Graduation requirements and regulations for every academic program are provided in this catalog. Degree requirements and course descriptions are subject to change. In most cases, you will use the catalog of the year you entered KU (see your advisor for details). Other years’ catalogs»

Introduction

The School of the Arts in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is composed of 4 departments:

The school acquaints students with the arts as an important field of a liberal culture, either as members of a discriminating public or as trained practitioners. It prepares students for careers in dance, film and media, theatre, and visual art and promotes scholarship and research in the arts. It offers curricula for teachers of art in public schools and institutions of higher education.

The school makes a substantial contribution to the cultural life of the campus, community, and state by providing a center for the best of theatre and dance performance and the exhibition of works of art and film.

Undergraduate Degree Requirements

Undergraduate Degree Programs

  • The degree of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) is granted with majors in dance, film and media studies, theatre, and visual art.
  • The degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) is granted with majors in dance, history of art, theatre design, and visual art.
  • The degree of Bachelor of General Studies (B.G.S.) is granted with majors in film and media studies and theatre.
  • The Bachelor of Art Education (B.A.E.) offers a major in art education.

Requirements for Graduation

All undergraduate degrees from the University of Kansas require completion of the KU Core Curriculum.  In addition to the KU Core, students must satisfy the degree specific and major requirements of the degree they are pursuing. 

Degrees from the School of the Arts are conferred on candidates who have satisfactorily completed a  minimum of 120 credit hours for the B.A., B.G.S., and B.F.A. degrees, including required subjects. The B.A.E. degree requires additional hours in student teaching, internship, and graduate credit for Kansas licensure and therefore requires a minimum of 139 hours.

45 credit hours must be in junior/senior-level courses, numbered 300 and above. 2.0 grade-point averages in KU courses and in junior/senior hours in the major are required for graduation. 4 hours of the total in each case except B.A.E. degrees may be in physical education activity courses. Art appreciation courses are not accepted toward art history requirements for students majoring in any field of art or design. HA 100 and HA 300 are not accepted toward any requirement for students majoring in any field of art or design.

 

Remedial Courses

Remedial courses listed in the catalog and Schedule of Classes are numbered below 100. Such courses include, but are not limited to, ENGL 50 and MATH 2. Such courses do not count toward graduation in the School of the Arts and may not be counted as distribution courses.

Facilities

Art and Design Building

View a slide show in the School of the Arts brochure.

The 130,000-square-foot Art and Design Building houses all major art and design programs, including studios and offices. The building houses the 2,100-square-foot Art and Design Gallery; this space features new exhibitions every 2 weeks and serves as an important component of the teaching mission. Each major program offers all students spacious work areas and a range of equipment, from traditional to the newest digital technology. Students have access to multiplatform computer labs with the most commonly used current software for photography, animation, CAD, 3-D, video production, desktop publishing, scanning, illustration, large- and medium-format plotters, and color and black-and-white laser printers. Unique satellite computer areas are dedicated to textiles, metalsmithing and jewelry, expanded media, and printmaking. Students have access to a traditional Photography Laboratory, including a dark room for black-and-white photography, a digital processing lab, dedicated spaces for project photography, and an equipment checkout facility. The 6,400-square-foot Common Shop includes a range of woodworking equipment, a plastic vacuum former, metalworking equipment, and classroom space. All labs and the shop have technical support staff.

There are 3 large, well-equipped painting studios. The print studios consist of 8,000 square feet of workspaces and a dedicated computer lab for serigraphy, lithography, and intaglio. The intaglio studio has 5 presses and a separate acid room. The lithography studio has 3 presses and various sizes of stones. The serigraphy studio has 12 printing stations, a separate wash-out room, and a large exposure unit, available for a variety of photo-based processes. The sculpture studio is divided into 5 general work areas with appropriate equipment: woodworking, metal fabrication, foundry, an open courtyard, and individual studios. The foundry contains equipment necessary for casting with a variety of kilns, 3 gas-fired furnaces, and an overhead crane. There is an induction furnace with a lift-swing unit for bronze and a tilt box unit for iron and steel.

The 3,800-square-foot metalsmithing and jewelry studio has 8 rooms with separate areas for soldering, metalsmithing, plating/electro-forming, a finishing room, casting, gas and TIG welding, enameling, and a student-operated supply store. Matrix GemVision computer software is available for students to develop 3-dimensional jewelry models. The ceramics area includes 5,300 square feet of studio space in the Art and Design building as well as separate west campus Chamney barn facilities. Kilns include salt, soda, cross-draft wood, anagama wood-fired, raku, an electric test kiln, and several kinds of gas and electric kilns. The textile design area has separate weaving, screen-printing, sewing, and dye areas. The weaving studios are equipped with 4-, 8-, and 16-harness floor looms and two 16-harness AVL compu-dobby looms. The sewing area includes traditional machines, sergers, and a computer- aided embroidery machine. The textile Mac computer lab offers numerous software applications specific to weaving and surface design including jacquard weaving CAD software.

Murphy Hall

Murphy Hall houses all major theatre programs and facilities for University Theatre productions. Crafton-Preyer Theatre is a large proscenium theatre seating 1,181. It is equipped with a full-stage turntable, a hydraulic orchestra pit elevator, cutting-edge lighting and sound control equipment, and a recently renovated counterweight line system. William Inge Memorial Theatre is a 50-foot by 50-foot black box theatre with flexible seating for approximately 120. It is also equipped with excellent lighting and sound control equipment. Well-equipped shops for scenery, costume, and props construction, as well as a lighting maintenance laboratory serve the production areas. Crafton-Preyer is also used as Stage Too! The audience is built onto the large stage of the theatre for a more intimate setting. 4 main studios are used as rehearsal halls and classrooms. The Thomas Gorton Music and Dance Library is in Murphy Hall.

Oldfather Studios

Programs in film and media studies are housed in the 18,000-square-foot Oldfather Studios, a fully equipped film and video production facility featuring a soundstage, sound and editing suites, screening rooms and classrooms. In these contemporary workspaces, students have the opportunity to plan, produce, and edit film and video using current technologies.

Robinson Center

The dance department is housed in Robinson Center, which contains 3 large, well equipped dance studios. One of the studios converts into the Elizabeth Sherbon Theatre, an informal, black box theatre. Dance students have performance opportunities with the University Dance Company, New Dance, and in School of Music and Department of Theatre productions. The Thomas Gorton Music and Dance Library is in Murphy Hall.

Spencer Museum of Art

The Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art is regarded as one of the most innovative university museums and has long been considered one of the top teaching museums in the country. 5 galleries display selections from the permanent collection of more than 36,000 works of art. Areas of special strength include medieval art; European and American paintings, sculpture, and prints; photography; Japanese Edo-period paintings and prints; 20th-century Chinese paintings; and an ethnographic collection that includes 10,000 Native American, African, Latin American, and Australian works. Spencer Museum sponsors exhibitions, lectures, films, workshops, and activities that support curricular instruction in the arts. The also museum houses the Kress Foundation Department of Art History and the Murphy Art and Architecture Library, with more than 170,000 volumes and 600 current journals documenting the visual arts, design, and architecture from all cultures, from antiquity to the present.

Lied Center

The Lied Center of Kansas is a multipurpose performing arts facility with a 2,000-seat performing arts hall. It offers outstanding presentations of music, dance, and theatre, as well as lectures by artists and scholars. The Lied Center is a major regional presenter and provider of performing arts. The Department of Visual Art, Spencer Museum of Art, Hall Center for the Humanities, and the Lied Center present active visiting artist programs.

Undergraduate Programs

  • The Department of Dance offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree and the Bachelor of Arts in Dance degree.
  • The departments of Film and Media Studies and Theatre offer Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies degrees.
  • The Department of Visual Art offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, the Bachelor of Arts degree, and the Bachelor of Art Education degree.
  • The program leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in theatre design is offered cooperatively by the School of the Arts and the Department of Theatre.

Courses for Nonmajors

Students in other KU schools may enroll in dance, film and media studies, theatre, and visual art courses for credit, subject to the availability of instructional time and the completion of necessary prerequisites. Qualifications are determined by course instructors.

Minors in dance, film and media studies, theatre, and visual art are offered for students in other disciplines.

University Honors Program

The school encourages qualified undergraduates to participate in the University Honors Program.

