU Core and their degrees within the first year of undergraduate study.

Written Communication

Students are expected to enroll in two courses that meet Goal 2, Learning Outcome 1 of the KU Core in their first year of study. Students should pay close attention to their degree specific requirements (such as for the Bachelor of Arts) given that certain degrees require specific Goal 2, Learning Outcome 1 courses despite advanced standing in writing courses due to examination scores. To ensure compliance with this policy, students may be administratively registered for courses if the College determines that they are not on track to complete this requirement in the first year of study. If a student is found to be in non-compliance with this policy, the College retains the right to place a hold on their records to prevent future registrations.

Quantitative Literacy

Students are expected to meet the requirement of Goal 1, Learning Outcome 2 of the KU Core in their first year of study. Students should pay close attention to their degree specific requirements (such as for the Bachelor of Arts) given that certain degrees require specific Goal 1, Learning Outcome 2 courses to meet both KU Core and degree specific requirements. To ensure compliance with this policy, students may be administratively registered for courses if the College determines that they are not on track to complete this requirement in the first year of study. If a student is found to be in non-compliance with this policy, the College retains the right to place a hold on their records to prevent future registrations.

Requirements for Graduation (All Undergraduate Degrees)

Grade-Point Average Required for Graduation

To be eligible to graduate from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with any of the baccalaureate degrees offered, a student must earn at least a 2.0 grade-point average in courses taken at KU and at least a 2.0 in KU junior/senior courses (courses numbered 300 and above) in the major. All junior/senior level major-eligible courses attempted at KU will be included in the GPA calculation.

Hours Required for Graduation

To be eligible to graduate from CLAS with any of the baccalaureate degrees, a student must successfully complete at least 120 credit hours, 45 of which must be junior/senior hours(courses numbered 300 and above). The required 120 hours are divided into 4 categories: the KU Core, College specific degree requirements, major, and elective requirements. The total hours are increased by enrollment in MATH 2 or any developmental course numbered below 100. The total also is increased by enrollment in excess of 64 hours of community college credit, 4 hours in physical education activity courses, 6 hours in music organization courses, and any repeated courses for which a student has already received credit.

Minimum and Maximum Hour and Grade-Point Average Requirements for All CLAS Degrees (B.A., B.G.S., B.S.)

Minimums
Total hours120
Junior/senior hours (courses numbered 300 or above)45
Hours in residence at KU (all must be taken at the junior/senior level)30
KU cumulative grade-point average2.0
Grade-point average in KU junior/senior hours in the major2.0
Grade-point average in KU hours in the minor2.0
Maximums
Hours from community colleges64
Hours in physical education activity courses4
Hours in music organization courses6

Note: Courses numbered below 100 do not count toward a degree but are included in the grade-point average.

General Education Degree Requirements

All degrees require courses that reflect the breadth of the disciplines in the College.

All undergraduate degrees from the University of Kansas require completion of the KU Core Curriculum. In addition to the KU Core, students must satisfy the degree specific and major requirements of the degree they are pursuing. Below are the degree specific requirements of the various degrees of the College. Major requirements may be found on the specific departmental pages in this catalog.

Electives Required for Graduation

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires:

  • Quantitative Reasoning. 3 credits. This course must have MATH 101 (College Algebra) or a higher mathematics course as a prerequisite. Additionally, this course must also be either approved for Goal 1, Learning Outcome 2 of the KU Core or another course approved by CUSA.
  • Laboratory or Field Experience. Variable credits. This course must be an academic-credit bearing laboratory or field experience. This course may be taken in conjunction with a lecture but the course combination must contain a laboratory.
  • Writing. 6 credits. Students must complete six credit hours (two courses) of collegiate writing-level instruction. Students must complete ENGL 101, Composition and ENGL 102/ENGL 105, Critical Reading and Writing /Freshman Honors English. Students who place in ENGL 102/ENGL 105 by examination, must complete ENGL 102/ENGL 105 and another course meeting Goal 2, Learning Outcome 1 of the KU Core.
  • Non-English Language Proficiency
    Variable credits. Students must demonstrate fourth semester proficiency in a single non-English language, or third semester proficiency in a first non-English language and first semester proficiency in a second non-English language. This requirement may be met through coursework or examination by the appropriate language department.

The Bachelor of General Studies degree has two distinct options for completion and requires either:

  • Option A. Completion of the requirements of a single B.G.S. major AND a secondary field of academic study (a second major or minor) OR
  • Option B. Completion of the B.G.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences. This degree program requires:
    • Liberal Arts and Sciences Breadth Requirement.
      Satisfied by the completion of a course (with a minimum of 2 credit hours) in 15 unique departments/programs within the College or School of the Arts (as determined by course prefix). Courses fulfilling this requirement may also contribute to the KU Core and other requirements.
    • World Language and Culture.

2 courses (each with 3 credit hours or more) in a single world language, or proof of two-semester proficiency in a language other than English, 

OR

Completion of 3 courses beyond the KU Core requirements (each with 3 credit hours or more) in world, non-Western culture (W or NW designated courses), or language areas. This may include a variety of areas, languages, and cultures.

  • Additional Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Satisfied by the completion of two additional courses from the natural sciences (requirement code N) and/or mathematics (MATH prefix courses) .

The Bachelor of Science degree:

  • All Bachelor of Science degree requirements are listed on their respective academic department pages within this catalog.

Each degree allows a certain number of elective hours. In addition to general education degree and major requirements, students may choose elective courses to bring the total credit hours to 120. In choosing electives, students should be aware of limits in certain areas listed under Hours Required for Graduation.

Junior/Senior Hours Required for Graduation

KU requires all students pursuing bachelor’s degrees to complete a minimum of 45 credit hours at the junior/senior level (courses numbered 300 and above).

Majors and Minors

Major Requirements

Students must complete a major to graduate with a degree in the College. Students pursuing the B.G.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences may not choose a secondary field of study.

A major requires the student to study at least one discipline in depth. The average number of required credit hours in the major for the B.A. degree is 30 hours. The Board of Regents requires a major to be at least 24 credit hours. See the individual major listings for specific minimum requirements. View a current list of all CLAS majors and minors.

Degree requirements and course descriptions are subject to change. Check with department offices or College Student Academic Services for current information.

Declaration of Major

The College expects that every student declare a major or be admitted to a professional school no later than the semester after completion of 60 credit hours. A student should meet with an academic advisor to discuss course selection and choice of major each term until the major is declared.  For a major to be officially declared, CLAS Student Academic Services must receive a copy of the Major Declaration form signed by the student and the major department representative. If a student is pursuing a double major, he or she should complete a Major Declaration form in each major department.

Departments may reserve enrollment in courses in the department for declared majors.

Changing majors late in the academic career may delay graduation. Consult a graduation advisor in the College Student Academic Services office, 109 Strong Hall for further information regarding a change in major.

Students are encouraged to explore different disciplines before choosing their majors. Students who are not ready to declare a major can register interest in a major at CLAS Student Academic Services. Help with choosing a major can be obtained at the University Advising Center (126 Strong Hall), CLAS Student Academic Services (109 Strong Hall), and the University Career Center 320 Anschutz Library.

Admission to CLAS Majors

The requirements for admission to an academic department in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences are based upon the term of admission to the Department. Departments may make exceptions to this policy at their discretion only with the consent of the student. Additionally, the Time Limit to Degree Policy, which allows a student a maximum of 10 years to complete his/her undergraduate degree, with a maximum of a two-year break from the University would supersede this policy.

Admission requirements to a particular major offer potential students the critical foundation of knowledge and skills necessary to become successful in that major. View current admission requirements for each CLAS department in the department's section of the current catalog.

CLAS department admission requirements include the following:

Designated Admission Course Requirements and Minimum Admission Grade-Point Average

Departments may designate up to 4 courses and require an admission grade-point average from 2.2 to 3.0. If a student may choose from a set of course requirement options, and he or she has taken more than the minimum number of course options in the application term, grades received in any designated admission course requirement up to and including that term may be computed in the grade-point average for admission consideration. Only course grades from repeated lower-level courses, meeting the standards of KU’s course repeat policy, are removed from the grade-point average calculation.

The Credit/No Credit option is not available for any course that is an admission requirement. If a student has mistakenly requested the CR/NC option for a course required for admission, 1.7 grade points for any CR grade recorded and 0.0 points for any NC grade recorded are calculated into the grade-point average for admission purposes. A department may determine that any designated admission course taken with the CR/NC option must be repeated.

Application Term

Students must complete all requirements for admission to a major by the first semester of the junior year or before. Application to the major should occur in the term in which admission requirements will be completed. If a student does not meet established admission grade-point average criteria or neglects to apply for admission in this term, she or he must petition the department for permission for late application. The department, as part of an approved petition, determines late admission requirements (including grade-point average and course requirements) and the final admission deadline.

Hours in the Major: Maximums and Minimums

There is no limit on hours taken in the major for the B.A., B.G.S., or B.S. degree. Departments are not allowed to require more than 40 hours in the major for the B.A. or more than 50 hours in the major for the B.S. Some skills courses and supporting science courses are not included in this maximum limit. A minimum of 12 hours in the major must be in courses numbered 300 or above. At least 15 hours in the major must be taken in residence at KU.

Major Grade-Point Average Graduation Requirement

A student must earn a grade-point average of at least 2.0 in KU junior/senior courses (numbered 300 and above) completed in the major. All junior/senior level major-eligible courses attempted at KU will be included in the GPA calculation.

If a student has mistakenly requested the Credit/No Credit option for a course in the major, 1.7 grade points for any CR grade recorded and 0.0 points for any NC grade recorded are calculated into the major grade-point average for certification purposes. A department may determine that any major course taken with the CR/NC option must be repeated.

Double Major

A student may earn a double major if he or she satisfies the requirements of both majors and completes 15 hours unique to each major in consultation with advisors in each department.

Special Major

Students who feel that their best interests cannot be served by the majors listed may petition for a special major (B.A. or B.G.S.), if they follow the guidelines below. Such majors are supervised by special committees of three faculty members recruited by the student. Interested students should consult College Student Academic Services, preferably before the end of the sophomore year.

The following guidelines apply to special majors:

  1. An official endorsement by one or more of the CLAS departments or degree programs involved must accompany a petition for a special major. The petition must be submitted to the committee on undergraduate studies and advising (CUSA).
  2. At least 12 credit hours numbered 300 or above counted toward the special major must be taken after approval of the special major.
  3. At least 2 committee members must be from the CLAS faculty.
  4. At least 2/3 of the credit hours to be counted toward the special major must be CLAS courses.
  5. Special majors must not overlap significantly with existing KU major programs and should not have the same titles as existing majors.
  6. A student seeking a special major must fulfill the general education degree requirements necessary for the B.A. or B.G.S degree.
    Note: Students considering classes to include in a special major should be guided by the fact that most CLAS majors require about 30 hours.

Minors

CLAS offers more than 40 approved minors. These are open to all students in the College regardless of the degree they are pursuing. The schools of Architecture, Design and Planning; Business; Education; Engineering; Journalism and Mass Communications; Music; Nursing; and Social Welfare permit their students to earn CLAS minors.

Requirements for the minor vary, but all must be at least 18 hours including 12 hours at the junior/senior level (numbered 300 and above). Nine of the junior/senior-level hours must be taken in residence at KU. One course overlap may be used to fulfill requirements for both the major and the minor. Students may not earn a minor unless they have completed a major and have completed at least one course for the minor after the date the minor was approved by College Assembly. Successful completion of a minor requires a minimum KU grade-point average of 2.0 in all courses taken for the minor. For requirements for each minor, see the programs listed on the Departments & Programs page.

The Credit/No Credit option is not available for any course that may satisfy minor requirements. If a student has mistakenly requested the CR/NC option for a course in the minor, 1.7 grade points for any CR grade recorded and 0.0 points for any NC grade recorded are calculated into the major grade-point average for certification purposes. A department may determine that any minor course taken with the CR/NC option must be repeated.

View a current list of all CLAS majors and minors.

KU Core

The KU Core curriculum, coupled with degree and major requirements in the College, ensure a balance of breadth and depth of knowledge critical in today’s world.

See the General Education Degree Requirements section above for details regarding College-specific requirements.

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements

All general education degree, major, and supporting requirements for each B.S. program are specified by department faculty, with approval of the College Assembly. They are listed under the department or program on the Departments & Programs page. B.S. candidates are held to a more prescribed program with fewer electives than B.A. candidates. Students pursuing the B.S. may complete an approved minor.

Overlap Between Requirements

A course may be used to fulfill a KU Core or College degree-specific requirement and a minor or major requirement.

A student may earn more than one major if he or she satisfies the requirements of all majors and completes 15 hours unique to each major in consultation with advisors in each department.

One course overlap is allowed between major requirements and minor requirements.


 

Graduate Programs

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (called the College or CLAS) is KU’s largest academic unit with more than 50 departments and programs. Graduate programs in the liberal arts and sciences include disciplines in the arts, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and natural and mathematical sciences, as well as many interdisciplinary degree programs where often highly diverse disciplines come together to offer students a unique graduate experience. Each graduate program’s page contains program-specific information about admission, course curriculum, and faculty mentors.

The College’s participation in graduate education reflects a long and distinguished commitment to higher learning and research across the liberal arts and sciences. The College takes full advantage of KU’s role as an international research institution to ensure that the knowledge imparted to students is current and that they learn the skills of inquiry and critical evaluation. Graduate students are central to the research and teaching missions of the College. They are also the next generation of scholars, artists, and skilled professionals who will make contributions to our communities and the production of knowledge for many years to come.

It is the students’ responsibility to comply with all requirements for the degree programs in which they plan to participate. These include the university requirements for graduate study at KU outlined in the College and Graduate Studies sections of the KU Policy Library, the University Senate Rules and Regulations, the Graduate Studies sections of the online catalog, as well as the requirements of the College outlined in this catalog section. Additionally, students are responsible for understanding the requirements that are unique to individual graduate programs outlined in the graduate handbooks of individual academic units and the Departments & Programs sections of the online catalog.

In general, the student is subject to the regulations in force at the time of matriculation as a degree-seeking student. If degree requirements change, the student may opt to follow the new requirements or to continue under the regulations in force at the time of admission. Any student readmitted 10 years or more after his or her initial term as a degree-seeking student must fulfill the requirements in effect on the date of readmission to the graduate program.

Graduate Degrees in the College

The College offers Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in 38 fields, including 2 fields within the School of the Arts.  Master of Arts (M.A.) or Master of Science (M.S.) degrees can be earned in more than 40 disciplines and the Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) degree is offered in creative writing, visual art, and theatre design with a concentration in scenography. Other professional degrees are offered at the master’s level in the Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) program and the Professional Science Master's (PSM) program.

The College also offers fast track Master's degrees adn 4+1 options.  These include:

  • Classics BA/MA
  • English BA/MA
  • Philosophy BA/MA
  • Environmental Studies BS/PSM
  • MA in Foreign Affairs Studies (FASt MA), Russian Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies
  • MA in Foreign Affairs Studies (FASt MA), Middle Eastand North Africa

For students whose academic and professional goals can best be achieved through investigations at the interface of 2 or more disciplines, the College offers master’s and doctoral degree programs in Interdisciplinary Studies. Please see the policy governing graduate degrees in Interdisciplinary Studies section of the online catalog.

The College currently offers 19 Graduate Certificates, with more certificate programs in development. 

View the College's Departments & Programs section of the online catalog for more information on specific fields of study.

KU Edwards Campus Graduate Programs

Students who would like to complete a graduate degree in the Kansas City area may choose from 4 College graduate degrees and 6 graduate certificates that are offered on the KU Edwards Campus in Overland Park. Information about program requirements, facilities, tuition, and fees is available on the Edwards Campus website. Residents of Kansas City metro area counties admitted as degree-seeking students to one of these programs may qualify for the MetroKC tuition rate for Edwards Campus courses. For more information, contact the College's Graduate Advisor at the Edwards Campus at (913) 897-8510.

The following graduate degrees are offered on the Edwards Campus:

The following graduate certificates are offered on the Edwards Campus:

  • City and County Management
  • Environmental Assessment
  • Global and International Studies
  • Performance Management
  • Professional Workplace Communication

Degree Requirements

Requirements for the completion of master’s and doctoral degrees in the College are governed by department- or program-specific policy, College policies and procedures, Graduate Studies policies, and the University Senate Rules and Regulations.

Information on degree requirements presented in this section are limited to the most frequently consulted policies and key milestones in the graduate career. Students will find additional information under the KU Policy Library, the Graduate Studies and College's graduate regulations sections of the online catalog, the academic unit’s handbook, and the University of Kansas Rules and Regulations.

Master's Degree Requirements

Coursework

Coursework requirements for the Master’s degree are established and tracked by the department or program, and their completion verified and approved by the College. Please consult with your advisor, the academic unit’s graduate handbook, and the relevant Departments & Programs section of the online catalog for further information on specific courses or course sequences required for the degree.

Thesis

Master’s students complete either a thesis or an equivalent enrollment in research, independent investigation, or seminar. Students earning a master's thesis degree must have completed at least 1 hour of thesis enrollment.  General rules for the preparation of a thesis are available on the Graduate Studies website.

Final Examination

A final general examination in the major subject is required for MA and MS degrees. The examination, which may be oral, written, or both, is held during the semester of the student’s final enrollment in course work and, in the case of thesis students, when the thesis has been substantially completed. All master's exam dates must be approved in advance by the College.  See also Master’s Degree Requirements and M.A. and M.S. Degrees in the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree Requirements

Coursework

Coursework requirements for the doctoral degree are established and tracked by the department or program, and their completion verified and approved by the College. Please consult with your advisor, the academic unit’s graduate handbook, and the relevant Departments & Programs section of the online catalog for further information on specific courses or course sequences required for the degree.

Research Skills and Responsible Scholarship

Graduate Studies requires that all doctoral students meet the Research Skills and Responsible Scholarship requirement before proceeding to the Comprehensive Exam. Specific requirements are determined by each department or program in consultation with Graduate Studies. Information on these requirements is contained in the department or program’s approved research skills requirement plan. Consult with your advisor and the Departments & Programs section of the online catalog for further information.

Residency

Two semesters, which may include one summer session, must be spent in full-time resident study at KU. The College requires that residency be fulfilled before the comprehensive oral examination is scheduled. For more information on residency requirements, please see the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog.

Comprehensive Oral Examination

The comprehensive oral examination covers the major field and any additional content for which the academic unit wishes to hold the student responsible. The examination is expected to be broader than a mere defense of the dissertation proposal.  Exam dates must be approved in advance by the College.

The student must be enrolled the semester or summer session in which he or she completes the comprehensive oral examination. This enrollment may count toward the post-comprehensive enrollment requirements as described in Graduate Studies’ Candidacy for Doctoral Degree policy.  If more than 5 years elapses between the completion of the comprehensive exam and degree completion, the student may be required to retake the exam.

More information about comprehensive exam requirements may be found in the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog.

Dissertation and Final Exam

Completion of the dissertation is the culminating phase of a doctoral program, marked by the final oral examination and defense of the dissertation. In all but the rarest cases, tentative approval of the dissertation is followed promptly by the final oral examination. Exam dates must be approved in advance by the College. Refer to the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog for further information on the regulations governing the final oral examination, including committee composition and attendance regulations.

Guidelines for preparing and submitting the final copies of the dissertation are available on the Graduate Studies website.

Ceremonies

At the end of each Spring semester, the College holds a master’s hooding ceremony and Graduate Studies organizes the annual doctoral hooding ceremony. The School of the Arts also hosts a ceremony for SOTA graduates. University Commencement information is available in the KU Commencement section of the KU website.

Attendance at these ceremonies is optional. Please consult the COGA website for more information.

Undergraduate Advising

Academic advising helps undergraduate students develop educational plans, clarify career and life goals, and appreciate the values of a liberal arts education. College Student Academic Services, in partnership with our faculty and staff across the University, is dedicated to helping undergraduate students achieve their educational and personal goals, and to maintaining the academic integrity of our degree programs. We welcome students, encourage them to be active participants in their educational experience, and celebrate their milestones.

CLAS encourages students to consult frequently with advisors, and to declare their majors as soon as possible in order to get connected with all resources in their chosen area of study. Academic advisors serve as guides, helping students explore options and make decisions. Undeclared CLAS students with fewer than 90 hours are assigned advisors in the University Advising Center, 126 Strong Hall. UAC also provides prelaw, premedical and prehealth professions advising.  When students declare majors, they are advised by faculty advisors and professional advisors in their major departments and in 109 Strong Hall.

College Student Academic Services, 109 Strong Hall, provides additional full-time advisors for students who entered KU before fall 1987 and students at all levels who have policy or petition questions or issues. In addition, SAS provides advising for prospective or new transfer seniors and refers them to faculty academic advisors in their majors as soon as possible. Finally, advisors in SAS work with graduating seniors to ensure timely completion of degree requirements through workshops, degree audits, and graduation advising appointments.

Degree Progress Report

The Degree Progress Report (DPR) is a computerized advising and degree-audit system, used to assist students and advisors in tracking progress toward completion of general education degree and major requirements for B.A., B.G.S., and B.S. degrees. Students should review their DPR each semester and be prepared to review and discuss information contained in the DPR at all advising appointments. The DPR can be accessed through the student's account in the MyKU Portal under the Advising tab. Although the DPR provides a list of courses taken and grades earned, it is not an official transcript and can be used only for internal advising. Students must obtain all official transcripts from the Student Records Center, 121 Strong Hall.

4-Year Graduation Plans

With careful planning and commitment to a full-time course load, students can graduate in 4 years.  Degree Plans for all degrees are available through the catalog "degree plan" tab. 

Graduate Advising

Advising of graduate students is primarily conducted within the graduate programs by program staff members and the individual faculty members who act as mentors and advisors. Students are encouraged to work with the director of graduate studies in their program regarding course selections and individual program requirements to ensure that all program milestones are reached as expected by the program faculty and the College. The graduate studies director or coordinator is also responsible for the regular assessment of students in the program and can address questions regarding a student’s progress toward the degree.

Students seeking information on specific policy or procedures should review the relevant content in the KU Policy Library as well as the College and Graduate Studies sections and the relevant Department or Program section of the online catalog. The College Office of Graduate Affairs, 102 Strong Hall, coga@ku.edu, is also available for assistance.

Students who have completed all degree requirements and are preparing to graduate are welcome to schedule a Graduation Appointment with the College Office of Graduate Affairs.

Undergraduate University Regulations

For information about university regulations, see Regulations or visit the University of Kansas Policy Library.

Academic Integrity

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences strictly enforces KU and CLAS policies on academic misconduct. Academic integrity requires honest performance of academic responsibilities by students. These include preparation of assignments, reports and research papers, taking examinations, completing administrative requirements, and a sincere and conscientious effort by students to abide by the policies set forth by instructors.

Change of School

Students with a KU cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher (or in their first semester) can fill out a Change of School Form requesting to be admitted to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and/or School of the Arts, from a KU professional school, through the last day of class for the current semester. Requests made after that will be for admission in the upcoming semester. This process is for active KU students. Students not admitted to KU follow the University’s admission policy.

Students with a KU cumulative GPA of less than a 2.00 will be evaluated according to the College’s academic standing policy and may not be admissible based on past academic performance at KU. Students that have been dismissed from another KU School will need to submit a change of school request one week or earlier prior to classes starting. Non-dismissed students may request to change schools through the 20th day of the current semester; after that date requests will be considered for the next semester.

  •  Change of school requests will not be reviewed until current semester grades are posted.
  • Students admitted to the College on probation will need to meet the College’s academic probation requirements during the semester they are admitted or face an academic dismissal.
  • The College reserves the right to deny admission to students who have had consecutive semesters of failing grades (or multiple semester withdrawals) regardless of their KU cumulative GPA in previous semesters.
  • Students dismissed from another school at KU and are found to be inadmissible to the College can follow our readmission after dismissal policy to return to KU for a future semester.

To change from one school to another, you must submit a Change of School form in the dean’s office of the school you plan to enter or in College Student Academic Services if you plan to enter the College. Follow the deadlines on the form. See the school’s requirements for admission.

Students applying for admission to the College from other schools in the university must meet the same minimum grade-point average requirements in KU attempted course work as continuing College students. Consult College Student Academic Services, Strong Hall, 1450 Jayhawk Blvd., Room 109, Lawrence, KS 66045-7518, 785-864-3500.

Credit/No Credit

A Credit/No Credit option is available to all degree-seeking undergraduates. You may enroll in 1 course a semester under the option, if the course is not in your major or minor. To exercise the option, you must fill out a card at the dean’s office of the school in which you are enrolled during the fifth and sixth weeks of the semester (or the third week of summer session and 8-week courses). See the Academic Calendar for current dates for electing this option. After the close of the option period, the choice cannot be changed. Under the option, a grade of Credit is recorded for grades of A, B, or C; No Credit is recorded for grades of D or F. Courses graded Credit or No Credit do not count in computing the grade-point average. Courses graded Credit are included in the total hours counted toward graduation. Courses graded No Credit do not count toward graduation. For more information, visit the KU Policy Library.

Warning: Certain undesirable consequences may result from exercising the option. Some schools, scholarship committees, and honorary societies do not accept this grading system and convert grades of No Credit to F when computing grade-point averages.

Students in the College must fill out a request in College Student Academic Services. The university-established timeline for exercising this option is strictly enforced.

Enrollment

See the Enrollment Guide for complete enrollment information.

New and Readmitted Student Enrollment

Immediately before the beginning of classes each term, an enrollment session is scheduled for new students. New students admitted for summer or fall term have an additional option of enrolling in fall courses during one of several summer orientation sessions. Invitations to orientation are sent automatically to newly admitted and readmitted students who applied for the spring, summer, or fall terms (except nondegree-seeking students). Readmitted students may attend a special abbreviated orientation session, may enroll during continuing enrollment, or may attend the enrollment sessions immediately before the start of the semester. Readmitted students whose readmission applications are completed by a designated date also may enroll during continuing enrollment, after meeting with an advisor. All students must preregister for orientation and enrollment sessions.

International students must complete the required check-in processes before enrollment and are encouraged to attend International Student Orientation, which includes advising and enrollment sessions.

Continuing Enrollment

This enrollment allows students who are currently enrolled during one term to enroll for the next term. Spring-enrolled students enroll in April for the following summer session or fall semester or both. Fall-enrolled students enroll in October or November for the following spring semester.

Late Enrollment

Each semester, the Academic Calendar announces dates for late enrollment and the last day to submit a Petition to Late Enroll.  Petitions are evaluated based on past academic performance.  A student may enroll in a course or change class sections after the semester has been in session for 4 weeks only if the course has met fewer than 25 percent of the class sessions. For most classes, the faculty have established earlier dates for beginning class attendance and participation. A fee is assessed for late enrollment.

Grading

The letters A, B, C, D, S (satisfactory), and Credit indicate passing work. The letters F and U (unsatisfactory) and No Credit indicate that the quality of work was such that, to obtain credit, the student must repeat regular course work. P represents satisfactory progress (an interim grade pending completion of a subsequent term’s course work). See the KU Policy Library for more information.

Graduation with Honors

Undergraduates may earn honors upon graduation in 3 ways. The student may graduate with distinction or highest distinction, earn departmental honors in the major, or complete the University Honors Program. It is possible to earn honors in 1 of these areas, any combination of them, or all 3. The award of honors is noted on the student’s transcript and in the Commencement program. Distinction and highest distinction are noted on the diploma.

Graduation with Distinction or Highest Distinction

The top 10 percent of each year’s graduating class is designated as graduating with distinction. Of these, the top one-third is designated as graduating with highest distinction. To be eligible, students must have completed at least 60 credit hours, graded A through F, in residence at KU. See Required Work in Residence below.

Graduation with Departmental Honors

Most departments and programs allow qualified majors to work toward graduation with departmental honors. Graduation with departmental honors is awarded in recognition of exceptional performance in the major, completion of a program of independent research or an alternative project, and a strong overall academic record.

In addition to the requirements of individual departments and programs (which must be approved by the College committee on undergraduate studies and advising), the College requires the following for graduation with departmental honors:

  1. Candidates must declare the intention to work for departmental honors with the appropriate departmental honors coordinator(s) no later than the time of enrollment for the final undergraduate semester, but sooner if required by the department(s). Copies of the intent form should be returned to College Student Academic Services.
  2. At the end of the final undergraduate semester, the candidate must have achieved an overall grade-point average of at least 3.25 and a grade-point average of at least 3.5 in the major. Both overall and major grade-point averages include work completed at other institutions, as well as at KU. No minimum grade-point average is required to declare candidacy for graduation with departmental honors unless specified by the department.
  3. Each candidate’s departmental honors work must include independent research or an acceptable alternative project. The results of research are presented in a form appropriate to the requirements of the major department. Equivalents to the independent research component are established by approved departmental honors programs. In courses meeting the independent research requirement, the candidate must earn a grade of B or higher. Successful completion of all departmental honors requirements must be certified to the departmental honors coordinator(s) by a panel composed of at least three members of the College faculty who have read the report of the independent research and heard the oral presentation, where required.

Petitions

A department or program may petition to award graduation with departmental honors to deserving students who, for good reason, do not meet every College and departmental requirement. Send petitions to the committee on undergraduate studies and advising, College Student Academic Services.

Late Completion of Honors Requirement

Requirements for graduation with honors may be completed after the date on which certifications are requested from departments, and in some cases, requirements, if not needed for graduation, may be completed after a student has graduated. However, the Incomplete policy does apply and grades would lapse at the time of graduation. When a candidate finishes all requirements, departments must notify College Student Academic Services in writing.

Honor Roll

Undergraduates with grade-point averages of 3.5 who have completed at least 12 hours with letter grades are recognized on the honor roll or dean’s list in fall and spring. An Honor Roll notation appears on the transcript.

Honors Program

The University Honors Program provides opportunities for outstanding and creative undergraduates in all schools at KU to develop their full potential during their undergraduate years. See Honors in this section of the online catalog for further information.

Incompletes

The letter I indicates incomplete work, such as may be completed without re-enrollment in the course. The letter I should not be used when a definite grade can be assigned for the work done. It is not given for the work of a student in any course except to indicate that some part of the work has, for reasons beyond the student’s control, not been done, while the rest has been satisfactorily completed. At the time an I is reported on the electronic roster, the character and amount of work needed, as well as the date required for completion and lapse grade if further work is not completed by this date, should be indicated.

A student who has an I posted for a course must make up the work by the date determined by the instructor, in consultation with the student, which may not exceed 1 calendar year, or the last day of the term of graduation, whichever comes first. An I not removed according to this rule automatically converts to a grade of F or U, or the lapse grade assigned by the course instructor, and appears on the student’s record.

Extensions to the time limit may be granted by the dean’s representative upon submission of a petition from the student containing the endorsement of the course instructor who assigned the I grade, or the department chairperson if the instructor is unavailable, prior to the expiration of the Incomplete. After the I grade is converted to a grade of F or U, the grade may only be changed in accordance with USRR Article II, Section 3.

Maximum and Minimum Undergraduate Semester Enrollment

No undergraduate may enroll for more than 20 hours a semester except by permission of the director of Student Academic Services. Summer enrollment is limited to 10 hours. Permission is not considered unless the student has demonstrated high levels of academic ability in previous semesters.

Prerequisites and Corequisites

Students are advised to enroll according to prerequisites and corequisites noted in individual course descriptions. These prerequisites are enforced in a variety of ways including blocking enrollment, administrative drops without notice, etc.

Probation

The College reviews all students' records at the end of fall and spring semesters and summer term to determine their academic standing. Students must maintain a 2.0 cumulative KU grade-point average to be in good academic standing. Students below that average are placed on probation.

  • Freshmen and Sophomores on Probation (between 0 and 59 completed hours): Each student in this category must earn a 2.0 KU term grade-point average until his or her cumulative KU grade-point average reaches 2.0, returning the student to good academic standing. Students who fail to meet these requirements are dismissed.
  • Juniors and Seniors on Probation (60 or more completed hours): Each student in this category must earn a 2.5 KU term grade-point average until his or her cumulative KU grade-point average reaches 2.0, returning the student to good academic standing. Students who fail to meet these requirements are dismissed.

To return to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the student must follow CLAS readmission guidelines.

Readmission after Dismissal

Students dismissed for the first time from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must wait at least 1 full fall or spring semester before returning to KU1. Summer session does not count as a full semester. In addition, a dismissed student must demonstrate academic success by completing a minimum of 6 hours of transferable academic course work at another higher education institution. To be readmitted, students must attain a grade-point average of 2.5 or higher in all hours taken after dismissal. All course work taken at every institution is calculated into the grade-point average since dismissal, even if the student opted for that institution’s retake policy. If students are lacking math or English courses to fulfill the Early and Continuous Enrollment requirements, they must complete all the courses necessary, through ENGL 101 (or equivalent) meeting or progressing on Written Communication requirements as established by KU Core and/or degree specific requirements and MATH 1011 (or equivalent) meeting or progressing Quantitative Reasoning and Literacy requirements as established by KU Core and/or degree specific requirements during the dismissal period. The College reviews the status of students dismissed from another KU school, based on CLAS regulations, beginning with the initial KU term. If the student would have been dismissed under CLAS regulations, this is considered a first dismissal, even though the student was not a CLAS student. Upon readmission, the student must maintain at least a 2.5 semester grade-point average until reaching good academic status to be allowed to continue in the College.

1

This may mean that some students must actually wait more than 1 semester to meet these conditions and apply for readmission.

Students dismissed for the second time from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must wait at least one academic year before applying for readmission. In addition, a dismissed student must demonstrate academic success by completing a minimum of 12 hours of transferable academic course work at another higher education institution. To be readmitted, students must attain a grade-point average of 2.5 or higher in all hours taken after dismissal. All course work taken at every institution is calculated into the grade-point average since dismissal, even if the student opted for that institution’s retake policy. If students are lacking ENGL 102 (or equivalent) and the second required math course (MATH 105MATH 111, MATH 115, MATH 121, MATH 365 or BIOL 570 or an equivalent course), they must complete these courses during the dismissal period. Upon readmission, the student must maintain at least a 2.5 semester grade-point average until reaching good academic status to be allowed to continue in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Note: Students who are in their last 30 hours must meet with the readmission advisor in College Student Academic Services to discuss their options.

A third dismissal is final.

Required Undergraduate Work in Residence

Junior/Senior Hours Required for Graduation

KU requires all students pursuing bachelor’s degrees to complete a minimum of 45 credit hours at the junior/senior level (courses numbered 300 and above). The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences requires that 30 of these 45 credit hours be completed in residence.

Hours in the Major: Maximums and Minimums

There is no limit on hours taken in the major for the B.A., B.G.S., or B.S. degree. Departments are not allowed to require more than 40 hours in the major for the B.A. or more than 50 hours in the major for the B.S. Some skills courses and supporting science courses are not included in this maximum limit. A minimum of 12 hours in the major must be in courses numbered 300 or above. At least 15 hours in each major(s) must be taken in residence at KU.

Time Limits

Undergraduates are strongly encouraged to complete the bachelor’s degree within 4 academic years. Students should complete a minimum of 30 credit hours each year. If a student is unable to complete 30 hours in the fall and spring terms, summer enrollment should be strongly considered.

Students have a maximum of ten years to complete their undergraduate work in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences under degree requirements in effect at the initial term of matriculation. Students experiencing a break in enrollment during these ten years will follow their curricular requirements at the point of matriculation provided that the break in enrollment does not exceed two calendar years. Students readmitted after two years are held to the curricular requirements in place at the term of readmission. Students maintaining continuous enrollment but who do not complete their degree requirements within ten years, may petition the College to complete their degree requirements under the curricular requirements in effect during the term of admission.

Transfer of Credit

CredTran is a transfer course equivalency system that lists more than 2,200 colleges and universities from which KU has accepted transfer courses in the past. If your school or course is not listed, your evaluation will be completed when you are admitted to KU.

Only transfer grades of C or higher contribute to total hours earned for students entering KU in spring 1990 or after, and for courses taken in spring 1990 or after by all students. For questions about transfer work fulfilling College requirements, contact College Student Academic Services, 109 Strong Hall.

Graduate University Regulations

The pursuit of graduate study in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at KU is governed by department- or program-specific policy, College policies and procedures, Graduate Studies policies, and University Senate Rules and Regulations. Information on the most frequently consulted policies is contained in this section. Students should also consult the academic unit’s handbook, Graduate Studies and College sections of the KU Policy Library, and the Graduate Studies and University of Kansas Regulations sections of the online catalog.

Academic and Research Integrity

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences strictly enforces KU and College policies on academic and scholarly misconduct. Academic integrity requires honest performance of academic and research responsibilities by students. These include, but are not limited to, ethical preparation of assignments, reports, and research papers; completion of examinations; ethical treatment of human and animal subjects; execution of administrative requirements; and a sincere and conscientious effort by students to abide by the policies set forth by instructors and research advisors.

Enrollment

Full-time, Half-Time and Part-Time Enrollment

Graduate Studies defines full-time enrollment as 9 credit hours in Fall or Spring semester and 6 hours in the summer session. Maximum enrollment for graduate students, except in rare instances, is 16 hours in Fall or Spring semester and 9 hours in the summer session. Please see the Full-time Enrollment for Graduate Students policy in the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog and the KU Policy Library for more information on what constitutes full-time, half-time, and part-time enrollment, including variations on this policy for doctoral students enrolled in dissertation hours, GTA/GRA/GA appointments, and active duty military. At a minimum, all graduate students should be continuously enrolled in the Fall and Spring semesters while completing the credit hours required for the fulfillment of their degrees. Please consult the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog and the KU Policy Library for other enrollment regulations.

Continuous Enrollment for Master’s Students

The College requires that all master’s students who have completed the required coursework for their degrees must be continuously enrolled in the Fall and Spring semesters until all remaining requirements for the degree, including the thesis when applicable, are completed. No enrollment is required during the summer session unless it is the semester during which the student will graduate, in which case enrollment is required. Certain academic units have additional rules governing summer enrollment.

Post-Comprehensive Enrollment for Doctoral Students

After passing the Comprehensive Oral Exam, doctoral candidates must be continuously enrolled. During this time, until all requirements for the degree are completed (including the filing of the dissertation) or until 18 post-comprehensive hours have been completed (whichever comes first), the candidate must enroll for a minimum of 6 hours a semester and 3 hours a summer session. At least one of these hours each term must be in dissertation or approved dissertation-equivalent coursework.

In addition, Graduate Studies requires a period of at least 5 months to elapse between the comprehensive oral exam and the final exam. Students that have completed all degree requirements before completing 18 hours are still required to continue enrollment until this 5-month requirement has been met.

Upon completion of the 18-hour requirement, a student’s level of enrollment should reflect, as accurately as possible, the faculty time he or she utilizes. This may be as little as one hour per semester.

Special enrollment requirements apply to those with GTA/GRA/GA appointments. Please consult the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog and the KU Policy Library.

Lapses in Enrollment

Generally, no student is allowed to enroll after the first 4 weeks of a semester or the first 2 weeks of a summer session. If a student does not intend to enroll, he or she must determine the appropriate course of action in consultation with the department or program.

The student may elect to Voluntarily Discontinue from the program, and must inform the department or program in writing of this decision, which will in turn submit the necessary forms to the College. This option requires the student to seek re-admission to the program if they choose to return at a future date. They also remain eligible to seek admission to another department or program in the College.

The student may also petition for a Leave of Absence of up to one calendar year. If granted, the Leave of Absence maintains the student’s place in the program. Leave of Absence petitions must be submitted by the department or program and provide evidence of the department or program’s endorsement of the student’s petition. Students interested in this option should begin by consulting with their advisor.

The time spent on Leave of Absence does not count toward the student’s time to degree, and therefore does not shorten the time available to complete their degree requirements. Similarly, if a student that has elected to Voluntarily Discontinue subsequently returns to the program, the time that has elapsed since his or her discontinuance does not count toward the time to degree.

Students who fail to enroll without completing the Voluntary Discontinuance process or without being granted a Leave of Absence are reviewed by the College Office of Graduate Affairs and the students’ academic units for possible dismissal. Any time that accrues during these lapses of enrollment in which the student does not occupy any approved enrollment category (i.e., Enrolled, Voluntarily Discontinued, or Leave of Absence) is counted toward the time to degree.

Students on an international student visa should consult with the International Programs office prior to any change in enrollment status.

Please see Graduate Studies policies governing Leave of Absence and Voluntary Discontinuance in the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog and in the KU Policy Library.

Dual Enrollments

Students enrolled in two schools or working on two degrees at the same time must complete the work for both degrees. Courses may not be counted toward both degrees, except in the joint degree programs that have been established (e.g., M.P.A./J.D., M.A. in Economics/J.D., M.B.A./M.A. in Area Studies, etc.). Please refer to the Combined Degrees information in the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog for a complete list of approved joint degree programs.

University Regulations on Grading

Article II of the University Senate Rules and Regulations provides detailed information on regulations governing the grading of graduate coursework. Students should also consult the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog and the KU Policy Library for more information on the Grading Policy.

The following are of particular relevance for graduate students in the College:

Passing Grades for Graduate Coursework

Only courses graded C or above are considered passing and may be counted for graduate credit. Courses graded C-, D or F may not be used to fulfill degree requirements.

Incomplete (I) and Waiting Grades (WG)

Incomplete (I) grades are used to note, temporarily, that students have been unable to complete a portion of the required course work during that semester due to circumstances beyond their control. Incomplete work must be completed and assigned an A-F or S/U grade within the time period prescribed by the course instructor. After one calendar year from the original grade due date, an Incomplete (I) grade will automatically convert to a grade of F or U, or the lapsed grade assigned by the course instructor.

Waiting Grades (WG) are placeholders and should only be used in rare instances when, for reasons beyond his or her control, an instructor is not able to assign a course grade by the deadline.

Credit/No Credit (CR/NC)

Graduate students may select the Credit/No Credit option only for those courses that do not fulfill a degree requirement. Degree requirements include those courses used to fulfill the Research Skills and Responsible Scholarship requirement. Students should consult with their advisor prior to electing the CR/NC option.

College-Specific Grading Policy

Plus/Minus (+/-) Grades

Plus/minus (+/–) grades may be used in the College. The plus or minus sign describes intermediate levels of performance between a maximum of A and a minimum of F. Intermediate grades are calculated as 0.3 units above or below the corresponding letter grade.

Participation (P) Grades

Use of the Participation (P) grade is restricted in the College. It is only approved for a limited number of courses for which special permission has been sought. When permission is granted, P is only used to indicate participation in thesis, dissertation, or research enrollments (related to thesis or dissertation), or in the first semester enrollment of a two-semester sequence course. In any semester, the instructor may elect to assign a letter grade of A, B, C, D, or F when evidence about performance is available. A letter grade (A, B, C, D, or F) must be assigned in the last semester of enrollment to characterize the quality of the final product.

A-F or S/U grades are used in all other courses, including those that are repeated across semesters. The latter include courses in which students are collecting, assembling, or analyzing data; reviewing a research or scholarly literature; or creating portfolios. Students in these courses are expected to develop plans of study with their instructors and to contact these instructors throughout the semester to discuss their progress or changes in their plans. Instructors assign grades each semester based on the quantity and quality of the work students complete that semester. The grades that students receive in the last semester of these courses (e.g., for completing data analyses and literature reviews, exhibiting portfolios, defending theses or dissertations) apply only to that semester.

If a department or program has a course for which the P grading system may be more appropriate than the A-F or S/U grading system, it must seek special approval from the College.

Incompletes (I) and Waiting Grades (WG)

The College will not approve an application for graduation if a waiting grade (WG) or an incomplete (I) grade remains on the student’s transcript.

Probation and Dismissal Guidelines

To be in good standing, a student must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average and be making satisfactory progress toward the degree, as determined by the department or program.

If the grade-point average falls below 3.0, the department or program notifies the student in writing that they are being recommended for probation and outlines the expectations of the graduate program and the College that the student must meet to return to good standing. This is followed by a letter from the College confirming their probationary status.

When the rationale for probation is based on grade-point average, a student is typically placed on probation for 1 academic semester. If the cumulative grade-point average has not risen to 3.0 at the end of that semester, the student will be dismissed unless the College acts favorably on a departmental recommendation for the student to continue study.

Students may also be placed on probation for failing to make satisfactory progress toward the degree. This may include, but is not limited to, failed exams or failure to make adequate and timely progress on the dissertation or thesis.

A graduate student is dismissed upon recommendation of the student’s department or program. This typically occurs when a student fails to raise the grade point average to 3.0 after a semester of probation, or otherwise fails to meet the terms of the probationary period. Academic dismissal should occur before a semester begins. If a student is dismissed during the semester, the dismissal is effective only at the end of the semester in which the department or program gives notification of dismissal. The department or program will notify the student in writing of the reasons for their dismissal. This will be followed by a letter from the College confirming the dismissal from the program and from the College.

In cases when a student’s grade point average is so low that their ability to ever achieve the 3.0 grade-point average required for graduation is in serious doubt, the department or program should move to dismiss.

A student who has been dismissed from a graduate department or program in the College is not eligible for readmission to graduate study in any department or program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Time Limits

The University and the College have established time limits governing various stages of the graduate student career.

Maximum Time to Count Required Course Work

Courses completed at the University of Kansas, or transfer credits from another university, are valid for a period of 10 years. Courses that were completed more than 10 years before the scheduling of the final defense may not be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

With the endorsement of their graduate programs, students may petition the College to accept out-of-date course work to fulfill the requirements for their graduate degrees, provided they are able to justify why this course work meets the current standards of scholarship in the discipline.

Maximum Time to Submit Thesis or Dissertation

The College requires that students make all final revisions and file the final version of the thesis or dissertation manuscript to UMI/Proquest within 6 months of the date of final presentation and/or defense of the thesis or dissertation work. Until the final manuscript of a thesis or dissertation is filed, the student must be enrolled in accordance with enrollment policy. Graduate students in the College who do not file the final manuscript within the 6-month time limit must enroll in 3 hours a semester until the thesis or dissertation is completed and filed.

Maximum Time to Complete the Degree

Graduate Studies has established time limits on master’s and doctoral degree completion. Please see Graduate Studies policies on Doctoral Program Time Constraints and Master's Program Time Constraints in the Graduate Studies sections of the online catalog and in the KU Policy Library for full details.

Master's degree students have a total of seven calendar years, excluding any periods of absence due to an approved leave of absence or voluntary discontinuation from a program, in which to complete the work for a master’s degree.

Doctoral degree students have a total of 8 calendar years, excluding any periods of absence due to an approved leave of absence or voluntary discontinuation from a program, to complete the Ph.D. This includes students who enter with a master’s degree from an institution other than KU and bachelor’s degree holders who bypass the master’s and are admitted directly to a Ph.D. program.

Students who complete the master’s and doctoral degrees at KU have 10 years to complete both degrees.

A time limit extension may be granted by the College.  All extension petitions require the department to prepare and file a Graduate Degree Completion Agreement, which must then be approved by a designated subcommittee of the Committee on Graduate Studies.   Per Graduate Studies policy, extensions may be granted for up to 1 year.  However, additional time may be requested in the Completion Agreement.  If the Completion Agreement is approved, subsequent petitions will receive an expedited review. 

Academic units may set their own, more rigorous time limits. Consult with your advisor and review your academic unit’s handbook and the relevant Departments and Programs section of the online catalog for program-specific information, requirements, and restrictions.

Graduation

All graduate students must be enrolled the semester they complete all degree requirements.

Graduate Studies establishes an early deadline for degree completion for each semester and summer session, usually occurring at the end of the first 2 weeks of a semester or the end of the first week of summer session. If the student was enrolled the previous semester and meets all degree requirements including the submission of all required documentation by this early deadline, they are not required to enroll for that semester.

The final Graduate Application for Graduation Deadline is set by the Registrar for each semester. Please consult the official Academic Calendar for specific dates. To be eligible for graduation, an application for degree must be submitted and all degree requirements met by this deadline. This includes the submission of all required documentation to the College Office of Graduate Affairs. See the Graduation section of the COGA website for more information.

Undergraduate Awards

Graduation with Honors

Undergraduates may earn honors upon graduation in 3 ways, in addition to making the honor roll each semester. Students may graduate with distinction or highest distinction, earn departmental honors in the major, or complete the University Honors Program. It is possible to earn honors in 1 of these areas, any combination of them, or all 3. The award of honors is noted on the student’s transcript and in the Commencement program. Distinction and highest distinction are noted on the diploma.

Graduation with Distinction or Highest Distinction

The top 10 percent of each year’s graduating class is designated as graduating with distinction. Of these, the top one-third is designated as graduating with highest distinction. To be eligible, students must have completed at least 60 credit hours, graded A through F, in residence at KU. See Required Work in Residence below.

Graduation with Departmental Honors

Most departments and programs allow qualified majors to work toward graduation with departmental honors. Graduation with departmental honors is awarded in recognition of exceptional performance in the major, completion of a program of independent research or an alternative project, and a strong overall academic record.

In addition to the requirements of individual departments and programs (which must be approved by the College committee on undergraduate studies and advising), the College requires the following for graduation with departmental honors:

  1. Candidates must declare the intention to work for departmental honors with the appropriate departmental honors coordinator(s) no later than the time of enrollment for the final undergraduate semester, but sooner if required by the department(s). Copies of the intent form should be returned to College Student Academic Services.
  2. At the end of the final undergraduate semester, the candidate must have achieved an overall grade-point average of at least 3.25 and a grade-point average of at least 3.5 in the major. Both overall and major grade-point averages include work completed at other institutions, as well as at KU. No minimum grade-point average is required to declare candidacy for graduation with departmental honors unless specified by the department.
  3. Each candidate’s departmental honors work must include independent research or an acceptable alternative project. The results of research are presented in a form appropriate to the requirements of the major department. Equivalents to the independent research component are established by approved departmental honors programs. In courses meeting the independent research requirement, the candidate must earn a grade of B or higher. Successful completion of all departmental honors requirements must be certified to the departmental honors coordinator(s) by a panel composed of at least three members of the College faculty who have read the report of the independent research and heard the oral presentation, where required.

Late Completion of Honors Requirement

Requirements for graduation with honors may be completed after the date on which certifications are requested from departments, and in some cases, requirements, if not needed for graduation, may be completed after a student has graduated. However, the Incomplete policy does apply and grades would lapse at the time of graduation. When a candidate finishes all requirements, departments must notify College Student Academic Services in writing.

Honor Roll

Undergraduates with grade-point averages of 3.5 who have completed at least 12 hours with letter grades are recognized on the honor roll or dean’s list in fall and spring. An Honor Roll notation appears on the transcript.

Honors Program

The University Honors Program provides opportunities for outstanding and creative undergraduates in all schools at KU to develop their full potential during their undergraduate years. See Honors in this section of the online catalog for further information.

Graduate Awards

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers several awards to recognize outstanding graduate students, faculty service, teaching excellence, and exemplary advising. Below, you will find a brief description of each award. More specific information about eligibility and the call for nominations each year can be found on the College's website under Faculty Awards and Graduate Student Awards.

Graduate Student Awards

Howard J. Baumgartel Peace and Justice Award

This is an annual award to support a graduate student in the College or the School of Business for thesis or dissertation research whose interests, achievements, and talents are in the peace and justice field.  The award amount is $2,760 and is disbursed in the summer.

Outstanding Thesis/Research Project Award

The Committee on Graduate Studies in the College has established this award for students receiving a master's degree. The bi-annual award carries a $500 stipend, and either a thesis or research project awardee is selected in each cycle. Students are nominated for the award by their advisors.

Graduate Faculty Awards

Byron A. Alexander/John C. Wright Graduate Mentor Awards

Graduate students may nominate any tenured or tenure-track faculty member in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who has served as an outstanding mentor.  The award amounts are up to $1,000.

Career Achievement Teaching Award

This annual award recognizes a retired faculty member in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who has made a significant contribution to the teaching of College students at either the undergraduate or graduate level and who has distinguished him/herself through excellence in teaching. The award amount is $1,000.

African & African-American St Courses

AAAS 102. Arabic and Islamic Studies. 3 Hours NW/SC AE42/GE3H/GE3S / U.

An introduction to the study of Islam and the Arabic language in relation to Islamic cultures in Africa, the Mediterranean region, and beyond. Topics covered include the historical origins of Islam in relation to the Arabic language and its cultures of origin. This course is interdisciplinary, including attention to the topic from the perspectives of historical unfolding of both the language and religion, geographic and cultural perspectives, political and economic concerns, and aesthetic perspectives, including literature and the arts. LEC.

AAAS 103. Introduction to Africa. 3 Hours NW/SC GE3H/GE3S / S/W.

An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of African cultures and societies focusing on contemporary life on the continent. Topics to be covered include the geography, history, politics, and economics of the continent, as well as the religion, languages and literatures, music, and the arts. The interdisciplinary perspective will provide students with a sound basis for understanding contemporary African societies. LEC.

AAAS 104. Introduction to African-American Studies. 3 Hours SC AE41 / U.

Interdisciplinary introduction to the basic concepts and literature in the disciplines covered in African American Studies. Includes the social sciences, and humanities (including history, religion, and literature) as well as conceptual framework for investigation and analysis of Black history and culture and society. LEC.

AAAS 105. Introduction to African History. 3 Hours NW GE11/GE3H / H/W.

An introduction to important historical developments in Africa. Topics include empires, kingdoms, the slave trade, European colonialism, liberation movements, national identities, and a return to independence. (Same as HIST 104.) LEC.

AAAS 106. The Black Experience in the Americas. 3 Hours HT AE41 / H/W.

An interdisciplinary study of the history of the African peoples of the New World, relating their cultures and institutions to the African background and to their peculiar New World experiences up to and including the nineteenth century. While the main emphasis is on the U.S.A., attention is also paid to the Caribbean and Latin America. Approaches include demography, economics, social and political developments, literature, and music. (Same as HIST 109.) LEC.

AAAS 115. Introduction to African History, Honors. 3 Hours NW GE3H / H.

An intensive version of AAAS 105/HIST 104. An introduction to important historical developments in Africa, mainly south of the Sahara. Topics include early history, empires, kingdoms and city-states, the slave trade, southern Africa, partition and colonialism, the independence era, military and civilian governments, and liberation movements. Approaches include literature, the visual arts, politics, economics, and geography. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. (Same as HIST 111.) LEC.

AAAS 116. The Black Experience in the Americas, Honors. 3 Hours HT AE41 / H.

An intensive version of AAAS 106. Open only to students on Dean's Honor Roll or enrolled in Honors Program, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 160. Introduction to West African History. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H / H.

This course treats West African history through the first part of the twentieth century. The student is provided with a perspective on the major historical patterns that gave rise to West Africa's development as an integral part of world history. Special attention is paid to anthropological, geographical, and technological developments that influenced West African political and socioeconomic changes. (Same as HIST 160.) LEC.

AAAS 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in African & African-American Studies. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

AAAS 200. Directed Studies. 3 Hours U.

This course is designed for the study of special topics related to Africana at the freshman/sophomore level. It prepares students for continued practice in cultural reading and writing and for the academic rigor that awaits them at the upper levels. Prerequisite: Consent of department. IND.

AAAS 210. Brazil and Africa: Atlantic Encounters. 3 Hours H.

This is a survey course on the history of the relationships between Brazil and Western Africa from the sixteenth century onward. We examine the shape of the Atlantic world, the nature of the Portuguese empire in Brazil and Africa, the presence of Brazilian born agents in Western Africa, the cultural exchanges, the impact of colonial rule, and the responses of indigenous societies to these developments. Among the topics to receive attention are Brazil/Portuguese slave trade; slavery in Western Africa, urban and rural context of African slavery in Brazil; the family and religious life in both sides of the Atlantic; Brazilian communities in the coast of Africa; the abolition of slavery; and the long lasting relationships between Western Africa and Brazil. Students develop familiarity with major historical concepts, themes, and subjects. The course also aims to explore history as process to make sense of the past and the present. (Same as HIST 210.) LEC.

AAAS 300. African Traditional Religion and Thought. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A study of African traditional religious beliefs, systems and practices and how these have conditioned spiritual, moral and social values, attitudes, social relationships and institutions, art, literature and music. Topics covered include the African world-view, concepts of birth, life, marriage, death and reincarnation; the concurrent practice or monotheism, polytheism and the cult of the ancestors; and the extent of relevance to Black societies in the New World. Prerequisite: AAAS 103 or AAAS 105 or AAAS 106 or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 301. Portrait of a Third-World Nation: Haiti. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

Case study of Third-World problems and aspirations through the first Black nation to win independence from colonialism. Topics include: profile of the Third World; Caribbean diversity; the Columbian exchange; piracy; slavery and plantocracy; Revolution and the burden of freedom; U.S. occupation; Papa Doc, Baby Doc, and the Tontons Macoute; Liberation theology; peasant life; government and corruption; poverty and hunger; morality of foreign aid; Voodoo; folk medicine. No knowledge of Haitian or French required. Students may not receive credit for both HAIT 200 and AAAS 301. LEC.