Art Exhibitions

A number of exhibitions are sponsored by the Department of Visual Art. These are shown in department galleries and the Kansas Union. Each year, there are exhibitions of work by students in the school, representing the disciplines of art and design.

Performances

The University Dance Company performs a varied repertoire of ballet, modern, and jazz dance. It presents 2 major programs on campus each year as well as numerous presentations on tour.

The University Theatre gives students a chance to act in, direct, design, and crew theatre productions. Each year, the University Theatre mounts about 8 fully staged productions. Students gain experience in children’s theatre, musicals, operas, and a range of classical and contemporary plays.

Graduate Programs

The School of the Arts is part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (called the College or CLAS). The College is KU’s largest academic unit with more than 50 departments and programs. Graduate programs in the liberal arts and sciences include disciplines in the arts, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and natural and mathematical sciences, as well as many interdisciplinary degree programs where often disciplines come together to offer students a unique graduate experience. Each graduate program’s page contains program-specific information about admission, course curriculum, and advising.

The College’s participation in graduate education reflects a long and distinguished commitment to higher learning and research across the liberal arts and sciences. The College takes full advantage of KU’s role as an international research institution to ensure that the knowledge imparted to students is current and that they learn the skills of inquiry and critical evaluation. Graduate students are central to the research and teaching missions of the College. They are also the next generation of scholars, artists, and skilled professionals who will make contributions to our communities and production of knowledge for many years to come.

School of the Arts Graduate Degrees

The School of the Arts offers graduate programs in 3 departments. The Master of Arts (M.A.) degree can be earned in film and media studies, theatre, and visual art education. The Master of Fine Arts degree is offered in visual art and in theatre design with a concentration in scenography. For students whose academic and professional goals can best be achieved through investigations at the interface of 2 or more disciplines, the School of the Arts offers master’s degree programs in interdisciplinary studies.

The School of the Arts offers the Doctor of Philosophy degree in film and media studies and theatre.

Art Exhibitions

A number of exhibitions are sponsored by the Department of Visual Art. These are shown in department galleries and the Kansas Union. Each year, there are exhibitions of work by students in the school, representing the disciplines of art and design.

Performances

The University Dance Company performs a varied repertoire of ballet, modern, and jazz dance. It presents 2 major programs on campus each year as well as numerous presentations on tour.

The University Theatre gives students a chance to act in, direct, design, and crew theatre productions. Each year, the University Theatre mounts about 8 fully staged productions. Students gain experience in children’s theatre, musicals, operas, and a range of classical and contemporary plays.

Degree Requirements

Requirements for the completion of master’s and doctoral degrees in the College are governed by department- or program-specific policy, College policies and procedures, Graduate Studies policies, and the University Senate Rules and Regulations.

Information on degree requirements presented in this section are limited to the most frequently consulted policies and key milestones in the graduate career. Students will find additional information under the KU Policy Library, the Graduate Studies and College's graduate regulations sections of the online catalog, the academic unit’s handbook, and the University of Kansas Rules and Regulations.

Master's Degree Requirements

Coursework

Coursework requirements for the Master’s degree are established and tracked by the department or program, and their completion verified and approved by the College. Please consult with your advisor, the academic unit’s graduate handbook, and the relevant Departments & Programs section of the online catalog for further information on specific courses or course sequences required for the degree.

Thesis

Master’s students complete either a thesis or an equivalent enrollment in research, independent investigation, or seminar. Students earning a master's thesis degree must have completed at least 1 hour of thesis enrollment.  General rules for the preparation of a thesis are available on the Graduate Studies website.

Final Examination

A final general examination in the major subject is required for MA degrees. The examination, which may be oral, written, or both, is held during the semester of the student’s final enrollment in course work and, in the case of thesis students, when the thesis has been substantially completed. All master's exam dates must be approved in advance by the College.  See also Master’s Degree Requirements and M.A. and M.S. Degrees in the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree Requirements

Coursework

Coursework requirements for the doctoral degree are established and tracked by the department or program. Please consult with your advisor, the academic unit’s graduate handbook, and the relevant Departments & Programs section of the online catalog for further information on specific courses or course sequences required for the degree.

Research Skills and Responsible Scholarship

Graduate Studies requires that all doctoral students meet the Research Skills and Responsible Scholarship requirement before proceeding to the Comprehensive Exam. Specific requirements are determined by each department or program in consultation with Graduate Studies. Consult with your advisor and the Departments & Programs section of the online catalog for further information.

Residency

Two semesters, which may include one summer session, must be spent in full-time resident study at KU. The College requires that residency be fulfilled before the comprehensive oral examination is scheduled. For more information on residency requirements, please see the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog.

Comprehensive Oral Examination

The comprehensive oral examination covers the major field and any additional content for which the academic unit wishes to hold the student responsible. The examination is expected to be broader than a defense of the dissertation proposal.  Exam dates must be approved in advance by the College.

The student must be enrolled the semester or summer session in which he or she completes the comprehensive oral examination. This enrollment may count toward the post-comprehensive enrollment requirements as described in Graduate Studies’ Doctoral Candidacy policy.  If more than 5 years elapse between the completion of the comprehensive exam and degree completion, the student may be required to retake the exam.

More information about comprehensive exam requirements may be found in the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog.

Dissertation and Final Exam

Completion of the dissertation is the culminating phase of a doctoral program, marked by the final oral examination and defense of the dissertation. In all but the rarest cases, tentative approval of the dissertation is followed promptly by the final oral examination. Exam dates must be approved in advance by the College.  Refer to the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog for further information on the regulations governing the final oral examination, including committee composition and attendance regulations.

Guidelines for preparing and submitting the final copies of the dissertation are available on the Graduate Studies website.

Ceremonies

At the end of each Spring semester, the College holds a master’s hooding ceremony and Graduate Studies organizes the annual doctoral hooding ceremony. The School of the Arts also hosts a ceremony for SOTA graduates. University Commencement information is available in the KU Commencement section of the KU website.

Attendance at these ceremonies is optional. Please consult the COGA website for more information.

The School of the Arts is home to four departments: dance, film and media studies, theatre, and visual art. It is housed within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the broadest and most diverse academic unit on campus.

Students in the School of the Arts create, perform, and interpret works of art that contribute to our culture and history. As part of the College, students have access to ideas across the spectrum of arts, humanities, sciences and mathematics, social and behavioral sciences, and international studies. This partnership offers fresh possibilities for collaboration, paving the way for innovations and ideas.

Students interested in pursuing an undergraduate major or minor in the School of the Arts should contact the School of the Arts advisor at 785-864-3500 to schedule an advising appointment.

Graduate Advising

Advising of graduate students is primarily conducted within the graduate programs by program staff members and the individual faculty members who act as mentors and advisors. Students are encouraged to work with the director of graduate studies in their program regarding course selections and individual program requirements to ensure that all program milestones are reached as expected by the program faculty and the College. The graduate studies director or coordinator is also responsible for the regular assessment of students in the program and can address questions regarding a student’s progress toward the degree.

Students seeking information on specific policy or procedures should review the relevant content in the KU Policy Library as well as the College and Graduate Studies sections and the relevant Department or Program section of the online catalog. The College Office of Graduate Affairs, 102 Strong Hall, coga@ku.edu, is also available for assistance.

Students who have completed all degree requirements and are preparing to graduate should refer to the graduation checklists available on the COGA website. Graduating students are also welcome to schedule a Graduation Appointment with the College Office of Graduate Affairs.

Undergraduate University Regulations

For information about university regulations, see Regulations or visit the University of Kansas Policy Library.

Credit/No Credit

A Credit/No Credit option is available to all degree-seeking undergraduates. You may enroll in one course a semester under the option, if the course is not in your major or minor. For more information, visit the KU Policy Library.

Warning: Certain undesirable consequences may result from exercising the option. Some schools, scholarship committees, and honorary societies do not accept this grading system and convert grades of No Credit to F when computing grade-point averages.

Incompletes

The letter I indicates incomplete work, such as may be completed without re-enrollment in the course. The letter I should not be used when a definite grade can be assigned for the work done. It is not given for the work of a student in any course except to indicate that some part of the work has, for reasons beyond the student’s control, not been done, while the rest has been satisfactorily completed. At the time an I is reported on the electronic roster, the character and amount of work needed, as well as the date required for completion and lapse grade if further work is not completed by this date, should be indicated.

A student who has an I posted for a course must make up the work by the date determined by the instructor, in consultation with the student, which may not exceed 1 calendar year, or the last day of the term of graduation, whichever comes first. An I not removed according to this rule automatically converts to a grade of F or U, or the lapse grade assigned by the course instructor, and appears on the student’s record.

Extensions to the time limit may be granted by the dean’s representative upon submission of a petition from the student containing the endorsement of the course instructor who assigned the I grade, or the department chairperson if the instructor is unavailable. After the I grade is converted to a grade of F or U, the grade may only be changed in accordance with USRR Article II, Section 3.

Required Work in Residence

6 of the final 30 hours may be taken for nonresident credit, with advance permission. Nonresident credit may fill only elective requirements not in the major field of study.

Transfer of Credit

Only grades of C or higher are accepted as transfer credit toward degrees. Applicants with a lapse of 4 or more years since their last full-time enrollment may not expect studio credits in visual art to be accepted for transfer.

CredTran is a transfer course equivalency system that lists more than 2,200 colleges and universities from which KU has accepted transfer courses in the past. If your school or course is not listed, your evaluation will be completed when you are admitted to KU.

Graduate University Regulations

It is the students’ responsibility to comply with all requirements for the degree programs in which they plan to participate. These include the university requirements for graduate study at KU outlined in the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog, as well as the requirements of CLAS outlined in this section. Additionally, students are responsible for understanding the requirements that are unique to individual graduate programs outlined in both the graduate handbooks of individual academic units and the Departments & Programs sections of the online catalog.

In general, the student is subject to the regulations in force at the time of matriculation as a degree-seeking student. If degree requirements change, the student may opt to follow the new requirements or to continue under the regulations in force at the time of admission. Any student readmitted 10 years or more after his or her initial term as a degree-seeking student must fulfill the requirements in effect on the date of readmission to the graduate program.

Information on the most frequently consulted policies is contained in this section. Students should also consult the academic unit’s handbook, Graduate Studies and College sections of the KU Policy Library, and the Graduate Studies and University of Kansas Regulations sections of the online catalog.

Academic and Research Integrity

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences strictly enforces KU and College policies on academic and scholarly misconduct. Academic integrity requires honest performance of academic and research responsibilities by students. These include, but are not limited to, ethical preparation of assignments, reports, and research papers; completion of examinations; ethical treatment of human and animal subjects; execution of administrative requirements; and a sincere and conscientious effort by students to abide by the policies set forth by instructors and research advisors.

Enrollment

Full-time, Half-Time and Part-Time Enrollment

Graduate Studies defines full-time enrollment as 9 credit hours in Fall or Spring semester and 6 hours in the summer session. Maximum enrollment for graduate students, except in rare instances, is 16 hours in Fall or Spring semester and 9 hours in the summer session. Please see the Full-time Enrollment for Graduate Students policy in the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog and the KU Policy Library for more information on what constitutes full-time, half-time, and part-time enrollment, including variations on this policy for doctoral students enrolled in dissertation hours, GTA/GRA/GA appointments and active duty military. At a minimum, all graduate students should be continuously enrolled in the Fall and Spring semesters while completing the credit hours required for the fulfillment of their degrees. Please consult the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog and the KU Policy Library for other enrollment regulations.

Continuous Enrollment for Master’s Students

The College requires that all master’s students who have completed the required coursework for their degrees must be continuously enrolled in the Fall and Spring semesters until all remaining requirements for the degree, including the thesis when applicable, are completed. No enrollment is required during the summer session unless it is the semester during which the student will graduate, in which case enrollment is required. Certain academic units have additional rules governing summer enrollment.

Post-Comprehensive Enrollment for Doctoral Students

After passing the Comprehensive Oral Exam, doctoral candidates must be continuously enrolled. During this time, until all requirements for the degree are completed (including the filing of the dissertation) or until 18 post-comprehensive hours have been completed (whichever comes first), the candidate must enroll for a minimum of 6 hours a semester (Fall and Spring). At least one of these hours each semester must be in dissertation or approved dissertation-equivalent coursework.

In addition, Graduate Studies requires a period of at least 1 month to elapse between the comprehensive oral exam and the final exam. Students that have completed all degree requirements before completing 18 hours are still required to continue enrollment until this 1-month requirement has been met.

Upon completion of the 18-hour requirement, a student’s level of enrollment should reflect, as accurately as possible, the faculty time he or she utilizes. This may be as little as one hour per semester.

Special enrollment requirements apply to those with GTA/GRA/GA appointments. Please consult the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog and the KU Policy Library.

Lapses in Enrollment

Generally, no student is allowed to enroll after the first 4 weeks of a semester or the first 2 weeks of a summer session. If a student does not intend to enroll, he or she must determine the appropriate course of action in consultation with the department or program.

The student may elect to Voluntarily Discontinue from the program, and must inform the department or program in writing of this decision, which will in turn submit the necessary forms to the College. This option requires the student to seek re-admission to the program if they choose to return at a future date. They also remain eligible to seek admission to another department or program in the College.

The student may also petition for a Leave of Absence of up to one calendar year. If granted, the Leave of Absence maintains the student’s place in the program. Leave of Absence petitions must be submitted by the department or program and provide evidence of the department or program’s endorsement of the student’s petition. Students interested in this option should begin by consulting with their advisor.

The time spent on Leave of Absence does not count toward the student’s time to degree, and therefore does not shorten the time available to complete their degree requirements. Similarly, if a student that has elected to Voluntarily Discontinue subsequently returns to the program, the time that has elapsed since his or her discontinuance does not count toward the time to degree.

Students who fail to enroll without completing the Voluntary Discontinuance process or without being granted a Leave of Absence are reviewed by the College Office of Graduate Affairs and the students’ academic units for possible dismissal. Any time that accrues during these lapses of enrollment in which the student does not occupy any approved enrollment category (i.e., Enrolled, Voluntarily Discontinued, or Leave of Absence) is counted toward the time to degree.

Students on an international student visa should consult with the International Programs office prior to any change in enrollment status.

Please see Graduate Studies policies governing Leave of Absence and Voluntary Discontinuance in the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog and in the KU Policy Library.

Dual Enrollments

Students enrolled in two schools or working on two degrees at the same time must complete the work for both degrees. Courses may not be counted toward both degrees, except in the joint degree programs that have been established (e.g., M.P.A./J.D., M.A. in Economics/J.D., M.B.A./M.A. in Area Studies, etc.). Please refer to the Combined Degrees information in the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog for a complete list of approved joint degree programs.

Examinations

Students must be enrolled during the semester in which they complete their oral comprehensive or final examinations. Additionally, no graduate student will be allowed to take oral comprehensive or final examinations, or to go forward with a thesis or dissertation defense, if a waiting grade (WG) placeholder or an incomplete (I) grade is listed on the student’s transcript.

University Regulations on Grading

Article II of the University Senate Rules and Regulations provides detailed information on regulations governing the grading of graduate coursework. Students should also consult the Graduate Studies section of the online catalog and the KU Policy Library for more information on the Grading Policy.

The following are of particular relevance for graduate students in the College:

Passing Grades for Graduate Coursework

Only courses graded C or above are considered passing and may be counted for graduate credit. Courses graded C-, D or F may not be used to fulfill degree requirements.

Incomplete (I) and Waiting Grades (WG)

Incomplete (I) grades are used to note, temporarily, that a student's work has been satisfactory to date, but that they have been unable to complete a portion of the required course work during that semester due to circumstances beyond their control. Incomplete work must be completed within the time period prescribed by the course instructor, at which point a permanent grade will be assigned. After one calendar year from the original grade due date, an Incomplete (I) grade will automatically convert to a grade of F or U, or the lapsed grade assigned by the course instructor.

The I grade is not appropriate for enrollments in thesis, dissertation, or research hours or the first semester of a two semester sequence.

Waiting Grades (WG) are placeholders and should only be used in rare instances when, for reasons beyond his or her control, an instructor is not able to assign a course grade by the deadline.  WG should not be used to delay evaluation of thesis or dissertation hour enrollments.  This practice often leads to difficulties with timely graduation processing.

The College will not approve an application for graduation if a waiting grade (WG) or an incomplete (I) grade remains on the student’s transcript.