AAAS 302. Contemporary Haiti. 3 Hours NW.

Detailed analysis of recent Haitian history. The focus will include interactions between religion, social structure, politics, economics and international relations. (Same as HAIT 300.) Prerequisite: AAAS 301/HAIT 200, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 303. Peoples and Cultures of North Africa and the Middle East. 3 Hours NW / S.

This course familiarizes students with the peoples and cultures of North Africa and the Middle East. It examines the cultural, demographic, and religious diversity of the region, as well as the development of the early Islamic community and the formation of Islamic institutions. Issues such as religion and politics, inter-religious relations, nation-building, Islamic response to colonialism, Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Islamic resurgence, secularism, democratization, and gender, are also explored. (Same as ANTH 303.) LEC.

AAAS 305. Modern Africa. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H/W.

A survey of social, political, and economic developments during the colonial era and independence struggles. Themes may include resistance, liberation, nationalism, gender issues, agriculture, genocide, and human rights. (Same as HIST 300.) LEC.

AAAS 306. The Black Experience in the U.S. Since Emancipation. 3 Hours H.

An interdisciplinary study of the history and culture of Black people in America from Reconstruction to the present. Topics covered include an analysis of Reconstruction, Black leaders, organizations and movements, the Harlem Renaissance, migration, and race relations. Demographic variables covered include socio-economic class, education, political persuasion, and influence by avant-garde cultural changes. (Same as HIST 359.) LEC.

AAAS 307. Modern Africa, Honors. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H.

An intensive version of HIST 300. A survey of social, political, and economic developments during the colonial era and independence struggles. Themes may include resistance, liberation, nationalism, gender issues, agriculture, genocide, and human rights. (Same as HIST 307.) Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by consent of the instructor. LEC.

AAAS 316. Ministers and Magicians: Black Religions from Slavery to the Present. 3 Hours H.

This course examines the history and diversity of African American religious expression from slavery until the present, emphasizing both mainstream and alternative faiths. It covers the religious world views of enslaved Africans, and examines faiths inside and outside of Christianity. Topics may include: independent black churches, magical practices, the Holiness and Pentecostal movements, black Islam, religious freemasonry, and esoteric faiths. The class emphasizes the influence of gender, class, race, migration, and urbanization on black religion. (Same as AMS 316 and HIST 316.) LEC.

AAAS 317. African American Women: Colonial Era to the Present. 3 Hours H.

This interdisciplinary course covers the history of African American women, beginning in West and Central Africa, extending across the Middle Passage into the Americas, and stretching through enslavement and freedom into the 21st century. The readings cover their experiences through secondary and tertiary source materials, as well as autobiographies and letters, plays and music, and poems, novels, and speeches. (Same as AMS 317, HIST 317, and WGSS 317.) LEC.

AAAS 320. African Studies In: _____. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H/W.

Lecture and discussion course in African area of current interest. May be repeated for credit toward the major. Prerequisite: AAAS 103 or AAAS 105 or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 321. African Studies In, Honors: _____. 3 Hours H/W.

Lecture and discussion course in African area of current interest. May be repeated for credit toward the major. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program or with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: AAAS 103 or AAAS 105 or AAAS 115 or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 322. Legal Issues and the African American. 3 Hours H.

This course examines civil issues in African-American communities and populations, and their legal ramifications. Topics such as the penal system, court sentencing, death penalty, cultural norms, law enforcement and civil liberties are critically examined within social and humanistic theories. LEC.

AAAS 323. African-American Studies In: _____. 3 Hours H.

Lecture and discussion course in African-American area of current interest. May be repeated for credit toward the major. Prerequisite: AAAS 106 or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 324. African-American Studies In, Honors: _____. 3 Hours H.

Lecture and discussion course in African-American area of current interest. May be repeated for credit toward the major. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program or with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: AAAS 106 or AAAS 116 or consent of instructor LEC.

AAAS 325. Popular Black Music. 3 Hours H.

This is a comparative study of popular music produced in Africa, and the African Diaspora. The praxis, theories, histories, forms, artists and audiences are discussed. LEC.

AAAS 327. African American Culture. 3 Hours.

This course defines African American culture and seeks to identify ways in which it is distinct, both in terms of its roots and ongoing evolution. LEC.

AAAS 328. African American Urban Community and Class in the Midwest. 3 Hours H.

This course provides historical perspective on African Americans and the politics of economic class within black urban spaces from the end of Reconstruction to the post-World War II era. It focuses on the development of an upwardly mobile urban black middle class, and impoverished black urban "underclass," since the 1960s. Students are encouraged to successfully completed one of three courses: AAAS 104, AAAS 106, or AAAS 306. (Same as HIST 338.) LEC.

AAAS 330. Black Leadership. 3 Hours H.

The course focuses on the concept of leadership and on Black leadership in the United States. An in-depth analysis of selected case studies of Black leaders both historical and contemporary. Some attention will be given to the dispersion of Africans into the Americas and the leadership that emerged, conditioned both by environmental factors and the psychology engendered by the system of slavery. Selected successful Black leaders will be invited to visit the class from time to time. (Same as AMS 340.) LEC.

AAAS 332. Introduction to African Literature. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H/W.

Reading, analysis, and discussion of contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama from sub-Saharan Africa. Brief attention is paid to historical development and to traditional literature. (Same as ENGL 326.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

AAAS 333. Introduction to Caribbean Literature. 3 Hours AE42 / H/W.

Reading, analysis, and discussion of fiction, poetry, and drama from the Caribbean, including a small selection of Spanish, French, and Dutch Antillean works in translation. (Same as ENGL 339.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

AAAS 334. Introduction to African Dance Theatre. 2 Hours NW / U.

Introduction to the general techniques of non-verbal theatrical conventions in African cultures. Practical training in movement vocabulary supplemented by lectures on the "text" of performance. There will be an end of semester "studio performance." (Same as DANC 230 and THR 226.) LEC.

AAAS 335. Introduction to Southern African Literature. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

This course deals with the literatures of the southern Africa region, including works by both women and men from South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho, Zaire, Zimbabwe, and Mauritius. Course includes close attention to the political and cultural bases of social conflict in the region. LEC.

AAAS 336. Introduction to African Literature, Honors. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

Reading, analysis and discussion of contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama from Africa. Brief attention is paid to historical development and to traditional literature. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or with consent of instructor. Not open to students who have taken AAAS 332. LEC.

AAAS 340. Women in Contemporary African Literature. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H / H.

A critical study of issues and questions raised about women in contemporary African literature and implications for the larger society through the analysis of theme, language, characterization, roles and functions of women in selected works. (Same as WGSS 330.) LEC.

AAAS 345. Popular Culture in Africa: Spiritual Thrills, Romance and Sexualities. 3 Hours H.

This course examines how the different constituents of popular culture mobilize, construct and structure gender, and spiritual and sexual identities in select contemporary African countries. Discussions also focus on how popular culture mediates the contesting spaces of indigenous local constructs and the push and pull of global forces to create geographic and contemporary specificities. (Same as WGSS 345.) LEC.

AAAS 349. Islam. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3S / H/W.

Islam's Origins, the prophet Muhammed, the Holy Koran, religious symbols and moral mandates, and historical developments. (Same as REL 350.) LEC.

AAAS 350. Physical Geography of Africa. 3 Hours N.

This course is a survey of the basic physical features of the African continent including structure and relief, rivers and lakes, soils and mineral resources. It includes characteristics and processes of African climates, and the ecology of Africa's four major biomes: tropical rain forest, savanna, steppe, and desert. Climatic and environmental variations of the past, emergence of humankind, and development of pastoral and farming systems are discussed. Contemporary environmental concerns also include deforestation and desertification, the impacts of drought, methods for monitoring African environments, and Africa's prospects in a 21st century suffering from global warming. (Same as GEOG 350.) LEC.

AAAS 351. Africa's Human Geographies. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3S / S/W.

An introduction to historical, cultural, social, political, and economic issues in Africa from a geographic perspective. The course begins with the historical geography of humanity in Africa, from ancient times through to the present. Other topics include cultural dynamics, demography, health, rural development, urbanization, gender issues, and political geography. Case studies from Eastern and Southern Africa will be used to illustrate major themes. (Same as GEOG 351.) LEC.

AAAS 353. Modern and Contemporary African Art. 3 Hours H.

In this course, we examine the development of artistic modernisms in Africa in historical context. We also study the content, production, patronage, and display of modern and contemporary African art. In doing so, we consider African artists' engagement with modernity, globalization, and contemporary issues, as well as interrogate influential myths and assumptions regarding African artists and the work they produce. Course themes include the workshop as a critical site, independence movements and the creation of national art forms, art as global commodity, and art in resistance, remembrance, and revolution. (Same as HA 353.) LEC.

AAAS 355. African Theatre and Drama. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A study of the origin and development of continental African theatre and its affinity to the Levant. Traditional, colonial and contemporary dramatic theories and experiments will be examined in play selections. (Same as THR 326.) LEC.

AAAS 356. African-American Theatre and Drama. 3 Hours H.

A historical study of Black theatre in the U.S.A. from its African genesis to its contemporary Americanness. Epochs in African-American dramaturgy will be critically examined. (Same as THR 327) LEC.

AAAS 370. Introduction to the Languages of Africa. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3S / H/W.

A survey of the indigenous languages of Africa from a linguistic perspective, covering the main language families and their geographic distribution, and focusing on the features and structure of the more widely spoken and representative languages in each family (e.g., Fula, Hausa, Maninka, Swahili, Yoruba). (Same as LING 370.) LEC.

AAAS 372. Religion, Power, and Sexuality in Arab Societies. 3 Hours NW / S.

This course examines theories of religion, discourse, power, gender and sexuality in their application to Arab societies. The course introduces different aspects of Arab cultures. Through canonical works, we study political domination, tribal social organization, honor, tribe, shame, social loyalty, ritual initiations and discuss how these issues speak generally to anthropological inquiry. Regionally specific works are then framed by an additional set of readings drawn from anthropological, linguistics, and social theories. (Same as ANTH 372.) LEC.

AAAS 376. West African Art. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

Introduction to the rich visual art traditions of West Africa. Emphasis is given to the major art-producing cultures of the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast, including the pre-historic cultures of Nigeria, Mali, and Ghana. The diverse forms of figure sculptures and masquerade performance and meanings of these arts in historical and cultural contexts are examined. (Same as HA 376.) LEC.

AAAS 388. The Black Woman. 3 Hours S/W.

An interdisciplinary study of the role of Black women in our society, from the African background through the plantation experience to the present. Prerequisite: One course in the social sciences and/or humanities or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 400. Readings in: _____. 3 Hours U.

Investigation of a subject selected by a student in consultation with a departmental adviser and conducted under supervision. Individual reports and conferences. Open only to students who have completed at least six credit hours in African and African-American studies. Cannot be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

AAAS 415. Women and Islam. 3 Hours H/W.

Addresses the widely-held stereotype of Muslim women as pawns in a patriarchal socio-religious context. Investigating the Muslim cultures of certain regions, the course will examine the manner in which indigenous culture was influenced by the introduction of Islam and the historical impact of Islam on women's social roles. Focusing principally on social change in the 20th century, the course will consider how socio-political change affects religious roles where religion is integrally involved in daily life. To what extent is individualism valued, and how are the pressures of late 20th century life mediated? The course will draw on texts from history, sociology, and literature. Prerequisite: REL 107 or AAAS 349/REL 350 or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 420. Intercultural Communication: The Afro-American. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

An examination of the barriers to effective communication between Black Americans and non-Black Americans. (Same as COMS 447.) Prerequisite: Skills in basic composition essential. LEC.

AAAS 429. Postcolonial Theatre and Drama. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3S / H.

The course develops an understanding of the postcolonial concept and its different manifestations in theatre and drama across nations and cultures. It approaches postcolonialism as a way of reading theatre, and as a genre within theatre by exploring how the "colonial project" has reconfigured the concept, content, and context of theatre in both colonized and colonizing cultures. In addition to the study of postcolonial playwrights and their works, the course is also an introduction to postcolonial theory and its critics. (Same as THR 429.) LEC.

AAAS 432. Francophone African Literature. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3S / H/W.

This course is an introduction to 20th century African literature written in French, covering selected works by major authors from both sub-Saharan Africa and the Maghreb. Attention will be given primarily to the novel, although some poetry will also be read. Topics and themes include negritude, African identity in the wake of colonialism, Islam, and women's writing. Classes will be conducted in English. Students may read the texts in French or in translation. (Same as FREN 432.) Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and a 200-level English course. LEC.

AAAS 433. Islamic Literature. 3 Hours NW AE51 / H/W.

This course focuses on literature that reflects Islamic culture from its inception to contemporary times. Beginning with attention to the importance of the spoken word in the establishment of Islam, course readings and lectures follow the place of literary works in confirming Islamic perspectives. Readings include selections from the Qur'an, classical works of poetry and narrative, and contemporary autobiography. Authors are from Africa and the region of the Golden Age of Islam, including the best known: al-Ghazali (d.1111 C.E.), Attar (d. circa 1193-1235), Ibn Arabi (d. 1240 C.E,), Rumi (d. 1273), Saadi (d.1291), Hafiz (d. 1389 C.E.), and Shah (contemporary), as well as readings by and about less well known Muslim women scholars and Sufis in all historical periods. Readings are all in English translations. LEC.

AAAS 434. African Women Writers. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

This course focuses on four decades of African women's writing from all regions of the continent. Works included deal with a wide variety of issues relevant to African women, as well as universal issues of conceptions of gender roles, and the struggle to attain personal rights and freedom within traditional cultural frameworks. LEC.

AAAS 435. Muslim Women's Autobiography. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

This course examines the realities of Muslim women's experiences as conveyed in their own voices. Works are drawn from all over the world, from Africa and the Middle East to Europe and the U.S. and cover the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. LEC.

AAAS 440. The Afro-American Family: A Psychological Approach. 3 Hours S.

The examination of the structure, values, and behavior patterns of the contemporary African-American family as influenced by African cultures and kinship systems and the institution of slavery in association with other factors. Social and psychological forces that have enhanced or blocked family survival, stability, and advancement will be explored. The orientation of Black family life will emphasize its strengths, weaknesses, adaptations, strong kinship bonds, and equalitarian family roles. LEC.

AAAS 445. Arab Thought and Identity. 3 Hours NW / N/W.

The intention of this course is to present a comprehensive portrait and a deeper understanding of the Arab society and its cultural background. We will focus on the debate that is still raging about traditionalism versus modernity, and authenticity (assala) and specificity (Khususiyya) versus westernization. Moreover, we will discuss the question of Arab identity which manifests itself through a sense of belonging and diversity of affiliations, and relies as well on shared culture and its variations, and shared place in history and common experiences. It is designed for any student interested in this ethnic group. LEC.

AAAS 450. Popular Culture in the Muslim World. 3 Hours NW / H.

A study of pop songs, television, comics, and other idioms of popular culture from different parts of the Muslim world, with attention to Muslims' sense of humor, tragedy, aesthetics, and pertinent issues of the day. (Same as REL 450.) LEC.

AAAS 460. Topics and Problems in African and African-American Studies. 1-3 Hours H/W.

Individual investigation of special topics in African and African-American studies. May not be repeated for credit toward the major. Prerequisite: Six hours in African and African-American studies or consent of instructor. IND.

AAAS 470. Language and Society in Africa. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3S / H/W.

Examines issues and problems associated with language use in sub-Saharan Africa from a sociological perspective. Topics covered include an overview of the types of languages spoken on the continent: indigenous languages, colonial languages, pidgins and creoles, and Arabic as a religious language; problems associated with the politics of literacy and language planning, writing and standardization of indigenous languages; and the cultural and ideological dilemmas of language choice. (Same as LING 470.) Prerequisite: AAAS 103, AAAS 305, or LING 106; or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 496. Field Experience. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W.

A supervised placement in practical situations where students actively participate in organized work within the community, to be completed with an acceptable paper. The course may be taken in the United States, Caribbean, or Africa to meet the B.A. degree requirement in African and African-American Studies. Open only to junior and senior majors or by consent of the department. FLD.

AAAS 501. Regional History: _____. 3 Hours H/W.

A survey of the major political, social, economic and intellectual trends in a region of Africa or the Americas. Prerequisite: Five hours of distribution courses in history. LEC.

AAAS 502. Directed Language Study: _____. 5 Hours U.

Study of an African language at Elementary I and Elementary II levels under individual supervision and with the aid of self-instructional material. Open to juniors and seniors in good standing and graduate students only and with permission of the department. May be repeated for up to 10 credit hours. Cannot be used to fulfill BA foreign language requirement. IND.

AAAS 503. Directed Language Study: _____. 3 Hours U.

Study of an African language at Intermediate I and Intermediate II levels under individual supervision and with the aid of self-instructional material. Open to juniors and seniors in good standing and graduate students only and with permission of the department. May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours. Cannot be used to fulfill BA foreign language requirement. IND.

AAAS 504. Directed Language Study I: _____. 3 Hours U.

Study of an African language at Advanced I and Advanced II levels under individual supervision and with the aid of self-instructional material. Open only to juniors and seniors in good standing, graduate students and with permission of the department. May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours. Cannot be used to fulfill BA language requirement. IND.

AAAS 505. Directed Language Study II: _____. 3 Hours U.

Designed for native and near native speakers, this course involves reading of materials published in an African language intended for conversation, oral presentation, and writing by native speakers. May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: Native or near native speaker proficiency or consent of instructor. IND.

AAAS 510. Global Ethnic and Racial Relations. 3 Hours NW AE42 / S.

An examination of constructions of race and ethnicity around the world. Emphasis is on the social, political, historical, cultural and economic factors that lead to the creation of ethnic and racial identities, ethnic conflict and accommodation, ethnic movements, and ethnic political organization. Racial and ethnic relations in the U.S. are compared with other countries. Major focus is placed on ethnicity in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, and/or the Middle East. (Same as AMS 534 and SOC 534.) LEC.

AAAS 511. The Civil Rights Movement. 3 Hours H.

An examination of the Civil Rights Movement in American History. Emphasis is placed on the activities of major Civil Rights organizations, Civil Rights legislation and its impact on American life, and conflicts between integrationist and separatist forces in politics, economics, education, culture and race relations in the United States. LEC.

AAAS 512. African and Western Cosmologies. 3 Hours H/W.

Ancient and modern Western world views will be compared to African world views, with special attention paid to the way these are supported in the underpinnings of sociocultural institutions. Prerequisite: A course in African Studies and a course in the philosophy of science or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 517. Roots of Human Trafficking: Modern Slavery and Africa. 3 Hours H.

This reading- intensive seminar explores human trafficking in the modern world. It examines labor exploitation and commercialization in a historical perspective. The course aims to explore how Imperialism led to the expansion of human trafficking and how women, men and children experienced labor exploitation in different ways. We examine how forced labor was/is behind the car and bicycle industries, sugar, coffee, and chocolate consumption. Today more than 27 million people are held, sold, and trafficked as slaves around the world. This course discusses similarities and differences between contemporary and historical slavery and analyzes why and how it persists nowadays. Readings include accounts of people held in bondage, case studies, and reports. Students develop familiarity with major historical concepts, themes, and subjects. Students also engage, investigate, and understand history as a process to explain how we make sense of the past and the present. Students carry on a research project throughout the semester about the historical roots of a modern case of slavery and/or human trafficking, producing original scholarship. (Same as HIST 517.) Prerequisite: Successful completion of a history course numbered below 500, or permission of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 520. African Studies in: _____. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H/W.

Upper level lecture and discussion courses in African area of current interest and/or taking advantage of faculty resources in topics relevant to the major. May be repeated for credit toward the major. Prerequisite: Junior/Senior in good standing. LEC.

AAAS 521. African Studies In, Honors: _____. 3 Hours H/W.

Upper level lecture and discussion courses in African area of current interest and/or taking advantage of faculty resources in topics relevant to the major. May be repeated for credit toward the major. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program or with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Junior/senior in good standing LEC.

AAAS 522. African and African-American Religion:_____. 3 Hours H/W.

Historical development, systematic ideas and rites of selected periods, cultural settings, and movements. Prerequisite: Five hours of distribution courses in the humanities or AAAS 512 and consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 523. African-American Studies in: _____. 3 Hours H.

Upper level lecture and discussion courses in African-American area of current interest and/or taking advantage of faculty resources in topics relevant to the major. May be repeated for credit toward the major. Prerequisite: Junior/Senior in good standing. LEC.

AAAS 524. African-American Studies In, Honors: _____. 3 Hours H.

Upper level lecture and discussion courses in African-American area of current interest and/or taking advantage of faculty resources in topics relevant to the major. May be repeated for credit toward the major. Only open to students admitted to the University Honors Program or with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Junior/senior in good standing. LEC.

AAAS 525. Social History of Black Aging in America. 3 Hours H.

The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive historical examination of American society's changing attitudes and responses to aging and older adults, with emphasis on the Black aged. Beginning with the African background where older adults were highly valued, the course explores the impact of slavery, the industrial Revolution, urbanization and the development of the youth-oriented culture prevalent in the United States today. Subsequently, the course focuses on the emergence of twentieth century social gerontological problems and the role of the modern Black movements, public agencies, and private organizations in addressing the issues. Film, essays, drama, and/or fiction are utilized to illustrate the cultural attitudes of each historical period. Prerequisite: AAAS 103 or AAAS 105 or AAAS 106 or a course in American history, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 527. Popular Culture in Africa. 3 Hours S/W.

This course examines multiple expressions of popular culture in contemporary Africa, focusing on the aesthetics of forms such as music, theater, dress, street art, and popular literary genres, as well as the social themes they deal with and the societies that produce them. The approach will be based on a critical reconsideration of notions such as traditional versus modern culture, elite versus folk art, westernization, and cultural hybridity, in order to find better ways of discussing the cultural vibrancy of everyday life in contemporary Africa. LEC.

AAAS 532. Studies in Islam. 3 Hours H.

Study of religious thought, practice, and institutions of Islam with an emphasis on the examination of primary documents. (Same as REL 532.) LEC.

AAAS 534. The Rhetoric of Black Americans. 3 Hours H.

A study of the rhetoric of Black Americans, from their earliest protest efforts to the contemporary scene, with the focus on the methods and themes employed to alter their status in American society. (Same as COMS 551.) Prerequisite: COMS 130. Skills in basic composition essential. LEC.

AAAS 536. Islamic Art and Architecture in Africa. 3 Hours N.

Study of Islamic art and architecture in various cultural and geographical settings, from the first mosques of North African and the Swahili coast to contemporary Islamized masquerades in West Africa. We consider art objects and architectural sites in terms of religious practice, trade and commerce, ritual and political power, and contemporary expression. (Same as HA 536.) Prerequisite: AAAS 102, AAAS 103, HA 100, or HA 150; or permission of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 542. The History of Islam in Africa. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A study of the history and institutions of Islam in Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of Islam on African traditional religions and African civilizations in general; the historiographical traditions of Islam in Africa. (Same as REL 535.) Prerequisite: Five hours of distribution courses in the humanities. LEC.

AAAS 543. Language and Culture in Arabic-Speaking Communities. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3S / H.

The course examines the links between language structure, patterns of use, language choice, and language attitudes in the diglossic and bi-lingual Arabic-speaking communities. It also explores language as a reflector and creator of Arab culture (e.g. linguistic encoding of politeness, the Quranic text as the spoken and written word, the role of tropes in Arabic rhetoric). The topics for discussion range from the micro-level language choice to the macro-level issues of national language policies and planning within the domain of government and education across the Arab world. (Same as LING 543.) LEC.

AAAS 545. Unveiling the Veil. 3 Hours NW / H.

This course seeks to unveil a complex cultural practice that has been misconstructed by many scholars. It explores the versatility of the meaning of the veil. It examines the ways in which the veil has become a symbol of privacy, cultural identity, religious assertion, resistance and liberation, besides being a symbol of constraint, oppression, backwardness, and sexual mystery. LEC.

AAAS 550. Senior Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W.

Small discussion groups, each designed to consider a specific, clearly defined topic, using an interdisciplinary approach and requiring the demonstration of a comprehensive knowledge of the fundamentals in the field as appropriate to the topic. Class discussion based on student presentations. Prerequisite: Senior majors; special departmental permission for other seniors. LEC.

AAAS 551. Environmental Issues in Africa. 3 Hours S.

Acquaints students with the complexities of debates on environmental problems in Sub-Saharan Africa. Topics addressed may include deforestation, desert expansion, wildlife conservation, soil erosion, climate change, coral reef destruction, water resources development, mangrove preservation, and the environmental effects of war, industrialization, and urbanization. Class presentations and projects synthesize the perspectives of both human and physical geography. (Same as GEOG 550.) Prerequisite: GEOG 104 or permission of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 552. Classical Islamic Literature. 3 Hours NW / H.

An examination of major developments in classical Islamic literature in the Middle East and beyond, with attention to the poetic and prose works (in translation) that emerged from them. (Same as REL 552.) LEC.

AAAS 553. Geography of African Development. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3S / S.

Acquaints students with the values and social parameters of African agricultural and pastoral practice. Topics include customary land rights, African perspectives on the natural world, gender issues in African agriculture, and the urbanization of African cultures. The course also contrasts African views with those of Western development practitioners and donor agencies. Case studies from different countries are used to highlight the continent's regional differences. (Same as GEOG 553.) LEC.

AAAS 554. Contemporary Health Issues in Africa. 3 Hours S.

The course examines health and nutrition in African communities, using the methods of biological and medical anthropology. Fundamental to the approach taken in the course is the understanding that the health of human groups depends on interactions between biological and cultural phenomena in a particular ecological context. One topic will be selected per semester to examine in detail the full array of epidemiological factors contributing to patterns of specific diseases. AIDS, childhood diseases, and reproductive health of African women are among possible topics. Course material will be selected from scholarly and medical publications, as well as coverage in the popular media. The use of a variety of sources will enhance understanding of the biological and cultural issues involved, and will help students identify possible bias and misinformation in popular coverage of events such as famine or epidemic in African settings. (Same as ANTH 545.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in either Anthropology or African Studies. LEC.

AAAS 555. African Film. 3 Hours NW / H.

A critical study of Africa and its peoples as depicted in films. The aesthetic, cultural, economic, political, historical, and ideological aspects of African films are examined. (Same as FMS 544.) LEC.

AAAS 557. Cities and Development. 3 Hours S.

An intermediate level course in urban geography, with an emphasis on cities in the developing world. Example cities in Latin America and the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, and/or Southeast Asia may be examined. The main focus is on the intersection between urbanization and economic development, but social, political, and cultural aspects of development in cities are considered. Other topics include the geographic impacts of European colonialism, urbanization and industrialization, rural-to-urban migration, urban structure and spatial dynamics, urban planning, and environmental sustainability. (Same as GEOG 557.) LEC.

AAAS 560. Race, Gender, and Post-Colonial Discourses. 3 Hours H.

An examination of the ways in which the concept of race, gender, and post-colonialism frame African literatures from the Caribbean, North America, and the continent itself. The course will focus on these discourses grounding them in critical frameworks within which they can be contextually analyzed and evaluated, at the same time examining their impact in literacy praxis and theory. (Same as WGSS 560.) LEC.

AAAS 561. Liberation in Southern Africa. 3 Hours NW AE42 / U.

This course examines struggles for freedom in southern Africa and the consequences of political, economic, and social changes in the region. The end of colonial rule, the demise of white-settler domination, and the fall of the apartheid regime is discussed. As a major political event of the twentieth century, the liberation of southern Africa had both local and global consequences. The course analyzes transnational issues of liberation and resistance to consider broader regional and international perspectives. Course themes pay particular attention to gender and ethnicity and include a focus on democratization and contemporary meanings of liberation. Prior coursework in African Studies is strongly recommended, but not required. (Same as HIST 561 and POLS 561.) LEC.

AAAS 565. Gender, Culture, and Migration. 3 Hours H.

This course brings a human face to the 21st century manifestation of globalization by focusing on the issues of culture, gender and migration. How do these three aspects create the "global village" amongst both the host and donor peoples? When people move from one place to another, what do they leave behind, what do they take with them? What is gained, or lost by the host community? What is the impact of migration on a specific group's and individual's sense of identity? How has migration affected the people's construction, understanding, and practice of gender? Given their primary roles in the home and within the culture, these questions and more are posed with particular attention to women. Migration theories, interviews and personal testimonies as well as literary and dramatic works are critical to our analyses of the issues raised and enable us to hold conversations with, and listen to the stories of the ordinary people who make globalization happen and sustain it. (Same as AMS 565 and WGSS 565.) LEC.

AAAS 568. Kongo Trans-Atlantic. 3 Hours S.

This seminar explores Kongo culture and history through a cross-section of the African-Atlantic World: Western Equatorial Africa and related New World societies in Jamaica, Brazil, Haiti, Cuba, and the Georgia and Carolina coasts, and New Orleans (thus in former British, Portuguese, French, Spanish, and U.S. colonial territories). The seminar will assess recent scholarship on patterns of slavery and resistance, cultural and linguistic change, creolization and hybridization. (Same as ANTH 568). LEC.

AAAS 574. Slavery in the New World. 3 Hours H/W.

Slavery, slave culture, and the slave trade in the U.S., Latin America, and the Caribbean will be examined comparatively. Attention will also be given to African cultures, the effects of the slave trade on Africa, and the effects of African cultures on institutions in the New World. (Same as HIST 574.) LEC.

AAAS 578. Central African Art. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

Introduction to the arts and cultures of Central Africa. Emphasis is given to the major art-producing cultures of the Equatorial forest and the Southern Savanna regions of Cameroon, Gabon, Congo, Zaire, and Angola. The historical and cultural contexts for the visual arts associated with centralized leadership and non-centralized societies are explored. (Same as HA 578.) LEC.

AAAS 584. Black American Literature. 3 Hours H.

A study of the literature written by Black Americans from the pre-Civil War period to the present. Emphasis upon specific historical periods in the development of Black literature as well as on a critical analysis of major autobiographical, poetic, and fictional works. LEC.

AAAS 585. Race and the American Theatre. 3 Hours U.

The representation(s) of race in significant texts and performance styles in American theatre analyzed according to political ideologies, dramatic movements and the impact of these factors on the representation of the "other" in the theatre. (Same as AMS 529 and THR 529.) LEC.

AAAS 590. The Rise and Fall of Apartheid. 3 Hours H.

This course will deal with the last fifty years of South African history during which apartheid came to be formulated, supported, and perpetuated, and the forces that were responsible for its disintegration by 1990. Reference will also be made to the transformation process since April 1994. (Same as HIST 599.) LEC.

AAAS 598. Sexuality and Gender in African History. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H.

An examination of the history of sexuality and gender in Africa with a focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Major issues and methods in the historical scholarship on gender and sexuality will be covered. Topics of historical analysis include life histories, rites of passage, courtship, marriage, reproduction, education, masculinities, homosexuality, colonial control, and changing gender relations. Prior course work in African history is suggested. Graduate students will complete an additional project in consultation with the instructor. (Same as HIST 598.) LEC.

AAAS 600. Politics in Africa. 3 Hours NW AE42 / S.

A survey of politics in Africa, focused on the countries of sub-Saharan or Black Africa. The course includes a historical discussion of precolonial Africa, colonization and the creation of contemporary states, and the politics of independence, before examining contemporary political systems and the forces influencing patterns of politics on the continent. (Same as POLS 665.) Prerequisite: POLS 150 or AAAS 105 or AAAS 305 or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 611. History of the Black Power Movement. 3 Hours H.

Examines the Black Power Movement in its many manifestations, beginning with a discussion of its political and cultural background: the transition from Civil Rights to Black Power in the African American Freedom Movement of the 1960s; the impact on African Americans of African decolonization and the spread of anti-colonial and anti-imperialist movements throughout other parts of the globe. The course also examines the Black Arts Movement and its influence on the Black Power Movement and vise versa. Therefore, some attention will also be paid to the music, literature, theater, and the graphic arts of the period, and the aesthetic and political critiques of these artistic forms. Prerequisite: AAAS 511 not required but recommended. LEC.

AAAS 630. The Life and Intellectual Thought of W.E.B. Du Bois. 3 Hours H.

A critical examination of W. E. B. Du Bois, paramount black scholar and activist whose massive body of scholarly work spans the period from late 19th through the mid-20th centuries. Course covers the major works of Du Bois. Topics include Du Bois as sociologist, historian, propagandist, and creative writer. Moreover, the course deals with Du Bois as an intellectual in conversation with other black thinkers, including individuals such as, Booker T. Washington, Alexander Crummell, Anna Julia Copper, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Marcus Garvey, E. Franklin Frazier, Walter White and Thurgood Marshall. LEC.

AAAS 650. Sufism. 3 Hours NW / H.

A survey of developments in Sufi (Islamic Mystical) thought, poetry, and ritual throughout Muslim history and across the Muslim world. (Same as REL 650.) Prerequisite: AAAS 349/REL 350 or permission of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 657. Gender in Islam and Society. 3 Hours NW / H.

An investigation of the relationship between Islam, and gender roles and status in religious texts (Quran and Hadith) and in societies across the Muslim world, past and present. (Same as REL 657.) Prerequisite: AAAS 349/REL 350 or permission of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 662. Gender and Politics in Africa. 3 Hours S.

This course is designed to explore the field of gender and African politics. We begin by paying particular attention to African women's political roles during the pre-colonial and colonial society. Next, we examine the impetus, methods, and path of liberation struggles and how gender roles were shaped, shifted, and changed during these struggles. The majority of the class focuses on current issues in African politics, including gender and development, HIV/AIDS and women's health, gender and militarism. We also explore women's roles in political institutions, civil society organizations, trade and labor unions, and transnational movements. We also examine contemporary constructions of masculinity and femininity in African states and explore how these constructions affect social policy and national political agendas. (Same as WGSS 662.) LEC.

AAAS 663. The Anthropology of Islam. 3 Hours NW / H.

This course uses critical readings of major anthropological works on Islam to : 1) analyze various interpretations of "Islamic cultures" through a discussion of regionally-grounded works, and 2) examine how the anthropological study of Islam also is informed by theoretical and philosophical approaches to major anthropological questions, such as religion, myth, kinship, social organization, and power. The course offers both a history of various interpretations of Islam as well as a history of theories of these interpretations. (Same as ANTH 663.) LEC.

AAAS 676. West African Art. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

Introduction to the rich visual art traditions of West Africa. Emphasis is given to the major art-producing cultures of the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast, including the archaeological cultures of Nigeria, Mali, and Ghana. The diverse forms of figure sculptures and masquerade performance and meanings of these arts in historical and cultural contexts are examined. This course requires more intensive work than AAAS 376 and is open to upper division and graduate students only. Not open to students who have taken AAAS 376/HA 376. (Same as HA 676.) LEC.

AAAS 677. African Design. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A survey of sub-Saharan African media, emphasizing textiles, ceramics, metal and bead work, the artist's techniques, working methods and apprenticeship, and historical and contemporary cultural contexts, including the influence of tourism and the international art market on artistic production and style. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. (Same as HA 677.) Prerequisite: AAAS 376 or HA 376, or AAAS 578 or HA 578, or an introductory course in art history at the college level, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 679. African Expressive Culture: _____. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

An in-depth examination of an artistic tradition shared by a number of African cultures. Discussion includes historical development related to style, use and meaning and other relevant issues. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. (Same as HA 679.) Prerequisite: AAAS 376 or HA 376, or AAAS 578 or HA 578, or an introductory course in art history at the college level, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 680. Introduction to Modern Africa. 3 Hours H/W.

An interdisciplinary approach to cross-cultural understanding of Africa's place in the modern world. Specific emphasis will be given to the role of Africa in world history, African cultures, modern African history, and problems of development and nation building in Africa. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 690. Investigation and Conference. 1-3 Hours AE61 / H/W.

Individual and supervised readings in selected areas of African and African-American studies which will be an investigation of a subject selected by the student with the advice and direction of an instructor. Individual reports and conferences. Prerequisite: Seniors and consent of department. IND.

AAAS 695. Honors Project in: _____. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

An individual research project in African-American or African studies under the direction of a specialist in the area of the student's interest, the results of the project to be presented in written form and to be defended before a committee of three faculty members as provided for under the requirements for Honors. Majors only and permission of instructor. IND.

AAAS 700. Africa in World Politics. 3 Hours.

A 20th-century and 21st-century study of the combined internal and external forces that precipitated the rise of Africa, the major African issues in international relations, and Africa's impact on the modern world. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 701. Politics in Africa. 3 Hours.

A survey of politics in Africa, focused on the countries of sub-Saharan or Black Africa. The course includes a historical discussion of precolonial Africa, colonization and the creation of contemporary states, and the politics of independence, before examining contemporary political systems and the forces influencing patterns of politics on the continent. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 715. Seminar in African Art. 3 Hours.

A concentrated study of a special topic relating to African Art studies. Different topics are offered in different semesters. (Same as HA 715.) Prerequisite: Nine hours of Art History and/or consent of instructor. SEM.

AAAS 716. Women in Islam. 3 Hours.

Addresses the widely-held stereotype of Muslim women as pawns in a patriarchal socio-religious context. Investigating the Muslim cultures of certain regions, the course will examine the manner in which indigenous culture was influenced by the introduction of Islam and the historical impact of Islam on women's social roles. Focusing principally on contemporary social change, the course will consider how socio-political change affects religious roles where religion is integrally involved in daily life. To what extent is individualism valued, and how are the pressures of late 20th-century and early 21st-century life mediated? The course will draw on texts from history, sociology, and literature. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 720. Intercultural Communication: The Afro-American. 3 Hours.

An examination of the barriers to effective communication between Black Americans and non-Black Americans. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 723. Special Topics in Africana Studies: _____. 3 Hours.

Seminar in an area of current interest in African and African-American Studies. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 727. Africian-American Culture. 3 Hours.

This course defines African American culture and identifies ways in which it is distinct. The course identifies the roots of African American culture, as well as the transformations occurring over time. The course covers identity issues and considers the possibility of complex, multi-identity structures. The course addresses the issues of whether there is a common narrative or a common root metaphor for African American culture, how this is known epistemologically, internally and externally, and how epistemological "knowledge" is appropriated. Course pedagogy includes text readings, case studies, performance events, and media events. LEC.

AAAS 730. Black Leadership. 3 Hours.

The course focuses on the concept of leadership and on Black leadership in the United States. An in-depth analysis of selected case studies of Black leaders both historical and contemporary. Some attention will be given to the dispersion of Africans into the Americas and the leadership that emerged, conditioned both by environmental factors and the psychology engendered by the system of slavery. Selected successful Black leaders will be invited to visit the class from time to time. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 731. African Literature. 3 Hours.

Introduction to African Literature. Reading, analysis, and discussion of contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama from sub-Sahara Africa. Brief attention will be paid to historical development and to traditional literature. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 732. Francophone African Literature. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to 20th-century and modern Francophone African literature covering selected works by major authors from both sub-Saharan Africa and the Maghreb. Attention will be given primarily to the novel, although some poetry will also be read. Topics and themes include negritude, African identity in the wake of colonialism, Islam, and women's writing. Classes will be conducted in English. Students may read the texts in French or in translation. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 733. Islamic Literature. 3 Hours.

Contemporary literature that is set in the context of Muslim cultures provides for an examination of Muslim identity on its own terms. This course focuses on the literary examination of works by Muslim authors from Egypt, Sudan, Senegal, Guinea, Mali, Morocco, Nigeria, and Niger. From the perspective of both male and female authors, the issue of what it means to be a Muslim is considered through fictional accounts set in contemporary contexts. Some works will be read in translation from Arabic or French; others are written originally in English. Cultures considered in this course vary widely in their origins and customs, which allows for a focus on the one pervasive element they share in common: Islam as it shapes people's lives. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 734. African Women Writers. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on African women's writing from all regions of the continent. Works included deal with a wide variety of issues relevant to African women, as well as universal issues of conceptions of gender roles, and the struggle to attain personal rights and freedom within traditional cultural frameworks. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 735. Muslim Women's Autobiography. 3 Hours.

This course examines the realities of Muslim women's experiences as conveyed in their own voices. Works are drawn from all over the world, from Africa and the Middle East to Europe and the U.S. and cover from the 19th-century to the present. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 740. The Afro-American Family: A Psychological Approach. 3 Hours.

The examination of the structure, values, and behavior patterns of the contemporary African-American family as influenced by African cultures and kinship systems and the institution of slavery in association with other factors. Social and psychological forces that have enhanced or blocked family survival, stability, and advancement will be explored. The orientation of Black family life will emphasize its strengths, weaknesses, adaptations, strong kinship bonds, and equalitarian family roles. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 745. Arab Thought and Identity. 3 Hours.

The intention of this course is to present a comprehensive portrait and a deeper understanding of the Arab society and its cultural background. We will focus on the debate that is still raging about traditionalism versus modernity, and authenticity (assala) and specificity (Khususiyya) versus westernization. Moreover, we will discuss the question of Arab identity which manifests itself through a sense of belonging and diversity of affiliations, and relies as well on shared culture and its variations, and shared place in history and common experiences. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 749. Islam. 3 Hours.

Islam's origins, the prophet Muhammed, the Holy Koran, religious symbols and moral mandates, and historical developments. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 750. Popular Culture in the Muslim World. 3 Hours.

A study of pop songs, television, comics, and other idioms of popular culture from different parts of the Muslim world, with attention to Muslims' sense of humor, tragedy, aesthetics, and pertinent issues of the day. LEC.

AAAS 760. Topics and Problems in African and African-American Studies. 3 Hours.

Individual investigation of special topics in African and African-American studies. May not be repeated for credit. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 770. Language and Society in Africa. 3 Hours.

Examines issues and problems associated with language use in sub-Saharan Africa from a sociological perspective. Topics covered include an overview of the types of languages spoken on the continent: indigenous languages, colonial languages, pidgins and creoles, and Arabic as a religious language; problems associated with the politics of literacy and language planning, writing and standardization of indigenous languages; and the cultural and ideological dilemmas of language choice. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 774. Topics in Literatures of Africa and the African Diaspora: _____. 3 Hours.

An intensive study of the literatures of Africa and/or African diaspora (people of African descent dispersed around the world). This study will focus on the major characteristics of a particular period, genre, mode, and/or theme in literatures such as African, Caribbean, Afro-Brazilian, African American, African Canadian, Black British. Critical theories pertinent to writers and their work will be covered. Topics may include studies in drama, poetry, or the novel; migration narratives; literature of a particular era, such as the Harlem Renaissance, Negritude, or the Black Arts Movement; representations of gender, etc. As topics vary by semester, the course may be repeated for credit. (Same as ENGL 774.) LEC.

AAAS 788. The Black Woman. 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary study of the role of Black women in our society, from the African background through the plantation experience to the present. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 801. Introduction to Africana Studies: African-American. 3 Hours.

An introduction to, and overview of, the historical, intellectual, and professional foundations of African-American Studies; a multidisciplinary examination of the key texts and issues in the field. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 802. Introduction to Africana Studies: African. 3 Hours.

An introduction to, and overview of, the historical, intellectual, and professional foundations of African Studies; a multidisciplinary examination of the key texts and issues in the field. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 803. Research Methods in Africana Studies. 3 Hours.

A multidisciplinary introduction to the range of research methods employed to examine African and African-American history, cultures, and societies. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 804. Seminar in Africana Studies. 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary, comparative exploration of the histories, cultures, and societies of Africans and peoples of African descent. Students will be required to utilize the skills gained in AAAS 801 and AAAS 802 to design and implement a project that will be critically assessed in the seminar. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. Prerequisite: AAAS 801 and AAAS 802 or consent of instructor. LEC.

AAAS 810. Comparative Racial and Ethnic Relations. 3 Hours.

An examination of constructions of race and ethnicity around the world. Emphasis is on the social, political, historical, cultural and economic factors that lead to the creation of ethnic and racial identities, ethnic conflict and accommodation, ethnic movements, and ethnic political organization. Racial and ethnic relations in the U.S. are compared with other countries. Major focus is placed on ethnicity in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, and/or the Middle East. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 811. The Civil Rights Movement. 3 Hours.

An examination of the Civil Rights Movement in American History. Emphasis is placed on the activities of major Civil Rights organizations, Civil Rights legislation and its impact on American life, and conflicts between integrationist and separatist forces in politics, economics, education, culture and race relations in the United States. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 812. The Black Power Movement. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the Black Power Movement in its many manifestations, beginning with a discussion of its political and cultural background: the transition from Civil Rights to Black Power in the Afro-American freedom movement of 1960's; the impact on African Americans of African decolonization and the spread of anti-colonial and anti-imperialist movements throughout other parts of the globe. There will also be some examination of the Black Arts Movement and its influence on the Black Power Movement and vice versa. Therefore, some attention will also be paid to the music, literature, theater, and the graphic arts of the period, and the aesthetic and political critiques of these artistic forms. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 822. African and African-American Religion. 3 Hours.

Historical development, systematic ideas and rites of selected periods, cultural settings, and movements. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 825. Social History of Black Aging in America. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive historical examination of American society's changing attitudes and responses to aging and older adults, with emphasis on the Black aged. Beginning with the African background where older adults were highly valued, the course explores the impact of slavery, the industrial Revolution, urbanization and the development of the youth-oriented culture prevalent in the United States today. Subsequently, the course focuses on the emergence of twentieth-century social gerontological problems and the role of the modern Black movements, public agencies, and private organizations in addressing the issues. Film, essays, drama, and/or fiction are utilized to illustrate the cultural attitudes of each historical period. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 827. Popular Culture in Africa. 3 Hours.

This course examines multiple expressions of popular culture in contemporary Africa, focusing on the aesthetics of forms such as music, theatre, dress, street art, and popular literary genres, as well as the social themes they deal with and the societies that produce them. The approach will be based on a critical reconsideration of notions such as traditional versus modern culture, elite versus folk art, westernization, and cultural hybridity, in order to find better ways of discussing the cultural vibrancy of everyday life in contemporary Africa. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 830. The Life and Times of W.E.B. Du Bois. 3 Hours.

A critical examination of the life and thought of W. E. B. Du Bois, paramount black scholar and activist whose massive body of scholarly work spans the period from late 19th through the mid-20th centuries. Course covers the major works of Du Bois. Topics include Du Bois as sociologist, historian, propagandist, and creative writer, taking into account his often shifting views on art and culture, politics, leadership, civil rights and the color line, trade unionism, Pan-Africanism, socialism, internationalism, and, of course, double consciousness, among other issues. Moreover, the course will deal with Du Bois as an intellectual in conversation with other black thinkers, including individuals such as Booker T. Washington, Alexander Crummell, Anna Julia Copper, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Marcus Garvey, E. Franklin Frazier, Walter White and Thurgood Marshall. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 832. Comparative Black Literature. 3 Hours.

Reading, analysis, and discussion of contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama from Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States. Brief attention will be paid to historical development and to traditional literature. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 834. The Rhetoric of Black Americans. 3 Hours.

A study of the rhetoric of Black Americans, from their earliest protest efforts to the contemporary scene, with the focus on the methods and themes employed to alter their status in American society. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 843. Language and Culture in Arabic-Speaking Communities. 3 Hours.

The course examines the links between language structure, patterns of use, language choice, and language attitudes in the diglossic and bi-lingual Arabic-speaking communities. It also explores language as a reflector and creator of Arab culture (e.g. linguistic encoding of politeness, the Quranic text as the spoken and written word, the role of tropes in Arabic rhetoric). The topics for discussion range from the micro-level language choice to the macro-level issues of national language policies and planning within the domain of government and education across the Arab world. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 845. Unveiling the Veil. 3 Hours.

This course seeks to unveil a complex cultural practice that has been misconstrued by many scholars. It explores the versatility of the meaning of the veil. It examines the ways in which the veil has become a symbol of privacy, cultural identity, religious assertion, resistance and liberation, besides being a symbol of constraint, oppression, backwardness, and sexual mystery. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 851. Environmental Issues in Africa. 3 Hours.

Acquaints students with the complexities of debates on environmental problems in Sub-Saharan Africa. Topics addressed may include deforestation, desert expansion, wildlife conservation, soil erosion, climate change, coral reef destruction, water resources development, mangrove preservation, and the environmental effects of war, industrialization, and urbanization. Class presentations and projects synthesize the perspectives of both human and physical geography. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 852. Classical Islamic Literature. 3 Hours.

An examination of major developments in classical Islamic literature in the Middle East and beyond, with attention to the poetic and prose works (in translation) that emerged from them. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 853. Geography of African Development. 3 Hours.

Acquaints students with the values and social parameters of African agricultural and pastoral practice. Topics include customary land rights, African perspectives on the natural world, gender issues in African agriculture, and the urbanization of African cultures. The course also contrasts African views with those of Western development practitioners and donor agencies. Case studies from different countries are used to highlight the continent's regional differences. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 855. African Film and Video. 3 Hours.

A critical study of Africa and its peoples as depicted in films and videos. The aesthetic, cultural, economic, political, historical, and ideological aspects of African films and videos will be examined. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 857. Cities and Development. 3 Hours.

An intermediate-level course in urban geography, with an emphasis on cities in the developing world. Example cities in Latin America and the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, and/or Southeast Asia may be examined. The main focus is on the intersection between urbanization and economic development, but social, political, and cultural aspects of development in cities are considered. Other topics include the geographic impacts of European colonialism, urbanization and industrialization, rural-to-urban migration, urban structure and spatial dynamics, urban planning, and environmental sustainability. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 860. Race, Gender, and Post-Colonial Discourses. 3 Hours.

An examination of the ways in which the concept of race, gender, and post-colonialism frame African literatures from the Caribbean, North America, and the continent itself. The course will focus on these discourses grounding them in critical frameworks within which they can be contextually analyzed and evaluated, at the same time examining their impact in literacy praxis and theory. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 874. Slavery in the New World. 3 Hours.

Slavery, slave culture, and the slave trade in the U.S., Latin America, and the Caribbean will be examined comparatively. Attention will also be given to African cultures, the effects of the slave trade on Africa, and the effects of African cultures on institutions in the New World. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 880. Introduction to Modern Africa. 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary approach to cross-cultural understanding of Africa's place in the modern world. Specific emphasis will be given to the role of Africa in world history, African cultures, modern African history, and problems of development and nation building in Africa. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 884. Black American Literature. 3 Hours.

A study of the literature written by Black Americans from the pre-Civil War period to the present. Emphasis upon specific historical periods in the development of Black literature as well as on a critical analysis of major autobiographical, poetic, and fictional works. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 885. Race and the American Theatre. 3 Hours.

The representation(s) of race in significant texts and performance styles in American theatre analyzed according to political ideologies, dramatic movements and the impact of these factors on the representation of the "other" in the theatre. LEC.

AAAS 890. The Rise and Fall of Apartheid. 3 Hours.

This course will deal with the fifty years of South African history during which apartheid came to be formulated, supported, and perpetuated, and the forces that were responsible for its disintegration by 1990. Reference will also be made to the transformation process since April 1994. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 898. Sexuality and Gender in African History. 3 Hours.

An examination of the history of sexuality and gender in Africa focused on the 19th-century to the present. Major issues and methods in the historical scholarship on gender and sexuality will be covered. Topics of historical analysis include life histories, rites of passage, courtship, marriage, reproduction, education, masculinities, homosexuality, colonial control, and changing gender relations. Prior course work in African history is suggested. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC.

AAAS 899. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Investigation and research of a topic for a master's thesis. A maximum of 6 thesis hours may be counted toward the 33 hours required for the degree. THE.

African & African-American St Courses

AMHR 110. Elementary Amharic I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Basic level of oral fluency and aural comprehension. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Reading of simple texts. Not open to native speakers of Amharic. LEC.

AMHR 120. Elementary Amharic II. 5 Hours U / F2.

A continuation of AMHR 110. Readings in cultural texts. Prerequisite: AMHR 110. LEC.

AMHR 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Amharic. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

AMHR 210. Intermediate Amharic I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern Amharic texts and discussion in Amharic. Prerequisite: AMHR 120. LEC.

AMHR 220. Intermediate Amharic II. 3 Hours U / F4.

Continuation of AMHR 210. Discussion in Amharic of texts studies. Prerequisite: AMHR 210. LEC.

African & African-American St Courses

ARAB 110. Elementary Arabic I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Five hours of class per week. Basic level of oral fluency and aural comprehension. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Reading of simple texts. Not open to native speakers of Arabic. LEC.

ARAB 120. Elementary Arabic II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Five hours of class per week. A continuation of ARAB 110. Readings in cultural texts. Prerequisite: ARAB 110. LEC.

ARAB 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Arabic. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

ARAB 210. Intermediate Arabic I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Three hours of class conducted in Arabic. Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern Arabic texts and discussion in Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 120. LEC.

ARAB 220. Intermediate Arabic II. 3 Hours U / F4.

Three hours of class conducted in Arabic. Continuation of ARAB 210. Discussion in Arabic of texts studied. Prerequisite: ARAB 210. LEC.

ARAB 310. Advanced Arabic I. 3 Hours U / FP.

A practical Arabic language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Arabic. Designed for students who have had two or more years of Arabic study. Open to native speakers. Prerequisite: ARAB 220 or consent of instructor. LEC.

ARAB 320. Advanced Arabic II. 3 Hours / FP.

A continuation of ARAB 310. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ARAB 310 or consent of instructor. LEC.

ARAB 401. Readings in Arabic I. 3 Hours U / FP.

Designed for native and near-native speakers, this course involves reading newspapers and other publications in the language intended for native speakers, conversation, oral presentations, and advanced grammar. Prerequisite: Native or near-native speaker proficiency or consent of instructor. LEC.

ARAB 402. Readings in Arabic II. 3 Hours U / FP.

Continuation of ARAB 401. LEC.

African & African-American St Courses

HAIT 110. Elementary Haitian I. 3 Hours U / F1.

Beginning course in the vernacular language of Haiti, Martinique, Guadeloupe and other areas of the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean. Conversational approach, with essentials of grammar. Reading of basic texts. Special attention to folk culture as expressed by language. No previous knowledge of another foreign language is required. LEC.

HAIT 120. Elementary Haitian II. 3 Hours U / F2.

Continuation of HAIT 110, with further readings in Haitian literature. Prerequisite: HAIT 110 or consent of instructor. LEC.

HAIT 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Haitian. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

HAIT 230. Intermediate Haitian I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Continued practice in conversation and composition; intensive and extensive readings from contemporary press, short story, poetry, and folk tales. Prerequisite: HAIT 120 or consent of instructor. LEC.

HAIT 240. Intermediate Haitian II. 3 Hours U / F4.

Continuation of HAIT 230, with additional readings from theatre, novel, and historical texts. Prerequisite: HAIT 230 or consent of instructor. LEC.

HAIT 300. Contemporary Haiti. 3 Hours NW / H.

Detailed analysis of recent Haitian history. The focus will include interactions between religion, social structure, politics, economics and international relations. (Same as AAAS 302.) Prerequisite: AAAS 301/HAIT 200, or consent of instructor. LEC.

HAIT 350. Advanced Haitian I. 3 Hours U / FP.

Course objective is a sophisticated command of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Haitian. Texts include newspapers and other Haitian publications as well as spoken material produced essentially for native speakers. Conversation and oral presentations. Keeping of personal journal in Haitian. LEC.

HAIT 360. Advanced Haitian II. 3 Hours U / FP.

Continuation of HAIT 350, plus advanced readings from Haitian authors such as Carrie Paultre, Frank Etienne, Lyonel Desmarattes, and Michel-Rolph Trouillot. LEC.

HAIT 497. Directed Studies in Haitian. 1-15 Hours U / FP.

May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed fifteen hours. Material not covered by course work, and/or in field of student's special interest. Conferences. Course taken for one hour of credit may not be used to fulfill College's humanities distribution requirement. Prerequisite: Six hours of Haitian Creole and consent of instructor. IND.

HAIT 500. Directed Studies in Haitian Language and Literature. 1-15 Hours U / FP.

Advanced work in either language or literature or both. May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed fifteen hours. Conferences. As a three-credit-hour course, it may count toward a major in African and African-American studies. Prerequisite: Four semesters of Haitian Creole or equivalent and consent of instructor. IND.

HAIT 501. Directed Studies in Haitian Culture. 1-15 Hours U.

Advanced work in Haitian culture. May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed fifteen hours. Conferences. As a three-credit-hour course, it may count toward a major in African and African-American studies. No knowledge of Haitian or French is required. Prerequisite: AAAS 301 or HAIT 200, or consent of instructor. IND.

HAIT 700. Investigation and Conference. 1-6 Hours.

Supervised individual readings in selected areas of Haitian language, literature, and culture. Individual reports and conferences. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH.

African & African-American St Courses

HAUS 110. Elementary Hausa I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Five hours of class per week. Basic level of oral fluency and aural comprehension. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Reading of simple texts. Not open to native speakers of Hausa. LEC.

HAUS 120. Elementary Hausa II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Five hours of class per week. A continuation of HAUS 110. Readings in cultural texts. Prerequisite: HAUS 110. LEC.