Credit/No Credit (CR/NC)

Graduate students may select the Credit/No Credit option only for those courses that do not fulfill a degree requirement. Degree requirements include those courses used to fulfill the Research Skills and Responsible Scholarship requirement. Students should consult with their advisor prior to electing the CR/NC option.

College-Specific Grading Policy

A-F Plus/Minus (+/-) Grades

Plus/minus (+/–) grades may be used in the College. The plus or minus sign describes intermediate levels of performance between a maximum of A and a minimum of F. Intermediate grades are calculated as 0.3 units above or below the corresponding letter grade.

Participation (P) Grades

Use of the Participation (P) grade is restricted in the College. It is only approved for a limited number of courses for which special permission has been sought. When permission is granted, P is only used to indicate participation in thesis, dissertation, or research enrollments (related to thesis or dissertation), or in the first semester enrollment of a two-semester sequence course. In any semester when there is evidence about performance available, the instructor may elect to assign a letter grade of A, B, C, D, or F.  A letter grade (A, B, C, D, or F) must be assigned in the last semester of enrollment to characterize the quality of the final product.

If a department or program has a course for which the P grading system may be more appropriate than the A-F or S/U grading system, it must seek special approval from the College.

Grading of Thesis and Dissertation Hours (and Approved Equivalents)

The SP/LP/NP grading scale is restricted to thesis and dissertation hours, as well as those research courses approved by Graduate Studies as equivalents. It is the preferred scale for the grading of these courses in the College and is applied in the following manner:

SP - Satisfactory Progress. Progress is consistent with the goals for the semester as agreed upon with the advisor; supports timely completion of the degree.

LP - Limited Progress. Progress is less than what was agreed upon with the advisor; may cause delays in timely degree completion. Academic probation may be warranted.

NP- No Progress. The student has provided no evidence of progress on the thesis or dissertation work, or work completed was insufficient to move the thesis or dissertation project forward.  Probation is strongly encouraged and dismissal may be warranted.

To be eligible for graduation, the final semester of dissertation/thesis enrollment must be graded SP.

The College strongly encourages the use of the SP/LP/NP grading scale for thesis and dissertation courses. However, programs may elect to use any A-F scale. In no case is the S/U scale to be used for thesis or dissertation hours or their equivalents. Per Graduate Studies policy, no more than 6 credit hours graded S/U may count toward a graduate degree.

Probation and Dismissal Guidelines

To be in good standing, a student must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average and be making satisfactory progress toward the degree, as determined by the department or program.

If the cumulative grade-point average falls below 3.0, the student is automatically placed on academic probation for the following semester (Fall or Spring).  Students are notified by the College of their probationary status.  If the cumulative grade-point average has not risen to 3.0 by the end of the probationary semester, the student will be dismissed unless the College acts favorably on a departmental petition for the student to be granted a one-semester extension.

For the student's own benefit, in cases when the grade point average is so low that the ability to ever achieve the required 3.0 grade-point average is in serious doubt, the department or program should move to dismiss.

Upon recommendation of the department or program, a student may also be placed on probation for failing to make satisfactory progress toward the degree. This may include, but is not limited to, failed exams or failure to make adequate and timely progress on the dissertation or thesis.

A graduate student is dismissed upon recommendation of the student’s department or program. This typically occurs when a student fails to raise the grade point average to 3.0 after a semester of probation, or otherwise fails to meet the terms of the probationary period. Academic dismissal should occur before a semester begins. If a student is dismissed during the semester, the dismissal is effective only at the end of the semester in which the department or program gives notification of dismissal. The department or program will notify the student in writing of the reasons for their dismissal. This will be followed by a letter from the College confirming the dismissal from the program and from the College.

A student who has been dismissed from a graduate department or program in the College is not eligible for readmission to graduate study in any department or program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Time Limits

The University and the College have established time limits governing various stages of the graduate student career.

Maximum Time to Count Required Course Work

Courses completed at the University of Kansas, or transfer credits from another university, are valid for a period of 10 years. Courses that were completed more than 10 years before the scheduling of the final defense may not be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

With the endorsement of their graduate programs, students may petition the College to accept out-of-date course work to fulfill the requirements for their graduate degrees, provided they are able to justify why this course work meets the current standards of scholarship in the discipline.

Maximum Time to Submit Thesis or Dissertation

The College requires that students make all final revisions and file the final version of the thesis or dissertation manuscript to UMI/Proquest within 6 months of the date of final presentation and/or defense of the thesis or dissertation work. Until the final manuscript of a thesis or dissertation is filed, the student must be enrolled in accordance with enrollment policy. Graduate students in the College who do not file the final manuscript within the 6-month time limit must enroll in 3 hours a semester until the thesis or dissertation is completed and filed.

Maximum Time to Complete the Degree

Graduate Studies has established time limits on master’s and doctoral degree completion. Please see Graduate Studies policies on Doctoral Program Time Constraints and Master's Program Time Constraints in the Graduate Studies sections of the online catalog and in the KU Policy Library for full details.

Master's degree students have a total of seven calendar years, excluding any periods of absence due to an approved leave of absence or voluntary discontinuation from a program, in which to complete the work for a master’s degree.

Doctoral degree students have a total of 8 calendar years, excluding any periods of absence due to an approved leave of absence or voluntary discontinuation from a program, to complete the Ph.D. This includes students who enter with a master’s degree from an institution other than KU and bachelor’s degree holders who bypass the master’s and are admitted directly to a Ph.D. program.

Students who complete the master’s and doctoral degrees at KU have a maximum of 10 years to complete both degrees.

A time limit extension may be granted by the College.  All extension petitions require the department to prepare and file a Graduate Degree Completion Agreement, which must then be approved by a designated subcommittee of the Committee on Graduate Studies.   Per Graduate Studies policy, extensions may be granted for up to 1 year.  However, additional time may be requested in the Completion Agreement.  If the Completion Agreement is approved, subsequent petitions will receive an expedited review. 

Academic units may set their own, more rigorous time limits. Consult with your advisor and review your academic unit’s handbook and the relevant Departments and Programs section of the online catalog for program-specific information, requirements, and restrictions.

Graduation

All graduate students must be enrolled the semester they complete all degree requirements.

Graduate Studies establishes an early deadline for degree completion for each semester and summer session, usually occurring at the end of the first 2 weeks of a semester or the end of the first week of summer session. If the student was enrolled the previous semester and meets all degree requirements including the submission of all required documentation by the early deadline, they are not required to enroll for that semester.

The final Graduate Application for Graduation Deadline is set by the Registrar for each semester. Please consult the official Academic Calendar for specific dates. To be eligible for graduation, an application for degree must be submitted and all degree requirements met by this deadline. This includes the submission of all required documentation to the College Office of Graduate Affairs. See the Graduation section of the COGA website for more information.

Undergraduate Graduation with Honors

Undergraduates may earn honors upon graduation in 3 ways. The student may graduate with distinction or highest distinction, earn departmental honors in the major, or complete the University Honors Program. It is possible to earn honors in 1 of these areas, any combination of them, or all 3. The award of honors is noted on the student’s transcript and in the Commencement program. Distinction and highest distinction are noted on the diploma.

Graduation with Distinction or Highest Distinction

The top 10 percent of each year’s graduating class is designated as graduating with distinction. Of these, the top one-third is designated as graduating with highest distinction. To be eligible, students must have completed at least 60 credit hours, graded A through F, in residence at KU. See Required Work in Residence below.

Graduation with Departmental Honors

Most departments and programs allow qualified majors to work toward graduation with departmental honors. Graduation with departmental honors is awarded in recognition of exceptional performance in the major, completion of a program of independent research or an alternative project, and a strong overall academic record.

In addition to the requirements of individual departments and programs (which must be approved by the College committee on undergraduate studies and advising), the College requires the following for graduation with departmental honors:

  1. Candidates must declare the intention to work for departmental honors with the appropriate departmental honors coordinator(s) no later than the time of enrollment for the final undergraduate semester, but sooner if required by the department(s). Copies of the intent form should be returned to College Student Academic Services.
  2. At the end of the final undergraduate semester, the candidate must have achieved an overall grade-point average of at least 3.25 and a grade-point average of at least 3.5 in the major. Both overall and major grade-point averages include work completed at other institutions, as well as at KU. No minimum grade-point average is required to declare candidacy for graduation with departmental honors unless specified by the department.
  3. Each candidate’s departmental honors work must include independent research or an acceptable alternative project. The results of research are presented in a form appropriate to the requirements of the major department. Equivalents to the independent research component are established by approved departmental honors programs. In courses meeting the independent research requirement, the candidate must earn a grade of B or higher. Successful completion of all departmental honors requirements must be certified to the departmental honors coordinator(s) by a panel composed of at least three members of the College faculty who have read the report of the independent research and heard the oral presentation, where required.