HAUS 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Hausa. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

HAUS 210. Intermediate Hausa I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Three hours of class conducted in Hausa. Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern Hausa texts and discussion in Hausa. Prerequisite: HAUS 120. LEC.

HAUS 220. Intermediate Hausa II. 3 Hours U / F4.

Three hours of class conducted in Hausa. Continuation of HAUS 210. Discussion in Hausa of texts studied. Prerequisite: HAUS 210. LEC.

HAUS 310. Advanced Hausa I. 3 Hours U / FP.

A practical Hausa language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Hausa. Designed for students who have had two or more years of Hausa study. Open to native speakers. Prerequisite: HAUS 220 or consent of instructor. LEC.

HAUS 320. Advanced Hausa II. 3 Hours U / FP.

A continuation of HAUS 310. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of HAUS 310 or consent of instructor. LEC.

HAUS 401. Readings in Hausa I. 3 Hours U / FP.

Designed for native and near-native speakers, this course involves reading newspapers and other publications in the language intended for native speakers, conversation, oral presentation, and advanced grammar. Prerequisite: Native or near-native speaker proficiency or consent of instructor. LEC.

HAUS 402. Readings in Hausa II. 3 Hours U / FP.

Continuation of HAUS 401. LEC.

African & African-American St Courses

KISW 110. Elementary KiSwahili I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Five hours of class per week. Basic level or oral fluency and aural comprehension. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Reading of simple texts. Not open to native speakers of KiSwahili. LEC.

KISW 120. Elementary KiSwahili II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Five hours of class per week. A continuation of KISW 110. Readings in cultural texts. Prerequisite: KISW 110. LEC.

KISW 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in KiSwahili. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

KISW 210. Intermediate KiSwahili I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Three hours of class conducted in KiSwahili. Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern KiSwahili texts and discussion in KiSwahili. Prerequisite: KISW 120. LEC.

KISW 220. Intermediate KiSwahili II. 3 Hours U / F4.

Three hours of class conducted in KiSwahili. Continuation of KISW 210. Discussion in KiSwahili of texts studied. Prerequisite: KISW 210. LEC.

KISW 310. Advanced KiSwahili I. 3 Hours U / FP.

A practical KiSwahili language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in KiSwahili. Designed for students who have had two or more years of KiSwahili study. Open to native speakers. Prerequisite: KISW 220 or consent of instructor. LEC.

KISW 320. Advanced KiSwahili II. 3 Hours U / FP.

A continuation of KISW 310. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of KISW 310 or consent of instructor. LEC.

KISW 401. Readings in KiSwahili I. 3 Hours U / FP.

Designed for native and near-native speakers, this course involves reading newspapers and other publications in the language intended for native speakers, conversation, oral presentations, and advanced grammar. Prerequisite: Native or near-native speaker proficiency or consent of instructor. LEC.

KISW 402. Readings in KiSwahili II. 3 Hours U / FP.

Continuation of KISW 401. LEC.

KISW 410. Advanced KiSwahili. 3 Hours U.

The course objective is a sophisticated command of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in KiSwahili. Texts used include newspapers and other KiSwahili publications not expressly for language learners, and spoken material intended for native speakers is introduced. Conversation and oral presentations. Advanced grammar. Available for elective credit in the major. Prerequisite: Native, near-native or second language competence or satisfactory completion of fourth level language proficiency. LEC.

African & African-American St Courses

SOMI 110. Elementary Somali I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Five hours of class per week. Basic level of oral fluency and aural comprehension. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Reading of simple texts. Not open to native speakers of Somali. LEC.

SOMI 120. Elementary Somali II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Five hours of class per week. A continuation of SOMI 110. Readings in cultural texts. Prerequisite: SOMI 110. LEC.

SOMI 210. Intermediate Somali I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Three hours of class conducted in Somali. Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern Somali texts and discussion in Somali. Prerequisite: SOMI 120. LEC.

SOMI 220. Intermediate Somali II. 3 Hours U / F4.

Three hours of class conducted in Somali. Continuation of SOMI 210. Discussion in Somali of texts studied. Prerequisite: SOMI 210. LEC.

African & African-American St Courses

WOLO 110. Elementary Wolof I. 5 Hours H / F1.

Five hours of class per week. Basic level of oral fluency and aural comprehension. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Reading of simple texts. Not open to native speakers of Wolof. LEC.

WOLO 120. Elementary Wolof II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Five hours of class per week. A continuation of WOLO 110. Readings in cultural texts. Prerequisite: WOLO 110. LEC.

WOLO 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Wolof. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

WOLO 210. Intermediate Wolof I. 3 Hours U / F3.

Three hours of class conducted in Wolof. Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern Wolof texts and discussion in Wolof. Prerequisite: WOLO 120. LEC.

WOLO 220. Intermediate Wolof II. 3 Hours U / F4.

Three hours of class conducted in Wolof. Continuation of WOLO 210. Discussion in Wolof of texts studied. Prerequisite: WOLO 210. LEC.

WOLO 310. Advanced Wolof I. 3 Hours U / FP.

A practical Wolof language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Wolof. Designed for students who have had two or more years of Wolof study. Open to native speakers. Prerequisite: WOLO 220 or consent of instructor. LEC.

WOLO 320. Advanced Wolof II. 3 Hours U / FP.

A continuation of WOLO 310. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of WOLO 310 or consent of instructor. LEC.

WOLO 401. Readings in Wolof I. 3 Hours U / FP.

Designed for native and near-native speakers, this course involves reading newspapers and other publications in the language intended for native speakers, conversation, oral presentations, and advanced grammar. Prerequisite: Native or near-native speaker proficiency or consent of instructor. LEC.

WOLO 402. Readings in Wolof II. 3 Hours U / FP.

Continuation of WOLO 401. LEC.

WOLO 420. Advanced Wolof II. 3 Hours U.

Aspects of Wolof literature are examined at an advanced level, including differences between oral and written narrative, oral and poetic modes, varieties of registers as determined by gender and socio-economic level, and the effect of medium on literary style. Prerequisite: Native, near-native or second language competence, or satisfactory completion of fourth level language proficiency. LEC.

American Studies Courses

AMS 100. Introduction to American Studies. 3 Hours HT AE41/GE3H / H.

An introduction to the history and key concepts of American Studies. Students explore major changes in American culture through the critical reading and analysis of primary and secondary source material. Not open to students who have taken AMS 101. LEC.

AMS 101. Introduction to American Studies, Honors. 3 Hours HT AE41/GE3H / H.

An introduction to the history and key concepts of American Studies. Students explore major changes in American culture through the critical reading and analysis of primary and secondary source material. Not open to students who have taken AMS 100. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval by the American Studies Program. LEC.

AMS 110. American Identities. 3 Hours SC AE41/GE3S / S.

An interdisciplinary introduction to individual and group identities over time. Students explore theories and methods relating to identity from various perspectives, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and region. Not open to students who have taken AMS 112 or SOC 112. (Same as SOC 110.) LEC.

AMS 112. American Identities, Honors. 3 Hours SC AE41/GE3S / S.

An interdisciplinary introduction to individual and group identities over time. Students explore theories and methods relating to identity from various perspectives, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and region. Not open to students who have taken AMS 110 or SOC 110. (Same as SOC 112.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval by the American Studies Program. LEC.

AMS 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Americna Studies. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

AMS 260. America's Latinos/Latinas. 3 Hours AE41 / U.

An introduction to the Latino/a population (Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, Dominican-Americans, and Central and South Americans) in the US. Students discuss how US and Latin American societies have shaped Latino incorporation into the United States. We also discuss contemporary political, cultural and social issues that pertain to Latinos/as in the US. (Same as SOC 260) LEC.

AMS 290. Religion in American Society. 3 Hours HR AE41/GE3H / H.

A broad introduction to religion in American culture. This class emphasizes the well-established religions with large followings (viz. Judaism, Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and Protestantism). Some attention is also given to other religions active in America. Other topics covered include the relationship of church and state, religion in ethnic and racial minority groups, and women and religion. Not open to students who have taken REL 172. (Same as REL 171.) LEC.

AMS 310. American Culture, 1600-1876. 3 Hours H.

An examination of the major historical shifts, trends, and conflicts that have shaped the multicultural nature of life in the United States from the initial European settlements to 1876. In addition to tracing developments in literature, architecture, drama, music, and the visual arts, this course will investigate patterns and changes in the popular, domestic, and material culture of everyday life in America. (Same as HIST 310.) Prerequisite: AMS 100 or AMS 110 or H IST 128. LEC.

AMS 312. American Culture, 1877 to the Present. 3 Hours H.

An examination of the major historical shifts, trends, and conflicts that have shaped the multicultural nature of life in the United States from 1877 to the present. In addition to tracing developments in literature, architecture, drama, music, and the visual arts, this course will investigate patterns and changes in the popular, domestic, and material culture of everyday life in America. (Same as HIST 312.) LEC.

AMS 316. Ministers and Magicians: Black Religions from Slavery to the Present. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

This course examines the history and diversity of African American religious expression from slavery until the present, emphasizing both mainstream and alternative faiths. It covers the religious world views of enslaved Africans, and examines faiths inside and outside of Christianity. Topics may include: independent black churches, magical practices, the Holiness and Pentecostal movements, black Islam, religious freemasonry, and esoteric faiths. The class emphasizes the influence of gender, class, race, migration, and urbanization on black religion. (Same as AAAS 316 and HIST 316.) LEC.

AMS 317. African American Women: Colonial Era to the Present. 3 Hours H.

This interdisciplinary course covers the history of African American women, beginning in West and Central Africa, extending across the Middle Passage into the Americas, and stretching through enslavement and freedom into the 21st century. The readings cover their experiences through secondary and tertiary source materials, as well as autobiographies and letters, plays and music, and poems, novels, and speeches. (Same as AAAS 317, HIST 317, and WGSS 317.) LEC.

AMS 320. Border Patrolled States. 3 Hours H.

Examines the politics of immigrant, citizenship and space through official, intellectual and popular responses to the growth of Latino/a populations in the U.S. and to international migration to and from Mexico and Central America. Topics include consideration of how responses to immigration articulate racialized and culturally specific (including linguistic and religious) concepts of the nation, and how questions of citizenship and residency dovetail with issues of community "voice", public space, and diverse notions of "security". LEC.

AMS 322. Modernism. 3 Hours H.

Examines modernism as a transnational cultural movement primarily from the 1890s to the 1940s, but also considers the impact of modernism on later twentieth century cultural production. Provides an interdisciplinary exploration of art, architecture, film, literature and music. Topics include debates related to periodization, the nature of progress, the impact of colonialism and imperialism, the power of reason, and the relationship to previous "traditional" ideas. LEC.

AMS 330. American Society. 3 Hours H.

The social structure and organization of American society with special reference to recent social changes. (Same as SOC 330.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in sociology or American studies. LEC.

AMS 332. The United States in Global Context. 3 Hours AE42 / S.

Examines the influence abroad of US culture, policies and practices and the impact of other countries on US culture, society, and politics. Among the topics that may be examined are race, ethnicity, colonialism, imperialism, migration, technology, communications and media, popular culture, language, health, domestic and transnational organizations, as well as economic, political, religious, military and educational institutions. (Same as SOC 332). LEC.

AMS 340. Black Leadership. 3 Hours H/W.

The course focuses on the concept of leadership and on black leadership in the United States; an in-depth analysis of selected case studies on black leaders, both historical and contemporary. Some attention will be given to the dispersion of Africans into the Americas and the leadership that emerged, conditioned both by environmental factors and the psychology engendered by the system of slavery. Selected successful black leaders will be invited to visit the class from time to time. (Same as AAAS 330.) LEC.

AMS 344. Case Study in American Studies: _____. 3 Hours H.

This course examines in depth a specific American studies or theme. LEC.

AMS 345. Cultural Studies. 3 Hours H.

Students gain awareness of major scholars and "schools" that have pursued critical, interdisciplinary research or cultural processes and products in the field of American Studies. Topics may include cultural materialism, semiotics, nationalism, ethnic/racial identity, gender and sexuality, cultural politics, mass media, public spheres, social space and place, commodity consumption, music, and popular culture. LEC.

AMS 350. Visual Culture and the Harlem Renaissance. 3 Hours H.

Examines the African American cultural movement through art; the artistic gaze in novels; representations of African Americans in film; as well as the influence of musical and dramatic performance on the African American image. Considers the impact of American, European, and other cultural influences on black artists of the time. LEC.

AMS 360. Theory and Method. 3 Hours H.

An introduction through a topical theme to theories and methods currently used in American Studies. Prerequisite: AMS 100, AMS 110 and AMS 332 or their equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AMS 390. Geography of the United States and Canada. 3 Hours S.

A study of the different physical, economic, and cultural settings in the United States and Canada which form the basis for the various forms of livelihood. Emphasis on the United States. (Same as GEOG 390.) Prerequisite: An introductory geography course, or background in United States or Canadian history, social science, or culture, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AMS 494. Topics in: _____. 1-4 Hours H.

Interdisciplinary study of selected aspects of American society or culture or of the American experience. LEC.

AMS 510. History of American Women--Colonial Times to 1870. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

A survey of women's roles as housewives, mothers, consumers, workers, and citizens in pre-industrial, commercial, and early industrial America. (Same as HIST 530 and WGSS 510.) LEC.

AMS 511. History of American Women--1870 to Present. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

A survey of women's history in the United States that will include radical and reform movements, the impact of war and depression, professionalization, immigration, women's work and the biographies of leading figures in women's history. (Same as HIST 531 and WGSS 511.) LEC.

AMS 512. History of Women and Work in Comparative Perspective. 3 Hours H.

This course explores the connection between historical changes in the labor process and the occupational choices available to women in different countries. Through discussion and analyses of texts, students will evaluate the construction of a gendered division of work as shaped over time by economic, cultural, and political forces. The chronological and geographical focus may vary depending on the instructor. (Same as HIST 532 and WGSS 512.) LEC.

AMS 515. American Women and World War II. 3 Hours H.

Examines histories of U.S. women during World War II through an interdisciplinary approach that draws on popular culture and oral history. Utilizes theories and methods of oral history and examines representations of women such as Rosie the Riveter, GI Jane and the Sweetheart at Home. Topics include the consumption of images, the function of images in war and the relationship between popular culture and war. LEC.

AMS 520. Topics in Latino Studies: _____. 3 Hours U.

The study of special topics in Latino Studies. Students may repeat this course when different topics are offered. LEC.

AMS 522. American Racial and Ethnic Relations. 3 Hours S.

Analysis of the basic sociological concepts that apply to majority-minority relations; with special emphasis on racial and ethnic interaction in the United States. (Same as SOC 522.) Prerequisite: A distribution course in sociology or American studies. LEC.

AMS 529. Race and the American Theatre. 3 Hours U.

The representation(s) of race in significant texts and performance styles in American theatre analyzed according to political ideologies, dramatic movements and the impact of these factors on the representation of the "other" in the theatre. (Same as AAAS 585 and THR 529.) LEC.

AMS 534. Global Ethnic and Racial Relations. 3 Hours NW / S.

An examination of constructions of race and ethnicity around the world. Emphasis is on the social, political, historical, cultural and economic factors that lead to the creation of ethnic and racial identities, ethnic conflict and accommodation, ethnic movements, and ethnic political organization. Racial and ethnic relations in the U.S. are compared with other countries. Major focus is placed on ethnicity in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, and/or the Middle East. (Same as AAAS 510 and SOC 534.) LEC.

AMS 536. Ethnicity in the United States: _____. 3 Hours S.

An examination of the history, sociology, and culture of U.S. ethnic categories (e.g., American Indians, Latinos, Asian Americans, Jewish Americans, Irish Americans). The specific group studied varies from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit. (Same as SOC 536.) Prerequisite: A principal course in American Studies, Sociology, or Anthropology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

AMS 540. Culture, Space and Power in Urban America. 3 Hours H.

Surveys scholarship on urban expressive culture as it illuminates the politics to identity and public space by African American and Latino/a urban communities. Explores how race, class and gender positionality affect and reflect access to public space and recognition in the public sphere through aesthetic practices such as hip-hop, graffiti writing and custom car cruising. LEC.

AMS 550. Research Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

A seminar exploring a specific American studies theme. A research paper or equivalent project is required. Prerequisite: AMS 360 (a grade of C or better is recommended) or consent of instructor. Cannot be taken concurrently with AMS 551, AMS 552 or AMS 553. LEC.

AMS 551. Research Project in American Studies. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

Independent research on a selected topic under the direction of a faculty member. Students write an original research paper or complete an equivalent project in another medium, grounded in primary as well as secondary sources. Prerequisite: AMS 550 or consent of instructor. RSH.

AMS 552. Public Service in American Studies. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

Independent public service in a selected area undertaken in consultation with and under the direction of a faculty member. Students produce a final written project on the experience that integrates the public service experience and academic materials, or complete an equivalent project in another medium. Prerequisite: AMS 550 or consent of instructor. FLD.

AMS 553. Honors in American Studies. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

Honors equivalent of AMS 551. May be taken twice for credit. Three hours of AMS 553 may be substituted for a course in an appropriate category in the American Studies major. Prerequisite: AMS 550, eligibility for departmental honors, or consent of instructor. RSH.

AMS 554. Advanced Topics in American Literature to 1865: _____. 3 Hours H.

Study of American literary works before 1865. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, topic, historical period, author, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as ENGL 576.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of at least one 300- or 400-level English course. LEC.

AMS 555. Advanced Topics in American Literature Since 1865: _____. 3 Hours H.

Study of American literary works after 1865. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, topic, historical period, author, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as ENGL 577.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of at least one 300- or 400-level English course. LEC.

AMS 565. Gender, Culture, and Migration. 3 Hours H.

This course brings a human face to the 21st century manifestation of globalization by focusing on the issues of culture, gender and migration. How do these three aspects create the "global village" amongst both the host and donor peoples? When people move from one place to another, what do they leave behind, what do they take with them? What is gained, or lost by the host community? What is the impact of migration on a specific group's and individual's sense of identity? How has migration affected the people's construction, understanding, and practice of gender? Given their primary roles in the home and within the culture, these questions and more are posed with particular attention to women. Migration theories, interviews and personal testimonies as well as literary and dramatic works are critical to our analyses of the issues raised and enable us to hold conversations with, and listen to the stories of the ordinary people who make globalization happen and sustain it. (Same as AAAS 565 and WGSS 565.) LEC.

AMS 576. Cultural Geography of the United States. 3 Hours S.

Distributions of major culture elements including folk architecture, religion, dialect, foodways, and political behavior are systematically studied from a predominantly historical perspective. These discussions are followed by a survey of the major culture regions in America. Although not absolutely necessary, familiarity with concepts treated in any of the following courses would be helpful: AMS 100, AMS 110, ANTH 108, ANTH 308, GEOG 102, or GEOG 390. (Same as GEOG 576.) LEC.

AMS 579. Geography of American Foodways. 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary approach to food that explores the diversity of eating habits across the United States and the role of food as an indicator of cultural identity and change. Current regional and ethnic food consumption patterns are stressed. Topics include multiculturalism and regional identity, the symbiotic relationship between restaurant food and home cooking, the recent interest in farmers' markets and organic foods, and the importance of the food industry and the popular press in setting trends. (Same as GEOG 579.) LEC.

AMS 580. American Art. 3 Hours H.

A survey of American painting, sculpture, and architecture from colonial to recent times. (Same as HA 570.) Prerequisite: HA 100, HA 151, or the equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AMS 590. Transnational Asian Film. 3 Hours H.

Examines the ways that contemporary East Asian films and the American film industry appropriate cinematic techniques, styles and themes from one another. Uses cultural studies theories to examine the construction of cultural and historical narratives of transnational interaction among East Asian countries. Explores the impact of economic globalization on transnational film production. LEC.

AMS 629. Sociology of Sport. 3 Hours S.

Examination of organized sport as a social institution and its relation to other social institutions (e.g., political, economic, educational, and religious), with special emphasis on American society. Analysis of the social correlates of sports participation and a consideration of the role of sport in social change. (Same as SOC 629). Prerequisite: A principal course in American studies or sociology, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AMS 650. Jazz and American Culture. 3 Hours H.

This course considers cultural and social histories of jazz, from the 1920s through the present day, as sites for exploring ideological struggles over such fields as race, class, gender, sexuality, democracy, capitalism, freedom, community, Americanness, and globalization in the U.S. The course will explore such questions as the following: What music was called jazz at what times and places? What did it mean to whom? Who played it? Who wrote about it? Who listened to it? Who danced to it? Who policed it? Who produced it? Who used it to rebel? Who used it to survive? What did all of these practices mean to participants? The course will examine struggles over social meanings in the U.S. through a study of jazz performance, labor, representation, marketing, consumption, censorship, and historiography. Prerequisite: A course in American studies, American history, or consent of instructor. (Same as WGSS 652.) LEC.

AMS 652. Jazz I, Roots to 1955. 3 Hours H.

Survey of jazz music, from ragtime and blues to jazz of the 1940s and 50s. Covers various styles of jazz, including New Orleans, swing, bebop and cool. Students are expected to have a basic understanding of melody, harmony and rhythm, although ability to read scores is not necessary. Graduate students will complete additional work to be determined in consultation with the instructor. LEC.

AMS 653. Jazz II, 1955-Present. 3 Hours H.

Survey of jazz music, from 1950s to the present. Covers various styles of jazz, including free jazz, postmodern jazz and fusion. Students are expected to have a basic understanding of melody, harmony and rhythm, although ability to read scores is not necessary. Graduate students will complete additional work to be determined in consultation with the instructor. LEC.

AMS 680. Jazz Autobiography. 3 Hours H.

Examines the literary and musical significance of jazz autobiographies since the 1940s. Authors include Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, Billie Holiday, Charles Mingus, Nina Simone and others. Graduate students will complete additional work to be determined in consultation with the instructor. LEC.

AMS 682. Jazz Narratives in Novels and Films. 3 Hours H.

Examines jazz and musicians' life stories in prose fiction and fictional or biographical films. Novels may include works by John Clellon Holmes and Nathaniel Mackey. Films may include Lady Sings the Blues and Space is the Place. Graduate students will complete additional work to be determined in consultation with the instructor. LEC.

AMS 690. Black Cultural Studies. 3 Hours H.

Examines critical approaches to the study of African American cultural production. Uses literature, films, music, art and performance to explore the development of interpretations of black culture. Covers major developments in black aesthetics in the twentieth century, various theoretical schools of thought, and significant writers such as bell hooks, Stuart Hall, and Gina Dent. Graduate students will complete additional course work to be determined in consultation with the instructor. LEC.

AMS 694. Directed Readings. 1-4 Hours H.

Consent of instructor is required. IND.

AMS 696. Studies in: _____. 3 Hours H.

Interdisciplinary study of different aspects of the American experience in different semesters. LEC.

AMS 700. Introduction to Museum Exhibits. 3 Hours.

This course will consider the role of exhibits as an integrated part of museum collection management, research, and public service. Lecture and discussion will focus on issues involved in planning and producing museum exhibits. Laboratory exercises will provide first hand experience with basic preparation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on the management of an exhibit program in both large and small museums in the major disciplines. (Same as BIOL 787, GEOL 781, HIST 723, and MUSE 703.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AMS 714. Conservation Principles and Practices. 3 Hours.

This course will acquaint the future museum professional with problems in conserving all types of collections. Philosophical and ethical approaches will be discussed, as well as the changing practices regarding conservation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on detection and identification of causes of deterioration in objects made of organic and inorganic materials, and how these problems can be remedied. Storage and care of objects will also be considered. (Same as BIOL 700, GEOL 780, HIST 722 and MUSE 706.). Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AMS 720. The Nature of Museums. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the kinds of museums, their various missions, and their characteristics and potentials as research, education, and public service institutions responsible for collections of natural and cultural objects. (Same as BIOL 788, GEOL 782, HIST 720, and MUSE 702.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AMS 725. Museum Studies Workshop: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Short term, intensive workshops presented to provide specialized background in a variety of skills required in historical archives or museums. FLD.

AMS 730. Principles and Practices of Museum Collection Management. 3 Hours.

Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museum collections, their associated data, and their use in scholarly research; cataloging, storage, fumigation, automated information management and related topics will be presented for museums of art, history, natural history and anthropology. (Same as BIOL 798, GEOL 785, HIST 725, and MUSE 704.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AMS 731. Museum Management. 3 Hours.

Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museums as organizations; accounting, budget cycles, personnel management, and related topics will be presented using, as appropriate, case studies and a simulated museum organization model. (Same as BIOL 785, GEOL 783, HIST 728, and MUSE 701.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AMS 737. Music in America. 3 Hours.

A survey of historical developments from the Pilgrims to the present. (Same as MUSC 759.) Prerequisite: One course in the field of music history and literature or consent of instructor. LEC.

AMS 767. Gerontology Proseminar. 3 Hours.

A proseminar coordinated by the Gerontology Center. The proseminar explores essential areas of gerontology for researchers and practitioners, providing a multidisciplinary (psychology, biology, sociology, and communication) perspective on aging. The proseminar surveys contemporary basic and applied research, service programs, and policy and management issues in gerontology. (Same as ABSC 787, COMS 787, PSYC 787, and SOC 767.) (Formerly HDFL 787.) LEC.

AMS 787. Field Work. 1-12 Hours.

Supervised field research in aspects of American civilization. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. FLD.

AMS 797. Introduction to Museum Public Education. 3 Hours.

Consideration of the goals of an institution's public education services, developing programs, identifying potential audiences, developing audiences, and funding. Workshops and demonstrations are designed for students to gain practical experience working with various programs and developing model programs. (Same as BIOL 784, GEOL 784, HIST 721, and MUSE 705.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

AMS 799. American Studies Museum Apprenticeship. 1-6 Hours.

Provides directed, practical experience in research, collection care and management, public education, and exhibits with emphasis to suit the particular requirements of each student. (Same as ANTH 799, BIOL 799, GEOL 723, HIST 799, and MUSE 799.) FLD.

AMS 801. Introduction to American Studies. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the field of American Studies through an examination of some of the classic and innovative works, issues, debates, and controversies in the history and the literature of American Studies. LEC.

AMS 802. Theorizing America. 3 Hours.

Drawing from a broad range of perspectives (e.g., cultural theory, social theory, literary theory, etc.), this course will introduce students to current theoretical debates in American studies and the concepts that inform them. LEC.

AMS 803. Research Methods in American Studies. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the range of interdisciplinary research methods in American studies. Emphasis will be placed on an examination of the assumptions, logics, and procedures involved in various approaches to understanding American society and culture. LEC.

AMS 804. Research Seminar. 3 Hours.

An intensive application of theoretical and methodological issues to the development of specific substantive research problems. Students will be expected to design and implement a study that will be critically assessed in the seminar. LEC.

AMS 805. American Pluralism: Race, Ethnicity, and Religion in American Life. 3 Hours.

Analysis of the dynamics of intercultural and intergroup relations in America with special emphasis on the examination of major conceptual perspectives that have characterized the study of race, ethnicity, and religion in American life. LEC.

AMS 808. Studies in: _____. 3 Hours.

Interdisciplinary study of different aspects of the American experiences in different semesters. LEC.

AMS 809. Advanced Research Seminar. 3 Hours.

An intensive application of theoretical and methodological issues to the development of specific substantive research problems. Students will be expected to design and implement a study that will be critically assessed in the seminar. Prerequisite: AMS 804. Permission of the instructor required. LEC.

AMS 835. Colloquium in the History of Gender. 3 Hours.

This colloquium will cover theoretical and topical readings on the history of manhood, womanhood, and gender systems. (Same as HIST 895 and WGSS 835.) LEC.

AMS 836. Colloquium in United States Women's History. 3 Hours.

This colloquium will cover theoretical and topical readings on the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present. It is designed to familiarize students with the most important and current historiography in the field. (Same as HIST 896 and WGSS 836.) LEC.

AMS 837. Comparative Colloquium in Women's History. 3 Hours.

This colloquium will approach the history of women from a comparative perspective through theoretical and topical readings on women in at least two different cultures. (Same as HIST 897 and WGSS 837.) LEC.

AMS 896. Examination Preparation. 1-6 Hours.

Directed and independent study in preparation for the M.A. examination. May be repeated. RSH.

AMS 899. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Investigation of a topic for master's thesis. Total enrollment in this course may not exceed six hours of credit. THE.

AMS 900. Teaching Seminar. 1-6 Hours.

This seminar is designed to assist students in the preparation, presentation, and evaluation of teaching in American Studies. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC.

AMS 973. Seminar in United States Women's History. 3 Hours.

This research seminar will focus on the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present. Students will research and write a paper using primary sources, and present those papers to the seminar for evaluation. (Same as HIST 973 and WGSS 873.) LEC.

AMS 996. Examination Preparation. 1-9 Hours.

Directed and independent study in preparation for the doctoral comprehensive examinations. May be repeated. RSH.

AMS 997. Directed Readings. 1-4 Hours.

Directed reading in an area of American culture in which there is no appropriate course in the offerings of the American Studies program or of the cooperating departments, but in which there is a member of the graduate faculty competent and willing to direct a program of study. RSH.

AMS 998. Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours.

Topics vary from semester to semester. Graduate students are consulted in selecting topics. LEC.

AMS 999. Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

THE.

Anthropology Courses

ANTH 100. General Anthropology. 3-4 Hours SC AE42/GE3S / S.

Lecture and discussion sections covering the four primary fields of Anthropology: Biological Anthropology, Linguistics, Social Anthropology, and Archaeology. Concepts and approaches to each field, using past and present examples from around the world, will be examined with an emphasis on the unity of the anthropological approach. Future directions of human experience are explored. Discussion sections will be used to examine material covered in lecture and in readings in specific cultural and evolutionary contexts. Discussion and application of fundamental concepts to contemporary events, examination of fossil collections, and viewing and discussion of relevant visual materials are among topics to be covered in sections. LEC.

ANTH 102. Succeeding in Anthropology. 1 Hour S.

This course is designed to enhance students' chances for success in anthropology major and life after college. Students will learn how to maximize their possibilities for gaining academic assistance, grants, and career building, as well as design strategies for winning jobs, entry into graduate programs, and paid internships at home and abroad. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatifactory basis. LEC.

ANTH 104. Fundamentals of Physical Anthropology. 3-4 Hours NB GE3N / N.

Lecture and discussion sections covering the mechanisms and principles of Darwinian evolution with special emphasis on human and primate data. Lecture topics include genetics, variation, primate ethology, and the fossil evidence for human evolution. Discussion sessions include topics in Mendelian and population genetics, blood group systems, quantitative morphological variation, and fossil human and primate skeletal material. LEC.

ANTH 105. Fundamentals of Physical Anthropology, Honors. 3-4 Hours NB GE3N / N.

An honors section of ANTH 104 for students with superior academic records. LEC.

ANTH 106. Introductory Linguistics. 3 Hours SC AE42/GE11/GE3S / S.

Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure and semantic structure of languages. The course will include a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and will introduce students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. (Same as LING 106.) LEC.

ANTH 107. Introductory Linguistics, Honors. 3 Hours SC AE42/GE11/GE3S / S.

Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure, and semantic structure of languages. The course includes a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and introduces students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. (Same as LING 107.) LEC.

ANTH 108. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. 3-4 Hours SC AE42/GE3S / S.

An introduction to the nature of culture, language, society, and personality. Included in this survey are some of the major principles, concerns, and themes of cultural anthropology. The variety of ways in which people structure their social, economic, political, and personal lives. Emphasized are the implications of overpopulation, procreative strategies, progress and growth of cultural complexity, developments in the Third World, and cultural dynamics in Western as well as in non-Western societies. LEC.

ANTH 109. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, Honors. 3-4 Hours SC / S.

An honors section of ANTH 108 for students with superior academic records. LEC.

ANTH 110. Introduction to Archaeology. 3-4 Hours HT GE3H / H.

A general introduction to the study of archaeology. Evolution of prehistoric cultures in adaptive response to changing natural and social environments, from the early Paleolithic to the emergence of urban civilizations. LEC.

ANTH 111. Introduction to Archaeology, Honors. 3-4 Hours HT GE3H / H.

An honors section of ANTH 110 for students with superior academic records. LEC.

ANTH 160. The Varieties of Human Experience. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H/GE3S / S/W.

An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 360. LEC.

ANTH 161. The Third World: Anthropological Approaches. 3-4 Hours NW / S/W.

Violent change, revolution, planned change, and peaceful transition in non-Western cultures. A study of development, modernization, nation-building, rapid acculturation, and war. LEC.

ANTH 162. The Varieties of Human Experience, Honors. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H/GE3S / S/W.

An honors section of ANTH 160 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 160 or ANTH 360. LEC.

ANTH 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Anthropology. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

ANTH 293. Myth, Legend, and Folk Beliefs in East Asia. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H/W.

A survey of the commonly held ideas about the beginning of the world, the role of gods and spirits in daily life, and the celebrations and rituals proper to each season of the year. The purpose of the course is to present the traditional world view of the peoples of East Asia. (Same as EALC 130, REL 130.) LEC.

ANTH 300. General Anthropology. 3 Hours AE42/GE3H/GE3S / S.

A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 100. Not open to students who have had ANTH 100. LEC.

ANTH 301. Anthropology Through Films. 3 Hours AE42 / S.

An exploration of the human ways through films. Cross-cultural interpretations by filmed records of varieties of interpersonal relations seen through such aspects of culture as hunting, war, marriage, religion, sex, kinship, and death. Patterns of interactions are analyzed by examples from cultures around the world, primarily the non-Western world. LEC.

ANTH 303. Peoples and Cultures of North Africa and the Middle East. 3 Hours NW / S.

This course familiarizes students with the peoples and cultures of North Africa and the Middle East. It examines the cultural, demographic, and religious diversity of the region, as well as the development of the early Islamic community and the formation of Islamic institutions. Issues such as religion and politics, inter-religious relations, nation-building, Islamic response to colonialism, Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Islamic resurgence, secularism, democratization, and gender, are also explored. (Same as AAAS 303.) LEC.

ANTH 304. Fundamentals of Physical Anthropology. 3-4 Hours NB GE3N / N.

A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 104. Not open to students who have had ANTH 104 or ANTH 105. LEC.

ANTH 308. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. 3-4 Hours SC AE42/GE3S / S.

An introduction to the nature of culture, language, society, and personality. Included in this survey are some of the major principles, concerns, themes of cultural anthropology, and the variety of ways in which people structure their social, economic, political, and personal lives. Emphasized are the implications of overpopulation, procreative strategies, progress and growth of culture complexity, developments in the Third World, and cultural dynamics in Western as well as in non-Western societies. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 108 or ANTH 109. LEC.

ANTH 310. Introduction to Archaeology. 3-4 Hours HT GE3H / H.

A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 110. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 110 or ANTH 111. LEC.

ANTH 313. New Discoveries in Archaeology. 3 Hours S.

Recent discoveries in anthropological archaeology in various areas of the world and their impact on existing bodies of fact and theory, and on established methods of archaeological discovery. LEC.

ANTH 315. The Prehistory of Art. 3 Hours S.

A survey of prehistoric art focusing on the material record and interpretations of rock art (paintings, engravings on rock surfaces in rock-shelters, caves and in open air sites) and portable art created by prehistoric people. The emphasis is on the small-scale societies (hunter-gatherer and early food producers) around the world before the appearance of written records in respective geographic areas. Environmental, social and cultural contexts in which these art forms were created are discussed along with a review of past scholarship and current interpretive approaches to this old and enduring expression of human creativity. Course may be offered in lecture or online format. (Same as HA 315.) LEC.

ANTH 317. Prehistory of Europe. 3 Hours S.

A survey of one million years of prehistory from the peopling of the European continent to the Roman Empire. The course will focus on the growth of culture, considering economy and technology, art and architecture. Topics will include the Neanderthals, the big game hunters of the Ice Age, the megalith builders, the Celts. Prerequisite: An introductory course in anthropology, history, or cultural geography. LEC.

ANTH 318. Prehistory of Kansas. 3 Hours S.

A survey of the changing lifeways of Native Americans in Kansas from the time of the earliest inhabitants of at least 12,000 years ago to the period of Euro-American contact. Extensive use will be made of Museum of Anthropology collections. LEC.

ANTH 320. Language in Culture and Society. 3 Hours SC AE41/AE61 / S.

Language is an integral part of culture and an essential means by which people carry out their social interactions with the members of their society. The course explores the role of language in everyday life of peoples in various parts of the world and the nature of the relationship between language and culture. Topics include world-view as reflected in language, formal vs. informal language, word taboo, and ethnography of speaking. (Same as LING 320.) LEC.

ANTH 321. Language in Culture and Society, Honors. 3 Hours SC AE41/AE61 / S.

An honors section of ANTH 320 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 320 or LING 320. (Same as LING 321.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 340. Human Variation and Evolution. 3 Hours AE41 / N.

An examination of biochemical and physical variability in contemporary human populations. Topics include: genetic basis of human diversity, evolutionary theory, population genetics, blood groups, biochemical variations, body size and shape, pigmentation, and other morphological characteristics. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 341. Human Evolution. 3 Hours N.

The evolutionary processes and events leading to the development of humans and the humanlike forms from primate ancestors; fossil hominids and the origin of modern Homo Sapiens. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 343. Food, Nutrition and Culture. 3 Hours U.

The course is a cross-cultural survey of human dietary practices (foodways). Students are introduced to the concepts of nutrition, diet and cuisine. Evolutionary and adaptive aspects of human diets and cuisines are considered. Nutritional, environmental/ technological, social and ideological aspects of regional and ethnic foodways are examined. Invited lecturers from different cultural traditions offer indigenous perspectives on their foodways. LEC.

ANTH 350. Human Adaptation. 3 Hours S.

A survey and examination of present-day human populations focusing upon adaptations in different environments and the interaction of culture and biology. General evolutionary theory is treated with an emphasis on the mechanisms of evolutionary change. Genetic, physiological, and cultural adaptations to environmental stress are discussed from the standpoint of their past evolutionary significance and their influence on contemporary human variation. Prerequisite: ANTH 104 or ANTH 304. LEC.

ANTH 352. Controversies on the Living and the Dead. 3 Hours N.

The pros and cons of conflicting theories on the past and present evolution are examined. Race and intelligence, evolution of skin color, and genetic future of humans are among the considered topics. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 359. Anthropology of Sex. 3 Hours N.

An evolutionary perspective on the behavior and biology of males and females in human society. Topics will include the evolution of sexual dimorphism, social and biological issues in human reproduction, primate social patterns, human sexual behavior and taboos, sex and social structure, and the sociobiology of sex. LEC.

ANTH 360. The Varieties of Human Experience. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H/GE3S / S/W.

A more intensive treatment of ANTH 160. An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 160. LEC.

ANTH 361. The Third World: Anthropological Approaches. 3-4 Hours NW / S/W.

A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 161. Not open to students who have had ANTH 161. LEC.

ANTH 362. Peoples of Southeast Asia. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

An analysis of the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Emphasis on cultural-historical relationships and theories of cultural development and change. LEC.

ANTH 363. Gendered Modernity in East Asia. 3 Hours S.

This course explores rapidly changing gender relationships and the sense of being "modern" in East Asia by examining marriage and family systems, work, education, consumer culture, and geopolitics. The class seeks to understand how uneven state control over men and women shapes desires, practices, and norms and how men and women act upon such forces. Avoiding biological or social determinism, this course treats gender as an analytical category and examines how modern nation-states and global geopolitics are constituted and operated. (Same as EALC 363 and WGSS 363.) LEC.

ANTH 364. Peoples of Japan and Korea. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

An analysis of the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of Japan and Korea. Emphasis on historical and ethnological relationships, social structure, and ethics. (Same as EALC 364.) LEC.

ANTH 365. Japanese People through Film. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

Japanese people's culture and society through an extensive examination of both documentary and feature films. Readings from social science fields and literature will be used--the former to supply a theoretical framework for the study of Japanese people and the latter to further the inquiry into the individual sentiment motivating actions. (Same as EALC 365.) LEC.

ANTH 366. The Life Cycle in Japanese Culture and Literature. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A study of the Japanese people from birth to death: what it means to be born in a Japanese family, to grow up Japanese, and to die Japanese. Anthropological works and selections from Japanese literature and film will be used to examine ways in which Japanese people live through the critical periods in their life cycle. (Same as EALC 366.) LEC.

ANTH 367. Introduction to Economic Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

This course uses ethnographic case materials to explore the ways humans provision themselves under different social and environmental conditions. It introduces the basic theories, concepts, and debates of economic anthropology and provides a foundation for more advanced courses in this subdiscipline. Prerequisite: ANTH 108 or ANTH 308, or ANTH 160 or ANTH 360, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 368. The Peoples of China. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

An analysis of the cultural origin, diversity, and unity of the peoples of China. Emphasis on historical development, social structure, cultural continuity and change, and ethics. (Same as EALC 368.) LEC.

ANTH 370. Peoples and Cultures of the Pacific. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

A survey of the native cultures of Australia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Investigation of the origins and dispersal of Pacific peoples, their cultural adaptations to differing habitats, their forms of social, political, and religious organization. Consideration of the problems and cultural changes resulting from colonization and modernization. Prerequisite: ANTH 100, ANTH 108, ANTH 160, ANTH 308, ANTH 360, or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 372. Religion, Power, and Sexuality in Arab Societies. 3 Hours NW / S.

This course examines theories of religion, discourse, power, gender and sexuality in their application to Arab societies. The course introduces different aspects of Arab cultures. Through canonical works, we study political domination, tribal social organization, honor, tribe, shame, social loyalty, ritual initiations and discuss how these issues speak generally to anthropological inquiry. Regionally specific works are then framed by an additional set of readings drawn from anthropological, linguistics, and social theories. (Same as AAAS 372.) LEC.

ANTH 376. North American Indians. 3 Hours NW AE41 / S/W.

A survey of American Indian cultures north of Mexico at the time of the first contact with Western civilization; detailed studies of selected Indian cultures. LEC.

ANTH 379. Indigenous Traditions of Latin America. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

A survey of the major indigenous traditions of Mesoamerica, the Andes, and lowland tropical Latin America. Coverage emphasizes how indigenous cultural traditions and societies have both continued and changed since the European Invasion and addresses such current issues as language rights, territorial rights, sovereignty, and state violence. Students enrolled in the 600-level section will be required to complete additional research and class leadership tasks. Not open to students who have taken LAA 634. (Same as LAA 334.) LEC.

ANTH 380. Peoples of South America. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

A survey of native peoples and cultures of South America from the time of initial Western contacts to the present day. LEC.

ANTH 382. People and the Rain Forest. 3 Hours S.

An analysis of the cultural origin, diversity, and unity of the peoples of the neotropics. Emphasizing the peoples of Amazonia, the course introduces students to topics associated with the economic, political, and cultural dimensions of social life in rain forest communities. LEC.

ANTH 387. Field Research on Gender. 3 Hours S.

This course examines gender roles and gender culture in Costa Rica, especially in the southern part of the country. Students will be introduced, both theoretically and practically, to feminist anthropology as well as gender ethnography. It covers academic literature about the topic, and literature written by women. The class will also discuss different types of machismo culture and the structures and functioning of families in southern Costa Rica. Class taught in Golfito, Costa Rica. Course taught in Spanish. Contact the Department of Anthropology, or the Office of Study Abroad. LEC.

ANTH 389. The Anthropology of Gender: Female, Male, and Beyond. 3 Hours NW GE21.

This course will introduce students to cultural constructions and performances of masculinity, femininity, and alternative genders across time and space. Topics and cases will be drawn from primarily non-Western cultures, ranging from Javanese markets to Pacific Rim gardens, and from Haitian voudou to Maya royal politics. This course uses research by archeologists, linguists, anthropologists, and sociocultural anthropologists. (Same as WGSS 389.) LEC.

ANTH 397. Museum Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to the historical background, practice, and ethical issues involved in the creation, presentation, and dissemination of anthropological information in a museum setting. Students participate in the study of a collection of material culture (artifacts) from the Museum of Anthropology, culminating in development of a script for an exhibit. FLD.

ANTH 400. Topics in Anthropology, Honors: _____. 3 Hours H.

Selected issues and theories in contemporary anthropology (cultural, linguistic, biological, archaeological) for honors students. Topic for semester to be announced. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Prerequisite: Admission to the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 401. Integrating Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

Capstone course that integrates the primary fields of anthropology. Students apply concepts and approaches from each field to a particular topic in preparation for and presentation of a cross-disciplinary and integrative final project. Prerequisite: Completion of all required introductory anthropology courses and two anthropology courses LEC.

ANTH 406. Laboratory Techniques in Archaeology. 3 Hours S.

A survey of basic laboratory procedures associated with specimen preparation, analysis, classification, and measurement of archaeological materials, with emphasis on lithic and ceramic technology. Formal lectures and laboratory sections. LEC.

ANTH 410. Archaeological Myths and Realities. 3 Hours S.

A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 210. Not open to students who have had ANTH 210. LEC.

ANTH 415. The Rise of Civilization. 3 Hours S.

A study of evolutionary processes leading to the birth of the early great urban civilizations of the Old World and the New World. Patterns of growth and similarities and differences in the rise of urban complexes and states in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus Valley, and in Mexico/Guatemala and Peru. LEC.

ANTH 418. Summer Archaeological Field Work. 1-8 Hours AE61 / S.

Under the direction of a professional archaeologist, undergraduate and graduate students are taught proper procedures for the excavation and laboratory analysis of data from a prehistoric or historic archaeological site. Data gathered may be used for additional graduate research. Enrollment by application; limited to twenty students. A fee for subsistence costs will be charged. FLD.

ANTH 419. Training in Archaeological Field Work. 1-6 Hours S.

Undergraduate and graduate students are taught techniques of archaeological field work, including survey and excavation, as well as laboratory procedures, including artifact classification and curation. FLD.

ANTH 430. Linguistics in Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

The study of language as a symbolic system. Exploration into the interrelatedness of linguistic systems, of nonlinguistic communicative systems, and of other cultural systems. (Same as LING 430.) LEC.

ANTH 440. Introduction to Primates. 3 Hours N.

A review of the evolution and behavior of nonhuman primates. The survey includes the stages of primate evolution, morphology of living primates, and descriptions and analyses of primate behavioral patterns. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 442. Anthropological Genetics. 3 Hours N.

Principles of human genetics involved in biological anthropology. The genetics of non-Western populations considered within an evolutionary framework. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 445. Topics in Biological Anthropology: _____. 3 Hours N.

Seminar concentrating on selected problems and issues in contemporary biological anthropology. Topic for semester to be announced. Course may be repeated for a maximum of nine hours of credit. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 447. Human Behavioral Genetics. 3 Hours S.

A survey of human behavioral genetics for upper division undergraduates. Emphasis is on how the methods and theories of quantitative, population, medical, and molecular genetics can be applied to individual and group differences in humans. Both normal and abnormal behaviors are covered, including intelligence, mental retardation, language and language disorders, communication, learning, personality, and psychopathology. (Same as BIOL 432, PSYC 432, SPLH 432.) Prerequisite: Introductory courses in biology/genetics or biological anthropology and psychology are recommended. LEC.

ANTH 449. Laboratory/Field Work in Human Biology. 1-3 Hours AE61 / N.

Faculty supervised laboratory or field research for Human Biology majors. Students design and complete a research project in collaboration with a Human Biology faculty member. (Same as BIOL 449, SPLH 449, and PSYC 449.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Human Biology major. FLD.

ANTH 459. Anthropology of Sex, Honors. 3 Hours H.

The course is an introduction to the evolutionary study of human sexual behavior. Using an explicitly Darwinian framework, it examines the biological basis for human mate selection, male and female mating strategies, child-birth and child-care practices, parental care, marriage, and family structure. The power of Darwinian theory to predict human sexual behavior is tested in anthropological field studies, designed and carried out by students in the class. Class time is allocated for discussion of students' research as it progresses through each stage, and results are presented in the last weeks of the semester. Prerequisite: Introductory class in biology or biological anthropology. Open only to students in the University Honors Program, or by consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 460. Theory in Anthropology. 3 Hours GE3H / S.

A critical examination of the main theories and concepts in cultural anthropology. Consideration of the philosophical presuppositions underlying past and current theoretical issues and trends. LEC.

ANTH 461. Introduction to Medical Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to the social and cultural practices that contribute to health and disease, including a survey of therapy systems in both Western and non-Western societies (e.g., Native American, African, Western allopathic medicine, etc.). This course should be of special interest to premedical students and majors in the allied health professions. LEC.

ANTH 462. Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology. 3 Hours H / LFE.

This course introduces students to ethical considerations, methods used in ethnographic fieldwork, field notes, coding data, analysis, and write-up. Students design and carry out research projects. Prerequisite: ANTH 108 or ANTH 308, or ANTH 160 or ANTH 360 or ANTH162, or instructor's approval. LEC.

ANTH 465. Genocide and Ethnocide. 3 Hours S.

Study of the killing of peoples and cultures. Case studies, focusing primarily on tribal South America. Examination of the implications of these studies as regards our definition of culture and our evaluation of aid programs, missionary efforts, and international business expansion. LEC.

ANTH 474. Applied Cultural Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

Applications of anthropological theory, methods, and findings in programs of community and national development, public health, international aid, and military assistance. Examination of the role of the anthropologist, of ethics and values in intervention schemes, and of the organization of planned change in applied programs. Intensive analysis of selected case studies. FLD.

ANTH 480. Technology and Society in the Contemporary World. 3 Hours AE61 / S.

The impact of scientific and technological advances on social and personal life in contemporary society. A wide range of topics will be dealt with during the semester; examples include the internet and new modes of communication, developments in genetics and medicine, and testing for intelligence, drugs, lie detection, and other purposes. LEC.

ANTH 482. Psychological Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

Introduction to the interrelationship of individual and society: processes of socialization, perception and cognition, personality and culture, with emphasis on the psychological interpretation of human behavior and the sociocultural contexts of psychological processes. Both ethnographic and cross-culturally comparative perspectives are introduced. LEC.

ANTH 484. Magic, Science, and Religion. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

A comparative study of religion and systems of value and belief in non-Western cultures. LEC.

ANTH 496. Reading and Research. 1-6 Hours S.

Individual investigation of special problems in anthropology. Maximum of three credit hours in any one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

ANTH 498. Seminar in Technology: _____. 3 Hours S.

Topic for semester to be announced. LEC.

ANTH 499. Senior Honors Research. 1-6 Hours S.

Individual research under the direction of one or more instructors in the department. Maximum of four credit hours in any one semester. Prerequisite: A grade-point average of 3.5 in anthropology and 3.0 in all courses, and consent of instructor. IND.

ANTH 500. Topics in Archaeology: _____. 3 Hours S.

Seminar concentrating on selected problems and issues in contemporary archaeology. Topic for semester to be announced. Course may be repeated for a maximum of nine hours of credit. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a course in archaeology at any level, or by permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 501. Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology: _____. 3 Hours S.

Course concentrating on selected problems, theories, and issues in contemporary sociocultural anthropology. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC.

ANTH 502. Topics in Anthropological Linguistics: _____. 3 Hours S.

Course concentrating on selected problems, theories, and issues in contemporary anthropological linguistics. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC.

ANTH 503. Topics in Biological Anthropology: _____. 3 Hours S.

Course concentrating on selected problems, theories, and issues in contemporary biological anthropology. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC.

ANTH 504. North American Archaeology. 3 Hours S.

A general survey of the archaeology of North America. Detailed coverage of selected problems. LEC.

ANTH 505. Prehistory of Eastern North America. 3 Hours S.

A survey of the archaeological record of eastern North America from the late Pleistocene to the time of European contact. The diverse environments of eastern North America are considered in conjunction with the dynamic climatic and ecological changes which have occurred during the past 20,000 years to provide a background for study of the prehistoric groups who occupied the region. Topics will include the change in economies, technologies, and organization from the earliest hunter-gatherers through the development of pre-Colombian complex societies. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 310. LEC.

ANTH 506. Ancient American Civilizations: Mesoamerica. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

An archaeological survey of the Precolombian heritage of Mexico and Central America. The sites and cultures of the Olmecs, Teotihuacan, the Maya, the Zapotecs, the Toltecs, and the Aztecs will be considered in detail. Investigations of ancient art and architecture, crafts and technologies, trade and exchange, religious beliefs and practices, and writing and calendrical systems will be directed toward understanding the growth and the decline of these Native American civilizations. LEC.

ANTH 507. The Ancient Maya. 3 Hours S/W.

An intensive examination of current scholarship on the ancient Maya civilization of Mexico and Central America. The course will consider Maya culture from its roots in early villages of the Preclassic period to the warring city-states of the Postclassic period. Topics will include settlement and subsistence systems, sociopolitical evolution, art and architecture, myth and symbolism, and Maya hieroglyphic writing. An important theme of the course will be the relevance of the Precolumbian Maya for understanding complex societies and contemporary Latin American Culture. Prerequisite: Successful completion of one of the following: ANTH 110, ANTH 310, ANTH 415, ANTH 506, or ANTH 508. LEC.

ANTH 508. Ancient American Civilizations: The Central Andes. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

An archaeological survey of the ancient peoples of Peru and neighboring countries in South America. The origins of complex societies on the coast and in the Andean highlands will be reviewed with special consideration of the role of "vertical" environments in the development of Andean social and economic systems. Cultures such as Chavin, Moche, Nazca, Huari, Tiahuanaco, Chimu, and the rise of the imperial Inca state will be examined through artifacts, architectural remains, and ethnohistoric documents. LEC.

ANTH 510. An Introduction to Southwestern Archaeology. 3 Hours NW / S.

Consideration of the history and processes of cultural development from the evidence of humans' first presence to the historic period in the Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. Special attention will be devoted to the origins, changes within, and connections to modern Southwestern native peoples of three long-lived traditions known as Hohokam, Mogollon, and Anasazi. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 310. LEC.

ANTH 512. Ethnohistory: _____. 3 Hours S.

A critical evaluation of the records (local traditions, written documents, maps, photographs, etc.) relevant to a reconstruction of the history of cultures. Topic for the semester to be announced. LEC.

ANTH 514. The Near East in Prehistory. 3 Hours S.

A broad examination of the prehistory of the Near East, emphasizing selected regional and research themes. Discussion will include a consideration of cultural adaptation and environmental diversity, early history of archaeological work, and current research trends. While all cultural periods will be examined, a major emphasis will be on the origins of food production and Neolithic economies. LEC.

ANTH 515. Topics in Old World Prehistory: _____. 3 Hours S.

Topic for the semester to be announced. An introductory course in archaeology recommended. LEC.

ANTH 516. Hunters and Gatherers. 3 Hours S.

The diversity of hunter-gatherer cultures documented in the ethnographic and archaeological records is considered on a global scale, with particular attention given to the relationships between environment, technology, and organization. The evolution of hunter-gatherers from the earliest hominids until their interaction with more complex societies is considered, with emphasis given to the variation and nature of change in these societies. Prerequisite: ANTH 108 or ANTH 110, or ANTH 308 or ANTH 310. LEC.

ANTH 517. Geoarchaeology. 3 Hours N.

Application of the concepts and methods of the geosciences to interpretation of the archeological record. The course will focus primarily on the field aspects of geoarchaeology (e.g., stratigraphy, site formational processes, and landscape reconstruction), and to a lesser extent on the array of laboratory approaches available. (Same as GEOG 532.) Prerequisite: GEOG 104, ANTH 110, or ANTH 310. LEC.

ANTH 518. Environment and Archaeology. 3 Hours S.

An investigation of the relationships between the biophysical world and the development of human cultures. Examination of archaeological methods employed in the study of these relationships. LEC.

ANTH 519. Lithic Technology. 3 Hours S.

An introduction to the analysis and interpretation of prehistoric stone industries. Topics discussed include origins and development of lithic technology, principles of description and typology, use and function of stone tools; interpretation of flint knapping. Prerequisite: An introductory course in archaeology. LEC.

ANTH 520. Archaeological Ceramics. 3 Hours S.

Practicum in the method and theory of pottery analysis in archaeology. Topics include manufacturing techniques, classification, and compositional analysis of pottery artifacts, as well as strategies for interpreting the role of ceramic vessels in food production, storage, and consumption; social and ritual activities; trade and exchange; and the communication of ideas. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 310. LEC.

ANTH 521. Zooarchaeology. 3 Hours S.

This course is intended to complement faunal identification with practical involvement in analyses and interpretation of archaeological faunal assemblages using a variety of modern methods. Students will participate in the study of specific archaeological faunal remains, development of comparative zooarchaeological collections, and in middle-range research to document the variety of agents that affect faunal remains. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 310. LEC.

ANTH 522. Paleoethnobotany. 3 Hours S.

This course discusses the relationship between past human groups and their plant environment, including the use of plants for food, fuel, shelter, and household articles. Topics include a review of the development of paleoethnobotanical research, methods and techniques of data recovery, basics in plant identification, methods of data quantification and interpretation, and current research topics. In addition to selected readings, students will participate with the development of comparative botanical collections and the interpretation of botanical remains recovered from archaeological contexts. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 310. LEC.