Petitions

A department or program may petition to award graduation with departmental honors to deserving students who, for good reason, do not meet every College and departmental requirement. Send petitions to the committee on undergraduate studies and advising, College Student Academic Services.

Late Completion of Honors Requirement

Requirements for graduation with honors may be completed after the date on which certifications are requested from departments. In fact, requirements—for example, the completion of an honors thesis for which the credit hours are not needed to graduate—may be completed after a student has graduated. When a candidate finishes all requirements, departments must notify College Student Academic Services in writing.

University Honors Program

The University Honors Program provides opportunities for outstanding and creative undergraduate students in all schools at KU to develop their full potential during their undergraduate years. The Honors Program brings talented students together in honors classes and seminars to benefit from mutual interests and association. It brings students and faculty members together in a teaching and research environment that ensures high academic achievement and standards. The program also coordinates merit-based scholarship opportunities for qualified students, including KU awards such as the University Scholars Program, and Undergraduate Research Awards. The Honors Student Association and the Honors Ambassador Program provide opportunities for student leadership.

In general, honors classes are small, oriented to discussion, and taught by full-time members of the faculty. Most honors courses fulfill requirements and deal with introductory fundamentals and principles, but they are likely to do so in more depth than their non-honors equivalents. Honors courses are distinguished by the energetic atmosphere and critical thinking generated by the students in them and the faculty members who teach them.

Honors students are interested in expanding their knowledge and take a broad range of liberal arts and sciences courses. This is true of students in the professional schools (architecture, engineering, business, etc.) as well as students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Honors program advisors typically recommend that students explore their interests through the broad curriculum choices KU has to offer.

A first-year, semester-long tutorial experience provides an introduction to an academic area of study in an informal setting that allows students to get to know one another and the instructor. The tutorial explores the research methods of a discipline and acquaints the student with the research resources at KU. Honors advising is personalized in meetings with honors staff, faculty fellows, and specially selected advisors from across the university. The program’s advising committee facilitates early and frequent contact with academic advisors in the students’ areas of interest. Honors students benefit from priority enrollment, which provides flexibility in planning one’s academic curriculum.

The program does not require a minimum number of honors courses a semester. However, students in the program quickly discover that honors courses engage the intellect, hold the interest, and create the enthusiasm for learning they seek at a university. Students in the professional schools are particularly encouraged to seek out honors course opportunities early, while their curricula still have breadth and flexibility.

Honors students are strongly encouraged to include research, study abroad experiences, internships, and community service in their academic programs. Consult Honors Program staff about applying these activities toward completion of honors requirements.

Admission

Students with strong high school curricula and excellent academic records are encouraged to apply to the University Honors Program. Admission is highly competitive. Although no ACT/SAT composite score or high school grade-point average guarantees that a student will or will not be admitted to the University Honors Program, this year's average ACT composite for accepted students is a 32.4, and the average unweighted GPA for an accepted student is 3.96. Applications are evaluated on the basis of high school curriculum, grades, an essay, activities, and standardized test scores. Applications from first- and second-year students currently attending KU, as well as incoming transfer students, are evaluated on the basis of college course work, an essay, and college activities. Review of applications begins in October and continues through April. Send inquiries to the University Honors Program, 1506 Engel Road, Lawrence, KS 66045-3845. View further information and the online application.

Completion of the Program

Students graduate from the program by completing 8 honors units and the first-year, semester-long tutorial. The 8 units must be completed as follows:

  1. 6 honors courses (may include graduate-level courses numbered 700 and above).
  2. 1 out-of-classroom experience such as study abroad, departmental honors, documented research experience, approved and documented internship experience, or approved and documented community service.
  3. The eighth unit may be from either category 1 or category 2. Students also must maintain a minimum 3.25 grade-point average.

Nunemaker Center

This unique building, with its modern architectural design, is the home of the Honors Program, near the Daisy Hill residence halls at 15th Street and Engel Road. The Honors Program is home to several faculty fellows who serve the program and bring additional resources to the program to complement the full-time staff. Faculty fellows are available for advising, consultation about majors and careers, guiding research projects, and work with the Honors Council to develop programmatic initiatives.

Students are encouraged to take advantage of the spaces available at Nunemaker, including several classrooms and study areas, a kitchen, comfortable lounges that include 2 fireplaces, and wireless Internet access. Nunemaker also serves as a gallery for undergraduate art. The center is open days and evenings.

View Honors courses in the online catalog.

Graduate Awards

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers several awards to recognize outstanding graduate students, faculty service, teaching excellence, and exemplary advising. Below, you will find a brief description of each award. More specific information about eligibility and the call for nominations each year can be found on the College's website under Faculty Awards or the COGA website Awards and Funding.

Graduate Student Awards

Chancellor's Doctoral Fellowship

Each year selected doctoral programs award a Chancellor’s Doctoral Fellowship to an incoming doctoral student of exceptional promise. Fellows receive five years of fellowship support for their doctoral work, including a $25,000 stipend plus resident rate tuition and required fees.

Dean's Doctoral Fellowship

Each year selected doctoral programs in the College award a Dean’s Doctoral Fellowship to an incoming doctoral student of exceptional promise. Fellows receive up to five years of fellowship support for their doctoral work, including a stipend ranging from $20,000-22,000 plus resident rate tuition and required fees. Fellows must submit an application for external funding to be eligible for a fifth year of support.

Allen S. Wilber Scholarship

Selected departments may nominate one student each year for this award, which provides one-time funding of up to $10,000 for the study of social sciences or modern languages and literatures at the graduate level. The award is limited to those who completed an undergraduate degree at KU.

Kate Stephens Fellowship

Selected departments may nominate one student for this award, which provides a single, one-time stipend of up to $8,000 for the study of literature, history, or ethics. The award is limited to those who completed a bachelor's or master's degree at KU, and is offered every other year.

Howard J. Baumgartel Peace and Justice Award

This is an annual award to support a graduate student in the College or the School of Business for thesis or dissertation research whose interests, achievements, and talents are in the peace and justice field.  The award amount is $2,760 and is disbursed in the summer.

Outstanding Thesis/Research Project Award

The Committee on Graduate Studies in the College has established this award for students receiving a master's degree. The bi-annual award carries a $500 stipend, and either a thesis or research project awardee is selected in each cycle.  Students are nominated for the award by their advisors.

Graduate Faculty Awards

Byron A. Alexander/John C. Wright Graduate Mentor Awards

Graduate students (current or those who have graduated since May of the calendar year prior to the award deadline) may nominate any tenured or tenure-track faculty member in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who has served as an outstanding mentor.  The award amounts are up to $1,000.

Career Achievement Teaching Award

This annual award recognizes a retired faculty member in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who has made a significant contribution to the teaching of College students at either the undergraduate or graduate level and who has distinguished him/herself through excellence in teaching. The award amount is $1,000.

Dance Courses

DANC 100. Introduction to the Dance Major. 1 Hour H.

This is a 6 week online course designed to identify what is unique about the KU Dance experience, and to introduce students to the requirements for a BA or BFA degree. The course examines issues of academic integrity, informs students about academic support available to them, familiarizes students with the expectations of a dance major and suggests career opportunities for dance majors. Students complete five modules: Getting Started, Programs and Degrees, Academic Integrity and Support, Expectations and Career Pathways to provide a foundation for academic success in the major. LEC.

DANC 101. Ballet I. 2 Hours.

Classical and modern approaches to the language of ballet for beginners. May be repeated for credit. Does not count toward the dance major requirements. ACT.

DANC 103. Modern Contemporary I. 2 Hours.

Dance technique for beginners with precedents in the movement vocabularies of Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, Merce Cunningham, and the seminal choreographers of modern dance. May be repeated for credit. Does not count toward the dance major requirements. ACT.

DANC 105. Jazz I. 2 Hours.

Dance technique for beginners based on elements of Latino, African, popular and classical jazz dance forms. May be repeated for credit. Does not count toward the dance major requirements. ACT.

DANC 108. Pas de Deux. 1 Hour.

The elements of classical ballet partnering (pas de deux) are explored. These elements include supported poses, turns, lifts, and their coordination between the partners. For men only. Women enroll in Pointe and Pas de Deux, DANC 307. May be repeated for credit. ACT.

DANC 109. Men's Ballet. 2 Hours.

An introduction to classical ballet focusing on the particular requirements of the male ballet technique including leaps, turns, batterie, and their presentation. May be repeated for credit. ACT.

DANC 150. Choreography I. 2 Hours H.

The introductory-level course in a series of four composition courses (DANC 150, 250, 350 and 550). Includes basic exploration of improvisation: movement studies for solo figure, movement themes for duet, trio, and larger groups; and dances for non-traditional performing spaces both indoors and outdoors. Students will learn fundamental ingredients of dance (space, time, weight, and energy flow) and how to organize them into short compositional forms such as ABA, verse/refrain, or narrative. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Dance. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

DANC 201. Ballet III. 1-2 Hours H.

Intermediate level technique in classical and modern approaches to the language of ballet. May be repeated for variable credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 203. Modern III. 1-2 Hours H.

Intermediate level technique. May be repeated for variable credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 210. Rhythms and Structures of Music. 3 Hours H.

An introduction to the analysis and use of rhythms and the compositional forms of music for dance. LEC.

DANC 211. Ballet II. 2 Hours.

Classical and modern approaches to ballet technique for low intermediate dancers. May be repeated for credit. Counts toward the B.A. in Dance and Dance Minor requirements. Prerequisite: DANC 101 or consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 213. Modern Contemporary II. 2 Hours.

Dance technique for low intermediate dancers with precedents in the movement vocabularies of classical modernists and contemporary choreographers of dance. May be repeated for credit. Counts toward the B.A. and the Minor in dance requirements. Prerequisite: DANC 103 or permission of instructor. LAB.

DANC 215. Jazz II. 2 Hours.

Dance technique for experienced beginners based on elements of Latino, African, popular and classical jazz dance forms. May be repeated for credit. Counts toward the B.A. and Minor in dance requirements. Prerequisite: DANC 105 or consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 220. Dance Performance. 1 Hour.

A dance repertory and performance class with emphasis on developing skills for performing ballet, modern, jazz, historic, and/or forms of theatrical dance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 200- or 300-level dance technique course. ACT.

DANC 240. Introduction to Classical East Indian Dance. 3 Hours.

Classical East Indian dance has an extensive movement vocabulary that emphasizes the coordination of rhythmic foot patterns with intricate hand gestures. Students will learn the mudras (hand gestures) and their significance and integration within each dance. Readings will include excerpts from the Natya Sastra and other treatises of East Indian dance and culture. LEC.

DANC 250. Choreography II. 2 Hours H.

The intermediate course in a series of four composition courses (DANC 150, DANC 250, DANC 350 and DANC 550.) Includes more complex exploration of improvisation; movement studies for solo figure, movement themes for duet, trio, and larger groups; and dances for non-traditional performing spaces both indoors and outdoors. Students will further develop the ingredients of dance (space, time, weight, and energy flow) and how to organize them into studies including compositional forms such as ABA, verse/refrain, or narrative. Prerequisite: DANC 150 or consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 260. Musical Theatre Dance. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the dance and movement vocabulary uniquely associated with musical theatre productions, as well as a variety of popular dance styles from the 1920s to the present. Performance techniques for the stage are emphasized. LAB.

DANC 290. Sophomore Review. 0 Hours H.

The Sophomore Review of all majors in the BA program in Dance provides an assessment of student progress in the degree. Transfer students to the BA program participate in the year following their admission to KU. The review process consists of:verification that students are making academic progress: Students should have an overall GPA of 2.0; a self-evaluation composed of written responses to a series of questions about their own artistic, technical and discipline-specific academic progress in the program; a faculty evaluation comprised of written feedback on each students artistic, technical and discipline-specific academic progress in the program; and participation in at least one speedback session prior to the end of the second year. Speedback is a feedback process modeled on the speed dating format. All majors sit with faculty members for 5-minute intervals to receive individual feedback. Students engage with professors with whom they have been in technique class or rehearsal for the current year. There are no prerequisites for entry into the course. The completion of the course will be a prerequisite for enrollment in DANC 550 Senior Project. LEC.

DANC 307. Pointe and Pas de Deux. 2 Hours.

An introduction to pointe and classical partnering work for the intermediate/advanced female ballet dancer, with equal emphasis on pointe technique and style, and on classical repertory for couples. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 308. Pas de Deux. 1 Hour.

The exploration of classical ballet partnering (pas de deux) including supported poses, lifts, turns, and their coordination between the partners. For men only. Women enroll in Pointe and Pas de Deux, DANC 307. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 309. Men's Ballet. 2 Hours.

A continuation of the study of male classical ballet technique including leaps, turns, batterie, and their presentation. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 310. Music for Dance. 3 Hours.

An examination of music as accompaniment for dance in both classroom and performance settings. Students will listen and analyze music from various historic periods to develop the skills necessary to select music appropriate for choreography. They will learn techniques for working with accompanists and composers. Prerequisite: DANC 210 or consent of instructor. LEC.

DANC 311. Ballet III. 3 Hours H.

Advanced level technique in classical and modern approaches to the language of ballet. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. LAB.

DANC 313. Modern/Contemporary III. 3 Hours H.

Dance technique for intermediate/advanced dancers with precedents in the movement vocabularies of classical modernists and contemporary choreographers of dance. May be repeated for credit. Counts toward the B.A., B.F.A., and the Minor in dance requirements. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 315. Jazz III. 3 Hours H.

Dance technique for intermediate dancers based on elements of Latino, African, popular and classical jazz dance forms. May be repeated for variable credit. Prerequisite: DANC 105 or consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 320. University Dance Company. 0-1 Hours.

A dance repertory, performance and production class. Emphasis is on the development of skills for performing and/or producing dance concerts. Admission by audition only. May be repeated for credit. IND.

DANC 330. Approaches to World Dance. 3 Hours HL AE42 / H.

This course examines dance forms from throughout the world and how they relate to the times and cultures in which they evolved. Dance forms such as African, East Indian classical, European court dance, ballet, modern, and jazz will be studied through readings, master classes, live performances, videotapes, and films. Prerequisite: 200-level English course. LEC.

DANC 334. Introduction to African Dance Theatre. 2 Hours NW / U.

An introduction to the general techniques of non-verbal theatrical conventions in African cultures. Practical training in movement vocabulary will be supplemented by lectures on the "text" of performance. (Same as AAAS 334 and THR 334.) LEC.

DANC 350. Choreography III. 3 Hours H.

The advanced course in a series of four composition courses (DANC 150, DANC 250, DANC 350 and DANC 550.) Includes in-depth development of improvisation: movement studies for solo figure, movement themes for duet, trio, and larger groups; and dances for non-traditional performing spaces both indoors and outdoors. Students will develop increasingly complex studies of dance (space, time, weight, and energy flow) including compositional forms such as ABA, verse/refrain, or narrative. Prerequisite: DANC 250 or consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 375. Anatomy and Injury Prevention. 3 Hours H.

Basic concepts of neuromuscular and skeletal education through the use of specific imagery (ideokinesis). Based on the work of Mabel Todd, Lulu Sweigard, and Irmgard Bartenieff, the emphasis is on body connectedness and dynamic alignment. The aim is to realize full movement potential in the most efficient way through intrinsic body awareness. Injury prevention is addressed by introducing principles of conditioning (strength, flexibility, endurance) and factors leading to injury such as muscular imbalances or postural deviations. LEC.

DANC 411. Ballet IV. 3 Hours H.

Advanced level technique in classical and modern approaches to the language of ballet. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 413. Modern Contemporary IV. 3 Hours H.

Dance technique for advanced dancers with precedents in the movement vocabularies of classical modernists and contemporary choreographers of dance. May be repeated for credit. Counts toward the B.A., B.F.A., and the Minor in dance requirements. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 415. Jazz IV. 3 Hours.

Dance technique for advanced dancers based on elements of Latino, African, popular and classical jazz dance forms. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 420. Introduction to Videography and Website Design for Dance. 3 Hours H.