ANTH 523. Great Plains Archaeology. 3 Hours S.

A survey is provided of the archaeological record and its interpretations for the Great Plains area of North America. The records from earliest human occupation, variation in hunter and gatherer societies, to horticultural and farming societies, and the historic period are reviewed. The history of archaeological research in the region, explanatory frameworks and models, and discussion of changes in economy, technology, mobility, social organization, and population movements are among the topics of concern. LEC.

ANTH 540. Demographic Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

This course will survey demographic topics that are relevant to anthropological research and theory. Topics will include family and household structure, fertility, nuptiality, mortality, migration, and paleodemography. Emphasis will be placed on methods in use in these areas and applications from the literature. Prerequisite: Three courses in anthropology (at least one in physical and one in cultural) or graduate standing. LEC.

ANTH 542. Biology of Human Nutrition. 4 Hours N.

Lecture and discussion. A comprehensive introduction to human nutrition, focusing on the anatomical, biochemical, and physiological aspects of nutrition. The essential nutrients and their role in human metabolism are covered in detail, and the course's systemic approach places a strong emphasis on integration of metabolism. Students also are introduced to human dietary evolution, the concept of nutritional adaptation, and cross-cultural differences in diet and nutritional physiology. Discussion sections focus on applied aspects of human nutrition, including dietary assessment. The course is a prerequisite for ANTH 543, which is recommended as the second course in a sequence on human nutrition. Prerequisite: ANTH 104 or ANTH 304, and BIOL 152. Students who have not had BIOL 152 should have taken a comparable introductory course in organismal physiology. LEC.

ANTH 543. Nutrition Through the Life Cyle. 3 Hours N.

The first half of the course focuses on nutrition through the life cycle, with an emphasis on biological, cultural, and environmental factors that influence human dietary intake and nutrition across the life span. Particular attention is given to the role of nutrition in cross-cultural variation in human growth, development, and aging. The second half of the course examines evolutionary aspects of human nutrition, including the origins and adaptive significance of regional and cultural basis. The development of taste and food preferences, at the level of the individual and population, as well as symbolic aspects of dietary behavior also will be considered. Prerequisite: ANTH 542 or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 544. Origins of Native Americans. 3 Hours N.

A survey of the genetic, linguistic, historic, archaeological, and morphological evidence for the origins of indigenous populations of the Americas. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 545. Contemporary Health Issues in Africa. 3 Hours S.

The course examines health and nutrition in African communities, using the methods of biological and medical anthropology. Fundamental to the approach taken in the course is the understanding that the health of human groups depends on interactions between biological and cultural phenomena in a particular ecological context. One topic will be selected per semester, to examine in detail the full array of epidemiological factors contributing to patterns of specific diseases. AIDS, childhood diseases, and reproductive health of African women are among possible topics. Course material will be selected from scholarly and medical publications, as well as coverage in the popular media. The use of a variety of sources will enhance understanding of the biological and cultural issues involved and will help students identify possible bias and misinformation in popular coverage of events such as famine or epidemic in African settings. (Same as AAAS 554.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in either anthropology or African studies. LEC.

ANTH 549. Human Paleontology: Fossil Apes to Australopithecus. 3 Hours N.

This course is an intensive survey of the fossil evidence for hominoid evolution up to the emergence of the first hominids--Australopithecus. Topics include the origin and evolution of the great apes, gibbons, and extinct forms such as Ramapithecus and Gigantopithecus, as well as the appearance of Australopithecines. Functional morphology is stressed. This course may be taken either before or after ANTH 550. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 550. Human Paleontology: Homo Erectus to Homo Sapiens. 3 Hours N.

The rise of genus Homo is the theme of this course. Fossils representing erectus, Neanderthal, Upper Paleolithic, and post-Pleistocene forms are discussed in detail with particular emphasis on the relationship between cultural and morphological change. The course is a continuation of ANTH 549, but may be taken out of sequence. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 555. Evolution of Human Diseases. 3 Hours N.

This course traces the evolution of human diseases over the past 3 million years. Topics include paleopathology, epidemics/pandemics, genetic adaptations to diseases, and emerging/reemerging diseases. In addition, interrelationships between humans and diseases, coupled with interactions with other animals, vectors, and natural and cultural environments are discussed. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 561. Indigenous Development in Latin America. 3 Hours AE42 / S.

Surveys the history of the development enterprise since WWII, examines the marginalization and impoverishment of Latin America's indigenous peoples, and provides training to carry out projects for and with them to enhance their quality of life. Development is understood as not merely technological or economic, but also social, emotional, and educational. Students work in teams to design their own mock development project. A 3-credit non-obligatory companion course, Applied Anthropological Field School among the Ch'orti' Maya, will follow in the intersession after each version of this course. (Same as LAA 561.) Prerequisite: ANTH 100, ANTH 108, ANTH 160 or LAA 100; or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 562. Mexamerica. 3 Hours AE41 / S.

This class surveys the relations between Mexico and the U.S. as nation-states, and among Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and Anglo Americans (to a lesser extent other U.S. citizens) in historical perspective. Issues of sovereignty, national and ethnic identity, immigration, migration, labor relations, popular culture, media, and transnational economics are covered. Prerequisite: ANTH 108/308 or ANTH 160/360 or LAA 100. LEC.

ANTH 563. Cultural Diversity in the United States. 3 Hours SC / S.

Anthropological approaches to racial, ethnic, religious, and localized communities in contemporary U.S. Surveys major theories from social science, considers case studies of immigrant indigenous peoples from historical and contemporary, local, national, and international perspectives, and addresses questions concerning the sources, conditioners, and consequences of in-group and out-group identities. Prerequisite: Introductory cultural anthropology and one cultural course numbered 300 or above, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 564. The Peoples of Africa. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

"Peoples of Africa" examines the anthropology of Sub-Saharan Africa through selected case studies of particular societies and issues that have wider comparative relevance. Normally two to four societies are selected for the semester and studied through ethnographic, historical, and literary monographs. These case studies are examined in their pre-colonial, colonial, and postcolonial histories. Lectures, readings, and exercises emphasize three kinds of reasoning -- geographical, historical, and cultural context -- required to grasp events and issues in unfamiliar societies. The course also features major anthropological ideas that emerged in the study of African society, and tracks how anthropology has been adapted by African scholars, policy makers, and activists. LEC.

ANTH 565. Popular Images in Japanese Culture, Literatures, and Films. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

The course examines recurring themes and images in Japanese culture through films, literary works, and anthropological and other social science literature. These themes and images are studied in the contexts of both modern and traditional cultures. Although the popular deviates from the orthodox, nevertheless, the energy and pervasiveness of these bastard offspring enforce and sustain "proper" cultural values. As a result of exploration of both highways and backroads of cultural expression, a holistic picture of Japanese ethos will emerge. (Same as EALC 565.) LEC.

ANTH 567. Japanese Ghosts and Demons. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

An investigation of deeply rooted Japanese beliefs about intimate relationships among humans, animals, and nature - beliefs which help to explain the mysterious and to lend order to the world. Anthropological works, selections from Japanese literature, historical documents, artworks, and films will be used to examine supernatural themes. (Same as EALC 567.) LEC.

ANTH 568. Kongo Trans-Atlantic. 3 Hours S.

This seminar explores Kongo culture and history through a cross-section of the African-Atlantic World: Western Equatorial Africa and related New World societies in Jamaica, Brazil, Haiti, Cuba, and the Georgia and Carolina Coasts, and New Orleans (thus in former British, Portuguese, French, Spanish, and U.S. colonial territories). The seminar will assess recent scholarship on patterns of slavery and resistance, cultural and linguistic change, creolization and hybridization. (Same as AAAS 568) . LEC.

ANTH 569. Contemporary Central America and Mexico. 3 Hours S.

Mexico and Central America have formed a cultural interaction zone for thousands of years, and today share common challenges, particularly political, economic, and social ones related to the Spanish colonial legacy, U.S. involvement, and their place in the global economy. Some of the issues addressed include racism, civil war, migration, youth gangs, narco-trafficking, resource extraction, homeless children, the transition from local subsistence economies to low-income work, and struggles for indigenous rights. Prerequisite: ANTH 160 or ANTH 162, or ANTH 360, ANTH 108 or ANTH 308, or LAA 100. LEC.

ANTH 570. Anthropology of Violence. 3 Hours S.

Introduces students to the comparative and cross-cultural study of violence. The course begins by surveying different anthropological approaches to the study of violence, with special attention paid to classical social theorists as well as ethnographic works. Topics may include (post) coloniality and identity politics, nationalism, race, religion, and political culture; geographic areas to be covered may include Africa, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and South Asia. LEC.

ANTH 571. Violence, Aggression, and Terrorism in the Modern World. 3-4 Hours S.

A cultural and psychological analysis of the sources, dynamics, effects, and practices of modern patterns of violence. Variations in psycho/social reactions to violence will be examined with reference to personal, social, and cross-cultural characteristics. Particular attention will be given to the cultural and individual characteristics of people who successfully survive violence and terrorism targeted at them. Emphasis will be upon the psychological and cultural origins of terrorism and violence in modern societies. Prerequisite: Introductory course in anthropology or psychology. LEC.

ANTH 580. Feminism and Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

This seminar will introduce students to feminism in anthropology, including feminist theories, methodologies, ethnographic styles, and the history of women in the discipline since the late 1800s. Emphasis is on the social contexts for feminist theory-building since the 1960s and changing ideas about gender and power. (Same as WGSS 580.) Prerequisite: One of the following: ANTH 389, ANTH 460, WGSS 201; or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 582. Ethnobotany. 3 Hours S.

Course will involve lectures and discussion of ethnobotany - the mutual relationship between plants and traditional people. Research from both the field of anthropology and botany will be incorporated in this course to study the cultural significance of plant materials. The course has 7 main areas of focus: 1) Methods in Ethnobotanical Study; 2) Traditional Botanical Knowledge - knowledge systems, ethnolinguistics; 3) Edible and Medicinal Plants of North America (focus on North American Indians); 4) Traditional Phytochemistry - how traditional people made use of chemical substances; 5) Understanding Traditional Plant Use and Management; 6) Applied Ethnobotany; commercialization and conversation (focus on traditional harvest of plant materials); 7) Ethnobotany in Sustainable Development (focus on medicinal plant exploration by pharmaceutical companies in Latin America). (Same as EVRN 542.) Prerequisite: ANTH 104, ANTH 108, EVRN 148, or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 583. Love, Sex, and Globalization. 3 Hours S.

Escalating transnational flows of information, commodities, and people have created innumerable kinds of "intimate" contacts on a global scale, such as mail order brides, child adoption, sex tourism, commodified romance, and emotional labor. Exploring the ways that cultural artifacts of intimacy are rendered, fetishized, and reified in a free market economy, this course examines how discourses on love and sex encounter, confront, and negotiate the logics of the capitalist market, the discrepant narratives of (colonial) modernity, and the ethics of pleasure. In so doing, this course navigates the treacherous interplay among emotions-specifically love, sex, and money, seeking the potential and limits of cultural politics of emotions. (Same as WGSS 583.) LEC.

ANTH 586. Visual Anthropology. 3 Hours U.

This course takes a hands-on approach to the study of theory, ethics, and methods in visual ethnographic representation. Students also read and consider historical dimensions in this subdiscipline and complete individual and team projects in photographic and videographic media. Prerequisite: An introductory course in cultural anthropology or permission of the instructor. LEC.

ANTH 587. Multidisciplinary Field School in Partnership with the Chorti Maya. 3 Hours S.

Teams of interdisciplinary students partner with the Chorti Maya of Guatemala and Honduras to share information and experiences. One third of the course consists of readings and 4-5 orientation sessions on campus, and two thirds entails two weeks in Central America. Examples of activities might include historical research, water testing and improvement, photography, art, music, tourism consultation, marketing of crafts, human rights advocacy, web design, computer training, and museum work, among others. There are no prerequisites, but students with a working knowledge of Spanish will receive preference for admission. (Same as LAA 587.) LEC.

ANTH 595. The Colonial Experience. 3 Hours NW / S/W.

An anthropological and historical examination of the processes and dynamics of the colonial experience. Cross-cultural psychosocial phenomena that have profoundly affected the values and social organizations of both colonizers and colonized will be emphasized. Specific examples will be chosen from the former American, Japanese, and European colonial empires with emphasis on Asia. LEC.

ANTH 603. Shamanism Past and Present. 3 Hours S.

This course explores shamanism, broadly defined as the practice of gaining insight through the use of ecstatic techniques (dance, drumming, trance, vision quests, and the use of psychotropic substances) for the purpose of interpreting existence and healing illnesses, through a consideration of theories and evidence for its practice from Upper Paleolithic times to the present day. Examples from the ancient cultures of Asia, Europe, Africa, Australia, and the Americas are used to explore current theoretical approaches in order to identify shamans and shamanism in the past. Issues of identifying shamans and shamanism in art and archaeological contexts are discussed. The course also explores the role that shamanism plays in a wide variety of cultures. The principal goal of the course is to provide a reasoned, critical interpretation of shamanism in the context of contemporary debates about its definition and active practice. Prerequisite: ANTH 108/308 or ANTH 110/310 or ANTH 160/360. LEC.

ANTH 605. Mortuary Practices in the Archaeological Record. 3 Hours S.

Students study theories and methods of burial practices in the archaeological record. They learn about past communities; attitudes toward death and burial and how social organization, complexity, ideology, power, gender and age roles contribute to mortuary practices. The course examines a variety of Old and New World examples from different chronological periods through class presentations, debates and written assignments. The course focuses on comparisons and evaluation of traditional and current methods and approaches. Prerequisite: ANTH 100/300 or ANTH 110/310 or instructor's consent. LEC.

ANTH 619. Field Concepts and Methods in Geoarchaelogy. 3 Hours S.

A field course taught during the three week summer session. Involves all-day excursions to different regions in order to introduce students to a variety of archaeological landscapes and environments. Focuses on the application of geoscientific concepts and methods in archaeological field investigations, emphasizing natural processes such as erosion, deposition, weathering, and biological and human activity that create and modify the archaeological record, and on soil-stratigraphic and geophysical approaches to landscape and site investigations. LEC.

ANTH 648. Human Osteology. 4 Hours N / LFE.

Techniques in bone identification, sex, race, age determination, stature reconstruction, paleopathology, and bone biology are reviewed. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LAB.

ANTH 650. Human Reproduction: Biology and Behavior. 3 Hours N.

This is a comprehensive course in the biology of human reproduction (anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology). The implications of human reproductive biology for the evolution of human behavior are considered as well. Students also examine in detail the methods and theories underlying two interconnected approaches utilized by biological anthropologists in the study of human reproduction: human reproductive ecology, which focuses on the biological determinants of human reproductive function and reproductive success, and human behavioral ecology, which focuses on evolutionary relationships between human reproductive strategies and human social behavior. The course is the first part of a two-semester sequence (ANTH 650 and ANTH 660) that examines in detail biological and cultural determinants of human reproductive strategies. Prerequisite: ANTH 359 or BIOL 152 or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 652. Population Dynamics. 3 Hours N.

Examination of possible interrelationships between the demographic structure of a population and the forces of evolution. Students are exposed to field methods and techniques of population studies. Prerequisite: An introductory course in anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 660. Human Reproduction: Culture, Power, and Politics. 3 Hours S.

This seminar analyzes and critiques the socially constructed nature of reproductive practices and their articulation with relations of power. Topics range from conception to menopause, infertility to population. Cases are drawn from a wide variety of cultural contexts. This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence (beginning with ANTH 650) that examines in detail biological and cultural determinants of human reproduction. (Same as WGSS 660.) Prerequisite: ANTH 650, or 6 hours in women's studies, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 661. Cultural Dynamics. 3 Hours S.

A survey of representative studies of the processes of cultural stability and change, and of theories of innovation, diffusion, acculturation, growth, and planned intervention in cultural processes. LEC.

ANTH 663. The Anthropology of Islam. 3 Hours NW / H.

This course uses critical readings of major anthropological works on Islam to: 1) analyze various interpretations of "Islamic cultures" through a discussion of regionally-grounded works, and 2) examine how the anthropological study of Islam also is informed by theoretical and philosophical approaches to major anthropological questions, such as religion, myth, kinship, social organization, and power. The course offers both a history of various interpretations of Islam as well as a history of theories of these interpretations. (Same as AAAS 663.) LEC.

ANTH 664. Women, Health, and Healing in Africa. 3 Hours H.

The course explores the values, practices, cultural systems and social-economic conditions that influence the sickness and health of women in Africa. The focus is on theoretical and applied debates and issues including: contraception, infertility, and reproduction; HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections; spiritual suffering and mental illness; trauma and violence; chronic illness, disability, and aging; pharmaceuticals, biotechnologies, and clinical research. Prerequisite: 6 hours of coursework in Anthropology and/or Women's Studies and/or African American Studies. LEC.

ANTH 665. Women, Health, and Healing in Latin America. 3 Hours S.

This seminar uses a life-cycle approach to examine women's health (physical, mental, and spiritual) and their roles as healers. Special consideration is given to the effects of development programs on well-being, access to health care, and changing roles for women as healers. Cases will be drawn from a variety of Latin American contexts. (Same as WGSS 665 and LAA 665.) Prerequisite: 6 hours of coursework in anthropology and/or women's studies and/or Latin American studies. LEC.

ANTH 666. Anthropology of Religion. 3 Hours S.

An examination of the various approaches (individual, ritual, and cognitive) anthropologists have adopted in the study of religion, with emphasis on millenarian and prophetic movements as examples of radical change. LEC.

ANTH 667. Primitive Mythology. 3 Hours S/W.

Methods of studying the mythology of nonliterate peoples; historical survey of theories of myth; consideration of worldwide myths and primitive mythologies from specific cultures. LEC.

ANTH 670. Contemporary American Culture. 3 Hours S.

An anthropological investigation, in seminar format, of the social consequences of transformations in today's society. Specific topics may include: the information explosion; developments in science and technology; genetics and assisted reproduction; ethnic and cultural diversity; and changing views of the normal and abnormal, sexual and other forms of relationships, and of the self. Prerequisite: An introductory course in cultural anthropology, sociology, or American studies. LEC.

ANTH 671. The Culture of Consumption: (E.G. United States and Japan). 3 Hours S.

Examines the ideologies of capitalism and consumerism as they influence social institutions and daily life. Topics for consideration grow out of instructors' interests and may include areas such as class, religion, advertising, politics, gender, medicine, environment, childhood, and education. Prerequisite: ANTH 560 or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 672. Meat and Drink in America. 3 Hours S.

This seminar examines food and beverage production and consumption in the United States. Organized metaphorically as a meal, the course explores where food and beverages come from, how they are produced and by whom, and what they mean to us as eaters and drinkers. Although the course surveys food and beverage production and consumption in general, special attention is given to meat and poultry, alcohol, coffee, carbonated drinks, regional foods, opposition to consumption of meat and alcohol, and tobacco. LEC.

ANTH 673. Neoliberalism and Globalization. 3 Hours S.

Transnational processes profoundly shape the 21st century human experience. This course links theories of economic globalization with ethnographic case materials. It explores the spread of the dominant ideology driving these processes and the effects of neoliberal policies on the urgent and vital matters facing humanity today: war and peace, social justice, democracy, cultural pluralism, and ecologically sustainable development. The course thereby links macro-economic policies to the experiences of families, workers, communities, women, indigenous peoples, and other social groups. Prerequisite: ANTH 560 or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 674. Political Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

Analysis of political systems of tribal societies and of pre-industrial states. LEC.

ANTH 675. Anthropology of Law. 3 Hours S.

Comparative analysis of the legal and political strategies used to achieve social control in both Western and non-Western cultures. Emphasis on the differential use of customary and legal sanctions, formalized procedures of negotiation or adjudication, and the role of legal specialists in society. LEC.

ANTH 676. Culture Wars. 3 Hours S.

A seminar exploring the political, religious, cultural and ideological antagonisms that divide contemporary society. Topics of dissension to be treated may include Christianity vs. Islam, evolutionism vs. intelligent design, attitudes pertaining to sexual orientation, and the proper relation between church and state. LEC.

ANTH 680. Culture and Human Biology. 3 Hours S.

A lecture course concerned with the relationship between culture and biological systems; the prohibition of incest; socialization and aggression in ethnological studies; disease and therapy; and other alterations of mind and body states. LEC.

ANTH 684. Anthropology and the Health Sciences. 3 Hours S.

Ecology of human health; cultural and social factors in the etiology of human diseases; social and cultural variables involved in health practices, programs, the organization of healing systems and the diagnostic process; the consequences of health innovations and medicotechnical apparatus. LEC.

ANTH 690. The Social Construction of the Self. 3 Hours AE42/GE3H / S.

A seminar exploring concepts of the self as the product of variable social and cultural conditions. Consideration of dominant anthropological and interdisciplinary theories of the self and how the self is construed in various societies from Asia, the Pacific, and elsewhere. LEC.

ANTH 695. Cultural Ecology. 3 Hours S.

Investigation of the interrelations between sociocultural systems and the natural environment, including a survey of major theories and descriptive studies. (Same as GEOG 670.) LEC.

ANTH 696. Language, Culture and Ethnicity in Prehistoric Eastern Europe. 3 Hours S.

The course is for students who wish to understand the prehistory of Eastern Europe with special attention to the Slavs. The interdisciplinary course examines East European prehistory from the perspectives of archaeology and linguistics, considering also how ideologies have influenced the interpretation of results. No language prerequisite. (Same as SLAV 635) LEC.

ANTH 699. Anthropology in Museums. 3 Hours S.

The course reviews the history of archeological, ethnographic, physical anthropological and other types of collections. It also considers current issues facing anthropologists, such as: contested rights to collections and the stories that accompany them; representation and interpretation of cultures; art and artifact; conceptualization, design and building of exhibitions; and anthropological research and education in the museum. LEC.

ANTH 701. History of Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Development of the field of anthropology and its relations with intellectual history. Emphasis on method and theory in historical context. Required of all M.A.-level students in anthropology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate standing. LEC.

ANTH 702. Current Archaeology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to fundamental theoretical orientations and methodological approaches in world archaeology. Case studies illustrate data acquisition, dating methods, culture history, paleoenvironmental models, and culture processes. Required of all M.A.-level students in anthropology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate standing. LEC.

ANTH 703. Current Biological Anthropology. 3 Hours.

The fundamental issues, methods, and theories in contemporary biological anthropology. Required of all M.A.-level students in anthropology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate standing. LEC.

ANTH 704. Current Cultural Anthropology. 3 Hours.

The fundamental issues, methods, and theories in contemporary cultural anthropology and anthropological linguistics. Required of all M.A.-level students in anthropology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate standing. LEC.

ANTH 705. Technological Change: _____. 3 Hours.

Studies in technological change through invention, evolution, and diffusion. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC.

ANTH 706. Current Linguistic Anthropology. 3 Hours.

This course will cover fundamental issues, methods, and theories in contemporary linguistic anthropology. (Same as LING 706.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. LEC.

ANTH 707. Responsible Research and Scholarship in Anthropology. 3 Hours.

This course examines a range of issues critical to responsible research, scholarship, and practice in anthropology. Required for all doctoral students in Anthropology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in anthropology or consent of instructor. SEM.

ANTH 710. History of American Archaeology. 3 Hours.

A survey of the development of method and theory in American archaeology, with emphasis on North America. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 715. Seminar in North American Archaeology. 2-4 Hours.

In-depth examination of specific problems and issues in the study of archaeology in North America including the Arctic. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Archaeology or instructor's consent. SEM.

ANTH 718. Seminar in Latin American Archaeology:_____. 3 Hours.

In-depth examination of specific problems and issues in the study of Precolombian societies of Mesoamerica, Central America, and South America. Topic for semester to be announced. Prerequisite: ANTH 506, ANTH 508, and/or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 720. Seminar in Old World Prehistory: _____. 2-4 Hours.

Studies of prehistoric cultures and their natural environments. Topic for semester to be announced. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in anthropology or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 725. Introduction to Linguistic Science. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the theory and techniques of linguistic science for majors and others intending to do advanced work in linguistics and linguistic anthropology. Emphasis on the sound system, grammatical structure, and semantic structure of languages. Lectures and laboratory sessions. (Same as LING 700.) Not open to students who have taken ANTH/LING 106 or ANTH/LING 107. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. LEC.

ANTH 730. Linguistics in Anthropology. 3 Hours.

The study of language as it concerns anthropology. Language systems in relation to culture, language taxonomy, semantics, and linguistic analysis as an ethnographic tool. (Same as LING 730.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. LEC.

ANTH 732. Discourse Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on linguistic frameworks for the analysis of discourse. Discourse is a linguistic system larger than the sentence (utterance), which connects and contextualizes speech and written text. This course focuses on current issues and theoretical frameworks in the analysis of discourse. Using oral and written data, students will examine how contexts influence and shape linguistic form. Topics covered include transcription systems, the structure and organization of different genres of language, and the performance of social actions, including stance-taking, framing, and the construction of identity. Students will also have an opportunity to perform discourse analytic research on the data of their choice. (Same as LING 732.) Prerequisite: ANTH 706 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

ANTH 733. Language, Gender and Sexuality. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the complex relationship between language use and the social construction of gender and sexuality i.e. how language is used in the construction of gender and sexuality, and how gender and sexuality are performed and enacted through language. Examines theoretical notions of language, gender, and sexuality from linguistics, linguistic anthropology, and sociology. Among the topics covered are cross-cultural definitions of masculinity and femininity, construction of gendered and sexual identities through language use, language and power, ideologies, style, and performativity. The course will consider research on language, gender, and sexuality from a variety of cultures within the last 50 years. (Same as LING 733.) Prerequisite: ANTH 706 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

ANTH 734. Language Evolution. 3 Hours.

Human language demonstrates a level of complexity not found in the communicative systems of other species. This course focuses on the development of human language, so as to obtain a better understanding of the origin and development of human language. Questions addressed include: what features of language are distinct from other communicative system, when did human language originate, in what stages did human language evolve, and how does language relate to properties of the human brain and mind? Data from a variety of disciplines will be considered, including primatology, human development, cognition, evolutionary biology, archaeology, and linguistics. (Same as LING 734.) Prerequisite: ANTH 106 or ANTH 107 or LING 106 or LING 107 or ANTH 736 or LING 708 or ANTH 725. LEC.

ANTH 736. Linguistic Analysis. 3 Hours.

Practice in applying the techniques of phonological, grammatical, and syntactic analysis learned in introductory linguistics to data taken from a variety of languages of different structural types. (Same as LING 708.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. Not open to students who have taken LING 308. LEC.

ANTH 740. Linguistic Data Processing. 3 Hours.

The tools and techniques necessary to analyze linguistic fieldwork data, including research design, recording and elicitation techniques, computational data processing and analysis, and field ethics. Techniques of research, field recording, and data analysis technology. Methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation, and analysis of language context. Practice of techniques via short studies of at least one language. (Same as LING 740.) Prerequisite: LING 700 or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 741. Field Methods in Linguistic Description. 3 Hours.

The elicitation and analysis of phonological, grammatical, and discourse data from a language consultant. In-depth research on one language. Techniques of research design, methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation, and analysis of language context. (Same as LING 741.) Prerequisite: LING 705 or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 743. Nutritional Anthropology: Methods and Theory. 3 Hours.

This is an intensive course aimed explicitly at graduate students whose research involves some aspect of human dietary behavior (foodways) and human nutrition. It examines the application of both biological and cultural theory to the study of human nutrition and cross-population variation in nutritional strategies and dietary practices. Topics include, among others, the evolution of human nutrition, environment and nutrition, nutritional epigenetics, effects of food scarcity, the cultural meanings of food, food as metaphor, and food and language. A second emphasis of the course is on field methods in nutritional anthropology, including dietary interviews, observation of dietary behaviors, nutritional and anthropometric assessment, nutrient analysis and ever-expanding field methods in nutritional ecology (nutritional endocrinology, physiology and genetics). Ethical issues in nutritional anthropology also are considered. Prerequisite: Graduate student status or permission from instructor. LEC.

ANTH 747. North American Indian Languages. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the nature and distribution of North American Indian languages. Prerequisite: ANTH 306 or ANTH 430 or ANTH 730. LEC.

ANTH 748. Language Contact. 3 Hours.

Theories and case studies of languages in contact. Areal and genetic linguistics, genesis of pidgins and creoles, multilingualism. Social, political, economic, and geographic factors in language change. (Same as LING 748.) Prerequisite: A course in linguistics. LEC.

ANTH 749. Linguistics and Ethnolinguistics of China and Central Asia: _____. 3 Hours.

Selected topics in linguistics and linguistic anthropology, focusing on dominant and/or minority languages of China, Central Asia, or a particular region of Central and Eastern Eurasia. Topics may include any subfield of linguistics, including language contact, typology, dialectology, and sociolinguistics. Topic for semester to be announced. (Same as LING 749.) Prerequisite: A course in linguistics. LEC.

ANTH 754. Biological Bases of Human Behavior. 3 Hours.

The role of behavioral genetics in normal behavior is examined in this seminar. There is special emphasis on the genetics of complex human behavior such as sensory perception, aggression, intelligence, proxemics, kinesics, and learning. Several abnormal conditions, such as schizophrenia, chromosomal aberrations, alcoholism, and brain dysfunction are discussed in terms of the genetic and environmental interactions. LEC.

ANTH 756. Genetics of Isolates. 3 Hours.

The evolutionary effects of finite population size and reproductive isolation are discussed in this seminar. Stochastic processes, genetic distances, approaches to population structure, and measures of inbreeding are considered. Prerequisite: ANTH 652 or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 759. Dental Anthropology. 3 Hours.

An intensive study of human teeth. Principles of eruption, growth, genetics, anatomy, pathologies, measurements, casting, and cultural changes in teeth will be presented. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 761. Introduction to Medical Anthropology. 3 Hours SC.

An introduction to the social and cultural practices that contribute to health and disease, including a survey of therapy systems in both Western and non-Western societies (e.g., Native American, African, Western allopathic medicine, etc.). This course should be of special interest to premedical students and majors in the allied health professions. Graduate version of ANTH 461 with more advanced requirements. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 762. Human Growth and Development. 3 Hours.

Consideration of comparative physical growth patterns throughout the human life cycle. Sex and population differences in skeletal, dental, and sexual maturation. Effect of genetic and environmental factors upon growth and maturation. Prerequisite: An introductory course in biological anthropology or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 764. Selected Topics in Human Paleontology: _____. 3 Hours.

Intensive, high-level survey and critique of the application of modern biological theory of evolution and taxonomy to the problems of primate and human evolution. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 766. Topics in Biological Anthropology: _____. 3 Hours.

Topic for semester to be announced. Students may repeat the course for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 769. Seminar in Primate Studies. 3 Hours.

Survey of field and laboratory investigations of the comparative anatomy and behavior of nonhuman primates. LEC.

ANTH 770. Research Methods in Physical Anthropology. 3 Hours.

A practical course in the use of special laboratory techniques of biological anthropological research and methods of data presentation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

ANTH 775. Seminar in Cultural Anthropology: _____. 3-9 Hours.

Intensive consideration of special problems in cultural anthropology. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC.

ANTH 778. Seminar in Applied Cultural Anthropology. 3 Hours S.

Selected problems in applying anthropological theory, methods, and findings in programs of directed change. FLD.

ANTH 780. Social Organization. 3 Hours.

Comparative analysis of the structure, development, and function of human social groups. Emphasis on kinship, legal, economic, and political institutions. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 781. Symbolic Anthropology. 3 Hours.

An examination of anthropological approaches to religion, world view, and other symbol systems in simple and complex societies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 783. Doing Ethnography. 3 Hours.

Ethnography is both process and product. The product, a representation of a culture (or selected aspects of a culture), is based on fieldwork, the common term for the ethnographic process. This course explores how ethnographers prepare for the field, do their fieldwork, then report it. LEC.

ANTH 785. Topics in Ethnology: _____. 3 Hours.

Topic for semester to be announced. Usually the course will focus on selected problems in the social and cultural life of a people in a particular geographic region of the world. Coverage will include both the classical ethnological literature as well as special issues of current concern. Students may repeat the course for different topics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 786. Ethnographic Documentary Production. 3 Hours.

This course combines classroom and fieldwork in applications of theories, ethics, and methods of visual representation. Students carry out team-based ethnographic fieldwork projects through which they learn about pre-production, video production, and nonlinear post-production of ethnographic video documentaries. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ANTH 564 or permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 788. Symbol Systems: _____. 3 Hours.

Anthropological approaches to the study of worldview, religion, folklore, mythology, art, and other expressive behavior. Topic for the semester to be announced. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 789. Anthropology of Gender: Advanced Seminar in the Four Fields. 3 Hours.

This seminar is intended primarily for graduate students in anthropology or other disciplines that share an interest in any of the subdisciplines of anthropology (archaeology, linguistic anthropology, biological anthropology, and sociocultural anthropology) and/or anthropological theories and methods. Undergraduates pursuing Honors or other major research projects are also encouraged to participate. Students will receive training in the contemporary theories, research, and pedagogies informing the anthropology of gender. Class participants will explore how these materials intersect with their current thesis or research projects and develop syllabi specific to their subdiscipline. (Same as WGSS 789.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 794. Material Culture. 3 Hours.

The historical and cross-cultural study of artifacts as embodiments of technological, social, organizational, and ideological aspects of culture. LEC.

ANTH 799. Anthropology Museum Apprenticeship. 1-6 Hours.

Provides directed, practical experience in research, collection care and management, public education, and exhibits, with emphasis to suit the particular requirements of each student. Limit of six hours of credit for the M.A. degree. (Same as AMS 799, BIOL 799, GEOL 723, HIST 799, and MUSE 799.) FLD.

ANTH 810. Seminar in Ethnolinguistics: _____. 2-3 Hours.

An advanced study of the relations between language and culture. Subject will vary each semester; students may repeat the course more than once. (Same as LING 810.) LEC.

ANTH 811. Quantitative Archaeology. 3 Hours.

Instruction in statistical methods for analyzing quantitative data in archaeological research. Topics will include techniques for handling nominal, ordinal, and radio-scale variables, the collection and presentation of quantitative information, and the use of computers. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and college-level algebra and/or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 849. Seminar in Archaeology: _____. 2-4 Hours.

Subject matter of seminar to be announced for semester. LEC.

ANTH 851. Data Analysis in Archaeology: _____. 1-6 Hours.

A two-semester course designed to provide graduate students with basic principles in the analysis of archaeological data. Course content will include an introduction to archaeological systematics, analytical procedures, application of multivariate statistics, and computer applications. Topic for semester to be announced. FLD.

ANTH 853. Theory and Current Problems in Archaeology. 3 Hours.

Consideration of scientific methodology, basic assumptions of anthropological archaeology, relationship of archaeology and anthropology, and current theoretical and methodological trends in archaeology. LEC.

ANTH 876. Advanced Medical Anthropology: _____. 3-6 Hours.

This course provides advanced training in selected aspects of medical anthropology; the topic for a particular semester will reflect the current interests of the instructor. It is expected that the course content will alternate between theoretical and applied emphases. May be repeated for a total of six hours credit. Prerequisite: ANTH 461 or consent of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 880. Advanced Feminist Anthropology: _____. 3-6 Hours.

Intensive consideration of special problems in feminist anthropology. Topic for the semester to be announced. May be repeated for a total of six hours credit. (Same as WGSS 880.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

ANTH 889. Summer Archaeological Field Work. 1-8 Hours.

Under the direction of a professional archaeologist, undergraduate and graduate students are taught proper procedures for the excavation and laboratory analysis of data from a prehistoric or historic archaeological site. Data gathered may be used for additional graduate research. Enrollment by application; limited to twenty students. A fee for subsistence costs will be charged. FLD.

ANTH 890. Training in Archaeological Field Work. 1-6 Hours.

Graduate students are taught techniques of archaeological field work, including survey and excavation, as well as laboratory procedures, including artifact classification and curation. FLD.

ANTH 896. Graduate Research. 1-9 Hours.

Individual investigation of special problems in anthropology. Limit of six hours credit for the M.A. degree. RSH.

ANTH 897. Internship Research. 4-6 Hours.

Experiential learning in the application of anthropology through placement in business, government, community, research, or social service organization or agency. Students design and implement an anthropological project under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Anthropology. RSH.

ANTH 898. Internship Analysis. 1-6 Hours.

Experiential learning in the application of anthropology through placement in business, government, community, research, or social service organization or agency. This course is a sequel to ANTH 897. Students finish up any remaining research and deliver their findings to the client. They also prepare a written report and a verbal presentation for the Department of Anthropology. Prerequisite: ANTH 897 and Graduate standing in Anthropology. RSH.

ANTH 899. Master's Thesis. 1-12 Hours.

Limit of six hours credit for the M.A. degree. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.

ANTH 996. Graduate Research. 1-9 Hours.

Individual investigation of special problems in anthropology. RSH.

ANTH 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.

Applied Behavioral Science Courses

ABSC 100. Introduction to Applied Behavioral Science. 3 Hours SI GE11/GE3S / S.

An introduction to the principles of behavioral science and their application to problems facing contemporary societies (e.g., autism, public health, education, juvenile delinquency, substance abuse). Students will learn how behavioral scientists analyze human behavior and how these analyses are used to inform interventions. Students will also learn about careers in the behavioral sciences and how to pursue them. Course may be offered in lecture or online format. LEC.

ABSC 101. Introduction to Applied Behavioral Science, Honors. 3 Hours SI / S.

This course introduces students to the principles of scientific inquiry in applied behavioral science: objectivity, definitions, observation, reliability, validity, correlation and its limitations, causation, experimental design and analysis, and the interpretation of data. These principles are presented in the context of solving individual and societal problems across the lifespan, for example, in early childhood education, public health, developmental disabilities (e.g., autism), delinquency, independent living for people with disabilities, educational systems, and gerontology. Open only to students in the University Honors Program. LEC.

ABSC 150. Community Leadership. 3 Hours SF AE51 / S.

An introduction to analysis, intervention, evaluation, and leadership in contemporary problems facing local communities. Readings, lectures, and service-learning activities enable students to understand community problems and how citizens and professionals can address them. (Formerly HDFL 150.) LEC.

ABSC 151. Community Leadership, Honors. 3 Hours SF AE51 / S.

An introduction to analysis, intervention, evaluation, and leadership in contemporary problems facing local communities. Readings, lectures, and service-learning activities enable students to understand community problems and how citizens and professionals can address them. Open only to students in the University Honors Program. (Formerly HDFL 151.) LEC.

ABSC 160. Introduction to Child Behavior and Development. 3 Hours SI GE3S / S.

An introduction to child behavior and development with an emphasis on the normal developmental range of growth, intelligence, cognition, emotion, language, and social skills from birth to adolescence. (Formerly HDFL 160.) LEC.

ABSC 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Applied Behavioral Science. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

ABSC 268. Introduction to Marriage and Family Relations. 3 Hours S.

This course focuses on the family unit and the factors that affect its development. Topics include dating and cohabitation; family and lifestyle diversity; parental roles and child development; divorce and stepfamilies. The course emphasizes research related to these issues. (Formerly HDFL 288.) LEC.

ABSC 279. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-5 Hours S.

A course designed to enhance international experience in topic areas related to applied behavioral science at the freshman/sophomore level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Department permission. LEC.

ABSC 304. The Principles and Procedures of Behavior Modification and Therapy. 3 Hours GE3S / S.

An advanced examination of the principles of applied behavior analysis as used to address problems in developmental disabilities, childhood autism, language development, early childhood education, with adolescent and family life, and in normal everyday adult behavior. Issues in measurement, design, and evaluation of the effects of applied behavior analysis procedures and ethical implications of the use of these procedures are examined. Procedures used to teach and maintain appropriate behaviors, eliminate inappropriate behaviors, and develop comprehensive behavioral intervention programs are described. Prerequisite: ABSC 100 or ABSC 101 with a grade of C or better. LEC.

ABSC 308. Research Methods and Application. 4 Hours GE11 / S.

Examines research methods used to identify, describe, understand, and intervene on socially important problems occurring across the life span (e.g., early childhood, adolescence, elders) and in varied settings (homes, classrooms, group-care facilities, and communities). Discusses research methods and concepts (e.g., prediction, experimental control, reliability, validity) within scientific, psychological, and behavior- analytic frameworks. Presents strategies and tactics regarding descriptive and experimental methods, direct and indirect measurement, graphical and statistical analysis, and single-subject and group experimental designs. Examines ethics and social responsibility in research. Provides opportunities to read primary and secondary sources, develop research questions, write and present research proposals, and assist in the conduct of research projects. Prerequisite: ABSC 100 or ABSC 101 and ABSC 304 with a grade of C or better in each course. LEC.

ABSC 310. Building Healthy Communities. 3 Hours SF AE51 / S.

This course teaches knowledge and skills for addressing issues in community health and development (e.g., substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, child and youth development, prevention of violence). Students learn core competencies such as analyzing community problems and goals, strategic planning, intervention, and evaluation. In a service-learning component, students apply these skills to issues that matter to them and to the communities they serve. (Formerly HDFL 310.) LEC.

ABSC 311. Building Healthy Communities, Honors. 3 Hours SF AE51 / S.

This course teaches knowledge and skills for addressing issues in community health and development (e.g., substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, child and youth development, prevention of violence). Students learn core competencies such as analyzing community problems and goals, strategic planning, intervention, and evaluation. In a service-learning component, students apply these skills to issues that matter to them and to the communities they serve. (Formerly HDFL 311.) Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program. LEC.

ABSC 342. Adult Development and Aging. 3 Hours S.

An overview of environmental, cultural, and biological influences of adult development and aging. Course material is organized in terms of topics, rather than presenting a chronological account. (Formerly HDFL 342.) Prerequisite: ABSC 100 or ABSC 101, ABSC 150 or ABSC 151, or ABSC 160. LEC.

ABSC 350. The Behavioral Treatment of Children with Autism. 3 Hours S.

Students learn about methods of teaching children with autism and about evaluating those methods. Topics include: basic methods of teaching as applied to imitation, productive and receptive language, self-help skills, and engagement in community activities, as well as observation and measurement of behavior in community settings and evaluating consumer satisfaction. The course consists of classroom lectures, discussions, demonstrations, examinations, and completion of laboratory and observation assignments. Enrollment priority is given to majors who intend to do practicum work with children with autism. (Formerly HDFL 350.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 304 or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 356. Foundations of Early Childhood Education. 3 Hours S.

This course introduces students to the field of early childhood education. Contemporary perspectives and professional practices are examined through an analysis of historical and philosophical ideologies. (Formerly HDFL 356.) Prerequisite: ABSC/ HDFL 160 or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 360. Drugs, Addiction, and Behavior. 3 Hours S.

This course offers an overview of the basic and applied research in behavioral pharmacology and addictions, as well as interventions. Among the topics it covers are a history of drugs, addiction, and behavior; basic principles of drug action (e.g., pharmacodynamics); behavioral pharmacology testing paradigms (e.g., self-administration); drug action and effects (e.g., alcohol, nicotine, designer drugs, anti-depressants); behavioral deficits associated with addictions (e.g., memory); addiction treatment and recovery (e.g., maturing out, contingency management); and drugs and society. Prerequisite: ABSC 100. PSYC 104 is also recommended. LEC.

ABSC 405. Children and Media. 3 Hours H.

The applied study of child development theories and research methods on the influences and effects of television and related visual media on childhood in the contexts of families, schools, and society. (Same as PSYC 405 and THR 405) (Formerly HDFL 405.) LEC.

ABSC 410. Behavioral Approaches in Working with Adolescents. 3 Hours S.

Addresses some of the basic behavioral techniques used with juveniles who have problems in school, at home, or in the community: readings and role-playing sessions covering assessment of problems, relationship development, observing and defining behavior, teaching and contracting techniques, and counseling. Prerequisite: ABSC 304 highly recommended. LEC.

ABSC 425. Teaching Apprenticeship in Applied Behavioral Science. 3 Hours S.

Students read new materials, become more fluent with ABSC 100 content, and acquire tutoring skills. Course may not be repeated. Prerequisite: ABSC 100 and consent of the instructor and department chair. LEC.

ABSC 433. Analysis of Cultural, Ethnic, and Gender Roles in Childhood and Adolescence. 3 Hours S.

This course examines aspects of different cultures and ethnic groups, and the definitions of gender role behavior found in them. The research literature in these areas is reviewed and the implications for early childhood education settings are studied. The course examines this literature in order to provide an increased understanding of effective approaches to educational practices directly related to the structure of society in the United States. (Formerly HDFL 433.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 437. Independent Living and People with Disabilities. 3 Hours S.

A multi-disciplinary seminar exploring theory, method, research, and practice in independent living. The course reviews personal and environmental factors as they relate to everyday problems affecting people with varying disabilities. It also contains service-learning activities in which students apply skills and knowledge gained in the classroom. (Formerly HDFL 437.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in social sciences or consent of the instructor. LEC.

ABSC 441. Ethical, Legal and Professional Issues in Applied Behavioral Science. 3 Hours S.

The course covers ethical and legal issues in the responsible conduct of basic, applied, intervention and prevention research (e.g., informed consent and assent with typical and atypical populations); inclusion of underrepresented groups, participatory action research; bias, fraud, and plagiarism, conflict of interest; reporting misconduct; authorship conflict). It also covers professional issues in behavioral consultation and training, review of the Behavior Analysis Certification Board task list on basic behavior-analytic skills, client-centered responsibilities, and foundational knowledge. This course satisfies the Behavior Analysis Certification Board requirement for 15 classroom contact hours of coursework related to Ethical Considerations in Behavior Analysis needed to take the BACB examination. This course is taught at the 400 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800-level. Prerequisite ABSC 308. LEC.

ABSC 444. Curriculum Development for Young Children. 3 Hours S.

A survey of educational materials and activities appropriate for young children. Students explore several components of effective curriculum development (e.g., objectives, methods of activity presentation, teaching strategies) and learn to integrate them to construct curricula for a range of content and skill areas. By focusing on functional components of a curriculum, students learn to construct, critically evaluate, and modify curricula for typically and atypically developing children. Prerequisite: ABSC 304 or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 455. Health, Safety, and Nutrition in Early Childhood Development. 3 Hours S.

This course addresses children's health, safety, and nutritional needs and contemporary approaches to achieving wellness. Students develop analytical skills through reading, discussion, and application of theoretical and empirical concepts. Current research results are emphasized and applied to course problem sets and projects. (Formerly HDFL 455.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or equivalent knowledge. LEC.

ABSC 469. Special Topics in: _____. 1-3 Hours S.

A course designed for the study of special topics in applied behavioral science. Course content addresses major topics and specialized issues in the field. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 470. Organizational Behavior Management. 3 Hours S.

This course offers detailed discussion of the organizational behavior management (OBM) literature including performance management, behavioral systems analysis, and behavior-based safety. This course also addresses empirically supported staff training procedures and research in implementation science. Students assist with OBM-relevant research and develop skills in both translational and applied OBM research. Prerequisite: ABSC 100. LEC.

ABSC 479. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-5 Hours S.

A course designed to enhance international experience in topic areas related to topics in applied behavioral science at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Department permission. LEC.

ABSC 486. Issues in Parenting. 3 Hours S.

Theoretical approaches to the study of parenting and parent-child relationships, techniques for analyzing common parenting problems, designing appropriate interventions, fostering effective communication skills, understanding issues of diversity, and promoting parent education programs. Professional collaboration and support of families and children are emphasized throughout. Students develop analytical skills through reading, discussion, and application of theoretical and empirical concepts. (Formerly HDFL 486.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or equivalent knowledge of child development or child psychology. LEC.

ABSC 489. Directed Readings in: _____. 1-3 Hours S.

A course designed for directed readings in applied behavioral science. Readings address major topics and specialized issues in the field. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 484.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. IND.

ABSC 499. Directed Research in: _____. 1-3 Hours AE61 / S.

Basic and applied research experience. The course provides training in research methods, measures, and designs, and the conduct of research, in the behavioral sciences. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 509. Contemporary Behavioral Science: Historical, Conceptual, and Comparative Foundations. 3 Hours AE61 / S.

This course provides a survey of modern behavioral science and its applications. It reviews the field's history; integrates its sub-disciplines; situates it within the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities; and compares and contrasts it with other perspectives. It covers recent advances in research, their implications for understanding human behavior, and their application to solving societal problems. And, it addresses the ethical implications of applied behavioral science. Prerequisite: ABSC 100 or ABSC 101 and ABSC 304 with a grade of C or better in each course. LEC.

ABSC 535. Developmental Psychopathology. 3 Hours S.

A review of contemporary psychological and developmental disorders of children and youth. Course presents current models of psychopathology, classification systems, assessment methods, and treatment approaches designed for the individual, the family, and the community. Specific attention is given to age, gender, and cultural differences and similarities. Topics include: anxiety disorders, oppositional behavior disorders, physical/sexual abuse, learning disabilities, depression, chronic physical illness, and autism. (Same as PSYC 535.) (Formerly HDFL 535.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or PSYC 333, or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 542. Applied Gerontology. 3 Hours S.

This course will provide an overview of social and behavioral problems faced by older adults, people who provide for elders, and human service programs for elders. It also surveys empirically-derived intervention strategies designed to maintain abilities and reduce or eliminate problem behaviors experienced by elders or their caregivers. (Formerly HDFL 542.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 304 and ABSC/HDFL 308, or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 555. Issues in Administering Early Childhood Services. 2 Hours S.

This course provides an overview of professional, social, legal, and economic issues associated with the administration of early childhood services and programs. Emphasis is placed on theoretical principles, empirical research, and professional responsibilities inherent in the provision of quality service, including needs assessment, organizational skills, delivery systems, human resource management, communication skills, grant writing, legal and ethical considerations, and advocacy. (Formerly HDFL 555.) Prerequisite: Senior standing in the early childhood specialty area or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 560. The Juvenile Justice System: A Behavioral and Legal Perspective. 3 Hours S.

An overview of the juvenile justice system, including the history, development, and current controversy over children's rights in the legal system examined in light of relevant principles of behavioral science and behavioral systems of rehabilitation. Topics include delinquency, miscreancy, status offenses, dependent-neglected children, child abuse, and juvenile court procedures and personnel (e.g., probation officers), and rehabilitative programs. (Formerly HDFL 560.) Prerequisite: ABSC 100. LEC.

ABSC 562. Behavioral Community Psychology. 3 Hours S.

A seminar that provides an overview of the history and origin of behavioral community psychology. The course examines the development and future of behavioral community psychology as an integration of two sub-disciplines, applied behavior analysis and community psychology. Provides an integrated review of empirically-based behavioral interventions applied in community-based settings. Prerequisite: ABSC 100, or ABSC 150, or ABSC 310,or instructor permission. Course is offered at the 500 and 800 levels with additional assignments at the 800-level. LEC.

ABSC 565. Applied Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours S.

An advanced study of the application of theories and concepts of developmental and behavioral psychology to a range of specific issues and problems of childhood and adolescence. This course relies heavily on the empirical research literature. Topics include contemporary social issues and child development, research in applied settings, assessment, intervention, and prevention, as well as program evaluation. (Same as PSYC 565.) (Formerly HDFL 565.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or PSYC 333, and ABSC/HDFL/ PSYC 535. LEC.

ABSC 599. Honors and Thesis in Applied Behavioral Science. 1-5 Hours AE61 / S.

A two-semester course combining small group discussions of selected, advanced topics in applied behavioral science with honors thesis supervision on a project of the student's own design. Students normally enroll for one or two hours in fall semester and three to five hours in spring semester. (Formerly HDFL 496.) Prerequisite: ABSC 304, ABSC/HDFL 308, and instructor permission. IND.

ABSC 606. Special Projects in the Community. 1-10 Hours S.

Structured opportunities to develop and apply knowledge and skills (e.g., analyzing problems, strategic planning, intervention, evaluation) in a project that addresses a community problem or goal. (Formerly HDFL 606.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. IND.

ABSC 620. Drug Abuse: From Basic Research to Public Policy. 3 Hours S.

This course reviews basic and applied research in the social, behavioral, and neural sciences on how environmental variables, brain mechanisms, individual history, and cultural constraints interact and maintain drug abuse. Topics include the mechanisms of drug action; the safety, toxicity, stimulus properties, and functional impairments related to commonly abused drugs; common models of treatment and prevention; and historical and current legislative and judicial approach to drug abuse. (Formerly HDFL 620.) Prerequisite: A course in biology and a course in either applied behavioral science or psychology. LEC.

ABSC 626. Psychology of Adolescence. 3 Hours S.

Impact of factors of social environment and physical growth upon psychological development from puberty to young adulthood. (Same as PSYC 626.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104, PSYC 333, or HDFL/ABSC 160. LEC.

ABSC 632. Advanced Child Behavior and Development. 3 Hours S.

An advanced course in child development that includes a survey of the field's principles and theoretical approaches, and current issues in research and practice. Topics will include: prenatal development, cognition and language, social-emotional development, socialization influences in childhood, developmental psychopathology, and social policies. (Formerly HDFL 632.) (Same as PSYC 632.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160, PSYC 333, or instructor permission, and senior or graduate status. LEC.

ABSC 671. Applied Behavior Analysis. 3 Hours S.

This advanced course extends knowledge and skills in analyzing behavioral problems, designing interventions, and planning applied research projects. Topics include the selection of problems and target populations, analysis of problems/goals, designing measurement systems, developing interventions, and disseminating products from applied behavioral research. (Formerly HDFL 671) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 304 or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 672. Applied Behavior Analysis, Honors. 3 Hours S.

This advanced course extends knowledge and skills in analyzing behavioral problems, designing interventions, and planning applied research projects. Topics include the selection of problems and target populations, analysis of problems/goals, designing measurement systems, developing interventions, and disseminating products from applied behavioral research. Students design an intervention research project. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program; ABSC/HDFL 304 or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 675. Practicum in Infant-Toddler Care and Early Intervention I. 3-5 Hours AE61 / S.

Experience in a classroom-based early intervention and child-care program serving children younger than 3 years. Students gain practical experience with care-giving and teaching practices appropriate for typically and atypically developing children. Students learn to develop and implement individualized curricula based on assessments of children's skills. (Formerly HDFL 558.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 444 (or concurrent enrollment) and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 676. Practicum in Infant-Toddler Care and Early Intervention II. 3-5 Hours AE61 / S.

An advanced practicum providing experience in classroom-based early-intervention and child-care program serving children younger than 3 years. Students gain practical experience with care-giving and teaching practices appropriate for typically and atypically developing children. Students learn to develop and implement individualized curricula based on assessments of children's skills. (Formerly HDFL 559.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 444, HDFL 558 or ABSC 675, and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 677. Practicum in Preschool Education and Intervention I. 3-5 Hours AE61 / S.

A one-semester practicum providing opportunities for students to assume responsibility for the education and guidance of young children in an early childhood program. Regularly scheduled individual and staff conferences enable students to evaluate personal growth and progress as teachers of young children. (Formerly HDFL 492.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 444 (or concurrent enrollment) and instructor permission. Must also meet special state requirements for child care employees and volunteers. FLD.

ABSC 678. Practicum in Preschool Education and Intervention II. 3-5 Hours AE61 / S.

A one-semester advanced practicum providing opportunities for students to assume responsibility for the education and guidance of young children in an early childhood program. Regularly scheduled individual and staff conferences enable students to evaluate personal growth and progress as teachers of young children. (Formerly HDFL 493.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 444, HDFL 492 or ABSC 677, and instructor permission. Must also meet special state requirements for child care employees and volunteers. FLD.

ABSC 679. Practicum in Behavior Analysis Research in Early Childhood Education. 1-6 Hours AE61 / S.

A two-semester practicum providing opportunities for supervised training in one of several ongoing research projects in the field of behavior analysis, either basic or applied. Students assist in conducting research and participate in individual and group meetings to discuss and evaluate research and related methodological issues. (Formerly HDFL 688.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 308 and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 680. Practicum in Advanced Laboratory in the Development of Behavioral Treatments for Children with Autsm. 1-6 Hours AE61 / S.

Students participate in an intensive behavioral treatment program teaching language, social skills, self-help skills, and academic skills to young children with autism. Students learn: to develop and implement treatment programs; design and use of a system of data collection and analysis; and apply the principles and philosophy of community and school mainstreaming. (Formerly HDFL 550.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 350 and instructor permission. LAB.

ABSC 682. Organizational Behavior Management Practicum. 1-5 Hours AE61 / S.

This practicum course is designed to provide training and support practice in addressing socially significant problems and goals of community-based organizations using behavior analysis to guide assessment and intervention. Additionally, this course promotes community-university partnerships to support change and improvement in organizations through service learning. All practicum students are required to have previously completed ABSC 100 and selected applied behavioral science as a major or minor. FLD.

ABSC 685. Practicum in Community-based Residential or Day Treatment Programs for Disabled Adults. 3-6 Hours AE61 / S.

A one or two-semester practicum in which students are provided with the opportunity to work directly with developmentally disabled adults in either community-based residential or day treatment programs. Students are required to read relevant literature, carry out treatment programs, and participate in weekly meetings to discuss treatment goals and progress. (Formerly HDFL 696.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 304, ABSC/HDFL 410, and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 687. Practicum in Behavioral Gerontology. 1-6 Hours AE61 / S.

A one or two-semester practicum providing opportunities for supervised training in behavioral gerontology. Students: (a) read literature in the area of their specific practicum setting such as adult day care, senior centers, nursing homes; (b) assist in collecting information relevant to evaluating the program effectiveness of their efforts on behalf of the elderly; and (c) participate in discussions and planning meetings relevant to maintenance and improvement of operation of the practicum. (Formerly HDFL 644.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 342 or ABSC/HDFL 542 and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 690. Practicum in Community Health and Development. 1-6 Hours AE61 / U.

A two-semester practicum in which students engage in structured opportunities to practice core competencies related to the work of promoting community health and development (e.g., strategic planning, intervention, evaluation). In weekly group meetings, students prepare for their individual working field settings (e.g., health and human service agencies, research and advocacy organizations, community organizations). (Formerly HDFL 690). Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 150, ABSC/HDFL 310, and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 691. Practicum in Community Health and Development, Honors. 1-6 Hours AE61 / U.

A two-semester practicum in which students engage in structured opportunities to practice core competencies related to the work of promoting community health and development (e.g., strategic planning, intervention, evaluation). In weekly group meetings, students prepare for their individual working field settings (e.g., health and human service agencies, research and advocacy organizations, community organizations). (Formerly HDFL 692). Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program; ABSC/HDFL 151, ABSC/HDFL 311 and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 692. Practicum in Basic Research. 3 Hours AE61 / S.

Practical supervised training in the laboratory study of human and/or animal behavior. Students assist in conducting basic research, read and discuss research articles, attend lab meetings, and acquire data analysis and presentation skills. Prerequisite: ABSC 308 (or concurrent enrollment) and permission of the instructor. RSH.

ABSC 693. Practicum in Historical and Conceptual Foundations. 3-6 Hours AE61 / S.

Practical supervised training in the historical and conceptual foundations of applied behavioral science (e.g., behavior analysis). Students research and read primary source literatures and write papers that advances our understanding of the field's foundations (e.g., empirical, theoretical). Prerequisite: ABSC 100/101, ABSC 304, ABSC 308, and ABSC 509 (or concurrent enrollment), and permission of instructor. IND.

ABSC 694. Practicum in Juvenile Problems. 3-6 Hours AE61 / S.

A one-semester practicum providing opportunities for students to aid professionals in the development and implementation of behavioral treatment plans with adolescents. Regularly scheduled individual and group meetings enable the evaluation of the practicum students' progress while working in the rehabilitative process for juveniles who have problems that can bring them into contact with the juvenile justice system. (Formerly HDFL 694.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 410, ABSC/HDFL 560, and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 695. Special Practicum in: _____. 3-6 Hours S.

A one or two-semester practicum providing opportunities for supervised, hands-on training outside the existing specialty areas or their options. This practicum must be arranged with the prior approval of a faculty advisor and the department's Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. Students should see an advisor about this practicum early in their junior year. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 696. Special Practicum in, Honors: _____. 3-6 Hours S.

A one or two-semester practicum providing opportunities for supervised, hands-on training outside the existing specialty areas or their options. This practicum must be arranged with the prior approval of a faculty advisor and the department's Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. Students should see an advisor about this practicum early in their junior year. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 698. Special Research Practicum in: _____. 3-6 Hours S.

A one or two-semester research practicum providing opportunities for supervised, hands-on research training outside the existing specialty areas or their options. This practicum must be arranged with the prior approval of a faculty advisor and the department's Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. Students should see an advisor about this practicum early in their junior year. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 699. Special Research Practicum in, Honors: _____. 3-6 Hours S.

A one or two-semester research practicum providing opportunities for supervised, hands-on research training outside of the existing specialty areas or their options. This practicum must be arranged with the prior approval of a faculty advisor and the department's Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. Students should see an advisor early in their junior year about the practicum and its prerequisites and requirements. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 701. Parenting in Modern Society. 3 Hours.

The theoretical study of parenting and parent-child relationships, techniques for analyzing common parenting problems, designing appropriate interventions, fostering effective communication skills, understanding issues of diversity, and promoting parent education programs are some of the issues addressed in this course. Professional collaboration and support of families and children are emphasized throughout. Students develop analytical skills through reading, discussion, and application of theoretical and empirical research. (Formerly HDFL 701.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or equivalent knowledge of child development or child psychology. LEC.

ABSC 702. Curriculum Development for Young Children. 3 Hours.

A survey of educational materials and activities that are appropriate for young children (birth to age 8). Students explore several components of effective curriculum (e.g., objectives, effective methods of activity presentation, teaching strategies) and learn to combine them to construct curriculums for a range of content and skill areas. By focusing on the functional components of curriculums, students learn to construct, critically evaluate, and modify them for both typically developing children and children with special needs. A BACB® pre-approved course. (Formerly HDFL 702.) LEC.

ABSC 703. Leadership in Early Education Programs: Theory and Research. 3 Hours.

Effective leadership skills and professional roles associated with the administration of early childhood services and programs are examined in this course. Theoretical principles, empirical research, and professional responsibilities inherent in the provision of quality service, including needs assessment, organizational skills, delivery systems, human resource management, communication skills, grant writing, legal and ethical considerations, conflict resolution, and advocacy are explored through readings, discussion, and assigned projects. Not open to students who have completed ABSC 555. (Formerly HDFL 677). Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or equivalent knowledge of child development or child psychology. LEC.

ABSC 704. Research Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course provides students in the Clinical Child Psychology Program with the opportunity to enhance and consolidate their research activities by fulfilling one of the elective cluster course requirements. This practicum involves a contract with a research advisor and the program director. The contract includes definable products and dates for completion to prepare research for submission for publication, develop a grant proposal, or conduct additional research project independent of other requirements in the program. The course is not to be taken as an overload, but is to be part of a full-time course schedule. May be repeated. (Same as PSYC 704.) (Formerly HDFL 704.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 705. Pediatric Psychology. 3 Hours.

Discussion of behavior problems commonly encountered in the pediatric population, including reviews of data-based methodologies for remediation. Topics include general child rearing skills, bedtime problems, enuresis, encopresis, toilet training, self-injurious behavior, temper tantrums, behavior in community settings, child abuse, psychotropic drugs for children, adolescent behavior problems and selection of children's play materials. (Formerly HDFL 705.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160, ABSC/HDFL 632, or PSYC 602. LEC.

ABSC 706. Special Topics in Clinical Child Psychology: _____. 3 Hours.

A course offering detailed discussion of the literature and research methods of a special topic within clinical child and pediatric psychology. Topic and instructor may change by semester and will be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated. (Same as PSYC 706.) (Formerly HDFL 706.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 709. Biology and Behavior. 3 Hours.

A course on the role of physiology and anatomy in behavior, with an emphasis on their participation in the basic behavioral processes and in typical and atypical behavioral development. The course also addresses issues in measurement and current research. (Formerly HDFL 709). Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 796; ABSC/HDFL 798 recommended. LEC.

ABSC 710. Community Health and Development. 3 Hours.

This course extends knowledge and skills for addressing issues in community health and development (e.g., substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, child and youth development, prevention of violence). Students learn core competencies such as analyzing community problems and goals, strategic planning, intervention, and evaluation, and then apply these skills to issues that matter to them and to the communities they serve. (Formerly HDFL 710.) (Same as ISP 871.) LEC.

ABSC 716. Experimental Problems in Community Settings. 1-5 Hours.

Research in the experimental design and analysis of community settings. No more than 10 hours total. (Formerly HDFL 716.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 719. Experimental Field Work in Community Settings. 1-5 Hours.

Instruction in the methods and techniques of the experimental design and analysis of community settings through supervised participation in established research programs. Emphasizes the techniques of gathering original experimental data. No more than 10 hours total. (Formerly HDFL 719.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 721. Biological Bases of Mental Retardation. 4 Hours.

This course deals with the biological substrates of mental retardation. Retardation is classified as a medical syndrome, rather than by behavioral patterns, but behavioral peculiarities are addressed where relevant. Attention is directed to both genetic causes such as the chromosomal anomalies (e.g., Mongolism) and molecular and metabolic errors (e.g., phenylketonuria), as well as to the environmentally produced retardation by nutritional deficiency, prenatal rubella, and brain trauma. (Formerly HDFL 721.) Prerequisite: One course in biology or equivalent. LEC.

ABSC 723. Adolescent Adjustment. 3 Hours.

An overview of adolescence with primary emphasis on various adjustment difficulties and respective therapeutic approaches. Content to provide perspectives on relevant practice, research, theory, and contemporary social forces. (Formerly HDFL 723.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 725. Research Methods and Application. 3 Hours.

Surveys research methods used to identify, describe, understand, and intervene on socially important problems occurring across the life span (e.g., early childhood, adolescence, elders) and in varied settings (homes, classrooms, group-care facilities, and communities). Discusses research methods and concepts (e.g., prediction, control, reliability, validity) within scientific, psychological, and behavior-analytic frameworks. Presents strategies and tactics regarding descriptive and experimental methods, direct and indirect measurement, graphic and statistical analysis, and single-subject and group experimental designs. Examines ethics and social responsibility in research. Provides opportunities to read secondary and primary sources, develop research questions, write and present research proposals. (Formerly HDFL 725.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 730. Developmental Neurobiology. 3 Hours.

This course consists of lectures and discussion sessions on topics that describe the structural and functional maturation of the nervous system. The areas covered deal with the morphological, physiological, and biochemical changes in the developing central nervous system of vertebrates (including human infants), and with the interaction of the external environment with some of these maturational processes. Prerequisite: Introductory human development, psychology, or biology course. LEC.

ABSC 735. Within Subjects Research Methodology and Direct Observation. 3 Hours.

A graduate level introduction to the logic of experimentation, direct observation strategies, and research conducted using individual (e.g., single subject) and time series experimental designs. An ABA-accredited and BACB® pre-approved course. (Formerly HDFL 735.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in applied behavioral science or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 741. Readings in Gerontology. 3-5 Hours.

Supervised readings in topical areas of gerontology. A program of study, conferences, and reports are developed by the instructor and student. (Formerly HDFL 741.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 742. Research in Gerontology. 1-10 Hours.

Original investigations of some unsolved problems relating to adult development and aging. (Formerly HDFL 742.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 746. Introduction to Behavioral Science. 3 Hours.

This introductory course promotes knowledge and skill in analyzing behavioral problems across a range of societal issues. Special consideration is given to designing interventions, implementing, managing, and supervising applied projects. Topics include the identification and selection of problems and target populations, analysis of problems and goals, designing measurement systems, developing interventions, and disseminating products from applied behavioral research. SEM.

ABSC 756. Philosophical Bases of Early Childhood Education. 3 Hours.

Historical influences and current theoretical models of early childhood education are addressed through a survey and analysis of the literature. Not open to students who have completed ABSC 356. (Formerly HDFL 756.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or equivalent knowledge of child development or child psychology. LEC.

ABSC 765. Evaluating and Disseminating Scientific Material I. 1-3 Hours.

Intensive training in the evaluation and production of scientific critiques and reviews of current issues in the analysis of behavior, as disseminated through the media. May be repeated. (Formerly HDFL 765.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 787. Gerontology Proseminar. 3 Hours.

A proseminar coordinated by the Gerontology Center. The proseminar explores essential areas of gerontology for researchers and practitioners, providing a multidisciplinary (e.g., psychology, biology, sociology, communication) perspective on aging. The proseminar surveys contemporary basic and applied research, service programs, and policy and management issues in gerontology. (Same as AMS 767, COMS 787, PSYC 787, and SOC 767.) (Formerly HDFL 787.) LEC.

ABSC 788. Designing Early Education Environments. 3 Hours.

This course reviews empirically-supported strategies for designing effective and socially valid care and education environments for young children with and without disabilities. Topics will include: early educational theory, individualized curricula and goal selection strategies, various instructional typologies (e.g., direct instruction, embedded teaching), specific teaching tactics (e.g., prompting, time delay, differential reinforcement), preventive and assessment-based behavioral management strategies, current best practice recommendations for design of the social and physical environment, and methods for assessing children's, caregivers', and teachers' programmatic preferences. Prerequisite: ABSC 796. LEC.

ABSC 797. Proseminar in Child Language. 2 Hours.

A review and discussion of current issues in children's language acquisition. May be repeated for credit. Students are graded S/F. (Same as LING 799, PSYC 799 and SPLH 799.) (Formerly HDFL 797.) LEC.

ABSC 799. Experimental Analysis of Behavior. 3 Hours.

This course provides an in-depth description of the basic principles of operant and respondent conditioning in the context of basic non-human and human subjects research. Students will learn various theoretical approaches to understanding effects of reinforcement and punishment. Special attention will be provided to the role of verbal processes in the learning of verbally competent individuals. Students will gain substantive experience with identifying laboratory derived principles present in the literature that are relevant to application through assigned projects. SEM.

ABSC 800. Conceptual Foundations of Applied Behavioral Science. 3 Hours.

A master's-level graduate seminar on the field's conceptual foundations, with special emphasis on behavior analysis and its application - applied behavior analysis. The course addresses the field's history, philosophy of science, and disciplinary purview; its advanced behavioral principles and processes; its analyses of various content domains in the behavioral, social, and cognitive sciences (e.g., emotion, language, cognition, culture); and its relation to other disciplines (e.g., biology, psychology, anthropology). It also considers professional issues in, for example, the ethical conduct of research and practice. An ABA-accredited and BACB pre-approved course. Prerequisite: ABSC 799. SEM.

ABSC 801. Design and Analysis of Community Development Methods. 1-6 Hours.

An examination of principles and practices of community development and evaluation of methods used to promote community improvement. May be repeated if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 801.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 802. Behavior Analysis in Developmental Disabilities. 3 Hours.

A graduate seminar that includes an overview of the behavioral characteristics of various developmental disabilities and examination of empirically-supported behavioral approaches to the study and treatment of developmental disabilities. Topics will include classification and etiology, motivation, methods for developing appropriate skills, assessment and treatment of behavior disorders, staff training, and legal and ethical issues related to treatment. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 803. Fundamentals of Psychological Assessment and Intervention with Children. 3 Hours.

Lecture and supervised experience covering the theoretical and empirical literature on assessment and intervention methods for children, adolescents, and families. Students will learn and demonstrate evidence-based clinical interviewing skills, behavioral observation techniques, risk assessment techniques, therapeutic communication approaches, strategies for providing assessment feedback to families, and ethical principles related to the provision of assessment and psychotherapy (including client file and resource management.) The course requires interaction with clinical populations and communication with referral sources. (Same as PSYC 803.) Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical child psychology program. LEC.

ABSC 804. Research in Community Health Promotion. 1-6 Hours.

Supervised, original investigations of problems relevant to community health, such as the prevention of substance abuse or promotion of child outcomes. As appropriate, the course is focused on any combination of: literature research, research planning, and preparation conducting research, analyzing data, writing research reports, or preparing oral reports of completed research. (Formerly HDFL 804.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 805. Functional Behavioral Assessment. 3 Hours.

The strategies, tactics, and ethics of functional assessment are presented in the larger context of behavioral assessment (e.g., nomothetic and idiographic approaches). Research articles relevant to indirect, descriptive, and experimental functional assessment approaches and assessment-based interventions are carefully reviewed to determine the appropriate conditions for each type of assessment and intervention. (Formerly HDFL 805.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 806. Functional Behavioral Assessment Practicum. 1-6 Hours.

This course provides supervised experience in the use of functional behavioral assessment in home, clinic, or educational environments with young children presenting problem behaviors. (Formerly HDFL 806.) Prerequisite: ABSC 805 and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 807. Design and Evaluation of Community Health Promotion Methods. 1-6 Hours.

An examination of the methods used to develop and evaluate community health promotion programs. The course addresses topics of interest to participants, such as substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, or child outcomes. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 807.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 809. Professional Issues: Clinical Child Psychology. 1 Hour.

Consideration of special problems confronting the child and family oriented scientist-practitioner, and in the development of a professional identity. Topics include critical issues, including ethical, legal, cultural, empirical, and clinical aspects of research and practice. May be repeated. (Formerly HDFL 809.) (Same as PSYC 809.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology. LEC.

ABSC 810. Introduction to Developmental Assessment. 3 Hours.

A course covering the general principles of developmental assessment from birth through adulthood, with special emphasis on the history and nature of assessment instruments and the criteria for acceptance, reliability, and stability of results. Selected assessment techniques for infants, preschool children, elementary school children, adolescents, and adults are reviewed and evaluated for their utility, limitations, and applications. A critical analysis of assessment in general and particular assessment tools is made. (Formerly HDFL 810.) LEC.

ABSC 811. Achievement and Intellectual Assessment in Clinical Child Psychology. 3 Hours.

Course covers the basic theory, research, administration, and reporting of psychological assessment of development, intelligence, and achievement for children, adolescents, and adults within cultural and developmental contexts. The range of psychological instruments examined includes, for example, WIAT, K-ABC, W-J, S-B, WISC, WAIS, and WPPSI. (Same as PSYC 811.) Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical child psychology. LEC.

ABSC 812. Behavioral and Personality Assessment of Children. 3 Hours.

Lecture, laboratory, field work, and supervision. Theory and applications in the psychological evaluation of children with standardized assessment techniques. The administration, scoring, interpretation, and reporting of behavioral and personality functioning in children. (Formerly HDFL 812.) (Same as PSYC 812.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology. LEC.

ABSC 813. Behavioral Science Research Proseminar. 1-3 Hours.

A master's level professional seminar in which faculty and students present research proposals; offer formal presentations of completed empirical research, reviews of the literature, and other areas of scholarship; and engage discussion about contemporary empirical, conceptual, and professional issues in applied behavioral science. May be repeated for a total of six credits. (Formerly HDFL 813.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in applied behavioral science or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 814. Advanced Child and Family Assessment. 3 Hours.

Lecture, laboratory, field work, and supervision. Supervised experience in specialized psychological assessment approaches for children and families. Emphasis on interviewing, observation, psychometric scales, consultation, rationale, administration, analysis, and reporting of mental health functioning of children and families. Experience with clinical populations, and communication with referral sources. (Formerly HDFL 814.) (Same as PSYC 814.) Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical child psychology. LEC.

ABSC 820. Advanced Child Development. 3 Hours.

A survey of the basic empirical research in the field of child development, covering intelligence, cognition, perception, attention, personality, social behavior, and socialization processes. These literatures are integrated and their implications for social application are addressed. (Formerly HDFL 820.) (Same as PSYC 820.) Prerequisite: A course in child development or equivalent. LEC.

ABSC 821. Behavior Analysis of Child Development. 3 Hours.

An advanced graduate seminar on the behavior-analytic approach to child development. Students examine the behavior-analytic view of child development and compare and contrast this approach with other systems for understanding development. Students also review and critically evaluate current and seminal literature related to several different developmental domains (e.g., motor, emotional, social, cognitive development) and explore implications for the application of current knowledge. An ABA-accredited and BACB® pre-approved course. (Formerly HDFL 821.) Prerequisite: ABSC 798 and consent of instructor. LEC.

ABSC 822. Children and Public Policy. 3 Hours.

This course examines how public policies affect the development of children. Includes examination of child and family policy in the United States and other countries, policy-related research on children, major policy issues affecting children, and child advocacy. (Formerly HDFL 822.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 824. Treatment of Severe Learning Problems. 3 Hours.

The course reviews new approaches to working with persons with retardation and autism; theoretical orientations and how they affect implementation of procedures; and current research outcomes in various developmental areas of persons with retardation. It covers approaches used with persons through the life span, from childhood through adulthood, that are based on ecological and stimulus control variables. Ethical and practical implications are the focus of class lectures and discussions. (Formerly HDFL 824.) LEC.

ABSC 825. Social Development. 3 Hours.

A lecture and discussion course in social development. It includes such topics as theoretical approaches to the study of social development, as well as the literature on family processes, peer relations, aggression and prosocial behavior, child abuse and neglect, family violence, child care, and the media. (Same as PSYC 825.) (Formerly HDFL 880.) Prerequisite: A course in child psychology or development. LEC.

ABSC 828. Research in Early Intervention with Children. 3 Hours.

A seminar on current issues in assessment and intervention for young children who are at risk for or who have special needs. Provides foundation for evaluating and understanding research in early intervention. Includes historical, conceptual and legislative underpinnings of early intervention, risk factors affecting development, methodological issues in early intervention research, best practice standards, and applications to social, language, and pre-academic domains. (Formerly HDFL 828.) LEC.

ABSC 831. Science of Human Behavior. 3 Hours.

A graduate seminar on the analysis of human behavior, grounded in basic behavioral principles. The focus is on the process and products of human development, among them motivation/emotion, social behavior, personality, sensation/perception, language, cognition, creativity, attitudes/beliefs, consciousness/unconsciousness, purpose/will, and values. The course is pre-approved by the Behavior Analysis Certification Board® for its BCBA® certification requirements. Prerequisite: ABSC 800 and Master's degree in Applied Behavioral Science or instructor permission. SEM.

ABSC 834. Directed Readings in Community Health Promotion. 1-5 Hours.

Supervised readings in topical areas of community health promotion, such as the prevention of substance abuse and promotion of child outcomes. A program of study, conferences, and reports is developed by the instructor and student. (Formerly HDFL 834.) RSH.

ABSC 837. Advanced Study of People with Disabilities. 3 Hours.

This course reviews major approaches in identifying disability pathogenesis and explores the biological bases of selected congenital physical disabilities, and etiologies of selected acquired physical disabilities. Rehabilitation approaches and the role of scientist-practitioners in working with people with disabilities are also discussed. This course primarily covers adults with physical disabilities. (Formerly HDFL 837.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 840. Theoretical Concepts of Human Development and Child Care Practice. 3 Hours.

Basic introduction to treatment concepts and procedures related to child development and child-care programs. The major goal is to provide a theoretical framework that is effective in dealing with various types of child deviancy. (Formerly HDFL 840.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 841. Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Applied Behavioral Science. 3 Hours.

The course covers ethical and legal issues in (a) the responsible conduct of basic, applied, and intervention research (e.g., informed consent and assent with typical and atypical populations; inclusion of underrepresented groups; bias, fraud, and plagiarism in data collection and reporting; conflict of interest; reporting misconduct; authorship) and (b) professional issues in teaching, research, and service (e.g., written and presented scientific communication; grant preparation; the journal review process; cultural competence; teaching; vita preparation). The course will also include instruction in the preparation of editorial reviews for manuscripts submitted for publication to in peer-reviewed journals, in partial fulfillment of the department's doctoral requirement for preparing editorial reviews. A BACB pre-approved course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in applied behavioral science. LEC.

ABSC 846. Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology I. 1-3 Hours.

Introductory practicum experience for the Clinical Child Psychology Program. Orientation to psychological evaluation and treatment of children, adolescents, and their families and initial development of professional self-assessment skills. Students acquire specific clinical competencies through shadowing cases, assisting with interpretation of test of intelligence and academic achievement, conducting behavioral observations in field settings, and performing co-therapy of cases presenting to the KU Child and Family Services Clinic. May be taken in more than one semester. (Same as PYSC 846.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 847. Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology II. 1-3 Hours.

Intermediate practicum experience for the Clinical Child Psychology Program. Development of specific competencies in assessment and intervention with children, adolescents, and their families through didactics, field experience, and supervision. Students acquire specific clinical competencies through supervised provision of assessment and interventions for cases presenting to the KU Child and Family Services Clinic. Students develop ability to identify specific treatment goals and select therapeutic interventions that are conceptually congruent with clients' presenting problems and are based on sound empirical evidence. Students also develop the ability to integrate and synthesize test results, interview material, and behavioral observations into coherent case conceptualizations. May be taken in more than one semester. (Same as PSYC 847.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 848. Applied Gerontology: Practice and Intervention. 3 Hours.

A survey of intervention research in gerontology. Program evaluations designed to determine the effectiveness of community-based interventions, current social service delivery practice, and contemporary social policies are examined. An ABA-accredited and BACB® pre-approved course. (Formerly HDFL 848.) LEC.

ABSC 856. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Intervention with the Handicapped. 3 Hours.

This course surveys knowledge from various disciplines that address developmental disabilities across the life span. Its focus is on designing strategies for individual intervention and treatment programs by an interdisciplinary team. Designed for students in social work, speech pathology, psychology, nutrition, audiology, special education, physical therapy, nursing, child development, behavior analysis, and related fields. (Formerly HDFL 707.) Prerequisite: A basic course in child development or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 861. Principles of Behavior Analysis. 3 Hours.

An advanced graduate course on the basic principles of behavior, and related procedures for producing behavioral change, with both human and nonhuman subjects. The principles and procedures are presented as fundamental elements of behavior change. An ABA- accredited and BACB® pre-approved course. (Formerly HDFL 871.) LEC.

ABSC 862. Behavioral Community Psychology. 3 Hours.

A seminar that provides an overview of the history and origin of behavioral community psychology. The course will examine the development and future of behavioral community psychology as an integration of two sub-disciplines, applied behavior analysis and community psychology. The course will provide an integrated review of empirically-based behavioral interventions applied in community-based settings. The course is offered at the 500 and 800 levels with additional assignments required at the 800-level. Prerequisite: ABSC 710, or instructor permission. SEM.

ABSC 865. Applied Behavior Analysis in Complex Organizations. 3 Hours.

An examination of the theory, principles, and methods of behavior analysis and their applications to problems of human behavior in complex organizations such as businesses, industries, human service organizations, and governments. (Formerly HDFL 888.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 866. Service System and Consumer Issues in Developmental Disabilities. 3 Hours.

This course provides a service-system perspective on developmental disabilities. Students learn (a) how service systems have developed for people with developmental disabilities; (b) about service systems from the perspective of agency administrators, program evaluation, and public and private payment systems (e.g., health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHIPS, Title V); and (c) from consumers, themselves, about the barriers they face in obtaining needed services. Finally, students learn about advocating for service-system change at a consumer, program, and policy level. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 870. Practicum I in Behavioral Psychology. 1-6 Hours.

Instruction and supervised laboratory or field work for master's students. Practica are offered by different instructors on different topics; may be repeated for credit if the content differs. Topics and instructors are announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in applied behavioral science or instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 871. Practicum I in Behavior Analysis: _____. 1-6 Hours.

Instruction and supervised laboratory or field work for master's students. Practica are offered by different faculty members on different topics; may be repeated for credit if the content differs. Topics and instructors are announced in the Schedule of Classes. (Formerly HDFL 873.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in applied behavioral science or instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 872. Practicum I in: _____. 1-6 Hours.

Instruction and supervised laboratory or field work for master's students. Practica are offered by different faculty members on different topics; may be repeated for credit if the content is different. Topics and instructors are announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in applied behavioral science or instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 873. Practicum in Educational Psychological/ Rehabilitative Services: _____. 3-6 Hours.

This course is for students who wish to complete practicum experiences in services related to persons with retardation, autism, or physical disabilities in programs in various settings, such as the Ann Sullivan Center in Lima, Peru and the Algeria School in Paraguay. The course is designed to give interested students opportunities to work with professionals in these programs on a semester or summer basis. The course consists of participation in professional activities associated with the practicum program and a report of these activities to the instructor. (Formerly HDFL 789.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 874. Practicum in Consumer Evaluation of Behavior Programs. 3-6 Hours.

A practicum course designed to provide students with the knowledge, background, and practical experience in the conduct of consumer evaluations for behavioral treatment programs. (Formerly HDFL 855.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 875. Practicum in Community Health Promotion. 1-6 Hours.

A practicum course designed to provide students with knowledge, background, and practical experience in the implementation of community health promotion projects and their evaluation. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 808.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 876. Practicum in Community Development. 1-6 Hours.

A practicum course designed to provide students with knowledge, background, and practical experience in the implementation of community improvement projects and their evaluation. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 802.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 877. Advanced Practicum in Gerontology. 1-6 Hours.

Supervised practical experience in working with elders in home, community, or institutional settings. Regular individual conferences with faculty are used to evaluate student progress. (Formerly HDFL 849.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 880. Early Childhood Practicum for Allied Professionals. 1-6 Hours.

Professionals in fields such as journalism, social welfare, and psychology may have career interests that include work with or on behalf of young children. This practicum provides students with individualized opportunities to work with young children in a group setting in order to extend their professional skills. (Formerly HDFL 790.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 881. Early Childhood Care and Intervention Practicum I. 1-6 Hours.

A course covering the specification of learning goals and the implementation and evaluation of curriculum design management of groups of young children. May be repeated for no more than a total of six credit hours. (Formerly HDFL 791.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 882. Early Childhood Care and Intervention Practicum II. 1-6 Hours.

A course to assess and teach skills in diagnosis and evaluation of particular problems in the developmental process of young children (1-5 years of age), and to design and implement interventions. May be repeated for no more than a total of six credit hours. (Formerly HDFL 792.) Prerequisite: ABSC 791 and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 883. Early Childhood Administration Practicum. 1-6 Hours.

Experiences in understanding and developing parent satisfaction with care arrangements for their child(ren), providing services to personnel responsible for care and development of young children, and/or maximizing use of available services for young children on their behalf. May be repeated for no more than a total of six credit hours. (Formerly HDFL 793.) Prerequisite: ABSC 791 and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 884. Early Childhood Early Intervention Practicum. 1-6 Hours.

Laboratory teaching in an early childhood classroom that includes children who are developmentally delayed, demonstrate behavioral or learning difficulties, or have other developmental disabilities. Experience includes individualized programming for children with special needs, as well as group management and group curriculum planning. May be repeated for no more than a total of six credit hours. (Formerly HDFL 794.) Prerequisite: ABSC 791 and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 885. Early Childhood Teacher Training Practicum. 1-6 Hours.

Experience in supervising staff who work in programs for young children. Supervision includes orienting, monitoring, and evaluating staff performance; opportunities for interaction with other professionals; experience in facilitating staff communication; and consulting on research projects. (Formerly HDFL 795.) Prerequisite: ABSC 791 and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 886. Developmental Assessment Practicum: _____. 1-6 Hours.

This course provides direct experience in the developmental assessment of a selected age group, such as infants, preschool and elementary children, adolescents, or adults. It may be repeated providing the age group specification is not repeated. (Formerly HDFL 811.) Prerequisite: HDFL 810 or an equivalent course. FLD.

ABSC 887. Clinical Practicum in Pediatric Psychology. 1-6 Hours.

Supervised experience with pediatric patients referred for behavior problems, including, for example, temper tantrums, enuresis, encopresis, and hyperactivity. Also includes evaluation and treatment of children with commonly encountered behavior problems. In addition, students observe pediatric staff performing appropriate physical exams and observe the interaction between the medical staff and the pediatric psychologist. (Formerly HDFL 823.) Prerequisite: ABSC 705 and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 888. Diversity Issues in Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours.

Review of individual differences pertaining to culture, ethnicity, race, gender, sexual orientation, age, etc., as these have an impact upon theory, research, assessment, and treatment issues in clinical psychology. (Same as PSYC 888.) Prerequisite: Graduate status in clinical psychology, or consent of instructor. LEC.

ABSC 890. Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours.

A seminar for master's level students. It examines basic and applied research literatures in specialized fields of applied behavioral science. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 701.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in applied behavioral science or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 891. Research in: _____. 1-6 Hours.

Supervised research investigations in basic or applied behavioral science for master's students. The course introduces observational measurement, research methods and designs, and the conduct of research in the behavioral sciences. May be repeated for credit if the content is different. (Formerly HDFL 800.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 892. Readings in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

An individual, supervised study of recent research and scholarship for master's students. The course emphasizes current scholarship in selected areas of basic and applied behavioral science and its conceptual foundations. Designed for students whose needs cannot be met in other courses. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 833.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 893. Special Topics in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

A research and readings course for master's students. It allows them to concentrate their studies on selected basic and applied problems in behavioral science and carry out independent research. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 722, HDFL 724, HDFL 725, HDFL 799.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 894. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

A course designed to enhance international experience in topic areas related to behavioral science for master's students. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 897. Master's Thesis in Clinical Child Psychology. 1-10 Hours.

Supervised research experience for completing the thesis leading to master's degree. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Formerly HDFL 897.) (Same as PSYC 897.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 899. Master's Thesis in Applied Behavioral Science. 1-9 Hours.

Supervised research experience for the thesis leading to a master's degree in applied behavioral science. May be repeated. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Formerly HDFL 899.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in applied behavioral science or instructor permission. THE.

ABSC 900. Self-Control, Impulsivity, and Human Addictive Disorders. 3 Hours.

This course examines basic research designed to explore variables affecting animal and human decision making; particularly decisions classified as demonstrating impulsivity and self-control. The evidence for genetic and learning contributions to patterns of impulsive decision making will be explored, as will the relation between impulsivity and a range of addictive disorders. LEC.

ABSC 905. Psychopathology in Children. 3 Hours.

Diagnosis and treatment of psychological problems in childhood and adolescence. Preference given to graduate students in child clinical psychology, school psychology, and counseling psychology. (Same as PSYC 905.) Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of graduate credit in psychology or consent of instructor. LEC.

ABSC 908. Psychotropic Drugs: Effects Through the Life Span. 3 Hours.

This course covers basic pharmacological concepts, neuropharmacological principles, and the therapeutics of drug effects on behavior. Special attention is given to age and history as influences in psychopharmacological outcomes. (Formerly HDFL 908.) LEC.

ABSC 913. Behavioral Science Research Proseminar. 1-3 Hours.

A doctoral level professional seminar in which faculty and students present research proposals; offer formal presentations of completed empirical research, reviews of the literature, and other areas of scholarship; and engage discussion about contemporary empirical, conceptual, and professional issues in applied behavioral science. May be repeated for a total of eight credits. (Formerly HDFL 913). Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 920. Seminar in Language Development. 3 Hours.

The course pertains to relevant research regarding infant speech development, vocabulary development, linguistic development, articulation development, and language retardation. (Same as SPLH 966.) (Formerly HDFL 920.) LEC.

ABSC 921. The History and Systems of Psychology. 3 Hours.

An advanced graduate seminar on the history of psychology and its systems, and their relations to contemporary psychology. Pertinent issues in the history and philosophy of science are addressed (e.g., scientific revolutions), as are concerns in the historiography of psychology (e.g., presentism). (Formerly HDFL 891.) Prerequisite: Master's degree or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 931. Verbal Behavior. 3 Hours.

An advanced graduate seminar on the analysis of the verbal behavior of the proficient speaker and the biological, environmental, and motivational factors affecting it. Structural and developmental issues, as well as implications for language training and remediation are integrated throughout. Critiques and rebuttals are examined, along with current empirical and conceptual advances in research and theory. An ABA-accredited and BACB® pre-approved course. (Formerly HDFL 831.) Prerequisite: ABSC 800, advanced coursework in psycholinguistics or linguistics, or instructor permission. SEM.

ABSC 934. Directed Readings in Clinical Child Psychology. 3-5 Hours.

Designed to meet the needs of advanced students whose study in clinical child psychology cannot be met with present courses or for whom advanced work is desired in a specialized area of study. (Formerly HDFL 934.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 935. Experimental Foundations of Applied Behavior Analysis. 3 Hours.

A graduate level introduction to basic behavioral research. This course surveys seminal and current research in the experimental analysis of behavior and relates this work to research and practice in applied behavior analysis. Topics include respondent conditioning, complex schedule performance, avoidance, stimulus control, and choice. Prerequisite: ABSC 798 and consent of instructor. LEC.

ABSC 936. Quantitative Analysis of Behavior. 3 Hours.

Advanced experimental course (doctoral-level) that demonstrates the operations of principles of behavior, and the quantitative models that describe them, in the context of basic research. Specific review of the methods to obtain the data necessary to permit a quantitative analysis of behavior, along with the quantitative analyses themselves, will be discussed. Students will learn the advantages and disadvantages of quantitative analyses in the behavioral sciences, along with a behavioral perspective on quantitative models of behavior. Students will obtain hands-on experience selecting data for a quantitative analysis, reviewing whether the data and proposed model meet the requisite assumptions of EAB research on quantitative models, and analyzing behavioral data using quantitative models. Prerequisite: ABSC 799. SEM.

ABSC 940. Measurement and Experimental Design for Applied Research. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced course on research methods helpful in the development, evaluation, and dissemination of effective and sustainable behavior-analytic programs. The practices examined involve (a) selecting non-reactive measures of staff implementation behaviors; (b) selecting effective and sustainable components of a staff management program; and (c) experimentally analyzing the effectiveness and sustainability of the staff management program. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of the principles of behavior that determine the maintenance of staff interventions and, therefore, the survival of behavioral programs in their post-research phase. Students read and discuss the literature on factors that promote or impede program survival. Students design an intervention program using the practices examined in the course, simulate an experimental analysis of the program, and write a JABA-style manuscript describing the program and their simulated data. An ABA-accredited and BACB® pre-approved course. (Formerly HDFL 940.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 735 or HDFL 803, ABSC/HDFL 796, and ABSC/HDFL 871 or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 941. Teaching and Conference. 3-6 Hours.

This course is used by graduate students fulfilling the doctoral program teaching requirement. Students assist in class preparation and organization, teaching, grading, and office hours or serve as discussion section leaders or laboratory course supervisors. They meet regularly with the faculty members they are assisting. Students enroll for 3 hours for the equivalent of a 25% assistantship and 6 hours for a 50% equivalent. (Formerly HDFL 941.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 942. Techniques of Data Analysis for Applied Research. 3 Hours.

This course examines data analysis procedures commonly used with both large group and single subject experimental designs. In addition to presenting specific data analysis techniques, the strengths and weaknesses inherent in the various techniques are carefully reviewed and evaluated. (Formerly HDFL 942.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 735 or HDFL 803 and an intermediate statistics course. LEC.

ABSC 943. Advanced Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology III. 1-3 Hours.

Development of advanced competencies in assessment and intervention with children, adolescents, and their families through didactics, field experience, and supervision. Students acquire advanced clinical competencies through supervised provision of assessment and interventions for cases presenting to the KU Child and Family Services Clinic and/or approved external practicum sites, leadership of didactic components of practicum (i.e., formal case presentation), and modeling of clinical competencies for junior students. Students will demonstrate the ability to implement empirically derived therapeutic interventions in consideration of individual differences, cultural values, and individual preferences. Students in external practicum sites will demonstrate an understanding of evidence-based models of consultation and provision of consultation to care providers in professional contexts. May be taken in more than one semester. (Same as PSYC 943.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 944. Advanced Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology IV. 1-3 Hours.

Demonstration of advanced competencies in assessment, intervention, and consultation with children, adolescents, and their families through didactics, field experience, and supervision in the semester(s) prior to required clinical internship. Students demonstrate advanced clinical competencies through supervised provision of assessment and interventions for cases presenting to the KU Child and Family Services Clinic and/or approved external practicum sites, leadership of didactic components of practicum (i.e., integrated case presentation), and modeling of clinical competencies for junior students. Course requirements include the development of portfolios for demonstration of clinical competencies and application to clinical internships. May be taken in more than one semester. (Same as PSYC 944.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 947. Advanced Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology V. 1-5 Hours.

Specialized practicum experience for the Clinical Child Psychology Program. Demonstration of advanced competencies related to supervision and consultation in clinical psychology. With faculty supervision, students will develop and demonstrate the ability to provide effective supervision to less advanced students in the program in selected cases appropriate to the service setting. Further development of advanced clinical competencies through supervised provision of assessment and interventions for cases presenting to the KU Child and Family Services Clinic and/or approved external practicum sites, leadership of didactic components of practicum, and modeling of clinical competencies for junior students. May be taken in more than one semester. (Same as PSYC 947.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 951. The Analysis of Cognition. 3 Hours.

A graduate seminar on the behavior analysis of cognition. Topics include consciousness, attention, perception, memory, language, rule-governed behavior, problem-solving, decision-making, generativity, creativity, and beliefs and attitudes. Comparisons and contrasts are drawn among different theoretical orientations (information-processing, parallel-processing, nonmediational theories). Prerequisite: ABSC 800, advanced coursework in cognitive psychology, or instructor permission. SEM.

ABSC 961. Advanced Seminar in Applied Behavior Analysis: _____. 3 Hours.

An advanced seminar examining the literature and research methods in specialized areas of applied behavior analysis (e.g., developmental disabilities, community health, organizational development). May be repeated for credit if the content differs. An ABA-accredited and BACB® pre-approved course. (Formerly HDFL 971.) LEC.

ABSC 963. Clinical Child Psychology Internship. 1 Hour.

Three consecutive enrollments, covering a minimum of eleven months of experience in an approved clinical psychology field setting; supervision by qualified clinical child psychology faculty and field staff clinicians. Required of all clinical child psychology program students. An intensive guided experience in application of clinical child psychology theory, methods, and practices. Integrates scientific and clinical aspects of field. (Formerly HDFL 963.) (Same as PSYC 963.) Prerequisite: Completion of Ph.D. comprehensive examinations, graduate standing in clinical child psychology, and permission of clinical child psychology faculty. INT.

ABSC 965. Evaluating and Disseminating Scientific Material II. 1-3 Hours.

Intensive training in the evaluation and production of scientific critiques and reviews on current issues in the analysis of behavior, as disseminated through the media. May be repeated. (Formerly HDFL 965.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 970. Practicum II in Behavioral Psychology. 1-6 Hours.

Advanced instruction and supervised laboratory or field work for doctoral students beyond ABSC 870. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 971. Practicum II in Behavior Analysis: _____. 1-6 Hours.

Advanced instruction and supervised laboratory or field work for doctoral students beyond ABSC 871. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 972. Practicum II in: _____. 1-6 Hours.

Advanced instruction and supervised laboratory or field work for doctoral students beyond ABSC 872. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Topic and instructor are announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in applied behavioral science or instructor permission. FLD.

ABSC 976. Therapeutic Interventions with Children. 3 Hours.

Clinical approaches to the therapeutic treatment of children with special emphasis on research findings and laboratory (practicum) experience. A survey of relationship therapies, operant strategies, system approaches, parent education and play therapy by the right therapist for a specific child with a particular problem. (Same as PSYC 976.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 981. History of Behavior Analysis. 3 Hours.

An advanced graduate seminar on the long past, short history, recent origins, and modern history of applied behavioral science. This includes the field's history, internally: its conceptual system, sciences and discipline, profession, and institutions. It also includes the field's history, externally, for instance, the history of Western philosophy, science, American culture, and the behavioral and social sciences. Historiographic issues are addressed throughout. Prerequisite: ABSC 800 and Master's degree in ABSC or Instructor permission. SEM.

ABSC 989. Methods of Obtaining External Research Funding. 1-3 Hours.

The objective of this course is to demystify this process and prepare participants to submit their first independent research grant application. Participants learn about the characteristics of different funding mechanisms and agencies, the characteristics of successful and unsuccessful application strategies, how to turn an initial research idea into a competitive application, ethical issues that influence each stage of the development and submission process, and the nuts and bolts of grant development and management. Specific activities include critiquing an actual NIH grant application, participating in a mock review panel, and developing an actual grant application. LEC.

ABSC 990. Advanced Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours.

An advanced seminar for doctoral students. It examines basic and applied research literatures in specialized fields of applied behavioral science. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 930.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 991. Advanced Research in: _____. 1-9 Hours.

Advanced, supervised research in basic or applied behavioral science for doctoral students. The course may focus on any combination of a literature review, research planning and preparation, conducting research, analyzing data, writing research reports, and preparing oral reports of completed research. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 900.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 992. Advanced Readings in: _____. 1-6 Hours.

An advanced individual, supervised study of recent research and scholarship for doctoral students. The course emphasizes current scholarship in selected areas of basic and applied behavioral science and its conceptual foundations. Designed for students whose needs cannot be met in other courses. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 933.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 993. Advanced Special Topics in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

An advanced research and readings course for doctoral students. It allows them to concentrate their studies on selected basic and applied problems in behavioral science and carry out independent research. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 931.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. RSH.

ABSC 994. Advanced Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-6 Hours.

An advanced course designed to enhance international experience in topic areas related to behavioral science for doctoral level students. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. LEC.

ABSC 998. Doctoral Dissertation in Clinical Child Psychology. 1-10 Hours.

Research experience making an original contribution to literature in clinical child psychology. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Same as PSYC 998.) (Formerly HDFL 998.) RSH.

ABSC 999. Doctoral Dissertation in Behavioral Psychology. 1-9 Hours.

Advanced supervised research that makes an original, empirical contribution to the literature in applied behavioral science leading to a doctoral degree in behavioral psychology. May be repeated. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Formerly HDFL 999.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. THE.

Biology Courses

BIOL 100. Principles of Biology. 3 Hours NB GE3N / N.

Intended for non-science majors. The basic concepts of biology at the cellular, organismal, and population levels of organization and their applications to humans and modern society. An honors section, BIOL 101, is offered for students with superior academic records. BIOL 100 and BIOL 102 (or BIOL 101 and BIOL 103, honors) satisfy the College natural science with laboratory requirement. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 102 is recommended. LEC.

BIOL 101. Principles of Biology, Honors. 3 Hours NB GE3N / N.

Intended for non-science majors with superior academic records. The basic concepts of biology at the cellular, organismal, and population levels of organization and their applications to humans and modern society. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 102 or BIOL 103 is recommended. BIOL 101 and either BIOL 102 or BIOL 103 satisfy the College natural science with laboratory requirement. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 102. Principles of Biology Laboratory. 1 Hour U / LFE.

Intended for non-science majors. Exercises are designed to give the student hands-on experience with selected topics from the associated lecture course (BIOL 100). An honors laboratory (BIOL 103) is offered for students with superior academic records. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 100 is recommended. LAB.

BIOL 103. Principles of Biology Laboratory, Honors. 1 Hour U / LFE.

Intended for non-science majors with superior academic records. Exercises are designed to give the students hands-on experience with selected topics from the associated lecture course (BIOL 101). Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of instructor. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 101 is recommended. LAB.

BIOL 105. Biology Orientation Seminar. 1 Hour N.

Introduces interested students to information about majoring in the biological sciences at the University of Kansas. Students learn about degree requirements, academic advising, research opportunities, and career options, as well as how to align academic and professional goals. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC.

BIOL 110. Microorganisms in Your World. 3 Hours NB / N.

A course for students who are not science majors. Designed to acquaint students with some microbial activities which affect their lives. Includes the historical development of microbiology, the basic principles of microbial growth, disinfection, antibiotics, infection, and immunity; and some commercial, agricultural, and industrial uses of microorganisms. Emphasis is on infectious diseases. Not open to students with any credit in microbiology. May not be counted as a prerequisite for any other microbiology course. LEC.

BIOL 116. Introduction to Evolutionary Biology. 3 Hours N / LFE.

An account of evolutionary thinking from classical to contemporary time. The emphasis is on mainstream developments (Darwinism, Mendelism, the Modern Synthesis, Cultural Ecology), but certain social issues will be examined (social Darwinism, creationism). LEC.

BIOL 120. Insects in Your World. 3 Hours NB GE3N / N.

Students will learn about the global impact of insects on human concerns, both positive (pollination and decomposition) and negative (competition with humans for food, fiber, and shelter, and disease transmission) while developing an appreciation for the ways in which scientists work with real problems involving insects. The course will cover the overwhelming abundance and diversity of insects, and their life history, ecology, behavior, and physiology. This course is intended for both nonbiology and biology majors. Format: two lectures and one discussion section per week. LEC.

BIOL 150. Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biology. 4 Hours NB GE3N / N / LFE.

An integrated lecture and laboratory course for biology majors and students planning to take additional courses in biology. This course covers basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, molecular biology, genetics, physiology, and development of plants and animals. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. An honors section (BIOL 151) is offered for students with superior academic records. Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior enrollment in CHEM 130, CHEM 190, CHEM 150, or CHEM 170, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 151. Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Honors. 4 Hours NB GE3N / N / LFE.

An integrated lecture and laboratory course for students with superior academic records who are biology majors or who plan to take additional courses in biology. This course covers basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, molecular biology, genetics, physiology, and development of plants and animals. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program and concurrent or prior enrollment in CHEM 130, CHEM 190, CHEM 150, or CHEM 170, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 152. Principles of Organismal Biology. 4 Hours NB GE3N / N / LFE.

An integrated lecture and laboratory course for biology majors and students who plan to take additional courses in biology. This course covers basic elements of plant and animal morphology and physiology, principles of evolution, organismal diversity and phylogeny, population biology, population genetics, ecology, and behavior. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. An honors section (BIOL 153) is offered for students with superior academic records. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 with a grade of C- or higher; or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 153. Principles of Organismal Biology, Honors. 4 Hours NB GE3N / N / LFE.

An integrated lecture and laboratory course for students with superior academic records who are biology majors or planning to take additional courses in biology. This course covers basic elements of plant and animal morphology and physiology, principles of evolution, organismal diversity and phylogeny, population biology, population genetics, ecology, and behavior. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 with a grade of C- or higher and membership in the University Honors Program; or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 155. Principle Lab in: _____. 1-3 Hours U / LFE.

This introductory laboratory exposes the students to basic principles in biology and modern experimental techniques through an open-ended authentic research experience directed by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours NB GE11.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, organized around current issues in biology. Does not contribute to major requirements in biology. First year seminar topics are coordinated and approved through the Office of First Year Experiences. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

BIOL 200. Basic Microbiology. 3 Hours NB GE3N / N.

Introduction to bacteria and viruses. Topics include historical development of microbiology, bacterial structure and growth, enzymes and energy production, disinfection, antibacterial drugs, gene transfer, viral replication, infection and immunity, with emphasis on infectious diseases. Can be substituted for BIOL 201 as a prerequisite for other microbiology courses by consent of department. Not open to those with credit in BIOL 110, BIOL 201, BIOL 400, or BIOL 401. Prerequisite: A course in high school biology and a course in high school chemistry. This course is not recommended for first semester freshmen. LEC.

BIOL 203. Introductory Microbiology Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Laboratory exercises to complement BIOL 200. Prerequisite: BIOL 200. May be taken concurrently. LAB.

BIOL 210. Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Sciences. 1 Hour U.

An introductory overview of medical technology as a profession including types of analyses performed, specialties, interrelationships in the health care system and a visit to a clinical laboratory. This course will enable those considering a major in medical technology to have a clear definition of the profession. This course does not meet any degree requirements in biology. No prerequisite. (Same as CLS 210.) LEC.

BIOL 215. Plants Through Time. 3 Hours NB / N.

Examines the evolution of plants and their environments from the origin of life to the present, including the historical development of the biosphere, mass extinctions (past and present), and social implications of future climate changes and deforestation. Not recommended for students with credit in GEOL 121. LEC.

BIOL 225. Evolution and the History of Life. 3 Hours GE3N / N.

This introductory course for non-majors focuses on the significance of the history of life and the fossil record for our understanding of evolution. Key events in the history of life are considered, including the origins of life, the eukaryotic cell, and humans, and also various mass extinctions. The focus is on general scientific and evolutionary principles and mechanisms that can be extracted from the study of the fossil record. It also uses the lessons of the fossil record to consider the prospects for our own species. LEC.

BIOL 240. Fundamentals of Human Anatomy. 3 Hours N.

Introduction to the gross anatomy of the human body. Covers the spatial arrangement and appearance of structures throughout the body, including visual identification of these structures. Musculoskeletal relationships, and the anatomy of major organ systems, are emphasized. Not intended for biology majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 100, or equivalent. LEC.

BIOL 241. Human Anatomy Observation Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

One of the two laboratories in gross anatomy designed to complement BIOL 240. Emphasizes the three-dimensional appearance and spatial relationships of anatomical structures through supervised observations of pre-dissected human cadavers. Limited to students enrolled in, or seeking admission to, programs that require a human anatomy observation laboratory. Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOL 240 is required. LAB.

BIOL 242. Human Anatomy Dissection Laboratory. 3 Hours U / LFE.

One of the two laboratories in gross anatomy designed to complement BIOL 240. Provides an opportunity to develop a comprehensive three-dimensional understanding of anatomical structures and spatial relationships while gaining substantial dissecting experience. Student perform supervised dissection of human cadavers. Limited to students enrolled in, or seeking admission to, programs that require a human anatomy laboratory. Concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOL 240 is required. LAB.

BIOL 246. Principles of Human Physiology. 3 Hours N.

An introduction to the physiological and biochemical processes and general physiological principles necessary to sustain life. Organ and organ system processes are emphasized. Intended for students majoring in allied health or sports related curricula who require a course in human physiology. Not intended for biology majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or equivalent. LEC.

BIOL 247. Principles of Human Physiology Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Designed to complement BIOL 246. Uses experiments and simulations to demonstrate laboratory techniques and representative processes in areas of human physiology. Concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOL 246 required. LAB.

BIOL 350. Principles of Genetics. 4 Hours N.

Why are related individuals more similar than unrelated individuals and what is the basis for heritable traits? From Mendel's discoveries of the patterns of genetic inheritance, to the study of transmissible hereditary factors, genetics is central to understanding the biological sciences. Topics include molecular genetics and genetic engineering; Mendelian genetics and mapping; control of gene expression; cytogenetics; epigenetics and non-Mendelian genetics; and population and quantitative genetics. Examples are taken from a wide variety of organisms, including viruses, bacteria, plants, fungi, insects, and humans. Prerequisite: CHEM 135 or CHEM 175 or CHEM 195 with a grade of C- or higher and BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 with a grade of C- or higher and BIOL 152 or BIOL 153 with a grade of C- or higher; or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 360. Principles of Genetics, Honors. 4 Hours N.

The science of genetics aims to explain why individuals differ from one another and how these differences are inherited. Honors Genetics covers all core topics in fundamental genetics: Mendelian inheritance, meiosis and recombination, mutation, molecular genetics, population genetics, quantitative genetics and genomics. Special attention given to the practice of genetics and the complex relationship between genotype, phenotype and environment. A broader goal of Honors Genetics is to provide students a framework for understanding recent advances in medical genetics and the modern era of personal genomics. Prerequisite: CHEM 135 or CHEM 175 or CHEM 195 with a grade of C- or higher and BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 with a grade of C- or higher and BIOL 152 or BIOL 153 with a grade of C- or higher and membership in the University Honors Program; or consent of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 400. Fundamentals of Microbiology. 3 Hours NB GE3N / N.

Fundamental principles of microbiology with emphasis on physical and chemical properties of the bacterial cell; microbial metabolism, cultivation, growth and death of bacteria; microbial genetics, pathogenesis and immunity, industrially important microorganisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 and two semesters of college chemistry, or consent of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 401. Fundamentals of Microbiology, Honors. 4 Hours N.

Honors section of BIOL 400 and BIOL 612, by application and invitation. Prerequisite: BIOL 151, two semesters of college chemistry, and membership in the University Honors Program, or consent of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 402. Fundamentals of Microbiology Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Laboratory exercises designed to complement BIOL 400 or BIOL 700. Prerequisite: BIOL 400 or BIOL 612, or BIOL 400 or BIOL 612 concurrently. LAB.

BIOL 405. Laboratory in Genetics. 2 Hours U / LFE.

A laboratory program which includes written reports on fruit fly crosses, exercises on meiosis, probability and statistics, human genetics and computer simulations of genetics problems. Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior (preferred) enrollment in BIOL 350 or its equivalent. LAB.

BIOL 408. Physiology of Organisms. 3 Hours N.

A comprehensive and integrative approach to the study of organisms with an emphasis on physiological, ecological, structural, and behavioral adaptations to differing environments. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or BIOL 153 and CHEM 130 or CHEM 190 or CHEM 170; or consent of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 409. Physiology of Organisms, Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

The laboratory exposes the students to the structure and function of the major groups of animals and plants. Students use basic techniques of biological observation, such as microscopy and dissection, and experimental techniques to analyze plant and animal function. Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOL 408, or consent of the instructor. LAB.

BIOL 410. Human Biogeography, Honors. 3 Hours N.

Principles of evolution and earth change are used to examine distributions of human populations, wealth, and resources. Readings from the current literature will be included. Lecture and discussion. (Same as GEOG 410.) Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or BIOL 153 or GEOG 107 and membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 412. Evolutionary Biology. 4 Hours N.

Introduction to the patterns and processes of organic evolution. Considered are the history of evolutionary thought, molecular evolution, genetics and microevolution, selection and adaptation, and speciation and macroevolution. Emphasis will be placed on how scientists study and document change over time in natural populations, methods for testing hypotheses about events in evolutionary history, and how discovering evolutionary mechanisms at one level of organization can help to explicate general processes in the natural world. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 and BIOL 350, or consent of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 413. History and Diversity of Organisms. 3 Hours N / LFE.