This is a hands-on course exploring digital video technology for dance. Students are introduced to video and website production as well as the time management skills necessary to engage the multi-faceted project that is dance video. We will cover video techniques for recording dance; video editing; collaborating with national and international sites and artists; and self-promotion and marketing strategies with video and websites. The final project will be the creation of a video website for each student. No previous video editing experience is required. Prerequisite: Basic computer literacy. LEC.

DANC 430. Dance for Children. 3 Hours.

Methods and materials for teaching creative dance and the fundamentals of dance technique to children. Lessons are prepared and tested in the classroom and then presented to elementary school children. Prerequisite: DANC 313 or consent of instructor. LEC.

DANC 440. Introduction to Classical East Indian Dance. 3 Hours NW AE42.

Classical East Indian dance has an extensive movement vocabulary that emphasizes the coordination of rhythmic foot patterns with intricate hand gestures. Students will learn the mudras (hand gestures) and their significance and integration within each dance. Readings will include excerpts from the Natya Sastra and other treatises of East Indian dance and culture. LEC.

DANC 460. Dance History: Research and Reconstruction. 3 Hours HL AE42 / H.

Through research and reconstruction, students will examine major topics in dance history, such as the meaning and function of dance in pre-industrial societies, communal and court dance in Europe from the 14th to the19th centuries, and the transformation and development of dance as a theatre art in the modern world. Texts by dance historians and treatises by dancing masters will be supplemented by readings from fields, such as anthropology, philosophy, art history, and literature, that indicate the different ways of approaching the history of dance. LEC.

DANC 475. Career Preparation in the Arts. 3 Hours H.

Designed to provide an overview of key areas in career preparation in the arts, including resume writing, audition skills, professional speaking, grant writing and development, publicity and marketing strategies, developing relationships with presenters and funders, and audience education. Through readings, class discussion, guest lectures with professionals, and projects based on real-life scenarios, students develop tools to further their careers in the arts. This focused study also provides individuals with the direction and means to employ their training in the field of performing arts administration and management at many different levels. This course prepares students for their entry into the professional arts marketplace. LEC.

DANC 490. Introduction to Flamenco Dance Technique. 3 Hours AE42/GE3H.

Using the basic compas (rhythmic structures) of Flamenco, we will explore the different components of flamenco dance technique: floreo (spiraling fingers), brazeo (arm movements), palmas (rhythmic hand-clapping), marcaje (marking, or movement through space), vueltas (turns) and zapateado (footwork). We will cultivate an awareness of flamenco's unique posture, learn the structure of the different rhythmic forms and introduce the possibilities for personal expression and improvisation. LEC.

DANC 498. Directed Study in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Investigation of a special topic or project in aesthetics, dance history, movement analysis, production, or a creative project. A maximum of six hours may be counted toward graduation. Prerequisite: At least seven hours of credit in dance courses. IND.

DANC 520. Pedagogy. 3 Hours H.

Methods and materials designed to address the needs of teaching artists across genres of dance (ballet, modern/contemporary, jazz, creative movement) among children, adults and special populations. Lessons are prepared and tested in the classroom among peers. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LAB.

DANC 530. Practicum in: _____. 1 Hour.

Supervised experience in teaching beginning level dance technique in the styles of ballet, jazz, or modern dance. Different approaches are analyzed, discussed, and tested in the studio. Prerequisite: Intermediate level of dance technique in the style of the practicum. FLD.

DANC 540. Field Experience in Dance Teaching. 3 Hours.

Teaching ballet, modern, or jazz dance technique to children or adults with faculty supervision in an academic or community program. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. FLD.

DANC 550. Senior Project. 3 Hours AE61.

In-depth research project in dance theory or history, or choreography project involving the complete development and presentation of a dance idea. Prerequisite: Performance option: DANC 320, DANC 350, DANC 290 (for BA students only) and permission of the dance division. Research option: DANC 340, DANC 370, DANC 375, DANC 460, DANC 462, DANC 290 (for BA students only) and permission of the dance division. IND.

DANC 580. Special Topics in Dance: _____. 3 Hours.

A study of current developments in dance with an emphasis on performance or research. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or consent of instructor. LAB.

DANC 598. Seminar in Dance. 3 Hours.

Special studies in dance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor. LEC.

DANC 735. Analysis, Criticism, and Choreography. 3 Hours.

The choreographic approaches of outstanding dance masters of the past (for example, Marius Petipa and Isadora Duncan) and present (for example, Martha Graham and Merce Cunningham) will be analyzed in terms of their handling of gesture, time, space, structure, and meaning. Students will be expected to seek out and study readings, photographs, and films in order to do written and performance projects based on the choreographic principles of old and new masters in ballet and modern dance. Prerequisite: A course in dance choreography or consent of instructor. LEC.

DANC 898. Directed Study in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Directed study in some aspect of aesthetics, dance history, movement analysis, production, or an advanced creative project. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

Film and Media Studies Courses

FMS 100. Introduction to Film and Media. 3 Hours HL GE11 / H.

An introduction to analyzing and thinking critically about film and other media. Students will learn to read and interpret the basic signs, syntaxes, and structures of cinematic language. Through direct analysis of selected films, television, and new media, students will evaluate and construct evidentiary arguments about the aesthetic strategies creators use to make meaning for audiences. In addition, this course will familiarize students with the historical and industrial dimensions of film and media, as well as the influence technology has on their development into the twenty-first century. LEC.

FMS 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Film and Media Studies. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

FMS 200. Film and Media Aesthetics. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

An introduction to film and media aesthetics, including basic film/media theories and their practical applications. Students will be introduced to the concepts of time, space, composition, movement, editing, light, color, and sound. A key feature of the course will be a practical emphasis on learning how to see creatively by applying elements of design, camera lens and sound recording principles. Examples of these aspects of film and associated media will be examined and discussed in depth. Should be taken before or concurrently with FMS 275 or FMS 276. LEC.

FMS 204. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-6 Hours H.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Film at the freshman/sophomore level. Credit for coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

FMS 273. Basic Screenwriting. 3 Hours H.

An introduction to the craft and principles of screenwriting, from inspiration to writing a complete first act. Emphasis on factors relevant to the creation of a treatment and a screenplay. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 275. Basic Video Production. 3 Hours H.

Theory and practice of video production with emphasis on preproduction planning, scripting, directing, lighting, camera operation and audio. Lecture-laboratory. Prerequisite: FMS 100, completion of or concurrent enrollment in FMS 200, and consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 276. Basic Film Production. 3 Hours H.

An introduction to 16mm film techniques and structures, requiring construction of brief, individually produced fictive-narrative films employing classical continuity. Lecture-laboratory. Prerequisite: FMS 100 and consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 302. Undergraduate Studies Seminar in: _____. 1-3 Hours H.

Course organized any given semester to examine a particular studies topic or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. LEC.

FMS 303. Undergraduate Production Seminar in: _____. 1-3 Hours H.

Course organized any given semester to study a particular production topic or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. LEC.

FMS 304. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-6 Hours H.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Film at the junior/senior level. Credit for course work must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

FMS 307. Undergraduate Film/Media Internship. 1-6 Hours H.

Supervised study with an approved film/media company or project. May be repeated for credit. No more than six hours may be applied to the B.A. or B.G.S. degrees. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and at least seven hours credit in the department. INT.

FMS 310. History of the Silent Film. 3 Hours H.

A survey of the artistic, economic and sociological development of the narrative cinema with emphasis on the American studio system, German Expressionism, and Soviet Expressive Realism. Analysis of selected films. LEC.

FMS 311. History of the American Sound Film. 3 Hours HL / H.

A study of the artistic, economic, and sociological development of the American sound film with emphasis on the studio system, major directors, genres, and the impact of television. Analysis of selected films. LEC.

FMS 312. History of the International Sound Film to 1950. 3 Hours H.

A survey of the artistic, economic, and sociological development of the international sound film 1929 to 1950. Emphasis on European National Cinemas. LEC.

FMS 313. History of the International Sound Film Post 1950. 3 Hours H.

A survey of the artistic, economic, and sociological development of the international sound film from 1950 to the present. Emphasis on Free Cinema, New Wave, and other emerging post-war cinemas. LEC.

FMS 314. History of African-American Images in Film. 3 Hours HL AE41 / H.