An integrated lecture and laboratory course presenting an overview of the variety and ancestry of life on earth. Using representatives from prokaryotes, protists, plants, fungi, and animals, principles of phylogenetic reconstruction are illustrated and evolutionary trends in the life history features, functional morphology, and structural complexity of extant and extinct organisms are presented. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or BIOL 153, or consent of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 414. Principles of Ecology. 3 Hours N.

Study of the principles underlying species population density changes, community structure and dynamics, biogeochemical cycles, and energy flow and nutrient cycling in ecosystems. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or BIOL 153, or consent of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 415. Field and Laboratory Methods in Ecology. 2 Hours N.

This course complements BIOL 414 with field trips and laboratory exercises that illustrate the basic concepts of ecology. Topics covered include methodologies for quantitative sampling of terrestrial and aquatic systems, design of field studies, computer simulation and digital data analysis techniques, and scientific writing. Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOL 414. A statistics course is recommended. FLD.

BIOL 416. Cell Structure and Function. 3 Hours N.

Lecture survey of molecular cell biology with emphasis on experimental approaches to understanding cell function; topics include biological membranes and transmembrane transport, vesicular trafficking (secretion and endocytosis), cell signaling, cell motility and the cytoskeleton, and the regulation of the cell division cycle. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151; BIOL 350 or BIOL 360; CHEM 130 or CHEM 190 or CHEM 170; and CHEM 135 or CHEM 195 or CHEM 175, or consent of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 417. Biology of Development. 3 Hours N.

A general course designed to introduce students to the developmental biology of animals. Emphasis is placed on understanding how a single-celled fertilized egg develops into a complex multicellular organism by the processes of cell division, differentiation, growth, and morphogenesis. Lectures stress experimental approaches to investigating development, including classic embryology and modern molecular genetics. Prerequisite: BIOL 350 or consent of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 418. Laboratory in: _____. 1-3 Hours U / LFE.

A varied program of laboratory and fieldwork designed to introduce students to investigative approaches in the study of the basic concepts of biological science. Students may enroll in more than one section. Prerequisite: BIOL 100, BIOL 101, BIOL 150, BIOL 151, or exemption. Each section may have additional prerequisites to be determined by instructor. LAB.

BIOL 419. Topics in: _____. 1-3 Hours N / LFE.

Courses on special topics in biology, given as need arises. May be lectures, discussions, readings, laboratory, or fieldwork. Students may select sections according to their special needs. IND.

BIOL 420. Seminar: _____. 1-3 Hours N.

The preparation and presentation of oral reports on selected topics from the recent research literature. Students may choose one interest group each semester, but may enroll in a given interest group only once. Enrollment in each interest group limited to twenty students. Prerequisite: Course work varying with the topic of the seminar, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 421. Topics in Molecular Biosciences: _____. 3 Hours N.

Lecture instruction and the preparation and presentation of oral and written reports on selected topics from the recent research literature in molecular biosciences. Students may enroll in a given topic only once. Prerequisite: Course work varying with the topic of the seminar; or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 423. Non-laboratory Independent Study. 1-9 Hours AE61 / N.

Original study in discussion or preparation of review papers on selected topics of current interest. May be undertaken only with the consent of the major advisor and of the faculty member who will guide the research. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

BIOL 424. Independent Study. 1-9 Hours AE61 / N.

Original study in laboratory or field in selected topics of current research interest. May be undertaken only with the consent of the major advisor and of the faculty member who will guide the research. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

BIOL 425. Teaching Apprenticeship in Biology. 1-9 Hours N.

Involvement as teaching assistant for a course in Biology. Credit hours shall not exceed the credits offered for the course being taught. May be undertaken only with the consent of the Director of Undergraduate Biology and of the faculty member who will teach the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Director of Undergraduate Biology. FLD.

BIOL 426. Laboratory in Cell Biology. 3 Hours U / LFE.

Laboratory exercises will examine the function, organization, and composition of eukaryotic cells. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151, CHEM 130 or CHEM 190 or CHEM 170; concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOL 416 or BIOL 536; or consent of the instructor. BIOL 350 or BIOL 360 is highly recommended. LAB.

BIOL 428. Introduction to Systematics. 3 Hours N.

Basic elements of systematic theory and practice; phylogenetic reconstruction using morphological and molecular data; interpretation of phylogenetic hypotheses; principles of nomenclature and classification; evolutionary processes and patterns of species diversity; discussion of the aims and needs of taxonomy; species and speciation; construction of keys; significance of biological collections. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or BIOL 153. Not intended for students with advanced systematics background. LEC.

BIOL 430. Laboratory in Molecular Biology. 3 Hours U / LFE.

Practical experience in recombinant DNA technology and molecular cloning. Prerequisite: BIOL 416 or a course in biochemistry or microbiology. LAB.

BIOL 432. Human Behavioral Genetics. 3 Hours S.

A survey of human behavioral genetics for upper division undergraduates. Emphasis is on how the methods and theories of quantitative, population, medical, and molecular genetics can be applied to individual and group differences in humans. Both normal and abnormal behaviors are covered, including intelligence, mental retardation, language and language disorders, communication, learning, personality, and psychopathology. (Same as ANTH 447, PSYC 432, SPLH 432.) Prerequisite: Introductory courses in biology/genetics or biological anthropology and psychology are recommended. LEC.

BIOL 435. Introduction to Neurobiology. 3 Hours N.

Basic principles of neurobiology. The focus will be on the nature of communication among nerve cells and their targets. Topics will include the development, structure and function of nerve cells, chemistry of neurotransmission, processing and integration including the cellular and molecular basis of higher functions and neurological disorders. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151. LEC.

BIOL 440. Advanced Human Anatomy. 6 Hours N / LFE.

Integrated lecture and laboratory course designed to provide students with a detailed understanding of the structure of the human body. Cadaver dissection will reinforce three-dimensional relationships discussed in lecture and each of the main organ systems will be considered using a regional approach to the body. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or equivalent; BIOL 240, BIOL 241, or BIOL 242; and instructor consent. LEC.

BIOL 448. Kansas Plants. 3 Hours N.

A study of common and important non-cultivated Kansas plants, with special emphasis on the ecology of the state; paleoclimatic and paleobotanical background of the central prairies and plains; present climate, physiography and vegetation; poisonous, edible, and medicinal plants; identification by means of simplified keys. Prerequisite: BIOL 100, BIOL 101, BIOL 150, or BIOL 151 and BIOL 152 or BIOL 153. LEC.

BIOL 449. Laboratory/Field Work in Human Biology. 1-3 Hours AE61 / N.

Faculty supervised laboratory or field research for Human Biology majors. Students design and complete a research project in collaboration with a Human Biology faculty member. (Same as ANTH 449, PSYC 449, and SPLH 449.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Human Biology major. FLD.

BIOL 454. Brain Diseases and Neurological Disorders. 3 Hours N.

Major brain diseases and neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Huntington's Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Epilepsy, Schizophrenia, etc., are discussed in terms of the etiology, molecular, and cellular basis of potential therapeutic interventions. Prerequisite: BIOL 408 or BIOL 416 or BIOL 435 or BIOL 646, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 461. Biodiversity of the Rainforest. 3 Hours N.

An introduction to birds, bats, and plants of the rainforest, with emphasis on general characteristics of each of the taxa and their relationship to the tropical ecosystem, as well as their particular anatomy, ecology, behavior, and diversity. Field work focuses on identification of birds and bats (at species level), plants (at family level), and on capturing and preservation techniques. Taught in Golfito, Costa Rica. Contact Undergraduate Biology, or the Office of Study Abroad. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 and BIOL 152 or BIOL 153, or equivalent. Fall and spring semester courses are taught in Spanish; therefore, four semesters of Spanish are required. Summer courses are taught in English. LEC.

BIOL 463. Introduction to Ornithology of the Tropics. 4 Hours N.

A theory and practice course on birds. Course covers morphology, reproduction, evolution, ecology, and behavior, as well as systematics of Costa Rican birds. Course includes field work on bird identification. Taught in Golfito, Costa Rica. Contact Undergraduate Biology, or the Office of Study Abroad. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 and BIOL 152 or BIOL 153, or equivalent. Fall and spring semester courses are taught in Spanish; therefore, four semesters of Spanish are required. Summer courses are taught in English. LEC.

BIOL 465. Marine Biology. 4 Hours N.

A theory and practice course on biotic relations, the role of organisms and marine biodiversity. It covers basic marine principles and physico-chemical processes (temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and pH in the water) and their effect on the abundance, and horizontal and vertical distribution of marine organisms. Course includes field work on data collection. Taught in Golfito, Costa Rica. Contact Undergraduate Biology, or the Office of Study Abroad. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 and BIOL 152 or BIOL 153, or equivalent. Fall and spring semester courses are taught in Spanish; therefore, four semesters of Spanish are required. Summer courses are taught in English. LEC.

BIOL 467. Marine Resources Management. 3 Hours N.

A theory and practice course which focuses on the techniques used for monitoring the growth of fish, shrimp, and mollusks, with the purpose of understanding the variables that could produce the best yields. The course covers ecology (population growth, competition, predators, ecosystem dynamics), and fishery biology (growth, fish yield, capture efficiency) applicable in the field experiments. Taught in Golfito, Costa Rica. Contact Undergraduate Biology, or the Office of Study Abroad. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 and BIOL 152 or BIOL 153, or equivalent. Fall and spring semester courses are taught in Spanish; therefore, four semesters of Spanish are required. Summer courses are taught in English. LEC.

BIOL 468. Fresh Water Ecology. 4 Hours N.

A theory and practice class on the study of rivers and lagoons. It includes systematics of rivers, lagoons, and reservoirs. Course includes theory and field work to monitor physical (stream topography, flow, edge vegetation), chemical (nutrients, temperature, pH levels, dissolved oxygen), and biological (collecting and identification of aquatic insects) conditions in rivers. Taught in Golfito, Costa Rica. Contact Undergraduate Biology, or the Office of Study Abroad. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 and BIOL 152 or BIOL 153, or equivalent. Fall and spring semester courses are taught in Spanish; therefore, four semesters of Spanish are required. Summer courses are taught in English. LEC.

BIOL 477. Ecology and Global Change. 3 Hours N.

Humans influence both natural and managed ecosystems. This course studies the effects of climate change, land-use change, and reductions in biodiversity on ecosystems. Emphasis is placed on how biological and physical processes may be perturbed by human influences. Topics include the greenhouse effect, species extinctions, human disease expansion, and the effects of global change on agricultural productivity. A combination of lectures and discussion address issues from a scientific basis and link these ecological issues to our everyday lives and society as a whole. Prerequisite: BIOL 152, BIOL 153, or equivalent, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 480. Biology and Diversity of Parasites. 3 Hours N.

Introductory lecture course to the field of Parasitology. Provides basic knowledge about the morphology and biology of parasitic animals. Coverage includes a diversity of protozoan and metazoan groups parasitizing animals, including humans (e.g., malaria, amoebas, hookworms, tapeworms). Some emphasis is given to groups of parasites of particular medical and/or economic importance. Selected principles of parasitism are introduced. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or BIOL 153, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 481. Parasitology Laboratory. 1 Hour U / LFE.

Laboratory course in the study of protozoan and metazoan parasites of animal, including humans, emphasizing their diversity, classification, morphology, and identification. One three-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOL 480. LAB.

BIOL 494. Introduction to Mammalogy. 3 Hours / LFE.

A study of mammals, with emphasis on evolution, biogeography, systematics, and natural history. Lectures, laboratory, and field study. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or 153 or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 499. Introduction to Honors Research. 2 Hours N.

Intended for sophomores planning to enroll in the Biology Honors Program. Students interested in pursing Biology Honors discuss with Biology faculty members the rationale, methods, and interpretations of research being carried out in individual faculty labs to learn how scientific research is conducted. Prerequisite: At least 17 credit hours of college level natural sciences coursework or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 500. Biology of Insects. 3 Hours N.

Lectures and demonstrations providing an introduction to the study of insects, including general classification, structure, phylogeny, identification, development, physiology, behavior, ecology, and relations to human affairs. Prerequisite: BIOL 152, 153, or equivalent, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 502. Laboratory in Insect Biology and Diversity. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Laboratory and field studies of insects, emphasizing their diversity, classification, ecological relationships, morphology, and behavior. Course provides practical application of principles covered in BIOL 500. Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOL 500 or the equivalent. LAB.

BIOL 503. Immunology. 3 Hours N.

Lectures on the nature and mechanisms of natural and acquired resistance including humoral and cellular immunity. Characteristics of antigens and antibodies and of their interaction; ontogeny and cellular basis of immune responsiveness, hypersensitivity; specific immunologic tolerance. Prerequisite: BIOL 400 or BIOL 401, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 504. Immunology Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Laboratory designed to complement BIOL 503. Prerequisite: BIOL 503, or BIOL 503 concurrently. LAB.

BIOL 505. Social Insects. 3 Hours N.

Lectures and laboratory demonstrations on presocial and social insects, specifically termites, ants, wasps, and bees. Emphasis will be placed on evolution of social behavior and the place of social insects in sociobiology. Prerequisite: BIOL 152, BIOL 153, or equivalent. LEC.

BIOL 506. Bacterial Infectious Diseases. 3 Hours N.

Explores bacterial infectious diseases from the perspective of how disease is established and the mechanisms that underlie disease, as well as how to treat and prevent infectious disease. Not open to freshmen or sophomores. Prerequisite: BIOL 400 or BIOL 401, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 507. Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Laboratory to complement BIOL 506. Cultivation of pathogenic microorganisms, diagnostic procedures, and experiments to demonstrate various aspects of microbial pathogenicity and host responses. Prerequisite: BIOL 402 and BIOL 506 (or concurrent enrollment) or consent of instructor. LAB.

BIOL 509. Biology of Spiders. 3 Hours N.

An introduction to the evolution, anatomy, physiology, behavior, and ecology of spiders and other arachnids. Special topics include the action of spider venoms; the composition and uses of silk; courtship and mating; predation; social behavior; and the role of spiders in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 511 is encouraged. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 , BIOL 153 or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 510. Comparative Anatomy. 5 Hours N / LFE.

Structure, function, and evolution of the vertebrates. Lectures and laboratory study. A course designed for zoologists. Prerequisite: BIOL 100, BIOL 101, BIOL 150, or BIOL 151 and BIOL 152 or BIOL 153. LEC.

BIOL 511. Biology of Spiders Laboratory. 1 Hour U / LFE.

Topics will include comparative biology of arachnid orders (spiders, scorpions, harvestmen, mites, and others), external and internal anatomy of spiders, identification of common spider families and genera, and spider behavior. Students will be required to make a small collection (collect, preserve, and identify specimens). Prerequisite: BIOL 509; concurrent enrollment is preferred. LAB.

BIOL 512. General Virology. 3 Hours N.

Lectures and discussions covering the basic nature and characteristics of viruses from a general biological point of view: viruses of bacteria, animals and plants, physical-chemical properties; host cell-viral interactions; mode of replication of DNA and RNA viruses, tumor viruses. Prerequisite: BIOL 400, BIOL 401 or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 513. Virology Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Experiments involving cultivation, quantitation, and identification of animal viruses, continuous cell culture and primary chicken embryo culture techniques. Molecular biology techniques are used to demonstrate the steps in virus replication. The value of viruses as tools to understand normal cellular processes is emphasized in experiments which demonstrate the relative simplicity of viruses and the relative complexity of eukaryotic cells. Demonstrations include transformation of cells by tumor viruses and electron microscopy of virus particles. Prerequisite: BIOL 402 and BIOL 512, or consent of instructor. LAB.

BIOL 514. Principles of Ecology, Honors. 3 Hours N.

Honors section of BIOL 414 for students with superior academic records. Course covers core concepts on the ecology of individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystems. Relative to BIOL 414, topics are presented in greater depth with increased student participation and stronger emphasis on the primary scientific literature. Prerequisite: BIOL 100, BIOL 101, BIOL 150, or BIOL 151 and BIOL 152 or BIOL 153. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 516. Microbial Physiology. 3 Hours N.

Elements of microbial physiology. Carbohydrate metabolism; enzymes and coenzymes; microbial nutrition; quantitative problems in microbial physiology; a survey of microbial metabolic types. Prerequisite: BIOL 400 or BIOL 612 and BIOL 402, and five hours of organic chemistry. LEC.

BIOL 517. Microbial Physiology Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Laboratory designed to complement BIOL 516. Prerequisite: BIOL 516, or BIOL 516 concurrently. LAB.

BIOL 518. Microbial Genetics. 3 Hours N.

Bacteria and viruses as models of genetic systems. Mutagenesis and repair. Transformation, transductions, and recombination. Molecular biology of gene expression. Prerequisite: An introductory microbiology course. LEC.

BIOL 519. Microbial Genetics Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Laboratory designed to complement BIOL 518. Prerequisite: BIOL 402, BIOL 518, or BIOL 518 concurrently. LAB.

BIOL 520. Marine Biology. 3 Hours N.

This introductory course covers biological, physical, and chemical ocean sciences, with an emphasis on ecological aspects. In addition to this Lawrence campus course, students may enroll for a supplementary 1 credit field trip class to a Caribbean coral reef island offered in December or January. Prerequisite: BIOL 414 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 521. Insect Systematics. 4 Hours N.

A study of the diversity of insects, including the classification of all living and fossil orders and the more common families primarily on the basis of external morphology. The biology, ecology, phylogeny, and geological history of each order is covered. Includes both lectures and laboratory exercises. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: BIOL 500, BIOL 502 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 525. Aquatic Entomology. 4 Hours N.

Designed to enable students to develop skill in the area of identification of aquatic insects and to gain a detailed comprehension of their community structure and dynamics. The external morphology of all aquatic orders is covered, followed by consideration of specific physiological and behavioral adaptations that facilitate an aquatic existence. Includes both lectures and laboratory exercises. Requirements include making a collection of aquatic insects. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: BIOL 414 or BIOL 500. LEC.

BIOL 526. Insect Physiology and Internal Morphology. 3 Hours N.

Mechanisms and integration of the internal life-supporting systems of insects, emphasizing the interdependence of structure and function. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: BIOL 408 and BIOL 500, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 527. Primate Evolution and the Fossil Record. 3 Hours N.

This course exposes students to fundamental concepts of paleontology and evolutionary biology using the mammalian order Primates as a high-profile case study. Primates are interesting partly because humans are primates. Hence, scientific understanding of human origins and human evolution must be grounded in knowledge of our nearest relatives. This course places human origins within the broader framework of how primates have evolved over the course of the Cenozoic Era, often in response to radical changes in the Earth's physical environment. Prerequisite: BIOL 412 or BIOL 413, or consent of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 528. External Morphology of Insects. 4 Hours N.

A study of external structure common to all insect orders, with detailed comparative laboratory studies of representative species. Includes both lectures and laboratory exercises. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: BIOL 500, BIOL 502 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 529. Immature Insects. 3 Hours N.

The classification, structure, and ecological distribution of immature insects, especially larvae of Holometabola. Includes both lectures and laboratory exercises. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: BIOL 502 or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 530. Biodiversity Discovery and Assessment. 2 Hours N.

An integrated lecture and laboratory course designed to provide an overview of modern methods in biodiversity exploration and discovery. Lectures cover the theory and practice of planning fieldwork in remote locations, documenting species and their natural history, how museum collections are made, calculating and comparing species richness estimates, and the process of describing and naming new species. The laboratory component provides students experience in documenting species and their natural history, processing and curating samples of natural history specimens, and the statistical analysis of biodiversity data. (Same as EVRN 530.) Prerequisite: BIOL 152, 153, or equivalent, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 531. Tropical Fieldwork in Biodiversity Discovery. 1 Hour U.

An introduction to modern field methods of assessing biodiversity. Fieldwork employs insects and various field methods to estimate and compare species diversity between different habitats and field sites. Taught at different sites in tropical South America over Spring Break. Contact Undergraduate Biology, or the Office of Study Abroad. (Same as EVRN 531.) Prerequisite: BIOL 152, 153, or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Concurrent or prior enrollment of BIOL 530 is strongly encouraged. LAB.

BIOL 533. Biology of Fungi. 4 Hours N / LFE.

A study of the major groups of fungi from slime molds to mushrooms. Emphasis on their activities in natural substrates, isolation techniques, parasitic and mutualistic relationships with other organisms, uses in research, industrial applications, production of mycotoxins and poisons, and physiological, genetic and reproductive behavior. Lectures, laboratory, and field trips. Prerequisite: BIOL 100, BIOL 101, BIOL 150, or BIOL 151 and BIOL 152 or BIOL 153. LEC.

BIOL 536. Cell Structure and Function (Honors). 3 Hours N.

BIOL 536 is the honors version of BIOL 416. Completion of this class will satisfy the BIOL 416 requirement. Open to students in the Honors program or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: BIOL 350 or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 540. General Invertebrate Zoology. 4 Hours N / LFE.

Phylogeny, physiology, and embryology; evolutionary processes; characteristics of major ecological groupings. Laboratory will consider major taxonomic categories with emphasis on functional morphology and its evolutionary modifications. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or BIOL 153. LEC.

BIOL 541. Biology of Freshwater Invertebrates. 3 Hours N.

A lecture and laboratory course examining the classification, biological characteristics, and ecology of invertebrates in rivers, lakes, and wetlands. Major groups of benthic and planktonic invertebrates will be studied, including aquatic insects, crustaceans, molluscs, and others. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or BIOL 153; recommended BIOL 414 or BIOL 514, and/or BIOL 540. LEC.

BIOL 545. Evolution of Development. 5 Hours N.

An advanced course designed to expose students to evolutionary change in the developmental patterning of plant and animal form. This course includes a lecture component and a laboratory component to integrate multiple biological disciplines including comparative morphology, molecular evolution, developmental genetics and experimental development, to explore biodiversity at a mechanistic level. Lectures are designed to give students background on topics ranging from homology assessment to empirical examples of how changes in gene expression or function may have shaped morphological diversity. The laboratory complements these topics through observations of normal development in a diversity of plant and animal model organisms, and through conducting independent research experiments. Prerequisite: BIOL 350 or equivalent. LEC.

BIOL 555. General Plant Physiology. 3 Hours N.

The principal physiological processes of higher plants including photosynthesis, respiration, water relations, mineral nutrition, and factors associated with morphogenesis. Prerequisite: BIOL 408 or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 560. Histology. 3 Hours N.

Study of detailed microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, and organs of mammals. Examples are drawn from normal and abnormal tissue, histochemistry, and electron microscopy. Lecture and demonstrations. A course in anatomy and physiology is highly recommended. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or BIOL 153. LEC.

BIOL 570. Introduction to Biostatistics. 3 Hours N / LFE.

Statistical concepts related to biological problems. Topics include the scientific method, data representation, descriptive statistics, elementary probability distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing, emphasizing the analysis of variation. Prerequisite: College algebra and ten hours of natural science. LEC.

BIOL 571. Introduction to Biostatistics Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Introductory statistical analyses on microcomputers. Data entry and export; simple graphs and exploratory data analysis; descriptive statistics; sampling; point and interval estimation; one and two sample t-tests; Chi-square; regression and correlation; analysis of variance; and nonparametric methods. Prerequisite: BIOL 570 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently). LAB.

BIOL 582. Principles of Biogeography. 3 Hours N.

An introduction to the study of the distribution of life on earth. Covers geographical patterns of species diversity and the processes that give rise to those patterns: speciation, extinction, dispersal, vicariance, continental drift, ecological interactions, and phylogeny. Topics are presented within the framework of evolutionary history and include discussion of the biology of species on islands, terrestrial biomes, altitudinal zonation of species, latitudinal species gradients, historical factors governing species distributions, macroevolutionary trends in the fossil record, and application of modern molecular techniques for testing biogeographical hypotheses. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or 153 and past or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 412, 413, 414, or 550; or permission of Instructor. LEC.

BIOL 583. Herpetology. 3 Hours N.

A study of amphibians and reptiles. This lecture course will explore the taxonomic diversity of amphibians and reptiles, and current areas of active research in herpetology. Topics will be considered within a phylogenetic framework, and include discussion on systematics, biogeography, tetrapod origins, skeletal systems, growth, circulatory system, locomotion, thermal and water regulation, hibernation, ecology, sexual behavior, parental care, and mimicry. LEC.

BIOL 592. Ichthyology. 4 Hours N / LFE.

A study of fishes. Lecture topics include the structure and adaptations of fishes to the aquatic environment and a survey of major fish groups with emphasis on their evolution and biogeography. Laboratory topics include a survey of fish diversity using specimens and the use of keys to identify fishes, with emphasis on the Kansas fish fauna. This course meets with BIOL 792. Students taking this course at the 700 level will have additional work required of them. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 and/or BIOL 413. LEC.

BIOL 593. Ornithology. 3 Hours N / LFE.

A lecture and laboratory course on the biology, evolution, and diversity of birds. Prerequisite: BIOL 412 (or BIOL 413), or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 594. Forest Ecosystems. 3 Hours.

Students learn basic concepts of forest productivity, forest water relations, forest hydrology, nutrient cycling, through soils and vegetation, nutrient uptake, carbon cycling, decomposition, linkages to aquatic ecosystems, and agents of disturbance to these cycles. The class spends a significant part of the semester exploring forest soil profiles and the challenges they present to different forest ecosystems. We discuss the function of forested ecosystems in a global context and identify and understand smaller-scale processes that drive forest function. Prerequisite: CHEM 135 or CHEM 195 or CHEM 175, and BIOL 414. LEC.

BIOL 595. Human Genetics. 3 Hours N.

A lecture course providing balanced coverage of Mendelian and molecular genetics of humans; includes discussions and presentations on current issues in human and medical genetics. Prerequisite: BIOL 350. LEC.

BIOL 598. Research Methods. 3 Hours N / LFE.

An introduction for pre-service teachers to the tools used by scientists to solve scientific problems. Topics include design of experiments and interpretation of their results, use of statistics, mathematical modeling, laboratory safety, ethical treatment of human subjects, writing scientific papers, giving oral presentations, and obtaining data from the scientific literature. Open only to students in the UKanTeach program. LEC.

BIOL 599. Senior Seminar: _____. 1 Hour AE61 / N.

A synthesis and discussion of current trends in a discipline or disciplines related to one of the degrees offered in the biological sciences. Emphasis is placed on providing seniors with an appreciation of the discipline's state-of-the-art and on developing skills for success in the next stage of a career in the biological sciences. Topics depend on the associated degree program. Prerequisite: Must be taken in the final year of a degree and students must have completed most of the course work required for one of the degrees in the biological sciences. LEC.

BIOL 600. Introductory Biochemistry, Lectures. 3 Hours N.

Designed to offer the essentials of the chemistry of the constituents of living organisms and the changes these constituents undergo (during life processes) in the human body and other living forms. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 and one semester of organic chemistry. LEC.

BIOL 601. Principles of Biochemistry Laboratory. 2 Hours.

Theory and methods in the development of protein separation and purification, enzyme structure/function, and enzyme kinetics derived from primary literature searches and readings. Prerequisite: Corequisite: BIOL 600; or consent of instructor. LAB.

BIOL 602. Plant Ecology. 3 Hours N.

Introduction to basic concepts, focused at community and species level. Architectural ecomorphology of plants and their physiological responses to physical factors: solar radiation, climate, and soils. Plant succession as an interaction among species differing in ecomorphology and life style. Classification and ordination of plant communities: practice and theory. Other topics include: species diversity and lognormal distribution as to abundance classes; species/area relations and theory of island biogeography; allelochemic defenses; genecology; paleoecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 414 or consent of instructor. Concurrent enrollment in parallel laboratory, BIOL 607, recommended. LEC.

BIOL 603. Systematic Botany. 3 Hours N / LFE.

A lecture/laboratory course providing hands-on experience with plant identification, a history of plant classification, the principles of nomenclature and character analysis, the basics of systematics theory, and a phylogenically-oriented introduction to vascular plant diversity. Prerequisite: BIOL 413 or equivalent. LEC.

BIOL 606. Ecological Plant Physiology. 3 Hours N.

Physiological responses of higher plants to environmental factors are discussed. Major topics are: water relations, heat transfer, resistance to water and temperature stress, dormancy, photoperiodism, photosynthesis and respiration under natural conditions, and effects of environmental pollution. Prerequisite: BIOL 408 or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 607. Field and Laboratory Exercises in Plant Ecology. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Introduction to quantitative analysis of plant communities and correlated environmental parameters; field and/or laboratory measurements of ecophysiological traits and comparative ecomorphology of principal species. Prerequisite: BIOL 414. Concurrent enrollment in parallel lecture, BIOL 602, recommended, but not required. LAB.

BIOL 609. Current Progress in Microbiology. 1 Hour U.

A seminar course which will focus on current research in microbiology. A term paper will be required of each student. May be repeated for credit. Required of all majors in the senior year. Prerequisite: Two courses in microbiology. LEC.

BIOL 611. Molecular Systematics and Evolution. 4 Hours N / LFE.

An introduction to the use of molecular data in systematics and population biology. Topics include: evolution of genes and proteins; properties of mitochondrial DNA, chloroplast DNA, ribosomal RNA genes, protein-coding genes, and repetitive DNAs; laboratory methods for data collection; and data analysis. Prerequisite: BIOL 350. BIOL 550 or equivalent is recommended. LEC.

BIOL 612. Fundamentals of Microbiology. 3 Hours NB / N.

Lectures. Fundamental principles of microbiology with emphasis in physical and chemical properties of the bacterial cell; microbial metabolism, cultivation, growth and death of bacteria; microbial genetics; pathogenesis and immunity, industrially important microorganisms. Meets with BIOL 400, but students will be given additional and more advanced assignments, and will carry higher expectations. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 and two semesters of college chemistry, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 613. Biology of Honeybees. 3 Hours N.

Social organization, evolution, behavior, morphology, communication, pollination biology, and ecology of honeybees. Experience will be gained with colony dynamics and behavior while working with bees in the field. Prerequisite: BIOL 152, BIOL 153, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 616. Medical Entomology. 3 Hours N.

A study of the major human diseases transmitted by arthropods with emphasis on the biology and ecology of vectors, vector feeding mechanisms as related to disease transmission, epidemiology of arthropod-borne diseases, and the impact of arthropod-borne diseases on humans. Laboratory work on recognition of vector species, information sources, and use of taxonomic keys. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or BIOL 153 and a course in microbiology or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 622. Paleontology. 3 Hours N.

A study of the structure and evolution of ancient life; the nature and diversity of life through time; the interactions of ancient organisms with their environments and the information that the study of fossils provides about ancient environments; the use of fossils to determine the ages of rocks and the timing of past events in earth history; and the patterns of extinction through time. (Same as GEOL 521.) Prerequisite: BIOL 100, BIOL 101, BIOL 152, BIOL 153, GEOL 105, or GEOL 304. LEC.

BIOL 623. Paleontology Laboratory. 1 Hour U / LFE.

Laboratory course in the study of fossils with emphasis on the practice of paleontology and the morphology of ancient organisms. (Same as GEOL 523.) LAB.

BIOL 625. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 3 Hours N.

The role of natural selection in animal behavior, and the influence of behavior on population biology and social dynamics of animal species. Topics include: game theory and optimization as applied to animal behavior; altruism, cooperation and competition; kin recognition and interactions; group formation and dynamics, dominance, aggression, and territoriality; feeding strategies; reproductive behavior including mate choice, parental care, and mating systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 152; either BIOL 350, BIOL 412 or BIOL 414 recommended; or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 630. Conservation and Wildlife Biology. 3 Hours N.

Examination of the concepts and processes involved in conservation of plant and animal populations and communities. Topics to be covered include conservation of endangered species, problems with invasions of exotic species and habitat fragmentation, wildlife management, and design of nature reserves. Prerequisite: BIOL 414, BIOL 412 strongly recommended. LEC.

BIOL 636. Biochemistry I. 3 Hours N.

First semester of a two-semester lecture course in introductory biochemistry. Emphasis upon the physical structure of macromolecules and membranes, enzyme structure/function, and enzyme kinetics. Prerequisite: CHEM 335 or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 637. Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

The laboratory portion of BIOL 600 or 636. Experiments have been selected to introduce the student to cell constituents and biochemical reactions. One four-hour laboratory and one-hour lecture each week. Prerequisite: BIOL 600 or BIOL 636, or concurrent enrollment. LAB.

BIOL 638. Biochemistry II. 3 Hours N.

Second semester of a two-semester lecture course in introductory biochemistry. Emphasis upon the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Prerequisite: BIOL 636. LEC.

BIOL 639. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

The laboratory portion of BIOL 638. One four-hour laboratory and a one-hour lecture each week. Experiments have been selected to familiarize students with experimental biochemical techniques using state-of-the-art methodology. Prerequisite: BIOL 637 and 638 (BIOL 638 may be taken concurrently). LAB.

BIOL 640. The Biology and Evolution of Fossil Plants. 3 Hours N.

A lecture course in which fossil plants, protists and fungi are examined throughout geologic time. Emphasis will be directed at paleoecology, biogeography and the stratigraphic distribution and composition of ancient floras. (Same as GEOL 528.) Prerequisite: BIOL 413 or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 641. Laboratory in Paleobotany. 1 Hour U / LFE.

An examination of selected fossil plants throughout geological time and the techniques used to study them; laboratory will include identification and the use of plant fossils in biostratigraphy. (Same as GEOL 529.) Prerequisite: BIOL 413 or permission of instructor. Must be taken concurrently with BIOL 640. LAB.

BIOL 644. Comparative Animal Physiology. 3 Hours N.

Lecture and discussion of the basic mechanism of organic maintenance and integration; a comparative treatment of the uniformities and diversity of animal function; emphasis on environmental adaptations and evolutionary relationships. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or BIOL 153, and a course in organic chemistry, or consent of instructor. A college physics course is recommended but not required. LEC.

BIOL 646. Mammalian Physiology. 4 Hours N.

Lectures and demonstrations. An intermediate course in the functions, mechanisms and interactions of mammalian organ systems. Discussions span topics from molecular to whole animal functions. Required for pharmacy students and strongly recommended for students planning advanced work in any area of physiology. The student is assumed to have the knowledge and ability to utilize their math and science background. Prerequisite: Five hours of organic chemistry, a course of college physics. LEC.

BIOL 647. Mammalian Physiology Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Laboratory experiments in representative areas of mammalian physiology designed to complement BIOL 646. Not open to students with credit in BIOL 247. Prerequisite: Corequisite: BIOL 646. LAB.

BIOL 648. Systematics and Macroevolution. 3 Hours N.

An introduction to the theory of macroevolution and the fundamental principles of systematics. Intended for students planning to pursue advanced studies in organismal biology, evolution, and/or systematics. Topics in macroevolution will include hierarchy theory, species concepts, speciation and species selection. Methods of phylogenetic estimation will be discussed and include parsimony, Maximum likelihood and Baysian inference. Evolutionary studies utilizing phylogenies including tests of homology, studies of character evolution, and biogeography will be discussed. An overview of classification and nomenclature will also be provided. Prerequisite: BIOL 412 or equivalent. LEC.

BIOL 650. Advanced Neurobiology. 3 Hours N.

The course builds an in depth knowledge about basic mechanisms of synaptic communication among nerve cells and their targets, and the structure and function of nervous systems. Topics include nervous system development and synapse formation, structure and function of neurons, physiological and molecular basis of synaptic communication between neurons, mechanisms of synaptic plasticity involved in learning and memory, sensory systems (vision, auditory, vestibular, motor reflexes and pain), processing of neural information at cellular and system levels, synapse regeneration and diseases of the nervous system. Prerequisite: BIOL 435 (Introduction to Neurobiology), or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 652. Comparative Animal Behavior. 3 Hours N.

A comparative analysis of behavior as an adaptive mechanism; emphasis on ontogenetic and evolutionary aspects of behavior. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 or BIOL 153; and BIOL 412. Alternatively, BIOL 412 may be taken as a corequisite. LEC.

BIOL 654. Comparative Animal Behavior, Laboratory. 1 Hour U / LFE.

Laboratory and field phase of BIOL 652. Students may elect sections according to their special interests. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 652. LAB.

BIOL 655. Behavioral Genetics. 3 Hours N.

A survey of behavioral genetics in animals and humans. Emphasis is on how the methods and theories of quantitative, population and molecular genetics can be applied to individual and group differences in animals. Behaviors covered may include circadian rhythms, foraging, courtship, learning and memory, anxiety, social structures and human behaviors. Prerequisite: BIOL 350 or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 656. Ecosystem Ecology. 3 Hours N.

An introduction to the patterns and processes that affect terrestrial ecosystems. Emphasis is placed on understanding nutrient cycles (e.g., carbon nitrogen phosphorous), hydrologic cycles, and patterns of net primary productivity. The role of both natural and anthropogenic disturbances in structuring terrestrial ecosystems is examined in the context of global land-use patterns. Discussion of current research literature will be expected. (Same as EVRN 656.) Prerequisite: BIOL 414 and CHEM 130. LEC.

BIOL 661. Ecology of Rivers and Lakes. 3 Hours N.

Study of the ecology and structure of creeks, rivers, ponds, lakes, and wetlands as well as some of the major human impacts. Prerequisite: One year of biology or permission of the instructor. BIOL 414 recommended. LEC.

BIOL 662. Aquatic Ecology Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

A field and laboratory course introducing biological, physical, and chemical characteristics of lentic (ponds and lakes) and lotic (creeks and rivers) habitats. Students learn sampling and monitoring techniques and how to classify aquatic biota at higher taxonomic levels. Co- or prerequisite: CHEM 130 or CHEM 190 or CHEM 170, and BIOL 661. LAB.

BIOL 664. Vertebrate Biology. 3 Hours N.

A laboratory course emphasizing principles of systematics and identification and the behavioral ecology of local vertebrate animals. Prerequisite: BIOL 152, BIOL 153 or consent of instructor. LAB.

BIOL 667. Chemical Communication in Sex, Feeding, and Fighting. 3 Hours N.

The course focuses on the role of chemical information molecules in the interrelationships among organisms, with particular attention to interactions (a) within and between animal species, (b) within and between plant species, (c) between animals and plants, (d) between predators and prey, and (e) between parasites and hosts. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or BIOL 101 or BIOL 152 or BIOL 153 or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 668. Evolutionary Ecology. 3 Hours N.

Emphasis will be on the themes that interface ecology and evolutionary studies. Topics will include selection theory; reproductive, foraging, and sex allocation problems; coevolution; patterns or morphological and behavioral adaptations; competition, predation, and population regulation. Special attention will be given to the philosophy and practice of resolving unanswered questions in evolutionary ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 412 or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 672. Gene Expression. 3 Hours N.

A study of the structure and expression of genes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Emphasis on the mechanisms of DNA, RNA, and protein biosynthesis. Prerequisite: A course in biochemistry or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 673. Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology. 3 Hours.

Mechanisms of neural function and development will be considered at the cellular and molecular levels. Synaptic mechanisms of learning and memory, modulation of transmitter release, and the molecular basis of neurodegenerative disorders will also be discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 435, BIOL 646, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 676. Mammalian Neuroanatomy. 3 Hours N.

Lectures, video tape demonstrations, and laboratory dissection of mammalian nervous system with some attention to human material. Major emphasis on nervous system structure as it relates to function. For neurobiology and pre-health science majors. Prerequisite: Corequisite: A course in neurobiology (BIOL 435, BIOL 650), or permission of the instructor. LAB.

BIOL 688. The Molecular Biology of Cancer. 3 Hours N.

The basic concepts of molecular biology are examined and used to probe the process by which a normal cell becomes a cancer cell. The course investigates DNA damage and repair, chemical carcinogenesis, gene cloning and manipulation, the control of gene expression in eukaryotes, tumor viruses, the roles of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in carcinogenesis, and cancer therapy. Prerequisite: BIOL 350 and BIOL 416; or BIOL 536; or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 694. The Art of Becoming a Professional Scientist. 3 Hours N.

Discusses aspects of graduate education that are directed at students entering graduate school and that focus on how to be successful in the post PhD phases of a career, but that must be initiated early in the graduate student program of study. One three hour discussion per week. Senior standing and planning on entering graduate school. LEC.

BIOL 695. Animal Communication and Sensory Ecology. 3 Hours N.

Lectures and discussion sessions. A study of the propagation and perception of olfactory, acoustic, and visual signals produced by animals in the context of communication. Both physiological and evolutionary perspectives will be treated. Prerequisite: A course in behavior or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 699. Biology Honors Research Colloquium. 1 Hour AE61 / U.

Students pursuing Honors in Biology will meet weekly to discuss, both formally and informally, their honors research. Background information and experimental approaches of the research will be examined and critiqued. Prerequisite: Enrollment in Biology Honors program and consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 700. Conservation Principles and Practices. 3 Hours.

This course will acquaint the future museum professional with problems in conserving all types of collections. Philosophical and ethical approaches will be discussed, as well as the changing practices regarding conservation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on detection and identification of causes of deterioration in objects made of organic and inorganic materials, and how these problems can be remedied. Storage and care of objects will also be considered. (Same as AMS 714, GEOL 780, HIST 722 and MUSE 706.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 701. Topics in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Advanced courses on special topics in biology, given as need arises. Lectures, discussions, readings, laboratory, or field work. Students may select sections according to their special interests. LEC.

BIOL 702. Laboratory Practice: Radiation Safety Procedures. 0.75 Hours.

An introduction to the basic properties of radioisotopes, and the fundamental safety practices needed for the safe use of low levels of radioactive materials. Risks associated with radiation exposures and applicable state and federal regulations are discussed. (Normally the content of the first ten hours of BIOL 703.) Prerequisite: Senior standing in one of the sciences. LAB.

BIOL 703. Radioisotopes and Radiation Safety in Research. 1.25 Hour.

An introduction to the properties of radioactive materials, radiations, and their interaction with matter, methods of radiation detection and measurement, protective measures, applicable state and federal regulations, design and implementation of safety management systems in the research laboratory, design of tracer experiments, and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Prerequisite: BIOL 702 or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 702, algebra and two semesters of either physics or chemistry. LEC.

BIOL 704. Research Animal Methods. 3 Hours.

Lectures, discussions, and laboratory sessions. Selection of proper animal models for specific research studies. Various external influences that alter research data. Routine techniques including restraint, sample collection, injection, anesthesia and euthanasia. Prevention and handling of common research animal problems or diseases. Proper and humane animal care as defined by the Federal Animal Welfare Act. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in one of the biological sciences or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 706. Current Trends in Curation and Collection Management. 2 Hours.

Seminar course to provide students with a working knowledge of the primary issues and current trends in building, administration, and care of scientific collections. Topics include permits, collecting, accessioning, cataloging, preservation, preventive conservation, and access to collections and data. The course format consists of readings, lectures, guest speakers, discussions, and visits to scientific collections on campus. (Same as MUSE 710.) LEC.

BIOL 708. External Morphology of Insects. 4 Hours.

A study of external structure common to all insect orders, with detailed comparative laboratory studies of representative species. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: BIOL 500, BIOL 502 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 709. Immature Insects. 3 Hours.

The classification, structure, and ecological distribution of immature insects, especially larvae of Holometabola. Includes both lectures and laboratories. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: BIOL 502 or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 710. Insect Development. 3 Hours.

A study of the embryonic and postembryonic development of insects. Emphasis is placed on developmental physiology of the early embryonic stages, the morphogenesis of organ systems, and the action of hormones in postembryonic development. Laboratory includes demonstrations and histological and experimental work. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or BIOL 500. LEC.

BIOL 711. Insect Systematics. 4 Hours N.

A study of the diversity of insects, including the classification of all living and fossil orders and the more common families primarily on the basis of external morphology. The biology, ecology, phylogeny, and geological history of each order will be covered. Includes both lectures and laboratory exercises. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: BIOL 500 and BIOL 502 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 712. Evolutionary Biology - Graduate. 3 Hours.

A thorough survey of evolutionary biology. Topics include: the history of evolutionary thought, genetics and the nature of variation, adaptation, speciation, coevolution, macroevolution, the comparative method, and the history of life. Prerequisite: BIOL 350 or equivalent or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 714. Community and Ecosystem Ecology. 3 Hours.

Study of factors determining distribution of organisms, community structures, energy flow in ecosystems, and functional analysis of ecosystems. Discussion periods will include reading from current scientific literature. Prerequisite: Intended for graduate students in biology who did not have an undergraduate course in community ecology. Consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 716. Insect Physiology and Internal Morphology. 3 Hours.

Mechanisms and integration of the internal life-supporting systems of insects, emphasizing the interdependence of structure and function. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: BIOL 408 and BIOL 500, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 717. Insect Ecology and Behavior. 3 Hours.

Lectures and laboratory demonstrations. A study of insect population dynamics, life history strategies, co-evolutionary interactions, foraging, and reproductive and social behaviors. Approaches from basic population biology and behavioral ecology are emphasized. Prerequisite: A course in ecology or behavior, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 718. Laboratory in Molecular Biology. 3 Hours.

Practical experience in recombinant DNA technology and molecular cloning. Given concurrent with BIOL 418. Prerequisite: BIOL 416 or course in biochemistry or microbiology. Training in radiation safety preferred. LAB.

BIOL 719. Light and Electron Microscopy. 3 Hours.

A lecture and laboratory class emphasizing the theoretical and practical use of light microscopes and scanning and transmission electron microscopes. A variety of approaches using light microscopy will be employed, including brightfield, phase, fluorescence, DIC, polarization, and darkfield optics. A variety of techniques will be used to prepare specimens and view them using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Video and computer-aided analysis of images as well as conventional photographic techniques will be included. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 720. Scientific Illustration. 3 Hours.

Lectures, demonstrations, and studio participation. Instruction in the preparation of illustrations for scientific publications, theses, and oral and poster presentations. Emphasis on basic drafting and layout skills, and pen and ink and tone renderings intended for publication. Attention given to preparation of photographs for publication and oral presentations. Instruction provided in use of specialized optical equipment for drawing. Prerequisite: Upper division or graduate standing and permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 721. Microbial Genetics. 3 Hours.

Bacteria and viruses as models of genetic systems. Mutagenesis and repair. Transformation, transductions, and recombination. Molecular biology of gene expression. This course is the graduate-level section of BIOL 518 and MCRB 510. Graduate students will be assigned additional and more advanced studies. Prerequisite: An introductory microbiology course or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 725. Aquatic Entomology. 4 Hours.

Identification of aquatic insects and detailed study of their community structure and dynamics. The external morphology of all aquatic orders will be covered, followed by consideration of specific physiological and behavioral adaptations that facilitate an aquatic existence. Includes both lectures and laboratory exercises. Requirements include making a collection of aquatic insects. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: BIOL 414 or BIOL 500 or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 741. Biology of Freshwater Invertebrates. 3 Hours.

A lecture and laboratory course examining the classification, biological characteristics, and ecology of invertebrates in rivers, lakes, and wetlands. Major groups of benthic and planktonic invertebrates will be studied, including aquatic insects, crustaceans, molluscs, and others. Graduate students will be expected to submit either an original collection of freshwater invertebrates or write a research essay on a topic mutually agreed upon with the professor. Not open to students who have taken BIOL 541. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; recommended: undergraduate invertebrate biology class. LEC.

BIOL 742. Plant Population Biology. 3 Hours.

A survey of the major areas of plant population ecology and genetics including competition, demography, pollination ecology, gene flow, natural selection and mating systems. Each topic is introduced by a lecture and is further explored by discussion of the current literature. Prerequisite: BIOL 412 or equivalent. LEC.

BIOL 743. Population Genetics. 3 Hours.

Description and discussion of genetic variation in natural populations. The effects and interaction of selection, migration, mutation, mating systems, and finite population size on the maintenance of genetic variation. Discussion of the interface with evolution and population ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 350 and BIOL 412 or equivalent. LEC.

BIOL 745. Laboratory in Experimental Ecology. 3 Hours.

A series of seven laboratory modules emphasizing quantitative methods and experimental analysis. Each module requires data collection analysis, and written interpretation. Modern instrumentation, including use of microcomputers, is emphasized. Topics include ecological modeling, ecological genetics, physiological ecology, community structure, mating and reproduction and precipitation and soil chemistry. Prerequisite: BIOL 412 or BIOL 414. LAB.

BIOL 746. Principles of Systematics. 4 Hours.

Lectures: historical and philosophical foundations of modern systematics; theory and practice of classifications; character analysis; phylogeny reconstruction; formulation and testing of systematic hypotheses; species concepts and speciation; the interface between systematics and evolutionary theory, particularly the origins of asymmetric diversity patterns, macroevolution, adaptation, coevolution, and the evolution of higher taxa; roles of paleontological, ontogenetic, biochemical, and molecular data in systematics; and biogeography. Laboratory work: practical applications of nomenclature, development of keys, descriptions and systematic revisions, character analysis, phylogeny reconstruction, hypothesis testing, interpretation of biogeographic patterns. (Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.) Prerequisite: BIOL 628 or equivalent. Intended for graduate students planning to specialize in systematics. LEC.

BIOL 747. Quantitative Genetics. 3 Hours.

A discussion of genetic traits for which individual gene differences do not separate a population into qualitatively distinct groups. Includes the estimation of heritability, genetic determination, and number of loci, and a study of selection theory. Prerequisite: BIOL 404 or BIOL 412 or equivalent and a course in statistics. LEC.

BIOL 749. Topics in Stable Isotopes in the Natural Sciences:. 2-3 Hours.

Isotopic compositions of substances provide powerful insights into many topics in the natural sciences. Applications of isotopic analyses of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen to selected research topics such as plant resource use, food web analysis, paleoecology, paleodiet reconstruction, hydrology, and soils genesis will be examined. Knowledge of isotope chemistry is not required. (Concepts necessary to understand pertinent articles will be taught during the first class meetings.) May be repeated. (Same as GEOG 749.) LEC.

BIOL 750. Advanced Biochemistry. 3 Hours.

The structures and dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids will be developed in terms of well-understood examples which will also be used to discuss the function of major classes of proteins. The application of structural and dynamical principles to biological membranes and their function will also be discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, a general biochemistry course, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 751. Plant Communities of North America. 3 Hours.

Physiognomic and floristic analysis of the vegetation, with emphasis on the Southwest; distribution of communities in relation to climate, substratum, and disturbance; recognition of dominant elements of vegetation through study of specimens and illustrative material. Prerequisite: BIOL 602. LEC.

BIOL 752. Cell Biology. 3 Hours.

A lecture course emphasizing biochemical, developmental, and molecular aspects of cell structure and function. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or BIOL 416 or BIOL 536, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 753. Advanced Genetics. 3 Hours.

An advanced course in modern genetic analysis of eukaryotes. Course material will consist mainly of primary literature in the field of genetics. Topics covered include: genomic structure and genome projects; nature of mutations; mutant analysis; genetic recombination and mapping; analysis of gene function; genetic buffering; RNAi and epigenetics; and the genetics of model organisms. This course is meant for graduate students in the Molecular Biosciences and Genetics programs. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in genetics and a course in biochemistry, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 754. Brain Diseases and Neurological Disorders. 3 Hours.

Major brain diseases and neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Huntington's Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Epilepsy, Schizophrenia, etc., will be discussed in terms of the etiology, molecular, and cellular basis of potential therapeutic interventions. Graduate students are required to present original research paper assigned by the instructor to the class in addition to the other assignments for all the students enrolled. Prerequisite: BIOL 150, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 755. Mechanisms of Development. 3 Hours.

Molecular aspects of differential gene function, signal transduction, and cell polarity in the regulation of morphogenesis. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808 for graduate students; BIOL 417 or equivalent for undergraduate students; or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 756. Cell and Tissue Culture Laboratory. 3 Hours.

An introduction to current laboratory methods of cell and tissue culture, intended to provide an understanding of and substantial experience in several aspects of animal cell growth, cell synchrony, cell nutrition, the production and selection of mutant cell lines, the production and use of heterokaryons and interspecific hybrids, cell transformation in vitro, the cultivation and characterization of differentiated cells in culture, enzyme induction, and cell karyotyping. LAB.

BIOL 757. Carcinogenesis and Cancer Biology. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the field of cancer research. The major goal is to introduce the breadth of cancer research while, at the same time, providing sufficient depth to allow the student to recognize problems in cancer and to design experiments which study cancer biology. Toward that end, the student should (at the conclusion of the course) be able to: define cancer, identify and discuss its causes; identify and discuss the genetic basis for cancer development and progression; discuss the theoretical basis for cancer therapy design and efficacy testing; discuss the biochemical, molecular and cellular events involved in the natural history of major human neoplasms. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 767. The Vegetation of the Earth. 3 Hours.

A discussion of the world's vegetation in its natural condition and as affected by man. Included are aspects of its economic and cultural usefulness and the problem of its preservation. Prerequisite: BIOL 634. LEC.

BIOL 768. Plant Molecular Biology. 3 Hours.

Gene expression in chloroplasts, mitochondria, and plant nuclei, and regulatory interactions among these genomes. Special topics include the molecular biology of the photosynthetic apparatus, nitrogen fixation, stress and development, viruses and viroids, transposable genetic elements and gene evolution, and gene transfer and plant genetic engineering. Prerequisite: A course in biochemistry, cell or molecular biology, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 770. Plant Biochemistry. 3 Hours.

A detailed study of plant biochemistry with emphasis on metabolic and regulatory processes particularly characteristic or unique in plants. Prerequisite: BIOL 600 or equivalent. LEC.

BIOL 772. Gene Expression. 4 Hours.

A study of the structure and expression of genes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Emphasis on the mechanisms of DNA, RNA, and protein biosynthesis. This course meets concurrently with BIOL 672 and is open to graduate students seeking a more rigorous treatment of techniques in molecular biology that students receive in BIOL 672. Prerequisite: A course in biochemistry or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 775. Chemistry of the Nervous System. 3 Hours.

A detailed study of the molecular aspects of nerve transmission will be covered with special emphasis on the uptake, storage, release, biosynthesis and metabolism of specific neurotransmitters. Drugs affecting these processes and current research on receptor isolation and receptor mechanisms will be discussed from a chemical viewpoint. (Same as CHEM 775, MDCM 775, NURO 775, P&TX 775, and PHCH 775.) Prerequisite: BIOL 600 or equivalent or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 777. Integrative and Developmental Neurobiology. 3 Hours.

Cellular processing of neural information both at the local level and in long distance integration. Local computing functions, and integration of these functions among the various areas to produce coherent movement and perceptions will be discussed. A description of forces guiding the development of the nervous system to form a coherent working system in both invertebrate and vertebrate animals will be presented, as will determinants of brain sexual dimorphism. Prerequisite: An upper level course in physiology or BIOL 520. LEC.

BIOL 780. Fisheries. 2 Hours.

Philosophy and practice of conservation as it applies to major world fisheries. Species principally utilized, factors affecting production, methods for appraisal and management of stocks. Historical and prospective roles of the fisheries in relation to human food supplies and recreational needs. Prerequisite: BIOL 412. LEC.

BIOL 781. Fisheries, Laboratory. 2 Hours.

Training in field and laboratory techniques for fishery research and management. Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior enrollment in BIOL 780. LAB.

BIOL 782. Principles of Biogeography. 3 Hours.

A synthesis of historical and ecological biogeography of plants and animals, treating vicariance, dispersal, and community patterns; lectures, readings, discussions. A course in systematics and a course in ecology are recommended. LEC.

BIOL 783. Herpetology. 3 Hours N.

A study of amphibians and reptiles. This lecture course will explore the taxonomic diversity of amphibians and reptiles, and current areas of active research in herpetology. Topics will be considered within a phylogenetic framework, and include discussion on systematics, biogeography, tetrapod origins, skeletal systems, growth, circulatory system, locomotion, thermal and water regulation, hibernation, ecology, sexual behavior, parental care, and mimicry. Students taking the course at the 700 level will have additional work required of them. Prerequisite: BIOL 152 Principles of Organismal Biology, and/or BIOL 413 History and Diversity of Organisms. LEC.

BIOL 784. Introduction to Museum Public Education. 3 Hours.

Consideration of the goals of an institution's public education services, developing programs, identifying potential audiences, developing audiences, and funding. Workshops and demonstrations are designed for students to gain practical experience working with various programs and developing model programs. (Same as AMS 797, GEOL 784, HIST 721, and MUSE 705.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 785. Museum Management. 3 Hours.

Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museums as organizations; accounting, budget cycles, personnel management, and related topics will be presented using, as appropriate, case studies and a simulated museum organization model. (Same as AMS 731, GEOL 783, HIST 728, and MUSE 701.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 786. Fundamentals of Tropical Biology. 1-8 Hours.

The tropical environment and biota; ecologic relations, communities and evolution in the tropics. Primarily a field course, taught in Costa Rica; two sessions per year, February-March, July-August. FLD.

BIOL 787. Introduction to Museum Exhibits. 3 Hours.

This course will consider the role of exhibits as an integrated part of museum collection management, research, and public service. Lecture and discussion will focus on issues involved in planning and producing museum exhibits. Laboratory exercises will provide first hand experience with basic preparation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on the management of an exhibit program in both large and small museums in the major disciplines. (Same as AMS 700, GEOL 781, HIST 723, and MUSE 703.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 788. The Nature of Museums. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the kinds of museums, their various missions, and their characteristics and potentials as research, education, and public service institutions responsible for collections of natural and cultural objects. (Same as AMS 720, GEOL 782, HIST 720, and MUSE 702.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 789. Field Course in Entomology. 1-6 Hours.

Field experiences in various habitats, with an emphasis in ecology, systematics, behavior, and collection techniques. FLD.

BIOL 790. Paleontology of Lower Vertebrates. 3 Hours.

General account of the osteology, geological distribution, and evolution of the principal groups of fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Lectures and laboratory. (Same as GEOL 725.) LEC.

BIOL 791. Paleontology of Higher Vertebrates. 3 Hours.

Evolution of mammals, and anatomical modifications involved in the process as ascertained from the fossil record. Lectures and laboratory. (Same as GEOL 726.) LEC.

BIOL 792. Ichthyology. 4 Hours.

A study of fishes. Lecture topics include the structure and function of fishes; the adaptations of fishes to the aquatic environment; and a survey of major fish groups with emphasis on evolutionary relationships and biogeography. Laboratory topics include a survey of fishes using specimens, and the use of keys to identify fishes with emphasis on the Kansas fish fauna. A research paper using primary scientific literature is required. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor. LEC.

BIOL 794. Mammalogy. 3 Hours.

A study of mammals, with emphasis on systematics, biogeography, and natural history. Lectures, laboratory, and field study. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or BIOL 413. LEC.

BIOL 795. Biology of Amphibians. 3 Hours.

Evolutionary biology of amphibians with emphasis on systematics, morphology, development, reproductive strategies, and distribution; lectures and laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 664 or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 796. Biology of Reptiles. 3 Hours.

Evolutionary biology of reptiles with emphasis on systematics, morphology, reproductive strategies, and distribution; lectures and laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 664 or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 797. Field Course in Vertebrate Paleontology. 3-6 Hours.

Training in the techniques of collecting vertebrate fossils, description and interpretation of the stratigraphy of fossiliferous sediments, and interpretation of the adequacy and bias of samples. FLD.

BIOL 798. Principles and Practices of Museum Collection Management. 3 Hours.

Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museum collections, their associated data, and their use in scholarly research; cataloging, storage, fumigation, automated information management and related topics will be presented for museums of art, history, natural history and anthropology. (Same as AMS 730, GEOL 785, HIST 725, and MUSE 704.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 799. Natural History Museum Apprenticeship. 1-6 Hours.

Provides directed, practical experience in collection care and management, public education, exhibits and administration with emphases to suit the particular requirements of each student. Full time for one semester or half time for two semesters. (Same as AMS 799, ANTH 799, GEOL 723, HIST 799, and MUSE 799.) FLD.

BIOL 801. Topics in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Advanced courses on special topics in biology, given as need arises. Lectures, discussing readings, laboratory or field work. Students may select sections according to their special interests. LEC.

BIOL 802. The Art of Becoming a Professional Scientist. 3 Hours.

Discusses aspects of graduate education that are directed at the post PhD phases of a career, but that must be initiated early in the graduate student program of study. One 3-hour discussion per week. LEC.

BIOL 804. Scientific Integrity: Molecular Biosciences. 1 Hour.

This course introduces aspects and issues associated with being an ethical, responsible, and professional research scientist. Included topics are professional practices, regulations, and rules that define the responsible and ethical conduct of research. Graduate students will become familiar with and prepare to navigate through challenges that occur during a career in research science. The format of individual classes is expected to incorporate both instruction and discussion. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in Molecular Biosciences, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 806. Major Patterns in Insect Evolution. 3 Hours.

Extensive reading and discussion of the primary literature on topics relating to major patterns in the evolutionary history of insects, including the fossil history of insects, the monophyly of arthropods, the origin of wings, the changing role of insects in ecological communities, the origins of social behavior, modes and mechanisms of speciation, and patterns of species diversity. Assigned readings require a solid background in evolutionary theory and insect biology, especially morphology, development, and classification. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 807. Graduate Molecular Biosciences. 6 Hours.

An introduction to the advanced study of biochemistry, microbiology, genetics, cell and developmental biology, and neurobiology for all Molecular Biosciences graduate students. Topics can include macromolecular structure, metabolism, kinetics and thermodynamics, bioinformatics, prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetic mechanisms, cell structure and function, signal transduction, basic and pathogenic bacteriology, immunology, virology, membrane potentials, synaptic transmission, and sensory neurophysiology. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in Molecular Biosciences, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 809. Graduate Molecular Biosciences for Medicinal Chemists. 4 Hours.

An introduction to the advanced study of biochemistry, microbiology, and neurobiology for graduate students in Medicinal Chemistry. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in Medicinal Chemistry and consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 810. Seminar in Biochemistry. 1 Hour.

Presentation and discussion of specific areas of recent research in biochemistry. This course may be taken more than once. LEC.

BIOL 811. Advanced Molecular and Cellular Immunology. 2 Hours.

Covers recent advances in immunochemistry and immunobiology. Topics include structure and function of antibodies, hybridoma systems, idiotypes, induction and regulation of the immune response through cell interactions and cytokine action, and the role of immune activity in disease states such as hypersensitivity, autoreactivity, and cancer. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or an introductory course in immunology, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 812. Mechanisms of Host-Parasite Relationships. 2 Hours.

Emphasis is on virulence factors of microorganisms and the host response to infection. Topics will include pathogenesis of intracellular and extracellular parasites, bacterial adhesins, and toxins, and the role of innate and acquired immunity in host resistance and the response to infection. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in biochemistry, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 813. Advanced Bacterial Physiology. 2 Hours.

The intermediary reactions catalyzed by the bacterial cell during energy-requiring processes. Themodynamic considerations of these processes are discussed. Knowledge of calculus is recommended. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in microbiology and a course in biochemistry, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 814. Advanced Molecular Virology. 2 Hours.

The course concentrates on evaluation of current literature concerning all aspects of molecular biology, biochemical characterization, and pathogenic mechanisms involved in host-virus interactions. Students will be expected to present articles and participate in discussions. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in microbial genetics and a course in virology, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 815. Advanced Molecular Genetics. 2 Hours.

A literature-based course that covers recent advances in microbial molecular genetics. Topics include transcription, translation, mutagenesis and repair, genetic exchange mechanisms, and regulation of gene expression. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in microbial genetics, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 816. Careers in Chemical Biology. 1 Hour.

Advanced course examining current research topics in chemical biology. An emphasis will be placed on career options open to PhD scientists in Chemical Biology, and preparation for the different career paths. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. This course will be graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. (Same as CHEM 816, MDCM 816 and PHCH 816.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. SEM.

BIOL 818. Techniques in Molecular Biosciences. 2 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to common techniques used for research strategies in molecular biosciences. The course will cover common techniques in cell biology, biochemistry, microbiology, and neurobiology. Information will be presented in lectures and through practical demonstrations. This course is primarily intended for first year graduate students in the Department of Molecular Biosciences. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Molecular Biosciences Graduate Program or consent of instructor. LAB.

BIOL 840. Scientific Communication. 2 Hours N.

Principles of English communication skills for the professional scientist. The course explores the form, function, and practice (including ethics) of scientific communication, emphasizing elements of writing and speech that are important to clarity and precision. The course covers written and verbal communication of primary research results as well as composing correspondence, a curriculum vitae, reviews, etc. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. LEC.

BIOL 841. Biometry I. 5 Hours.

The application of statistical methods to data from various fields of biological research. Special emphasis is placed on practical computational procedures. Prerequisite: College algebra. LEC.

BIOL 842. Biometry II. 3 Hours.

This course is primarily devoted to special advanced topics in analysis of variance, analysis of covariance and regression analysis. Polynomial regression and multiple linear regression will be presented as will the general linear model. Elementary matrix algebra will be developed as needed. Prerequisite: BIOL 841. LEC.

BIOL 847. Phylogenetics. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the theory and practice of phylogenetic systematics. Includes principles of character analysis including determination of homology and determination of character polarity, testing alternate phylogenetic trees, and reconstructing trees using computer techniques. Also includes principles of constructing phylogenetic classifications and the nature of taxa in the phylogenetic system. Other topics, such as the nature of species and principles of biogeography are included. Prerequisite: Twenty hours natural history. LEC.

BIOL 848. Phylogenetic Methods. 4 Hours.

A survey of methods for inferring phylogenetic trees from character data and using phylogenies to address evolutionary questions. Lectures will present the relevant theory and algorithmic description of methods. Computer lab will familiarize students with software that implements the analyses discussed in lecture. Intended for graduate students specializing in systematics. Prerequisite: BIOL 845 and BIOL 841 or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 860. Principles and Practice of Chemical Biology. 3 Hours.

A survey of topics investigated by chemical biology methods including: transcription and translation, cell signaling, genetic and genomics, biochemical pathways, macromolecular structure, and the biosynthesis of peptides, carbohydrates, natural products, and nucleic acids. Concepts of thermodynamics and kinetics, bioconjugations and bioorthogonal chemistry will also be presented. (Same as CHEM 860, MDCM 860 and PHCH 860.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 872. Gene Expression II. 3 Hours.

Second semester of a two-semester lecture course on gene expression. Emphasis on control of gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Prerequisite: BIOL 772 or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 888. Topics in Evolutionary Morphology: _____. 2 Hours.

Presentation and discussion by graduate students and faculty of selected topics centering on observed changes in structure and function of organisms from a phylogenetic point of view. Presentation will include results of original research when possible and appropriate, and otherwise, will be based on syntheses of recent literature. RSH.

BIOL 890. Advanced Study in Microbiology. 1-10 Hours.

Original investigation by students at the master's degree level. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Ten or more hours of microbiology and consent of department. RSH.

BIOL 895. Human Genetics. 3 Hours.

A lecture course providing balanced coverage of Mendelian and molecular genetics of humans; includes discussions and presentations on current issues in human and medical genetics. Prerequisite: A course in genetics. LEC.

BIOL 899. Master's Thesis. 1-10 Hours.

Research which is to be incorporated into an M.A. thesis. Not more than ten hours may be earned. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.

BIOL 901. Graduate Seminar in Biochemistry and Biophysics. 1 Hour.

Advanced course examining current research topics in biochemistry and biophysics. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Enrollment in graduate school, and departmental admission. LEC.

BIOL 902. Graduate Seminar in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. 1 Hour.

Advanced course examining current research topics in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Enrollment in graduate school, and departmental permission. SEM.

BIOL 903. Graduate Seminar in Neurobiology. 1 Hour.

Advanced course examining current research topics in neurobiology. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Enrollment in graduate school, and departmental permission. LEC.

BIOL 904. Graduate Seminar in Microbiology. 1 Hour.

Advanced course examining current research topics in microbiology. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Enrollment in graduate school, and departmental permission. RSH.

BIOL 905. Advanced Molecular Genetics. 1-3 Hours.

A review of current literature in molecular genetics. RSH.

BIOL 906. Advanced Genetics. 1-3 Hours.

May be repeated for credit up to six hours. Review of current literature and genetic theory of selected topics such as population, molecular, quantitative, and physiological genetics. RSH.

BIOL 911. Research Topics in Plant Physiology and Biochemistry. 1-6 Hours.

Directed research on selected topics. Prerequisite: BIOL 770 or equivalent. RSH.

BIOL 918. Modern Biochemical and Biophysical Methods. 4 Hours.

This course emphasizes the use of techniques for solving problems of structure and function of biological macromolecules. Students will complete several modules that consist of lectures relating to theory and practical aspects of each methodological approach, and apply these techniques to solving a specific problem. Students will submit a paper describing the resulting data and conclusions. Prerequisite: BIOL 807, BIOL 808, and BIOL 818, or permission of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 925. Research Grant Proposal Preparation. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the basics of preparing a successful scientific grant application. Topics to be covered include how to develop a novel, fundable project, scientific writing and grantsmanship, and what criteria reviewers consider in evaluating grants. The course will be a mix of instruction and class discussion. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in Molecular Biosciences, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 930. Ultrastructure and Cellular Mechanisms. 3 Hours.

Two lectures and one seminar-recitation. A detailed consideration of electron microscopic analyses of cell structure as related to cell function. Prerequisite: BIOL 416. LEC.

BIOL 943. Multivariate Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

Matrix formulation of multivariate models and data. Specific methods covered include Principal Components Analysis, Factor Analysis, Multiple Group Discriminant Analysis and Canonical Analysis, and Canonical Correlation Analysis. Prerequisite: BIOL 842 or knowledge of elementary matrix algebra. LEC.

BIOL 944. Topics in Quantitative Ecology: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Presentation and discussion by instructor and students of mathematical and statistical concepts in ecology. Topics are selected from texts or sets of readings. LEC.

BIOL 950. Evolutionary Mechanisms. 3 Hours.

Reading and discussions of evolutionary mechanisms from the genetic, ecologic, and systematic viewpoints. Prerequisite: BIOL 412. LEC.

BIOL 952. Introduction to Molecular Modeling. 3 Hours.

Introduction to theory and practice of contemporary molecular modeling, including molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, computer graphics, data analysis, use of structure and sequence databases, docking, and homology modeling. Weekly computer laboratory section aimed at allowing participants to pursue independent research projects that incorporate modeling aspects. Lectures, laboratory manuals, program descriptions, and technical notes are presented on course web page. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC.

BIOL 968. Seminar in Vegetation Geography. 2-3 Hours.

(Same as GEOG 937.) LEC.

BIOL 985. Advanced Study. 1-10 Hours.

Individual investigations; laboratory, field or museum; or reading assignments in specialized topics not ordinarily treated in other courses. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. RSH.

BIOL 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

Original research that is to be incorporated into a Ph.D. dissertation. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.

Biology Courses

BTEC 300. Introduction to Biotechnology. 3 Hours N.

Review of techniques used in food, agricultural, pharmaceutical, industrial, and environmental biotechnology. Role of regulatory agencies during the discovery, development, and manufacture of new medical devices, biotechnology, biomedical, and pharmaceutical products. Guest presentations in biotechnology. Prerequisite: BIOL 416. LEC.

BTEC 330. Biotechnology Regulation and Documentation Processes. 3 Hours N.

Current good manufacturing practices (GMP) as they apply in the biotechnology workplace. History, rationale, purpose, and GMP requirements applicable to the manufacturing, packaging, labeling, testing, and control of pharmaceutical products, and consequences of inaction. Prerequisite: BTEC 300. LEC.

BTEC 340. Biotechnology Research Methods and Applications. 3 Hours N.

Introduction to fermentation and protein chemistry. Theory behind laboratory techniques and overview of industrial scale expression systems. Bacterial cell culture techniques, principles of fermenter operation and purification, documentation procedures, important tasks for clean room operations, including sanitization, sterilization, cleaning procedures, calibration, and environmental monitoring. Prerequisite: BTEC 300; BIOL 600. LEC.

BTEC 341. Principles of Bioprocessing Laboratory I. 1 Hour N.

Laboratory sessions involve use of microbial expression vectors, fermentation systems, and large-scale purification of recombinant protein. Includes bacterial cell culture techniques, principles of bioreactor/fermentation operations and purification techniques, and calibration. Primary goal of this course is to provide students with an advanced background in bacterial upstream and downstream biotechnology. Prerequisite: BTEC 300; BTEC 340 or concurrent enrollment in BTEC 340. LAB.

BTEC 405. Microbial Genetics Laboratory. 4 Hours N.

Research projects center on using molecular genetics to examine the biology of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen often found in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Students engage in independent projects to probe various aspects of P. aeruginosa physiology such as antibiotic resistance, phase variation, toxin production, secondary metabolite production, twitching motility, swarming behaviors, and more. Projects aim to discover the molecular basis for these processes using both classical and new, cutting-edge techniques. These include plasmid manipulation, genetic complementation, mutagenesis, PCR, DNA sequencing, enzyme assays, and gene expression studies. Prerequisite: BIOL 350; BIOL 402 . LAB.

BTEC 424. Independent Study in Biotechnology. 1-3 Hours N.

Independent project at a related bioscience industry partner or faculty in selected topics of current translational research interest. May be undertaken only with the consent of the major advisor who will guide the research after determining objectives with the interested industry partner or faculty. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

BTEC 440. Biotechnology Research Methods and Applications II. 3 Hours N.

Theory and practicum behind laboratory techniques and overview of industrial scale expression systems of insect or mammalian protein chemistry. Cell culture techniques, principles of bioreactor operation and purification, documentation procedures, important tasks for clean room operations, including sanitization, sterilization, cleaning procedures, calibration, and environmental monitoring are evaluated. Prerequisite: BTEC 340; BTEC 341. LEC.

BTEC 441. Principles of Bioprocessing Laboratory II. 1 Hour N.

Mammalian cell culture techniques, principles of bioreactor operations and purification techniques, and calibration. The primary goal of this course is to provide students with an advanced background in mammalian upstream and downstream biotechnology. Prerequisite: BTEC 341; BTEC 440 or concurrent enrollment in BTEC 440. LAB.

BTEC 450. Applied Bioinformatics. 3 Hours N.

Overview of the fields of bioinformatics and genomics. Topics, tools, issues and current trends in these and related fields are discussed. Principles and practical application of bioinformatics tools in molecular biology and genetics are evaluated. The haploid human genome occupies a total of just over 3 billion DNA base pairs. This information is not contained in books, but stored in electronic databases. Computational biology utilizes infer function by comparative analysis. This course is designed for life scientists from all fields to introduce them to the power of bioinformatics and enable them to access and utilize biological information in databases for their own research. Prerequisite: BTEC 300; BIOL 570 or MATH 365 or PSYC 210. LEC.

BTEC 460. Introduction to Quality Control/Quality Assurance in Biotechnology. 3 Hours N.

Quality control techniques, assurance issues, and management methods. Quality in design and planning, in the constructed project, and in production of goods and services. Prerequisite: BTEC 330. LEC.

BTEC 475. Bioseparations Laboratory. 2 Hours N.

Develop novel and effective strategies for extraction and purification of recombinant and native biomolecules by understanding constraints posed by the biological system and the products. Research projects are geared toward developing cost-effective processes for recovery of industrial and biopharmaceutical products derived from a variety of native and/or transgenic sources. Prerequisite: BTEC 405; BTEC 441. LAB.

BTEC 494. Selected Topics in Biotechnology. 1 Hour N.

Course work varies with the topic of the seminar. The preparation and presentation of oral reports on selected topics from recent translational research literature. Students may choose one interest group each semester, but may enroll in a given interest group only once. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: BTEC 300 and approval of instructor. LEC.

BTEC 501. Ethical Issues in Biotechnology. 1 Hour N.

Student investigations and discussions of current controversial issues in biotechnology. This course emphasizes thinking about new technologies in a rational and thoughtful way. Prerequisite: BTEC 300. LEC.

BTEC 541. Gene Expression Analysis: Microarrays. 2 Hours N.

This course reviews current theory, techniques, instrumentation, troubleshooting, analysis tools, and advanced protocols for microarray analysis. Students have the opportunity to utilize skills learned during lecture in a laboratory environment. At the conclusion of this course, students understand microarray experimental design, its tools, and analysis of generated data. Prerequisite: BTEC 300. LAB.

BTEC 542. Protein Expression in Insect Cells. 2 Hours N.

Introduction to the insect cells expression system, and its advantages and disadvantages. Introduction to expression of recombinant proteins with baculovirus. Outline of antibody and antibody fragments as well as other complex proteins. Basic techniques used for growth and maintenance of insect cell cultures. The lab portion of the course provides students with practical experience in protein expression techniques in the insect cells expression system. Prerequisite: BTEC 300. LAB.

BTEC 545. RNA Interference and Model Organisms. 2 Hours N.

Introduction and history of RNA interference technology. Principles, mechanism, and applications of RNA interference in model organisms. Laboratory sessions include RNA interference-mediated silencing of genes in plants, C. elegans, and mammalian cell culture. Prerequisite: BTEC 300. LAB.

BTEC 547. Bioanalytical Lab. 2 Hours N.

Analytical methods used for testing biotherapeutics are examined. Emphasis is placed on assessing protein concentration, purity, identity and activity. The importance of sample processing, throughput and level of validation are explored as samples from upstream processing, downstream processing and final bulk are interrogated. Students also learn key concepts used to validate the performance of analytical methods. Prerequisite: BTEC 300. LAB.

BTEC 599. Biotechnology Capstone Experience. 3 Hours N.

Supervised internship at a biotech company; or an independent thesis; or honors thesis with Honors Program. Prerequisite: BTEC 441 and approval of instructor. FLD.

Center for East Asian Studies Courses

CEAS 200. Topics in East Asian Studies: _____. 1-3 Hours U.

An introductory interdisciplinary topics course addressing contemporary issues related to one or more East Asian countries. Format and content will vary. Does not count toward the EALC major or minor requirements unless otherwise indicated by EALC in the Schedule of Classes. LEC.

CEAS 500. Seminar in East Asian Studies: _____. 1-3 Hours U.

An interdisciplinary seminar addressing contemporary issues related to one or more East Asian countries. Prerequisites to be determined by instructor(s) on the basis of course content. Does not count toward the EALC major or minor requirements unless otherwise indicated by EALC in the Schedule of Classes. LEC.

CEAS 610. Minorities in Japan. 3 Hours S.

This course offers a sociological and historical exploration of Japan's minorities: the Ainu, Okinawans, Burakumin, and Zainichi Koreans who are often excluded from narratives of Japanese history. Exclusion of the minority issue not only overlooks the existence of minority populations in Japan but also contributes to misconceptions of Japan as a homogeneous country. The course objective is to challenge the conventional master narrative of racial and cultural homogeneity. We shed light on Japan's minorities, their historical experiences, current struggles, and future challenges. Prerequisite: An introductory East Asian Studies course or consent of instructor. LEC.

CEAS 704. Contemporary East Asia. 3 Hours.

This graduate seminar explores rapidly changing societies in contemporary East Asia, particularly China, Japan, and Korea. The course provides a critical overview of East Asia and its diversity and complexity using cross-cultural perspectives and interdisciplinary social science approaches, and situates East Asian societies in the context of globalization. (Same as EALC 704.) LEC.

CEAS 802. Research Seminar. 3 Hours.

Students will work with the instructor and, when appropriate, an additional faculty advisor to design, research and write up a research paper on an East Asian topic of their choosing. Students enrolling in this course are expected to have taken a social science research methods class prior to taking this course and to apply those methods to the research process. A core course for the MA in Contemporary East Asian Studies. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. SEM.

Chemistry Courses

CHEM 100. Chemistry in Context: _____. 3 Hours NP GE3N / N.

An introduction to chemistry that focuses on basic chemical principles, designed for students with no previous background in chemistry. This course promotes the development of chemical literacy within a context that encourages an appreciation for the role and significance of chemistry in the modern world. Not intended for students who need to fulfill a specific chemistry requirement as part of their degree program. LEC.

CHEM 110. Introductory Chemistry. 5 Hours NP GE3N / N / LFE.

This integrated lecture and laboratory course provides an introduction to basic concepts related to general, organic, and biological chemistry. Suitable for students seeking an introductory course and for students who are majoring in health and allied health fields. Students whose majors require more than one semester of chemistry should enroll in CHEM 130, CHEM 170, or CHEM 190. CHEM 110 and CHEM 150 cannot both be taken for credit. LEC.

CHEM 130. General Chemistry I. 5 Hours NP GE12/GE3N / N / LFE.

This course seeks to develop a working knowledge of the conceptual foundation and the quantitative chemical relationships on which subsequent chemistry courses are built. Atomic structure, chemical bonding, reaction stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and periodic trends are emphasized in this integrated lecture and laboratory course. Students pursuing or considering a major in one of the chemical sciences should strongly consider taking CHEM 170 or CHEM 190. Students with credit in CHEM 110 will have two hours added on to their total number of hours required for graduation. Prerequisite: Must be eligible for MATH 115. LEC.

CHEM 135. General Chemistry II. 5 Hours GE3N / N / LFE.

This course, which is a continuation of CHEM 130, focuses on chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, and thermodynamics. Additional topics, such as environmental chemistry, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry, and/or polymers, may also be introduced in this integrated lecture and laboratory course. Students pursuing or considering a major in one of the chemical sciences should strongly consider taking CHEM 175 or CHEM 195. Prerequisite: CHEM 130, CHEM 170, or CHEM 190 with a grade of C- or higher. LEC.

CHEM 150. Chemistry for Engineers. 5 Hours GE3N / N / LFE.

This one semester course is designed for students in the School of Engineering who are not required to take additional chemistry courses at the college level. Topics covered in this integrated lecture and laboratory course include quantum theory, atomic structure, chemical bonding, solids, liquids, gases, thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, kinetics, polymer chemistry, and materials science. The application of these concepts to engineering problems and practices is emphasized. Prerequisite: Must have completed a course in high school chemistry and be eligible for MATH 121 or MATH 125 (or have Departmental consent). Students not admitted to the School of Engineering must receive permission from instructor. CHEM 110 and CHEM 150 cannot both be taken for credit. LEC.

CHEM 170. Chemistry for the Chemical Sciences I. 5 Hours NP GE12/GE3N / N / LFE.

The first course in a two-course sequence focused on the principles and applications of modern chemistry. This integrated lecture and laboratory course is designed for students pursuing or considering a major in one of the chemical sciences (such as chemistry, biochemistry, chemical engineering or petroleum engineering). The CHEM 170/CHEM 175 course sequence covers the same general topics as CHEM 130/CHEM 135, but with an increased emphasis on modern applications of chemistry. Students with credit in CHEM 110 will have two hours added on to their total number of hours required for graduation. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MATH 115. LEC.

CHEM 175. Chemistry for the Chemical Sciences II. 5 Hours N / LFE.

An integrated lecture and laboratory course which is a continuation of CHEM 170. Prerequisite: CHEM 130, CHEM 170, or CHEM 190 with a grade of C- or higher. LEC.

CHEM 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Chemistry. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

CHEM 180. Seminar I. 0.5 Hours U.

Special topics for chemistry majors such as using the chemical literature, educational and professional perspectives, scientific ethics, and undergraduate research opportunities. It is recommended that students take this half-semester course in their freshman or sophomore year. Prerequisite: A declared major in chemistry or consent of instructor. LEC.

CHEM 190. Foundations of Chemistry I, Honors. 5 Hours NP GE12/GE3N / N / LFE.

This integrated lecture and laboratory course, which is designed for qualified and motivated students having a strong interest in chemistry, provides a more thorough treatment of the concepts and topics covered in CHEM 130 and CHEM 170. It is anticipated that students in CHEM 190 plan to take more than one year of chemistry at the college level. Students with credit in CHEM 110 will have two hours added on to their total number of hours required for graduation. Prerequisite: high-school chemistry and calculus; at least one of the following: (a) acceptance into the KU Honors Program, (b) an AP exam score in chemistry of 3 or higher, (c) a mathematics ACT score of 28 or higher; or permission of instructor. LEC.

CHEM 195. Foundations of Chemistry II, Honors. 5 Hours GE3N / N / LFE.

A course designed for qualified and motivated students with strong interest in chemistry to provide a more thorough treatment of the concepts and topics of advanced general chemistry. Recommended for students in the University Honors Program. Prerequisite: CHEM 130, CHEM 170, or CHEM 190 with a grade of C- or better, and permission of the instructor. LEC.

CHEM 201. Laboratory Safety in the Chemical Sciences. 1 Hour U.

A course for undergraduate students focusing on chemical safety in modern laboratories. The course will feature practical instruction in lab safety, an introduction to safety resources, and group discussions centered around case studies. Required for all B.S. majors, and for all B.A. majors participating in undergraduate research. Students with credit in CHEM 201 may not take CHEM 701 for credit. Prerequisite: CHEM 135, CHEM 175, or CHEM 195. LEC.

CHEM 250. Mathematical Methods for the Chemical Sciences. 3 Hours NM.

A one-semester course covering advanced mathematical methods necessary for upper-level physical and analytical chemistry courses. Topics include complex numbers and functions, ordinary and partial differential equations, linear algebra and probability and statistics with special emphasis on applications to problems in the chemical sciences. Prerequisite: Corequisite: MATH 127. LEC.

CHEM 309. History of Chemistry. 3 Hours H.

Birth of modern chemical science from roots in Greek natural philosophy, alchemy, Renaissance medicine and technology. The Chemical Revolution of Lavoisier and Dalton. Maturity of chemistry in the 19th and 20th centuries, along with an examination of growth of chemical institutions and the rise of chemical industry. Emphasis on developments from the 18th century to the present. (Same as HIST 309.) LEC.

CHEM 310. Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry. 3 Hours GE3N / N.

A study of the structures and reactions of important classes of organic compounds. Along with the organic laboratory, CHEM 331, this course will fulfill the needs of students requiring a single semester of organic chemistry. Students requiring more than one semester of organic chemistry should enroll in CHEM 330. Prerequisite: CHEM 135, CHEM 175, or CHEM 195 with a grade of C- or higher. LEC.

CHEM 330. Organic Chemistry I. 3 Hours GE3N / N.

A study of the structure and reactivity of selected classes of organic compounds. CHEM 330 is the first course of a two-semester sequence. Students with credit in CHEM 310 will have two hours added on to their total number of hours required for graduation. Prerequisite: CHEM 135, CHEM 175, or CHEM 195 with a grade of C- or higher. LEC.

CHEM 331. Organic Chemistry I Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Emphasis on basic techniques for the preparation, separation, and purification of organic compounds. Required for a major in chemistry and by those departments and programs specifying a complete undergraduate organic chemistry course. Prerequisite: CHEM 310 or CHEM 330 or CHEM 380 with a grade or C- or higher or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 310 or CHEM 330 or CHEM 380. LAB.

CHEM 335. Organic Chemistry II. 3 Hours N.

A continuation of CHEM 330, intended for students who want further training in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 330 or CHEM 380 with a grade of C- or higher. LEC.

CHEM 336. Organic Chemistry II Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

More advanced organic laboratory techniques with emphasis on modern spectroscopic methods for determining the structure and purity of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 331 and CHEM 335 or CHEM 385 with a grade or C- or higher or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 335 or CHEM 385. LAB.

CHEM 380. Organic Chemistry I, Honors. 3 Hours GE3N / N.

This is the first half of a two-semester sequence in organic chemistry for students with strong records in previous chemistry courses. Recommended for members of the University Honors Program and students majoring in chemistry or related fields. Students with credit in CHEM 310 who take and complete CHEM 380 will have two hours added to their total number of credit hours required for graduation. Prerequisite: CHEM 135, CHEM 175, or CHEM 195 with a grade of C- or higher and permission of the instructor. LEC.

CHEM 385. Organic Chemistry II, Honors. 3 Hours N.

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence in organic chemistry for students with strong records in previous chemistry courses. Recommended for members of the University Honors Program and students majoring in chemistry or related fields. Prerequisite: CHEM 330 or CHEM 380 with a grade of C- or higher, and permission of the instructor. LEC.

CHEM 390. Topics in Chemistry, Honors: _____. 1-5 Hours N.

A course on special topics in chemistry, given as the need arises. Course content applies and expands upon general chemistry concepts, such as chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, and bonding. In this course, students gain knowledge in a topic of contemporary interest in chemistry, are challenged to examine the experimental and theoretical basis of this knowledge, and consider the broader impacts of this knowledge outside the discipline. Course may be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: CHEM 135, CHEM 175 or CHEM 195 and membership in the University Honors Program; or permission of instructor. Each section may have additional prerequisites to be determined by the instructor. LEC.

CHEM 450. Directed Readings/Laboratory in Chemistry. 1-3 Hours N.

Individual and supervised study or laboratory work on special topics or problems in chemistry. Prerequisite: Ten hours of chemistry and a minimum overall grade-point average of 2.0 or consent of department. IND.

CHEM 510. Biological Physical Chemistry. 3 Hours N.

A one semester course, designed particularly for biology, biochemistry, and premedical students, which surveys the fundamentals of physical chemistry. The basic principles of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, quantum chemistry, and spectroscopy will be introduced, and their application to aqueous solutions and biochemical systems will be emphasized. Prerequisite: One semester of organic chemistry, two semesters of calculus, and two semesters of physics. LEC.

CHEM 511. Biological Physical Chemistry Laboratory. 2 Hours AE61 / U / LFE.

A course particularly for biology, biochemistry, and premedical students. Experiments in physical chemistry illustrating the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, thermodynamics, and kinetics as applied to chemical systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 510. LAB.

CHEM 530. Physical Chemistry I. 3 Hours N.

An introduction to the basic principles of quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular structure, molecular rotations and vibrations, group theory, spectroscopy, and statistical mechanics. Prerequisite: Two semesters of general chemistry; PHSX 212; MATH 127; and CHEM 250 (or MATH 220 or MATH 320 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 290) or consent of instructor. LEC.

CHEM 531. Physical Chemistry I Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Experiments in physical chemistry, with emphasis on the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics and spectroscopy as applied to chemical systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 530. LAB.

CHEM 535. Physical Chemistry II. 4 Hours N.

Emphasizes the thermodynamics of molecular systems with application to the structure and properties of gases, liquids, solids, materials, statistical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and reaction dynamics. Prerequisite: CHEM 530 or consent of instructor. LEC.

CHEM 536. Physical Chemistry II Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Experiments in physical chemistry, with emphasis on the fundamental principles of chemical thermodynamics and kinetics. Prerequisite: CHEM 535 or consent of instructor. LEC.

CHEM 598. Research Methods. 3 Hours N / LFE.

An introduction for pre-service teachers to the tools used by scientists to solve scientific problems. Topics include design of experiments and interpretation of their results, use of statistics, mathematical modeling, laboratory safety, ethical treatment of human subjects, writing scientific papers, giving oral presentations, and obtaining data from the scientific literature. Open only to students in the UKanTeach program. LEC.

CHEM 620. Analytical Chemistry. 3 Hours N.

Principles of analytical chemistry with emphasis on the fundamental methods used for chemical analysis. Topics include experimental error, statistical analysis, method development, sampling, calibration methods, spectrophotometry, chromatography, mass spectrometry, and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: One semester of organic chemistry and one semester of organic chemistry laboratory, or permission of instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 621. LEC.

CHEM 621. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Experiments illustrate fundamental principles of chemical analysis methods. The course serves as an introduction to advanced instrumental methods of analysis. Prerequisite: One semester of organic chemistry and one semester of organic chemistry lab, or permission of instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 620. LAB.

CHEM 635. Instrumental Methods of Analysis. 2 Hours U.

Theory and application of instrumental methods to modern analytical problems. Topics covered include atomic and molecular spectroscopy, electrochemistry, mass spectrometry, and separations. Prerequisite: CHEM 620 and CHEM 621 and one semester of physical chemistry laboratory, or permission of instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 636. LEC.

CHEM 636. Instrumental Methods of Analysis Laboratory. 2 Hours AE61 / U / LFE.

Theory and application of instrumental methods to modern analysis problems. Experiments covered in this capstone laboratory course include atomic and molecular spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and separation methods. Prerequisite: CHEM 620 and CHEM 621, and one semester of physical chemistry laboratory; or permission of instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 635. LAB.

CHEM 660. Systematic Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Hours N.

A systematic study of the elements and their compounds, emphasizing the relationship between properties of substances and their atomic and molecular structures and the positions of the elements in the periodic systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 510 or CHEM 530. LEC.

CHEM 661. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory. 2 Hours U / LFE.

Experiments concerning the synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 660 or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 660. LAB.

CHEM 680. Topics in Chemistry: _____. 1-5 Hours N.

Courses on special topics in chemistry, given as the need arises. Course may be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: 20 hours of Chemistry. Each section may have additional prerequisites to be determined by the instructor. LEC.

CHEM 695. Seminar II. 0.5 Hours U.

Special topics and presentations by students and faculty in areas of current interest such as recent advancements in chemistry, professional development, societal issues facing chemists, and reports of ongoing research. This half-semester course is recommended for seniors. Prerequisite: CHEM 180. LEC.

CHEM 698. Undergraduate Research Problems. 1-6 Hours AE61 / N.

May be repeated to accumulate a maximum of 10 credit hours. An undergraduate research course, in any of the fields of chemistry, consisting of experimental or theoretical work, or the preparation of an extensive paper based on library investigation of a selected topic. A final report must be submitted to the instructor at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 201, or CHEM 201 concurrently, or documentation of appropriate laboratory safety training. IND.

CHEM 699. Undergraduate Honors Research. 2-6 Hours AE61 / N.

To be taken two semesters for a total of no more than 8 hours. An undergraduate research course, in any of the fields of chemistry. At the completion of the research, a written thesis, and an oral presentation will be required. Open to students in the Chemistry Honors Program. Prerequisite: CHEM 201, or CHEM 201 concurrently, or documentation of appropriate laboratory safety training. IND.

CHEM 700. Responsible Scholarship in the Chemical Sciences. 1 Hour.

A course for beginning graduate students with particular emphasis on scholarship issues relevant to the chemical sciences. Topics will include scientific ethics, codes of conduct, record keeping, authorship, and the responsibilities of a scientist. Group discussions, particularly centered around case studies, will be a significant component of the course. LEC.

CHEM 701. Laboratory Safety in the Chemical Sciences. 1 Hour.

A course for beginning graduate students focusing on chemical safety in modern laboratories. The course will feature practical instruction in lab safety, an introduction to safety resources, and group discussions centered around case studies. LEC.

CHEM 718. Mathematical Methods in Physical Sciences. 3 Hours.

Review of all complex variable theory; introduction to the partial differential equations of physics; Fourier analysis; and special functions of mathematical physics. (Same as PHSX 718.) Prerequisite: Two semesters of junior-senior mathematics. LEC.

CHEM 720. Fundamentals and Methods of Analytical Chemistry. 3 Hours.

An introductory graduate level course in analytical chemistry, in which the principles of electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and separation science are utilized to solve analytical problems in inorganic, organic and biochemistry. Prerequisite: An undergraduate course in analytical chemistry, a year of organic chemistry, and a year of physical chemistry. LEC.

CHEM 730. Coordination and Organometallic Chemistry. 3 Hours.

An examination of the basic foundations of coordination chemistry and organometallic chemistry including symmetry methods, bonding, magnetism, and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite: Two semesters of organic chemistry and one semester of physical chemistry in which quantum chemistry is introduced. The latter course may be taken concurrently with CHEM 730. LEC.

CHEM 740. Principles of Organic Reactions. 3 Hours.

A consideration of the structural features and driving forces that control the course of chemical reactions. Topics will include acid and base properties of functional groups; qualitative aspects of strain, steric, inductive, resonance, and solvent effects on reactivity; stereo-chemistry and conformations; an introduction to orbital symmetry control; basic thermodynamic and kinetic concepts; and an overview of some important classes of mechanisms. Prerequisite: Two semesters of undergraduate organic and one semester of physical chemistry or concurrent enrollment. LEC.

CHEM 742. Spectroscopic Identification of Organic Compounds. 3 Hours.

The use of techniques such as infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, and ultraviolet spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry for elucidating the structure of organic molecules. A lecture and workshop course. Prerequisite: CHEM 626 and CHEM 627. LEC.

CHEM 750. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the basic principles of quantum theory relevant to atomic and molecular systems. Topics include operators and operator algebra, matrix theory, eigenvalue problems, postulates of quantum mechanics, the Schrodinger equation, angular momentum, electronic structure, molecular vibrations, approximation methods, group theory, and the foundations of spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Two semesters of physical chemistry. LEC.

CHEM 760. Introduction to Chemistry in Biology. 3 Hours.

A comprehensive introduction to the application of chemistry to address problems in biology at the molecular level. The fundamentals of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates) and techniques of chemical biology research will be discussed. LEC.

CHEM 775. Chemistry of the Nervous System. 3 Hours.

A study of the overall concept of central nervous system functioning. A brief introduction to neuroanatomy and neurophysiological techniques as well as a relatively detailed discussion of the chemistry of neurotransmitters is included. (Same as BIOL 775, MDCM 775, NURO 775, P&TX 775, and PHCH 775.) Prerequisite: One year of undergraduate organic chemistry. LEC.

CHEM 800. Research. 1-10 Hours.

Original investigation on the graduate level. RSH.

CHEM 810. Colloquium: _____. 1 Hour.

Colloquia on various topics of current interest are presented by students, faculty, and visiting scientists. LEC.

CHEM 812. Chemical Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

Individual studies of certain advanced phases of chemistry not covered in the regular graduate courses. IND.

CHEM 816. Careers in Chemical Biology. 1 Hour.

Advanced course examining current research topics in chemical biology. An emphasis will be placed on career options open to PhD scientists in Chemical Biology, and preparation for the different career paths. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. This course will be graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. (Same as BIOL 816, MDCM 816 and PHCH 816.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. SEM.

CHEM 820. Analytical Separations. 3 Hours.

An advanced treatment of analytical separations techniques. The theory of separation science will be augmented with discussion of practical aspects of instrumentation and experiment design. Prerequisite: CHEM 720. LEC.

CHEM 822. Electrochemical Analysis. 3 Hours.

An advanced treatment of selected electroanalytical techniques and methodology. Prerequisite: CHEM 720. LEC.

CHEM 824. Spectrochemical Methods of Analysis. 3 Hours.

General concepts of encoding chemical information as electromagnetic radiation; major instrumental systems for decoding, interpretation, and presentation of the radiation signals; atomic emission, absorption, and fluorescence; ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and microwave absorption; molecular luminescence; scattering methods; mass spectrometry; magnetic resonance; automated spectrometric systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 720. LEC.

CHEM 826. Mass Spectrometry. 3 Hours.

An introduction to mass spectrometry. The various ionization techniques and mass analyzers will be discussed, and many examples of different mass spectrometric applications will be introduced. Prerequisite: CHEM 720. LEC.

CHEM 828. Bioanalysis. 3 Hours.

A course covering important aspects in modern chemical measurement with particular emphasis placed on bioanalysis. This course will survey the modern analytical challenges associated with the ongoing efforts in genomics and proteomics and discuss future trends in methods in instrumentation. Prerequisite: CHEM 720. LEC.

CHEM 830. Structure, Bonding and Spectroscopic Methods in Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Hours.

An introduction of quantum and group theories in relation to bonding and physicochemical properties of inorganic substances. Topics include vibrational and electronic spectroscopies, magnetism, and inorganic photochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 730. LEC.

CHEM 832. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms and Catalysis. 3 Hours.

Mechanistic aspects of transition metal chemistry including substitution reactions, electron transfer reactions, rearrangement reactions, ligand reactions and inorganic photochemistry. Principles and applications of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalytic processes emphasizing catalysis at transition metal centers. Prerequisite: CHEM 730. LEC.

CHEM 840. Physical Organic Chemistry. 3 Hours.

An examination of the methods used to probe the mechanisms of organic reactions and of the chemistry of some important reactive intermediates. Topics will include isotope effects, kinetics, linear free energy relationships, solvent effects, a continuing discussion of orbital symmetry, rearrangements, carbocations, carbanions, carbenes, radicals, excited states, and strained molecules. Prerequisite: CHEM 740. LEC.

CHEM 842. Organic Synthesis I. 3 Hours.

A discussion of fundamental reactions for the formation of carbon-carbon bonds, oxidation, reduction, and functional group interchange. Prerequisite: CHEM 740. LEC.

CHEM 844. Problem Solving in Organic Chemistry. 1 Hour.

A course designed to develop a student's ability to apply fundamental concepts of mechanistic organic and organometallic chemistry, physical organic chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, synthetic organic reactions and techniques for structure elucidation. Students will propose solutions to practice problems mimicking challenges that arise in contemporary research in organic chemistry. The format includes interactive problem-solving discussions led by faculty and peers and monthly written examinations. May be repeated up to three times until the student has passed at least four of the written exams. Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: CHEM 740 or permission of instructor. SEM.

CHEM 850. Advanced Quantum Mechanics. 3 Hours.

The advanced mathematical and physical principles of quantum mechanics relevant to atomic and molecular systems. Topics may include abstract vector spaces and representations, time-dependent quantum dynamics, electronic structure theory, density matrices, second-quantization, advanced group theory, path integrals, and scattering theory. Prerequisite: CHEM 750 or its equivalent. LEC.

CHEM 852. Statistical Thermodynamics. 3 Hours.

Thermodynamics and introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics with emphasis on problems of chemical interest. The course consists of two roughly equal parts: 1) An advanced overview of the laws and concepts of thermodynamics with application to specific problems in phase and chemical equilibria and 2) An introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics for both classical and quantum systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 750 or its equivalent. LEC.

CHEM 854. Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics. 3 Hours.

A study of the rates, mechanisms, and dynamics of chemical reactions in gases and liquids. Topics include an advanced overview of classical kinetics, reaction rate theories (classical collision theory, transition-state theory and introductory scattering theory), potential energy surfaces, molecular beam reactions, photochemistry, Marcus electron transfer theory and other areas of current interest. Prerequisite: CHEM 750 or its equivalent. LEC.

CHEM 856. Molecular Spectroscopy. 3 Hours.

Quantitative molecular spectroscopy and its chemical applications. The basic principles of the molecular energy levels, selection rules and spectral transition intensities will be discussed and applied to rotational, vibrational, electronic, and nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Linear and nonlinear spectroscopies will be addressed. Prerequisite: CHEM 750 or its equivalent. LEC.

CHEM 860. Principles and Practice of Chemical Biology. 3 Hours.

A survey of topics investigated by chemical biology methods including: transcription and translation, cell signaling, genetic and genomics, biochemical pathways, macromolecular structure, and the biosynthesis of peptides, carbohydrates, natural products, and nucleic acids. Concepts of thermodynamics and kinetics, bioconjugations and bioorthogonal chemistry will also be presented. (Same as BIOL 860, MDCM 860 and PHCH 860.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

CHEM 899. Master's Thesis. 1-10 Hours.

Research work (either experimental or theoretical) in chemistry for students working toward the M.S. degree. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.

CHEM 900. Advanced Research. 1-10 Hours.

Original investigation in chemistry at the graduate level. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Advancement to doctoral candidacy. RSH.

CHEM 914. Computational Methods in Physical Sciences. 3 Hours.

Advanced computer applications in physical science. General discussion and illustration of problem organization and solution by numerical and other methods with examples from physics, astronomy, and other physical sciences. Students will design, write, validate, and document a computer program to solve a physical problem. (Same as ASTR 815 and PHSX 815.) Prerequisite: Six hours of computer science courses numbered 300 or above, and six hours of physics and/or astronomy courses numbered 300 or above. LEC.

CHEM 930. Bioinorganic Chemistry. 3 Hours.

A survey of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes, their structures and functions, including recent advances in biomimetic modeling, small molecule activation in biological systems, and related physical methods. Prerequisite: CHEM 832. LEC.

CHEM 942. Organic Synthesis II. 3 Hours.

A survey of important techniques in organic chemistry with respect to scope, limitations, mechanism, and stereochemistry. Emphasis will be placed on new synthetic methods and application of such methods to the synthesis of structurally interesting compounds, particularly natural products. Prerequisite: CHEM 842. LEC.

CHEM 950. Advanced Statistical Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Advanced equilibrium statistical mechanics and introduction to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. Topics include: the theory of liquids, critical phenomena linear response theory and time correlation functions, Langevin dynamics, and molecular hydrodynamics. (Same as PHSX 971.) Prerequisite: CHEM 909 or equivalent. LEC.

CHEM 970. College Teaching Experience in Chemistry. 3 Hours.

A student will engage in a semester-long, planned instructional activity that shall include college classroom teaching under the supervision of a chemistry department faculty member. Prerequisite: Two semesters as a graduate teaching assistant. LEC.

CHEM 980. Advanced Topics in Chemistry: _____. 2-3 Hours.

A course covering special advanced topics in chemistry not included in other graduate courses. One or more topics will be covered in a given semester and an announcement of the course content and prerequisites will be made at the end of the previous semester. This course may be taken more than once when the topic varies. LEC.

CHEM 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-10 Hours.

Research work (either experimental or theoretical) in chemistry for students working toward the Ph.D. degree. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.

Child Language Program Courses

CLP 799. Proseminar in Child Language. 2 Hours.

A review and discussion of current issues in children's language acquisition. May be repeated for credit. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Same as ABSC 797, LING 799, PSYC 799 and SPLH 799.) (Formerly HDFL 797.) SEM.

CLP 874. Research Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Master's level. Application of research methodology in a laboratory situation. Emphasis is on direct participation in designing and conducting an experimental investigation on topics related to child language acquisition and disorders, including quantitative methods. May be repeated for up to a maximum of 3 credits. Prerequisite: SPLH 660 or equivalent research methods course. LAB.

CLP 876. Independent Study in Problems of Child Language. 1-6 Hours.

Investigation of special topics by individual master's level students. Paper required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

CLP 880. Seminar in Child Language. 1-3 Hours.

A seminar devoted to factors affecting children's language acquisition and language impairments, with some attention to theoretical formulations, causal pathways and mechanisms of change. Topics may vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. SEM.

CLP 898. Investigation and Conference (Masters). 1-8 Hours.

Directed research and experimentation for M.A. students in some phase of child language acquisition/disorders. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

CLP 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Development of Master's Thesis in the area of child language acquisition and/or disorders. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE.

CLP 944. Multilevel Models for Longitudinal and Repeated Measures Data. 3 Hours.

Applications of the multilevel model (hierarchical linear model, general linear mixed model) for analyzing longitudinal and repeated measures data, including analysis of growth curves, within-person fluctuation, repeated measures research designs with crossed random effects, and simultaneous prediction of multiple sources of variation. Prerequisite: Instructor permission LEC.

CLP 945. Advanced Multilevel Models. 3 Hours.

Advanced applications of the multilevel model (hierarchical linear model, general linear mixed model) for examining multiple sources of variation, models for crossed sources of nesting, three levels of nesting, heterogeneous variances, multivariate outcomes, and non-linear outcomes. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC.

CLP 948. Latent Trait Measurement and Structural Equation Models. 3 Hours.

Contemporary measurement theory and latent variable models for scale construction and evaluation, including confirmatory factor analysis, item response modeling, diagnostic classification models, and structural equation modeling. (Same as EPSY 906.) Prerequisite: EPSY 905. LEC.

CLP 964. Seminar in Child Language. 1-3 Hours.

A seminar that considers advanced research problems in investigations of child language and language impairment, diagnosis, longitudinal development, change over time, and causal factors. Paper is required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. SEM.

CLP 974. Research Practicum. 3 Hours.

Application of research methodology in a laboratory situation. Emphasis is on direct participation in designing and conducting a study related to child language acquisition or impairments, and analyzing outcomes. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

CLP 975. Directed Teaching: Child Language. 1-3 Hours.

Provides experiences in classroom and laboratory instruction under supervision of graduate faculty. Variable credit to reflect amount of instructional responsibility assumed. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

CLP 998. Investigation and Conference. 1-8 Hours.

Directed research, experimentation, and/or quantitative analysis for Ph.D. students in topics related to child language acquisition, language impairment, diagnosis, causation, or treatment. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

CLP 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

Doctoral Dissertation in topics related to child language acquisition, language impairment, diagnosis, causation, or treatment. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE.

Classics Courses

CLSX 148. Greek and Roman Mythology. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H/W.

A systematic examination of the traditional cycles of Greek myth and their survival and metamorphosis in Latin literature. Some attention is given to the problems of comparative mythology and the related areas of archaeology and history. Slides and other illustrated materials. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is required. LEC.

CLSX 149. Greek and Roman Mythology Honors. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H/W.

The study of Greek and Roman mythology through extensive readings in primary classical texts and secondary authors. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 151. Introduction to Classical Archaeology. 3 Hours HT GE11/GE3H / H/W.

An introduction to the history, methods, and excavation techniques of archaeology, with special emphasis on ancient Greece and Rome. Topics include stratigraphy, chronology, artifact analysis, the role of archaeology in our understanding of Greek and Roman society, and the treatment of archaeology in popular culture. Illustrated throughout with presentations of important archaeological sites of the ancient Mediterranean such as Athens and Pompeii, from the earliest times through late antiquity. LEC.

CLSX 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Classics. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

CLSX 178. Writing About Greek and Roman Culture. 3 Hours GE21 / H.

This course uses focused content from Greek and Roman mythology as a vehicle for learning, applying, and practicing essential skills of writing. The content varies from term to term but is always circumscribed, such as Helen of Sparta, nature myths, the wandering hero, or children in Greek tragedy. Students complete a variety of writing exercises that build upon each other and include revision. The course will be taught in English. LEC.

CLSX 210. Greek Rhetoric in Theory and Practice. 3 Hours GE22 / H.

This course explores the theory and practice of ancient Greek rhetoric, with the aim of developing student's own rhetorical skills and habits. All readings are in translation; no knowledge of ancient Greek is required. Students study rhetoric in such authors as Homer, Demosthenes, Plato, and Lysias and discuss such topics as the role of public speaking in maintaining Greek democracy, the difference between rhetorical skill as a means and an end, the relationship between rhetorical style and civic identity, and the adaptability of rhetoric to various circumstances and audiences. Students practice delivery with ancient speeches; write and deliver speeches tailored to a variety of situations; and listen to and critique the speeches of their peers and others. LEC.

CLSX 220. Roman Oratory in Theory and Practice. 3 Hours GE22 / H.

This course explores the theory and practice of ancient Roman rhetoric, with the aim of developing student¿s own rhetorical skills and habits. All readings are in translation; no knowledge of Latin is required. Students will study rhetoric in such authors as Cicero, Quintilian, Caesar, and Seneca and discuss such topics as the role of rhetorical theory in Roman education; oratory as a hallmark of public service during the Republic, and its transition to a pastime in the Imperial age; the ways the Romans connected oratorical style with humor, the body, and gender identity; and the leeway given to speakers in constructing an argument. Students practice delivery with ancient speeches; write and deliver speeches tailored to a variety of situations; and listen to and critique the speeches of their peers and others. LEC.

CLSX 230. Greek Literature and Civilization. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be writers of poetry and prose such as Homer, Sappho, the tragedians, Aristophanes, Plato, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, athletics, oral performance, sexuality, and the development of literary genres. No knowledge of Greek required and no prerequisite. LEC.

CLSX 232. Word Power: Greek and Latin Elements in English. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of English words drawn from Greek and Latin for all those interested in the sources of the English vocabulary. Enough Greek and Latin for essential purposes is also studied. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332. LEC.

CLSX 240. Roman Literature and Civilization. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

An introduction to ancient Roman literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be authors such as Plautus, Vergil, Livy, Petronius, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, oratory, slavery, political propaganda, the Roman games, and the development of Roman literature. No knowledge of Latin required and no prerequisite. LEC.

CLSX 317. Greek and Roman Art. 3 Hours H/W.

A survey of the art of ancient Greece and Rome (ca. 1000 B.C.E.- 500 C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, architecture, sculpture, and painting. Illustrated lectures and discussion; use of the Wilcox Classical Museum. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Not open to students who have taken both CLSX 526/HA 526 and CLSX 527/HA 537, except with permission of the instructor. (Same as HA 317, HWC 317.) LEC.

CLSX 330. Greek Literature and Civilization, Honors. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

Honors version of CLSX 230. An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Greek texts. No knowledge of Greek required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 332. Scientific Word Power: Greek and Latin Elements in the Vocabulary of Science. 3 Hours H.

A study of the terminology of science with reference to its debt to the Greek and Latin languages. While all the natural sciences will be treated, there will be some emphasis on the biological sciences. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332. LEC.

CLSX 340. Roman Literature and Civilization, Honors. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

Honors version of CLSX 240. An introduction to ancient Roman Literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Roman texts. No knowledge of Latin required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 350. Modern Themes, Ancient Models: _____. 3 Hours H.

The study of the evolution of a cultural or literary tradition from the Graeco-Roman world into modern times. The theme of the course will normally vary from semester to semester; topics such as these may be examined: the analysis of a literary genre (e.g. drama, satire, lyric), the transformation of the ancient mythical heritage, the reception of ancient astronomy. Students should consult the Schedule of Classes for the theme of the course in a given semester. With departmental permission, may be repeated for credit as topic varies. (Same as HWC 380.) LEC.

CLSX 351. Introduction to Classical Archaeology, Honors. 3 Hours HT GE11/GE3H / H/W.

Honors version of CLSX 151, with the focus towards critical approaches and research. Special attention is paid to recent methodological, theoretical, and ethical debates within the profession of Classical archaeology. Assignments and activities may include position papers on contentious issues of the day, research assignments, and/or field trips to museums and related institutions. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 355. Ancient Greece and Rome in Film. 3 Hours H.

This course explores the reception of the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome in film. Students in this course learn about the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome through primary sources, and analyze several films from the 20th and 21st centuries for which these sources are relevant. The course considers the relationship between historical accuracy and artistic license in the films selected for the course, how each film reflects the concerns of the modern cultural context in which it was made, the common visual and thematic elements that link films set in ancient Greece or Rome, and the reuse of elements from Greek and Roman mythology and history in films set in the modern world. No knowledge of Latin or Greek required. LEC.

CLSX 374. Gender and Sexuality, Ancient and Modern. 3 Hours AE42 / H.

Classical Greek and Roman attitudes to gender and sexuality compared and contrasted with modern notions and behaviors. Attention is paid to literature (dramatic, philosophical, medical, and legal texts) and archaeological evidence (vase painting, sculpture, and domestic architecture). The course may include the following topics: age divisions and rites of passage from childhood to maturity; marriage; conception, birth, and infanticide; the family; love; homoeroticism; property and economics; and sexuality and the law, politics, and religion. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HWC 374.) LEC.

CLSX 375. Studies in: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W.

Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 384. Ethics in Greek Tragedy. 3 Hours HL / H.

This course explores Greek tragedy as a literary genre focused on ethical conflict. Students will read plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, giving particular attention to identifying the ethical dilemmas the characters face (such as whether or not vengeance is just, or whether nature or law should govern human actions), the criteria by which these characters make their decisions, and the results of the stances they take. The course will also include consideration of the context in which the plays were produced and the role they play in Athenian (and Greek) culture of the 5th century. No knowledge of Greek is required. LEC.

CLSX 388. Poetry and Politics in Fifth-Century Athens. 3 Hours H.

The later plays of Euripides and Sophocles, selected plays by the comic dramatist Aristophanes, and passages from the historian Thucydides. Criticism of the plays, and discussion of themes common to literature and history in this period. The dissolution of a high culture. CLSX 384 is NOT a prerequisite. No knowledge of Greek required. LEC.

CLSX 490. Comprehensive Examination of Classical Antiquity. 1 Hour U.

An examination covering the six areas of course work and reading for the Classical Antiquity major, to be taken by the student pursuing the major in the last semester of the senior year. Prerequisite: A declared major in Classical Antiquity and status as a graduating senior. IND.

CLSX 492. Independent Study for Classical Antiquity Majors. 3 Hours U.

Under the supervision of an advisor in Classics, the student will do extensive reading in the area of Classics generously defined, to result in two or more papers as agreed upon between faculty and student. IND.

CLSX 496. Honors Essay in Classical Antiquity. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W.

Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Classical literature, culture, or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay advisor. IND.

CLSX 501. The History of the Latin Language. 3 Hours H.

The place of Latin among the Indo-European languages and the languages of Italy, its development as a literary medium, and how it changed in pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar from its beginnings through the Medieval period. LEC.

CLSX 502. Development of Ancient Greece, ca. 1000-300 B.C.. 3 Hours H/W.

Emphasis on the ancient sources and texts, developments in political institutions and society, the changing definitions of personal, cultural, and national identities, and the cultural tensions between Greece and the cultures to the west and east, especially Italy and Persia. No knowledge of the ancient languages is required. (Same as HIST 502). LEC.

CLSX 515. Gender and Sexuality in Greek Culture. 3 Hours H.

This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Greek antiquity. Contents will vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as WGSS 515.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 516. Gender and Sexuality in Roman Culture. 3 Hours HL / H.

This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Roman antiquity. Contents vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as WGSS 516.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 525. Aegean Archaeology and Art. 3 Hours H/W.

An interdisciplinary survey of the major cultures of the prehistoric Aegean (Greek) world from the Neolithic period to the end of the Bronze Age (ca. 3000-1100 B.C.E.), with special emphasis on the cultural and artistic achievements of the Mycenaeans, Minoans, and Cycladic islanders, including their contacts with the neighboring cultures of Anatolia (Hittites and Troy), the Levant, Egypt, and South Italy. Includes lecture with slides and discussion. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 525.) LEC.

CLSX 526. Greek Archaeology and Art. 3 Hours H/W.

An interdisciplinary survey of the material culture of the ancient Greek world from the Protogeometric period to the end of the Hellenistic age (ca. 1100 - 30 B.C.E.), with emphasis on the major sites, monuments, and changing forms of social and artistic expression (e.g., architecture, sculpture, vase painting). Includes lectures with slides and discussion; use of the Wilcox Museum of Classical Antiquities. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 526.) LEC.

CLSX 527. Roman Archaeology and Art. 3 Hours H/W.

An interdisciplinary survey of the material culture of ancient Rome from its origins to the late empire (8th c.B.C.E. - 4th c.C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, monuments, and changing forms of social and artistic expression, as well as on Etruscan and Greek influence on Rome and Rome's influence on its provinces. Includes lectures with slides and discussion; use of the Wilcox Museum of Classical Antiquities. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities; and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). (Same as HA 537.) LEC.

CLSX 529. Archaeology and Art of the Ancient Near East. 3 Hours H.

A cross-cultural survey of the material remains of the major civilizations of the ancient Near East, including Anatolia, Mesopotamia, the Levant, and Egypt from Neolithic period to the rise of the Roman empire (ca. 6000 B.C.E. - 30 B.C.E.). Includes lectures with slides and discussion. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 529.) LEC.

CLSX 538. Pompeii and Herculaneum. 3 Hours H.

An interdisciplinary treatment of the art and archaeology of the ancient Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum in Italy. Emphasis on the structures and decorations of major public spaces and houses and on aspects of cultural, social, political, commercial, and religious life from the period of the second century B.C.E. to 79 C.E., when Pompeii and Herculaneum were buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. Slide lectures and discussion. (Same as HA 538, HWC 538.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, History of Art, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

CLSX 550. Capstone in Classics. 1-3 Hours AE61 / H.

This capstone seminar synthesizes various aspects in the discipline of Classics by focusing on recent award-winning scholarship or creative work in the field. Specific assignments and additional readings vary from one semester to another and will be stated on the instructor's syllabus. Introductory knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Prerequisite: 15 hours in CLSX/LAT/GRK at the 200 level or above, or status as a senior major in the department, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

CLSX 570. Study Abroad Topics in Greek and Roman Culture: _____. 1-3 Hours H.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Classics at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

CLSX 575. Readings in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only six hours may count toward the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

CLSX 576. Topics in Greek and Roman Literature: _____. 3 Hours H.

Lecture and discussion course focusing on a theme, genre, or period of literature from the ancient classical world. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only 6 hours may count toward the major. LEC.

CLSX 577. Topics in the Archaeology and Art of the Ancient Mediterranean: _____. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

Lecture and discussion course focusing on a theme, medium, region, or period in the archaeology and art of the ancient Near Eastern and classical world. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only 6 hours may count toward the major. LEC.

CLSX 675. Studies in: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W.

Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

CLSX 717. Investigations in Greek Drama I. 3 Hours.

Attendance at CLSX 384 required, plus one seminar per week, discussing the scholarly background of the major lecture, as well as the problems and aims of teaching Greek drama in English to undergraduates. No knowledge of Greek is required. RSH.

CLSX 718. Investigations in Greek Drama II. 3 Hours.

A continuation of CLSX 717. Attendance at CLSX 388 plus one seminar per week. No knowledge of Greek is required. RSH.

CLSX 790. Practicum in the Teaching of Classics. 0.5 Hours.

Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Classics courses. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD.

CLSX 899. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Thesis hours. THE.

Classics Courses

GRK 104. Elementary Ancient Greek. 5 Hours U / F1.

The essentials of ancient Greek grammar, with readings. LEC.

GRK 105. Elementary Ancient Greek, Honors. 5 Hours U / F1.

The essentials of ancient Greek grammar, with readings. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC.

GRK 108. Ancient Greek Readings and Grammar. 5 Hours U / F2.

A continuation of Greek 104, with extensive readings from one or more classical authors. Prerequisite: GRK 104 or GRK 105. LEC.

GRK 109. Ancient Greek Readings and Grammar, Honors. 5 Hours U / F2.

A continuation of GRK 105, with extensive readings from one or more classical authors. Prerequisite: GRK 104 or 105; and membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC.

GRK 112. Intermediate Ancient Greek. 3 Hours U / F3.

Systematic grammar review and selected texts from Plato and Euripides. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109 or consent of instructor. LEC.

GRK 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Greek. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

GRK 301. Philosophy and Oratory. 3 Hours H/W / F3.

Systematic grammar review in conjunction with readings selected from Plato, Aristotle and the Attic orators, with attention to issues of interpretation and social and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109. LEC.

GRK 302. Drama and Lyric Poetry. 3 Hours H/W / F3.

Systematic grammar review in conjunction with readings selected from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and the lyric poets, with attention to issues of literary interpretation and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109. LEC.

GRK 303. Greek Narrative Prose. 3 Hours H/W / F3.

Systematic grammar review in conjunction with readings selected from the historians Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon, as well as from the Greek novels and the New Testament. Attention will be given to issues of interpretation and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109. LEC.

GRK 310. Homer's Odyssey. 3 Hours H/W / F4.

Selections from Homer's Odyssey, with attention to issues of literary translation and interpretation, performance, and social and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303. LEC.

GRK 312. Homer's Iliad. 3 Hours H/W / F4.

Selections from Homer's Iliad, with attention to issues of literary translation and interpretation, performance, and social and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303. LEC.

GRK 375. Readings in: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W / F3.

Readings in classical Greek texts. May be repeated for up to twelve hours. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or the equivalent. IND.

GRK 496. Honors Essay in Greek. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W / FP.

Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Greek literature or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay advisor. IND.

GRK 508. Early Greek Philosophy. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

A study of the doctrines of Greek philosophy before Plato. Emphasis on the Pre-Socratic philosophers with some attention paid to the Sophists and the Hippocratic Corpus. (Same as PHIL 508.) Prerequisite: PHIL 384, or GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303, or GRK 310, or GRK 312, or permission of instructor. LEC.

GRK 701. Archaic Poetry. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from Homer, Hesiod, Pindar, the lyric poets. LEC.

GRK 702. Drama. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes. LEC.

GRK 703. History and Oratory. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Attic orators. LEC.

GRK 704. Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from Plato, Aristotle, the Pre-Socratics. LEC.

GRK 705. Readings in Classical Greek. 3 Hours.

Extensive reading in a variety of Greek authors. LEC.

GRK 790. Practicum in the Teaching of Greek. 0.5 Hours.

Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Greek. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD.

GRK 798. Studies in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Selected readings for qualified students who desire special work on a flexible basis. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Undergraduate proficiency in Greek or equivalent. RSH.

GRK 899. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatifactory basis. THE.

Classics Courses

LAT 104. Elementary Latin I. 5 Hours U / F1.

An introduction to the Latin language. LEC.

LAT 105. Elementary Latin I, Honors. 5 Hours U / F1.

Integrates study of elementary Latin with study of Roman culture. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 108. Elementary Latin II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Latin grammar concluded with selected readings. Prerequisite: LAT 104 or LAT 105, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 109. Elementary Latin II, Honors. 5 Hours U / F2.

Latin grammar concluded with selected readings, integrated with study of Roman culture. Prerequisite: LAT 105 or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 112. Readings in Latin Literature. 3 Hours U / F3.

Systematic grammar review in conjunction with selected prose authors, such as Cicero or Caesar, with additional readings in Roman poetry. Attention to literary history and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 108 or LAT 109, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 113. Readings in Latin Literature, Honors. 3 Hours U / F3.

Systematic grammar review in conjunction with selected prose authors, such as Cicero or Caesar, with additional readings in Roman poetry. Exercises in literary analysis and/or prose composition. Prerequisite: LAT 109 or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Latin. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

LAT 200. Vergil's Aeneid. 3 Hours H/W / F4.

Selections from Vergil's Aeneid, with attention to literary interpretation and literary history. Prerequisite: LAT 112 or LAT 113 or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 201. Vergil's Aeneid, Honors. 3 Hours H/W / F4.

Selections from Vergil's Aeneid with attention to literary history. Exercises in literary interpretation and verse composition. Prerequisite: LAT 113 or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 300. Intermediate Latin Composition. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Composition in Latin prose, stressing the basic principles of Latin syntax and style. Recommended for majors and minors. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201. LEC.

LAT 301. Prose Fiction and Epistolography. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Selected readings from such authors as Cicero, Seneca, Petronius, Pliny, and Apuleius, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 302. Hexameter Poetry. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Selected readings from such authors as Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, and the satirists, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 303. Roman Historians. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Selected readings from such authors as Caesar, Livy, and Tacitus, with attention to issues in Roman history and historiography. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 304. Lyric and Elegiac Poetry. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Selected readings from such authors as Catullus, Horace, Tibullus, Propertius, Sulpicia, Ovid, and Martial, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 305. Roman Drama. 3 Hours H/W / FP.

Selected readings from such authors as Plautus, Terence, and Seneca, with attention to literary interpretation, theater history, and performance. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC.

LAT 375. Readings in: _____. 1-3 Hours H/W / FP.

Readings in Latin literature, selected in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for up to twelve hours. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or consent of instructor. IND.

LAT 496. Honors Essay in Latin. 3 Hours AE61 / H/W / FP.

Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Latin literature or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay advisor. IND.

LAT 700. Advanced Latin Prose Composition. 3 Hours.

An examination of the grammar, syntax, and style of the Latin language through exercises in composition. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

LAT 701. Hexameter Poetry. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from authors such as Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, Statius. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

LAT 702. Lyric and Elegy Poetry. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from authors such as Catullus, Horace, Propertius, Tibullus, Sulpicia, Ovid, Martial. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

LAT 703. History, Oratory, Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from authors such as Cicero, Livy, Seneca, Tacitus, Augustine. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

LAT 704. Drama, Satire, and Novel. 3 Hours.

Close reading of texts from Plautus, Terence, Horace, Petronius, Seneca, Juvenal, Apuleius. LEC.

LAT 705. Readings in Classical Latin. 3 Hours.

Extensive reading in a variety of Latin authors. LEC.

LAT 790. Practicum in the Teaching of Latin. 0.5 Hours.

Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Latin. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD.

LAT 791. Seminar in the Teaching of Latin. 3 Hours.

An introduction to teaching required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants. Topics to include: pronunciation, etymology, Latin style, testing methods, and the selecting of texts. LEC.

LAT 798. Studies in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Selected readings for qualified students who desire special work on a flexible basis. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Undergraduate proficiency in Latin or equivalent. RSH.

LAT 899. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatifactory basis. THE.

Communication Studies Courses

COMS 104. Introduction to Communication Studies. 3 Hours H.

Survey of the major areas of the Communication Studies field. Provides an overview of communication theory and research methods, and introduces key topics, approaches, and applications in core areas such as rhetoric, organizational communication, interpersonal communication, intercultural communication, and communication technology. LEC.

COMS 130. Speaker-Audience Communication. 3 Hours GE22 / U.

Study of rhetorical theory and its application to the preparation, presentation, and criticism of oral discourse in audience situations. Special consideration of listening behavior and of the ethical conduct of speech in a free society. This course fulfills the College argument and reason requirement. LEC.

COMS 131. Speaker-Audience Communication, Honors. 3 Hours GE22 / U.

The study of rhetorical theory and its application to the preparation, presentation, and criticism of oral discourse in audience situations. Special consideration of listening behavior and of the ethical conduct of speech in a free society. This course fulfills the College argument and reason requirement. This is an honors section of COMS 130 open only to students in the Honors Program. LEC.

COMS 132. Speaker-Audience Communication for the Professional Schools. 3 Hours GE22 / H.

This course focuses on the study of oral communication: the application, preparation, presentation and criticism of messages appropriate in the business or organizational setting. Special consideration is given to speaker confidence, working in teams, listening behaviors and application of communication theories to the audience and rhetorical situation. Not open to students with credit in COMS 150. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the professional schools. LEC.

COMS 133. Speaker-Audience Communication for the Professional Schools, Honors. 3 Hours GE22 / H.

This course focuses on the study of oral communication the application, preparation, presentation and criticism of messages appropriate in the business or organizational setting. Special consideration is given to speaker confidence, working in teams, listening behaviors and application of communication theories to the audience and rhetorical situation. Not open to students with credit in COMS 150. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the professional schools who are members of the University Honors Program. LEC.

COMS 150. Personal Communication. 3 Hours U.

This course is an introduction to communication theory, process, and skill. The course seeks to increase the student's understanding of communication theory, both interpersonal and public, and of his or her own communicative behavior. Class projects and participation urge students to apply this theoretical knowledge to a variety of settings, including interpersonal and addressing groups and audiences. This course does not fulfill the College argument and reason requirement. Not open to those who have credit in COMS 130. LEC.

COMS 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Communication Studies. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

COMS 201. Introduction to Leadership. 2 Hours H.

This course introduces students to the study of the leadership process. The course covers theories and research on core themes of leadership, focusing on how course materials relate to students' own leadership experiences. This course is taught online. Concurrent enrollment in COMS 202 is recommended. Students considering the Leadership Studies Minor must complete COMS 202. Not open to seniors. LEC.

COMS 202. Introduction to Leadership Applications. 1 Hour AE51 / H.

This course focuses on the application of information learned in COMS 201. Activities and discussions emphasize application, analysis, and engagement with the process of leadership. Concurrent enrollment in COMS 201 is recommended. Students considering the Leadership Studies Minor must complete COMS 201 and COMS 202. Not open to seniors. Prerequisite: Corequisite: COMS 201. LEC.

COMS 210. Communication in Organizational and Professional Contexts. 3 Hours S.

Introduces foundational concepts in organizational communication, focusing on topics such as superior-subordinate relationships, information- and feedback-seeking, relationships with stakeholders, and dealing with organizational change. The course emphasizes individual communication practices and responsibilities that contribute to organizational outcomes and personal success in organizations. LEC.

COMS 230. Fundamentals of Debate. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

Introduction to the principles of debating. Emphasis on debating techniques, analysis of the question, methods of using evidence, refutation, and brief making. This course fulfills the College argument and reason requirement. LEC.

COMS 231. Practicum in Forensics. 1 Hour U.

For students selected by faculty supervisor for work on university debate squad. Students to enroll at time of their selection. Recurring enrollments permitted. FLD.

COMS 232. The Rhetorical Tradition. 3 Hours HR GE3H / H.

Historical survey of theories of communication and persuasion, the people who produced them, and the philosophical assumptions upon which they rest. Beginning with the Greeks, especially Plato and Aristotle, and ending with selections from Kenneth Burke and other contemporary figures, the course focuses on changing concepts of rhetoric throughout a time span of some 2000 years. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 235. Introduction to Rhetoric and Social Influence. 3 Hours HL GE11 / H.

This course examines in detail the texts of speeches and essays on controversial issues in order to illustrate the varied forms of rhetorical action and the diverse modes of analysis and evaluation that can be applied to them. Examples are drawn from the rhetorical literature of contemporary U.S. speakers and prose writers. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 238. Cases in Persuasion. 3 Hours H.

An exploration of basic principles that explain the effect and effectiveness of the arts of persuasion currently practiced in American society. Class discussions of incidents leading to the discovery of principles and theories that explain them. Continuing emphasis on issues concerning the ethical character of persuasion in contemporary life. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 244. Introduction to Interpersonal Communication Theory. 3 Hours SI GE3S / S.

Examines basic theoretical perspectives and research on verbal and nonverbal communication elements affecting communication between individuals in a variety of contexts. Topics include communication competence, developmental aspects of interpersonal communication, and interpersonal influence. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 246. Introduction to Intercultural Communication. 3 Hours S.

This course attempts to provide an understanding of communication as it affects culture and as it is affected by culture. Special emphasis will be placed on the principle of similarity and differences as it relates to the roles of verbal and non-verbal symbols, codes, and cues, stereotypes, prejudices and value and thought patterning systems between and among cultures. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 307. Introduction to Political Communication. 3 Hours S.

The primary goal of this course is to encourage critical engagement in politics and political campaigns. This course addresses various elements of political communication, with primary focus on the political campaign. By the end of the semester students are able to understand the relevant theories of political communication, evaluate and use critical thinking skills in consuming political messages, and grasp the complex structural and situational factors that influence political discourse. Prerequisite: COMS 130. LEC.

COMS 310. Introduction to Organizational Communication. 3 Hours SC GE3S / S.

This course provides a foundation for the study of communication in organizational contexts. It introduces students to various organization theories including classical, human relations, systems, and cultural approaches and examines the role of communication in each. Information flow, communication climate, communication networks, work relationships and managerial communication are discussed as well as organizational symbolism, conflict resolution, rituals and ethics. The course is designed to heighten students' awareness of the role of communication in the organizing process and to develop their abilities to diagnose and prevent communication-related problems. Prerequisite: COMS 130 or COMS 150. LEC.

COMS 320. Communication on the Internet. 3 Hours S.

This course introduces social and communication issues in the context of online interaction. Surveys a range of social internet technologies (e.g., newsgroups, chat, MUDs, etc.). Focus is on the interpersonal topics, including the establishment and maintenance of individual and cultural identities, personal relationships, the emergence of online communities, power and conflict in online groups, language use in online contexts, and how online groups are used to enhance or alter civic and global cultures. LEC.

COMS 322. Audience Centered Public Speaking in the Workplace. 3 Hours GE22 / S.

In this course, students develop and present their ideas by applying communication theories to organizational audiences in various presentation situations. Specifically, this course focuses on presentation development, preparation, presentation and critique of messages appropriate in the business or organization setting. Special attention is given to speaking with confidence, presenting and working effectively in teams, reflecting and improving on presentations skills, and listening and speaking ethically in an increasingly diverse work world. LEC.

COMS 330. Effective Business Communication. 3 Hours S.

The purpose of this course is to develop effective written, spoken, and electronically mediated communication skills necessary for business. Students will write short technical reports, plan meetings and conferences, prepare and present briefings and persuasive proposals with visual aids, and examine the use of new communication technologies. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 331. Persuasive Speaking. 3 Hours H.

Guided experiences in the preparation and presentation of discourse intended to influence outcomes of human interactions in various speaker-audience situations, including television. Special emphasis on speech styles in influencing thought, attitudes, and behavior. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 335. Rhetoric, Politics and the Mass Media. 3 Hours H.

This course investigates the ways in which rhetorical strategies (persuasive and linguistic usage) permeate the relationship between politics and politicians and the mass media. We will analyze media coverage of political debates, the presidential use of radio, television and press conferences, and the network evening news coverage of political events to see how political decisions are influenced by and influence the media. (Same as POLS 521.) Prerequisite: COMS 130 or COMS 150. LEC.

COMS 342. Problem-Solving in Teams and Groups. 3 Hours S.

This course introduces basic concepts important to leading and/or participating in problem-solving work teams. Problem identification and analysis and leadership are emphasized and practiced. Teamwork variables are discussed and promoted. Lecture, demonstrations, exercises in class are structure for students to analyze groups outside of class. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 344. Relational Communication. 3 Hours S.

This course studies communication issues, theories, research and skills applicable to sustaining and enriching long-term relationships, such as families, friendships and close workplace collaborations. Emphasis is given to applying course concepts to students' own relationships and interaction in class. Prerequisite: COMS 244. LEC.

COMS 356. Introduction to Behavioral Research Methods in Communication. 3 Hours GE12 / S.

An introduction to the nature of theory and theory building in the study of human communication. Research methods include experimentation, survey, content analysis, and field description. An introduction to statistics and statistical tests is included as well. Prerequisite: MATH 101 and admission to the Communication Studies major or consent of instructor. LEC.

COMS 410. Micro-Level Organizational Communication. 3 Hours S.

An examination of dyadic level communication in organizations, with emphasis on contexts of superior-subordinate and peer communication. The course also addresses contexts of organizational entry and exit, perception and judgment, information seeking, feedback, and organizational attachment. Prerequisite: COMS 310. LEC.

COMS 411. Marco Level Organizational Communication. 3 Hours S.

An exploration of the communication patterns and challenges between organizational groups and organizations as a whole. Key elements include networks, boundary spanning, inter-organizational collaboration, and the role of technology in linking large organizational components. Prerequisite: COMS 310 or instructor permission. LEC.

COMS 412. Communication in Distributed Organizations. 3 Hours S.

Examination of the communication challenges faced by distributed organizations, especially those with a global presence. Topics include telework, virtual terms, and new processes required to support interaction among people located in several different places. Prerequisite: COMS 310 or permission of instructor. LEC.

COMS 420. Communication, Technology and Globalization. 3 Hours H.

Examines the social, cultural, and economic challenges and opportunities advanced communication technologies and globalization pose to processes such as democratic deliberation, urban governance, and environmental sustainability. Prerequisite: COMS 130. LEC.

COMS 425. Communication and the American Presidency. 3 Hours H.

Examination of the ways in which American presidents communicate with the American people and how such communication influences the public. Emphasis is on a number of approaches to better understanding presidential communication, including rhetorical, historical, and content analysis. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 431. Communication and Leadership. 3 Hours H.

This course provides an overview of the role of communication in leadership in a variety of contexts, including: interpersonal, small group, intercultural, organizational, and public sphere. It will include theoretical and experiential approaches to effective leadership communication. Prerequisite: Admission to Leadership Minor or consent of instructor. LEC.

COMS 435. Forms and Styles of American Public Discourse. 3 Hours H.

Changing styles of public discourse are examined from the beginning of the nation to contemporary times, and the generic forms of address that have emerged from our national dialogue, such as jeremiads, inaugurals and apologies, are studied from a formistic perspective. Prerequisite: COMS 235. LEC.

COMS 440. Communication and Gender. 3 Hours AE41 / S.

Focuses attention on the relationship between communication and gender, including both physical and psychological dimensions. Topics include: sex role orientations and stereotypes; perceived and actual differences in verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors; the influence of gender on communication in a variety of contexts. (Same as WGSS 440.) Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 441. Health Communication. 3 Hours H.

This course is a survey of the many disciplines found in the field of health communication, including persuasion that targets health-related behavior, negotiation of treatment with health care providers, emotional support of patients, news media coverage of medical research, and health campaign principles. Prerequisite: COMS 130. LEC.

COMS 447. Intercultural Communication: The Afro-American. 3 Hours AE41 / H/W.

An examination of the barriers to effective communication between black Americans and non-black Americans. (Same as AAAS 420.) Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 450. Ethical Issues in Political Communication. 3 Hours H.

Application of ethical standards to the evaluation of political communication. Examination of value questions related to advocacy in modern society (propaganda, demagoguery, credibility). Analysis of First Amendment rights and other issues pertaining to censorship and freedom of speech (defamation, dissent, incitement, public morals, privacy). Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 453. Communication in Political Campaigns. 3 Hours H.

This course examines political communication as it evolves throughout a political campaign and includes such topics as theories and strategies, stages in political campaigns, influence of the mass media, television advertising, candidate debates, polling, and the use of new technologies in delivering campaign communication. Selected examples from recent campaigns illustrate the strategies and effects of political communication as we examine how politicians persuade us to vote for them. Prerequisite: A course in communication studies. LEC.

COMS 459. Undergraduate Seminar in: _____. 1-3 Hours H.

Course organized any given semester to study particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. (Distribution credit given for two or three hours only.) LEC.

COMS 460. Undergraduate Seminar in: _____. 1-3 Hours S.

Course organized any given semester to study particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. (Distribution credit given for two or three hour enrollments only.) LEC.

COMS 485. Communication and Organizational Change. 3 Hours S.

Examines communication processes that support or hinder implementation of organizational change. Topics include stakeholder analysis, individual responses to change, communicating about change, generating support for change, and managing resistance to change. LEC.

COMS 496. Capstone in: _____. 3 Hours AE61 / S.

In the capstone course students synthesize and apply knowledge and skills gained through the major. Capstone coursework requires students to integrate practices and theories learned in their areas of concentration. Topics within each concentration change as needs and resources develop. Prerequisite: Senior standing, COMS 130, and completion of COMS 235 and COMS 356 or concurrent enrollment. LEC.

COMS 497. Honors Seminar. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

This course is intended for honor students who want to learn more about the history of communication studies, major areas of research, or more in-depth knowledge about special communication-related topics. Areas to be covered may change as needs and resources change. LEC.

COMS 498. Honors Thesis. 2-6 Hours AE61 / H.

(Six hours maximum credit, which may be distributed through two semesters.) Study should include readings directed toward original research, i.e., an intensive investigation of a specific problem in this field. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Honors Committee. IND.

COMS 499. Directed Study in Communication Studies. 1-3 Hours H.

(A maximum of six hours of credit may be counted, with not more than four in a single area of study.) Investigation of a special topic or project selected by the student with advice, approval, and supervision of an instructor. Such study may take the form of directed reading, or special research, individual reports and conferences. (Distribution credit given for two-three hours only.) Prerequisite: At least seven hours of credit in the department and consent of instructor. IND.

COMS 503. Post-Soviet Communication. 3 Hours H.

This course is designed to acquaint students with the shifting manner of public discourse in Post-Soviet Russia and help them to explore in some depth cross-cultural communication between America and Russia. In addition to contemporary and historical background on Russian communicative practices, students examine discourse in business development, mass media, marketing, and advertising. All readings in English. (Same as SLAV 503). LEC.

COMS 530. Internship in Communication Studies. 1-3 Hours AE61 / S.

Students do communication-centered fieldwork in an organization related to their career goals. Criteria for the organizations and work assignments suitable for internship credit are in an information brochure available at the COMS Department office and website. The internship plan is developed with field supervisor and internship faculty adviser. Reports and meetings are required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, admission to COMS major. FLD.

COMS 531. Seminar in Leadership Strategies and Applications. 3 Hours H.

This seminar serves as the capstone course for the Leadership Studies minor. It includes advanced readings on leadership theory and practice, as well as major written and applied projects in which students integrate and demonstrate what they have learned in the program. Prerequisite: COMS 201, COMS 431, and admission to the Leadership Studies minor. LEC.

COMS 532. Leadership Studies Practicum. 1-3 Hours AE61 / U.

Students engage in a variety of training programs and field experiences in which they learn about leadership, observe leaders in action, and involve themselves in leadership activities. Written assignments and group discussions are used to analyze their learning. Should be taken for a total of three credit hours, across more than one semester. Prerequisite: COMS 201 and admission to the Leadership Studies minor. FLD.

COMS 535. American Public Address, Puritans to 1900. 3 Hours H.

A history of American public address from the Puritans to about 1900. Using the tools of rhetorical criticism, students describe, analyze, and evaluate select rhetoric from the period. Graduate students are assigned extra reading and a research paper. Prerequisite: COMS 235. LEC.

COMS 536. American Public Address, 1900-Present. 3 Hours H.

A history of American public address from 1900 to the present. Using the tools of rhetorical criticism, students describe, analyze, and evaluate select rhetoric from the period. Graduate students are assigned extra reading and a research paper. Prerequisite: COMS 235. LEC.

COMS 537. Communication in Conflict Resolution. 3 Hours S.

An examination of conflict situations and the manner in which communication can serve as a vehicle for their intensification or resolution. The focus is on the theory of games as it applies to conflict within interpersonal situations; implications will be drawn for larger social systems. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 538. Persuasion Theory and Research. 3 Hours S.

This course focuses on the social scientific study of persuasion. Traditional theories of attitude change and persuasion research are studied along with techniques of measuring attitudes. Attention is also given to the attitude-behavior relationship and the production of compliance-gaining messages. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 539. Argumentation. 3 Hours S.

Analysis of the theory and techniques of argumentation in historical and contemporary writings, with special emphasis on the works of Aristotle, John Stuart Mill, Richard Whateley, and Stephen Toulmin. Application of argumentation theory to political and legal discourse. Opportunity for student performances in the preparation and criticism of argument. Prerequisite: Four hours in the department. LEC.

COMS 543. Group Leadership Practicum. 1-3 Hours S.

Theory and practice in leadership of small group interaction. Includes responsibility for conducting a semester-long series of group meetings in an educational context under the supervision of faculty, study and training in leadership skills, a weekly practicum seminar, and individual conferences with supervising instructor. May be taken more than once, but not for more than four hours total credit. (Distribution credit given for two-three hours only.) Prerequisite: COMS 344, COMS 455, and permission of instructor. FLD.

COMS 544. Advanced Interpersonal Communication: Theories and Research. 3 Hours S.

Intensive exploration of contemporary theories and research in the field of interpersonal communication; emphasis on an array of theoretical models and research exemplars; comparative analysis of major theoretical and research paradigms. Prerequisite: COMS 244 or instructor consent. LEC.

COMS 546. Communication Across the Life-span. 3 Hours S.

Examination of the ways in which communication changes across the life-span, and influences human development. Course will include topics such as barriers to communication among elderly populations; communication and mis-communication across generations; the role of language in constructing life-span development (e.g., the mid-life crisis); development of language and social interaction during childhood; peer relationships and communication in adolescence; uses and effects of mass communication across the life-span. Prerequisite: COMS 244 and COMS 356. LEC.

COMS 547. Communication and Culture. 3 Hours S.

A study of the systematic relationship between communication and culture. Emphasis is on culture as a variable in communicative situations: cultural aspects of attitude and cognition, language interchange, cultural differences in extra-verbal behavior, interaction between oral traditions and mass media. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, COMS 230, or an introduction course in anthropology. LEC.

COMS 548. Theories of the Interview. 3 Hours S.

Comprehensive study of communication processes in dyadic, face-to-face situations commonly encountered in organizations and professional environments. Intensive analysis of simulated and real-life interviews. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 549. Communication in Service and Sales. 3 Hours S.

This course will deal with communication between organizational personnel and their customers or clients. Case studies and research concerning communication behaviors of service providers and salespeople will be covered. Prerequisite: COMS 310. LEC.

COMS 551. The Rhetoric of Black Americans. 3 Hours H/W.

A study of the rhetoric of black Americans, from their earliest protest efforts to the contemporary scene, with focus on the methods and themes employed to alter their status in American society. (Same as AAAS 534.) Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 552. The Rhetoric of Women's Rights. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

An analysis of the themes and rhetorical strategies of the women's rights movement in America. The course will view the struggle for women's rights from a historical perspective and will conclude with contemporary issues concerning the role of women in society. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 554. Rhetoric of Popular Culture. 3 Hours H.

A study of the social and cultural importance of popular culture. Emphasis is on using rhetorical analysis and a number of important theoretical perspectives to help examine popular culture's often unnoticed influence. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 555. Family Communication. 3 Hours S.

An examination of trends and theory related to the scientific study of the family, with a focus on issues related to family interaction, functioning, relationships, and communication. Research and theories from communication, sociological, and psychological perspectives are employed to examine topics such as family violence, mental health problems, marital satisfaction, divorce, courtship, and the impact of the family on its children (and vice versa). Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 557. East Asian Communication. 3 Hours S.

Explores the major communication theories and research in the East Asian cultural contexts by focusing on the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean cultures. Examines, from a broader perspective, certain cultural values (e.g. harmony, hierarchy, conservatism, and modernism) upheld in East Asian cultures and their influences on people's communicative behaviors in an age of globalization. Students explore issues of history, identity, verbal and non-verbal symbols, stereotypes, prejudice, values and thought patterning systems in the East Asian cultural context from a communicative perspective. This course is designed as a bridge course and meets with a graduate level section of the same title. Prerequisite: COMS 246. LEC.

COMS 559. Seminar in: _____. 1-3 Hours H.

Course organized any given semester to study particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. (Distribution credit given for two-three hours only.) LEC.

COMS 560. Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours S.

Course organized any given semester to study particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. (May be repeated for credit if content varies). LEC.

COMS 590. Nonverbal Communication. 3 Hours S.

Examination of non-linguistic behavior in human communication, including proxemics (spacing), kinesics (movement and expression), and paralinguistics (voice quality). Includes phylogenetic and developmental perspectives, methods of analysis, applications to interpersonal problems. (Same as PSYC 590.) Prerequisite: COMS 356 or PSYC 210 or PSYC 211. LEC.

COMS 603. Topics in Presidential Rhetoric: _____. 3 Hours H.

This course involves an examination of presidential rhetoric, including a focus on the strategies present in presidential discourse, the function that this rhetoric serves, and the historical context in which it was presented. One or more important presidential rhetors will be covered each semester. This course can be repeated for credit if taken under a different topic. LEC.

COMS 605. Speech Writing. 3 Hours H.

Emphasis is on actual practice in preparing speech manuscripts for oneself and others. Model speeches are examined to better understand language, evidence, and stylistic choices available to speech writers. The ethical dimensions of writing for others in corporate and political positions are stressed. Students are required to prepare a variety of speeches and analyses of others' speeches. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC.

COMS 607. Political Communication. 3 Hours H.

This course will focus on contemporary political communication theory and illustrate how such theories are exemplified in modern political contexts: political arguments and developing consensus, constitutional issues and hearings, the rhetorical presidency, the dissemination of political information, and political uses of definition. (Same as POLS 520.) Prerequisite: COMS 130 or COMS 150. LEC.

COMS 608. Communication, Media and Terrorism. 3 Hours S.

The course considers the topics of media and terrorism from a macro public opinion and politics perspective. This course addresses the nature of terrorism, who terrorists are, and what are their grievances with the larger society in which they are embedded. Terrorism has unique links to communication and these will be explored in various ways: consideration of acts of terror, recruiting new terrorists, and issues in choosing effective and ineffective means of fighting terrorism. Additional topics include media portrayals of terrorism in news discourse and mediated communication such as motion pictures and televised dramatic portrayals. Prerequisite: COMS 130. LEC.

COMS 620. Communication and New Technology. 3 Hours S.

This course explores the impact of new communication technology on individuals and groups in various contexts. Topics include: The development of computer-mediated communication, social and psychological impacts of new communication technology, the evolution of telework and advances in interactive telecommunications. LEC.

COMS 639. Legal Communication. 3 Hours S.

An analysis of how communication principles and theories operate within the context of the legal system. Topics covered will include the lawyer/client interview, depositions and pre-trial discovery, settlement negotiation, jury selection, opening and closing statements, and witness testimony. Prerequisite: COMS 130 or COMS 150. LEC.

COMS 647. Issues in Intercultural Communication. 3 Hours S.

Examination of the processes and factors affecting communication in an intercultural context, and of methods of training for intercultural communication roles. Prerequisite: COMS 547 and an introductory course in anthropology, or consent of instructor. LEC.

COMS 656. Mass Media: Social Science Applications. 3 Hours S.

This course introduces students to the major theories of and prominent research in mass communication. The aim is to stimulate critical thinking about the content and effects of mass communication, develop critical consumption skills, and enhance awareness of public policy issues relating to the media. Students are required to read a variety of chapters and articles on mass communication, promoting independent investigation into specific areas of interest. This course is a bridge course and meets with a graduate level section of the same title. Prerequisite: COMS 356. LEC.

COMS 667. Interpersonal Communication in Multinational Organizations. 3 Hours.

A study of interpersonal communication in management and professional development in intercultural situations. Focus on preparation of the global manager or professional in the organizational environment. Special attention to the problems and challenges of intercultural interactions in the context of multinational organizations. LEC.

COMS 669. Human Conflict and Peace. 3 Hours H.

Study of religious, cultural, and social traditions toward understanding the nature and purposes of human conflict. Analysis of various meanings of peace, with emphasis on study of nonviolent approaches to management of conflict. Class discussion, readings, and individual research projects. (Same as REL 669.) Prerequisite: Junior standing or above. LEC.

COMS 710. Survey of Theory and Research in Organizational Communication. 3 Hours.

This course examines the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of organizational communication research. Course topics cover variable analytic traditions and systems theory, as well as cultural, critical, and various interpretive approaches to understanding communication in organizational contexts. Prerequisite: COMS 310 and permission of the instructor. LEC.

COMS 730. Writing and Speaking for Decision Makers. 3 Hours.

Theory and application of communication strategies for corporate communication. This course presents rhetorical analysis of organizational situations and audiences, focusing on corporate decision-makers. Included are informative and persuasive communications such as board presentations, requests for proposal and responses to RFPs, grant proposals, and persuasive presentations for adoption, implementation, or evaluation of organizational programs. Course is limited to Regents Center students only. LEC.

COMS 741. Special Topics in Communication Studies: _____. 2-3 Hours.

Examination of special topics in Communication Studies. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. LEC.

COMS 784. Proseminar in Communication and Aging. 1 Hour.

A weekly forum for students and faculty to discuss professional issues and interdisciplinary research in communication and aging. May be repeated for credit. (Same as PSYC 784.) (Same as SPLH 784.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

COMS 787. Gerontology Proseminar. 3 Hours.

A proseminar coordinated by the Gerontology Center. The proseminar explores essential areas of gerontology for researchers and practitioners, providing a multidisciplinary (psychology, biology, sociology, and communication) perspective on aging. The proseminar surveys contemporary basic and applied research, service programs, and policy and management issues in gerontology. (Same as ABSC 787, AMS 767, PSYC 787, and SOC 767.) (Formerly HDFL 787.) LEC.

COMS 807. Rhetoric, Politics and the Mass Media. 3 Hours.

This course investigates the ways in which rhetorical strategies (persuasive and linguistic usage) permeate the relationship between politics and politicians and the mass media. We will analyze media coverage of political debates, the presidential use of radio, television and press conferences, the network evening news coverage of political events, the influence of political advertising to see how political decisions are influenced by and influence the media. LEC.

COMS 810. Organizational Communication: Theory and Research. 3 Hours.

This course examines the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of organizational communication research. Course topics cover variable analytic traditions and systems theory, as well as cultural, critical, and various interpretive approaches to understanding communication in organizational contexts. Prerequisite: COMS 310 and permission of instructor. LEC.

COMS 811. Applied Organization Communication. 3 Hours.

This survey course addresses key communication processes in organizations, including developing and sustaining workplace relationships, providing and receiving feedback, processes of effective teams and in leadership situations. Students will apply these concepts to appreciate the dynamics of organizational culture, power, and ethics at work and will identify strategies to enhance workplace success. SEM.

COMS 835. Impression Formation and Interpersonal Behavior. 3 Hours.

Intensive investigation of the processes involved in impression formation and of the effects of established impressions upon interpersonal communication. (Same as PSYC 845.) Prerequisite: COMS 535 or PSYC 670. LEC.

COMS 844. Seminar in Interpersonal Communication. 3 Hours.

This class will address current theory and research in interpersonal communication. Issues addressed may include verbal or nonverbal communication in families, close relationships, initial interactions, and the like. LEC.

COMS 846. Communication and Aging. 3 Hours.

Examination of the interrelationship between communication and the aging process. The course will include current research and theory on such topics as intergenerational communication, language and age identity, age-stereotyping and communication, mass media and aging, age and health communication, and others of current interest in the field. LEC.

COMS 848. Communication Audits in Organizations. 3 Hours.

The principal thrust of this course is a hands-on analysis of the communication in 1-2 organizations. Students work as a consulting group to analyze dimensions of communication, communication channels, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and communication strategies. Experience is gained in organizational research methods, instrument development, organizational analysis, feedback, and organizational development. LEC.

COMS 850. Introduction to Research Methods. 3 Hours.

An introduction to methodological approaches to the study of communication. Approaches considered will include (a) humanistic message analysis and evaluation; (b) ethnographic and observational techniques; (c) survey construction and execution; and (d) experimental design and procedures. Special focus on issues of validity, reliability, and ethics. LEC.

COMS 851. Communication Research: Historical and Descriptive. 3 Hours.

An introduction to types of historical and descriptive research in human communication. Library resources and methods of research will be covered. Emphasis will be placed upon preparing a research prospectus and upon writing the research report. LEC.

COMS 852. Communication Research: Experimentation and Quantitative Analysis. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the process of research in communication studies, including consideration of basic principles in research design, methods of observation and measurement, and the application of appropriate statistical techniques. LEC.

COMS 855. Qualitative Research Methods in Communication Studies. 3 Hours.

Study of strategies for describing communication behavior in particular contexts, emphasizing ethnography and specific observational and interview data gathering and analysis methods. Prerequisite: COMS 755 or equivalent. LEC.

COMS 856. Communication Research: Quantitative Analysis. 3 Hours.

An intermediate overview of statistical techniques commonly used in communication research. Content will include a review of univariate statistical tests such as t-test, correlation, chi-square, and other nonparametric techniques of data analysis. Additionally, factorial analysis of variance, multiple regression, and factor analysis will be covered, along with the application of appropriate statistical techniques. Prerequisite: COMS 850 and an introductory course in statistics. LEC.

COMS 859. Proseminar in Communication Studies. 3 Hours.

An overview and integration of communication studies based upon an examination of selected basic writings in the discipline. LEC.

COMS 860. New Communication Technology and the Work Place. 3 Hours.

An examination of changes in the work place and for workers associated with new communication technologies such as e-mail, voice mail, teleconferencing, distributed computer processing, and computer-supported decision making. Emphasis is on changes in organizational communication patterns, participant responses to the technologies, and evaluation of the outcomes of implementing work place communication technologies. To be taken by Regents Center students. LEC.

COMS 898. Investigation and Conference (For Master's Candidates). 1-8 Hours.

(Limited to eight hours credit toward the M.A. degree.) Directed research and experimentation for M.A. students in some phase of speech science or the teaching of speech and drama. RSH.

COMS 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.

COMS 907. Seminar in Political Communication. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on contemporary political communication theory and illustrate how such theories are exemplified in modern political contexts: political arguments and developing consensus, communication strategies in Congressional and bureaucratic decision-making, the rhetorical presidency, the dissemination of political information, political narrative, and political campaigns. LEC.

COMS 920. Introduction to Teaching Oral Communication. 3 Hours.

This seminar prepares new graduate teaching assistants for their first teaching experience. Students will develop course materials including lectures, discussion prompts, assignments, exams based on pedagogical best practices. Students will apply theoretical concepts related to teaching, learning and assessment, and apply those theories to their own classrooms. LEC.

COMS 930. Seminar in Speech: _____. 1-4 Hours.

Special problems in speech. LEC.

COMS 932. Theories of Rhetoric: Classical. 3 Hours.

An intensive study of the rhetorical theories of classical writers from 466 B.C. to the decline of Roman oratory. Principal emphasis will be on Isocrates, Plato, Aristotle, Quintilian, Cicero, and Longinus. LEC.

COMS 933. Theories of Rhetoric: Neo-Classical. 2-3 Hours.

A study of the development of rhetorical theory from 325 A.D. to the twentieth century. Notable departures from the classical tradition will be examined. Special concentration on the writings of Augustine and the tradition of medieval preaching. Alcuin, Ramus, Bacon, Campbell, Whately, Blair, John Quincy Adams, and the elocutionary movement. LEC.

COMS 936. Seminar in Language and Discourse. 3 Hours.

This seminar uses interdisciplinary readings to examine central theoretical questions regarding language and communication. The course moves from considering major theoretical positions to current research in communication on discourse. Methodological issues in the study of language and discourse are also addressed. LEC.

COMS 938. Seminar in Persuasion. 2-3 Hours.

Examination of selected topics in persuasion, with emphasis on the application of recent theories and experimental research to the analysis of persuasive discourse. Prerequisite: COMS 538 or equivalent. LEC.

COMS 939. Seminar in Argumentation. 2-3 Hours.

Examination of special problems in argumentation, with emphasis on the relationship of systems of argumentation to their philosophic presuppositions. Discussion of the writings of Toulmin, Natason, Johnstone, Perelman, Dewey. Prerequisite: COMS 539 or equivalent. LEC.

COMS 941. Seminar in Health Communications. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of the many disciplines of study found in the field of health communication. Emphases include decision making regarding health-related behaviors, the influence of interpersonal messages, negotiating treatment with health care providers, coping with medical difficulties, the critical examination of medical research, news, and health campaigns, and the impacts of new technologies. SEM.

COMS 945. Seminar in Social Support. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of the many disciplines of the fundamental form of communication known as social or emotional support or comforting. Emphases include message-, receiver-, and interactionally-oriented approaches, as well as support contexts, dilemmas, structures, features, and positive effects on physical and mental health. SEM.

COMS 946. Seminar in Communication and Intergroup Relations. 3 Hours.

Conceptual and theoretical frameworks for exploring and understanding relations between individuals from different societal groups (e.g., cultural/ethic, gender, age). Focus on issues of identity, power relations as manifested in interpersonal, mass media, and organizational contexts. The course will include methodological and applied implications for studying different groups, both within the USA and around the world. LEC.

COMS 947. Communication in Cultural Innovation and National Development. 3 Hours.

An examination of the role of speech and other types of communication in the introduction of change within cultures and the diffusion of innovation between cultures. Specific communication problems concerning agriculture, education, international aid, military assistance, and public health will be discussed. LEC.

COMS 948. Seminar in Organizational Communication. 2-3 Hours.

Analysis of speech communication functions in the organizational structures of business, industry, labor, military, education, government, and professional agencies. Development of conceptual schemes for conducting research and training programs on speech systems which characterize the operation of organized groups. LEC.

COMS 950. Seminar in Public Address: _____. 3 Hours.

The study of public address by historical periods or by topics. LEC.

COMS 951. Seminar in Movement Theory and Genre Criticism. 3 Hours.

This course examines the theoretical and methodological underpinnings of approaches to rhetorical analysis focusing on social movements and rhetorical genres. It will review existing theory on these topics, develop a methodological approach to both forms of critical analysis, and test each methodological approach via case studies. Prerequisite: COMS 755 or consent of instructor. LEC.

COMS 952. Seminar in Mythic and Narrative Approaches to Rhetorical Criticism. 3 Hours.

This course examines the theoretical and methodological underpinnings of approaches to rhetorical analysis focusing on narrative rhetoric, with a special emphasis on myth as a type of narrative. It will review existing theory on these topics, consider a number of alternative methodological approaches, and test each methodological approach via case studies. Prerequisite: COMS 755 or consent of instructor. LEC.

COMS 953. Seminar in Organizational Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on theoretical and methodological materials related to the use of rhetoric in an organizational setting. It will review existing theory and methodological development on this topic, paying special attention to the distinction between rhetoric used within an organization and rhetoric focused on audiences external to the organization. Multiple case-studies will be considered to illuminate the functioning of both internal and external organizational rhetoric. Prerequisite: COMS 755 or consent of instructor. LEC.

COMS 955. Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. 3 Hours.

A study of contemporary and historical writings on rhetorical criticism. Emphasis is placed upon the development of critical methodology for future research and writing. Prerequisite: COMS 755. LEC.

COMS 958. Comparative Theories of Speech Communication. 3 Hours.

A descriptive and comparative analysis of theories of communication applicable to speech behavior. Prerequisite: COMS 859 or equivalent. LEC.

COMS 959. Theories of Rhetoric: Contemporary. 3 Hours.

A study of the writings on rhetorical theory in the twentieth century. Principal emphasis will be on the psychological treatment of rhetoric. I.A. Richards and Kenneth Burke, and the relationship in the twentieth century between rhetoric and dialectic, rhetoric and poetic. Prerequisite: COMS 859 or equivalent. LEC.

COMS 997. Research in: _____. 1-6 Hours.

Supervised research under the direction of a faculty member on a topic of mutual interest to the faculty and graduate student. RSH.

COMS 998. Investigation and Conference (For Doctoral Candidates). 1-8 Hours.

(Limited to eight hours credit towards the Ph.D. degree.) Directed research and experimentation for Ph.D. students in some phase of speech science or the teaching of speech and drama. RSH.

COMS 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE.

Computational Biology Courses

BINF 701. Bioinformatics I. 5 Hours.

First semester of a two-semester course in bioinformatics and computational biology. Topics include basic concepts of bioinformatics and molecular modeling, bioinformatics databases, computational tools and modeling methods, protein sequence and structure alignment, conformational analysis, secondary structure determination, tertiary structure modeling (homology, threading, ab initio, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, protein folding and dynamics), as well as students presentations of material from current papers in the field of study and their own on-going research for discussion and critique. Prerequisite: College introductory biochemistry (no requirement for specific courses), math, and computer courses or concurrent enrollment in such courses and consent of instructor. LEC.

BINF 702. Bioinformatics II. 5 Hours.

Second semester of a two-semester course in bioinformatics and computational biology. Topics include protein quaternary structure modeling (protein-protein/DNA/small ligand docking, binding, computer-aided drug design), protein structure-function relationships, biological membranes (structure and function of integral membrane proteins, protein-membrane and protein-protein interactions in membranes), phylogenetic trees, modeling of genome-wide protein interaction networks based on structure, sequence, experiment and data-mining, as well as students presentations of material from current papers in the field of study and their own on-going research for discussion and critique. Prerequisite: BINF 701. LEC.

BINF 703. Advanced Computational Biology I. 5 Hours.

This is the first semester of an intensive two-semester course in Computational Biology, aimed at second-year graduate students. Topics include graph theory, systems biology, mathematical and computational modeling of complex systems, synthetic biology and protein design. Students will gain a mastery of cutting-edge topics in Computational Biology through lectures, careful reading of current literature, and advanced individual research projects. Prerequisite: BINF 701 and BINF 702, or consent of instructor. LEC.

BINF 704. Advanced Computational Biology II. 5 Hours.

This is the second semester of an intensive two-semester course in Computational Biology, aimed at second-year graduate students. Topics include graph theory, systems biology, mathematical and computational modeling of complex systems, synthetic biology and protein design. Students will gain a mastery of cutting-edge topics in Computational Biology through lectures, careful reading of current literature, and advanced individual research projects. Prerequisite: BINF 703. LEC.

BINF 709. Topics in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Advanced courses on special topics in Bioinformatics, given as need arises, including lectures, discussions, readings, or laboratory. Students may select sections according to their special interests. LEC.

BINF 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

Original research that is to be incorporated into a PhD dissertation. THE.

East Asian Languages&Cultures Courses

CHIN 100. Elementary Conversational Chinese I. 3 Hours U.

Three hours of class per week plus outside use of recorded text materials. Basic spoken language instruction intended primarily for beginners planning travel or work in China and Taiwan. Introduction to basic written characters. Does not fulfill College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language distribution requirements or department major and minor requirements. LEC.

CHIN 101. Elementary Conversational Chinese II. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of CHIN 100. Prerequisite: CHIN 100 or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 102. Beginning Chinese I. 4 Hours U.

Taught mainly in the summer, this course covers about 75% of the material in CHIN 104, upon which this course is modeled. LEC.

CHIN 104. Elementary Chinese I. 5 Hours U / F1.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of spoken drill each week. An introduction to spoken and written modern standard Chinese (Mandarin). Not open to students with native ability in Mandarin or Chinese dialect. Students who have any previous knowledge of Chinese must take a placement exam before enrolling in Chinese classes at K.U. Consult Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures for details. LEC.

CHIN 106. Elementary Chinese for Advanced Beginners. 3 Hours U.

This course is designed for students who have already acquired some elementary Chinese language abilities (in high school or from family), but cannot be placed in CHIN 108, Elementary Chinese II. The course focuses on perfecting listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, and prepares students for CHIN 108. For admission to the class, students must take the EALC Chinese placement exam, be interviewed by designated instructors, and approved. LEC.

CHIN 108. Elementary Chinese II. 5 Hours U / F2.

Continuation of CHIN 104. Prerequisite: CHIN 101, CHIN 104, or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 148. Intensive Elementary Chinese. 10-12 Hours U / F1 / F2.

An accelerated one semester course in elementary Chinese, covering the material of CHIN 104 and CHIN 108. Classes meet for two hours of lecture and one hour of drill daily. Emphasis on spoken language with grammar and readings in selected texts. No prerequisite. LEC.

CHIN 177. FIrst Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Chinese. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

CHIN 204. Intermediate Chinese I. 5 Hours U / F3.

Continuation of CHIN 108. Three hours of lecture and three hours of spoken drill. Prerequisite: CHIN 108 or equivalent. LEC.

CHIN 206. Intermediate Chinese Conversation. 2 Hours U.

Practice in speaking, presentation of prepared talks, and guided discussions. This course is primarily used to award transfer credit and does not fulfill any portion of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: CHIN 204 or equivalent. FLD.

CHIN 208. Intermediate Chinese II. 5 Hours U / F4.

Continuation of CHIN 204. Prerequisite: CHIN 204. LEC.

CHIN 251. Reading and Writing Chinese I. 1-3 Hours H.

Designed for those who speak modern standard (Mandarin) Chinese but lack reading and writing skills. Focuses on acquiring knowledge of the Chinese writing system and preparing students for possible entry into advanced courses in Chinese, e.g. CHIN 504 (Advanced Modern Chinese I), or, after appropriate testing, for possible exemption from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. Students should take the online Chinese placement exam and consult with the Chinese Language Program Coordinator. Enrollment by permission of the Chinese Language Program Coordinator only. LEC.

CHIN 252. Reading and Writing Chinese II. 1-3 Hours H.

Continuation of CHIN 251. Prerequisite: CHIN 251 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

CHIN 290. Accelerated Chinese. 3 Hours U.

Instruction in reading and writing Chinese for students who already possess a degree of oral/aural proficiency. This course will prepare students for enrollment in CHIN 504, Advanced Modern Chinese I. No prerequisites. Consent of instructor required. LEC.

CHIN 342. Introduction to Classical Chinese. 3 Hours H / FP.

An introduction to Classical Chinese through detailed analysis of short original passages from a variety of early Chinese texts. Students gain a foundation in the grammar and vocabulary of Classical Chinese, preparing them for CHIN 544. The course is offered at the 300 and 500 levels, with additional requirements for students taking the 500 level. Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of Chinese characters (e.g. from CHIN 108 or JPN 108) and consent of the instructor, or CHIN 208 or JPN 208. Not open to students who have completed