A history and critical assessment of the diverse images of African-Americans in American cinema and the impact of those images on American society. Screenings of feature and independent films, including those by African-Americans. LEC.

FMS 315. Survey of Japanese Film. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H.

This course surveys the major developments in and critical approaches to twentieth-century Japanese film. Focusing mostly on narrative films, Survey of Japanese Film introduces students to basic methodological issues in Japanese film history, especially questions of narrative, genre, stardom, and authorship. We examine Japanese cinema as an institution located within specific contexts focusing on the ways in which this institution shapes gender, class, ethnic, and national identities. This course examines how patterns of distribution, exhibition, and reception have influenced film aesthetics and film style over the last century. Through secondary readings, lectures, and discussions students critically examine how Japanese cinema as an institution both responds to and intervenes in the social, cultural, and political history of twentieth century Japan. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as EALC 315.) LEC.

FMS 316. Cinemas of the Southern Cone: Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

This course will examine the cinemas of three neighboring South American countries to find similar themes and some differences between them historically, politically, and culturally. Themes will include: gender and nation, political repression during dictatorship, globalization and the cinema, youth culture in the Southern Cone, and representations of race and ethnicity, immigration and identity in contemporary cinema. Other themes in common are financing issues, such as co-production agreements, film production under the regional trade pact Mercosur and issues of circulation, distribution and marketing of national films. Most films will be feature length narrative, but a few documentaries will be shown. May be taken as FMS 716, but with additional requirements. LEC.

FMS 317. Race and the American Documentary. 3 Hours H.

This course surveys a range of documentaries in which race is a key part. There are two class objectives: the first is to broaden the students' knowledge of American social history and culture, especially around issues of identity, representation and race. The second is to heighten the students' critical skills as viewers of films in general. A complete film or portion is screened at each class session, preceded by an introductory lecture, and a follow-up discussion. Readings from a variety of scholarly texts are excerpted for student review prior to a particular class. LEC.

FMS 318. Anti-war Film. 3 Hours H.

An overview and exploration of the history of anti-war film and media themes to show how attitudes regarding war and political policy can be affected by positive and negative depictions of conflict. Course includes analysis of selected films. LEC.

FMS 320. Adaptation from Stage to Screen. 3 Hours H.

In an increasingly global media economy, adaptation study offers an enterprising model for the cross-pollination of texts across historical, national, and cultural boundaries. Although this course focuses more specifically on adaptations and adaptation processes involving theatrical events and cinematic properties, this larger view should be kept in mind. The course will consist of readings, screenings, and presentations by faculty in the Department Film and Media Studies and the Department of Theatre addressing theoretical issues, case studies, and intertextual considerations, and an historical overview of theatre-film interaction. LEC.

FMS 322. Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Cinema. 3 Hours H.

A comprehensive introduction to Soviet cinema and its legacies in post-Soviet Russia. The course will examine what distinguished Soviet film industry from those in other countries and the ways in which it impacted the development of cinema worldwide. Films are analyzed both as artistic works (with attention to formal qualities, cinematic styles, and influences) and as documents that provide insight into the socio-political contexts of the times when they were made. We will also discuss influential contributions by Soviet filmmakers to our understanding of what makes film unique as an art form. The course is offered at the undergraduate and graduate level, with additional assignments at the graduate level. (Same as SLAV 322.) LEC.

FMS 345. New Media and Society. 3 Hours H.

Students will be introduced to major themes and debates in digital media studies and apply critical approaches for understanding new media practices, technologies, and theories. In addition to readings and lectures, students will engage in a variety of digital activities and participate in production-oriented projects. By the end of this course students will gain a foundational understanding of historical and emerging relationships between new media (internet, cell phones, digital games, etc.) and society, acquire key digital skills, and experience a variety of new media texts and services. This course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. LEC.

FMS 373. Intermediate Screenwriting. 3 Hours H.

Emphasis on writing a full-length screenplay. Explores genre, character, dialogue, and the development of a personal writing style. Prerequisite: FMS 273 and consent of instructor (students will be selected based on writing samples). LEC.

FMS 374. Animation. 3 Hours H.

A survey that combines animation history, theory, and production by examining animated works of all kinds and exploring various styles utilizing both hands-on techniques and digital animation programs. Lecture-laboratory. LEC.

FMS 375. Intermediate Video Production. 3 Hours H.

Theory and practice of longer-form video production with emphasis on scripting, talent coordination and editing in preproduction, production and postproduction. Lecture-laboratory. Prerequisite: FMS 275 and consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 376. Cinematography. 3 Hours H.

Theory and practice of cinematography, with emphasis on creation of film, video, and digital imagery. Prerequisite: FMS 275 or FMS 276, and consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 377. Post-Production. 3 Hours H.

Students become familiar with techniques and processes in film and video post-production including, but not limited to, editing, sound, post-production management, marketing, and distribution. This course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: FMS 275 and consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 380. American Popular Culture of: _____. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

An interdisciplinary examination of popular cultural forms and their relationships with the social, political and economic dynamics of America, with emphasis on film, media, music, literature (including magazines and newspapers) and the graphic arts. The decade or other specific topic to be studied changes as needs and resources develop. May be repeated for credit for different decades or topics. LEC.

FMS 401. Undergraduate Professional Development Seminar. 1 Hour H.

Provides an overview of opportunities for professional development in Film and Media Studies, and helps students plan goals for their education through an understanding of professional practices. The course also covers practical exercises in professional development, including writing resumes, finding internships and entry-level work, and other aspects of establishing a career in Film and Media Studies. Prerequisite: FMS 275 or equivalent. Open to FMS Majors only. Graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. LEC.

FMS 407. Undergraduate Film/Media Service Learning Internship. 1-6 Hours H.

Supervised study with an approved government agency, established non-profit organization, school, or community-based partner to produce a professional-level film and/or media project in the public interest. Community work should meet the needs of the community-based organization and the education goals set by the student, instructor, and community based partner; be in direct service, indirect service, policy analysis, research, and/or advocacy work; engage the student with individuals or communities of need and with issues related to social justice, community development, and/or access to resources. May be repeated for credit. No more than six hours may be applied to the B.A. or B.G.S. degrees. Graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and at least 22 credit hours in the department. FLD.

FMS 410. US Diversity in Visual Culture. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

This course examines the way in which diversity in the United States, including race, class, gender, and sexuality, are represented through visual culture, historically and in the present. The study of visual culture analyzes the way in which visual images communicate systems of beliefs, contribute to identity formation, and have an influence on our thinking about diversity. Course looks at United States visual objects (i.e., film, television, photography, art, advertisements, and theatre as well as visual practices, i.e., in public and private spaces. LEC.

FMS 411. Television Studies. 3 Hours H.

A historical, theoretical and critical survey of U.S. television from 1945 to the present from the public's perspective, with emphasis on the early influences of radio (e.g., Federal regulation and sponsorship), film and theatre; TV's rapid rise as the U.S. public's prime source of entertainment, news and information; TV's rise as a key cultural, economic and political phenomenon; TV's more recent accommodations to the forces of globalization, new technologies/media, and new business models through convergence. Discussion and screening of representative TV texts as seen against the backdrop of the theories and critical views of TV scholars ranging from Raymond Williams and John Fiske to Henry Jenkins. LEC.

FMS 412. Cyberculture Studies. 3 Hours H.

Historically there has been a tendency to approach new media technologies and their proliferation as either utopic or dystopic. Cyberculture studies has been no exception. Students will work toward a comprehensive understanding of cyberculture as emergent computer networks forming around and constructing entertainment, knowledge, business, community, and identity. Cyberculture will be examined as the constant (re)organizing of virtual and physical relationships as well as the reorganization of media production, distribution and consumption. The variety of opportunities for computer-mediated human interaction such as social networks, virtual worlds, blogs, and games will be examined as cyberculture transposes online and offline relationships and practices. LEC.

FMS 413. Asian Media Studies. 3 Hours H.

This course examines new and emerging media in East Asia and how the media industries of East Asia function. Using recent scholarship and industry data on contemporary cyberculture, music studies, and television industries of East Asia we examine how such factors as globalization, post-colonialism, censorship, emerging technology, and national media legislation affect regional and transnational media industries in Japan, South Korea, and Mainland China/Taiwan/Hong Kong. (Same as EALC 413.) LEC.

FMS 414. Kansas Art, History, and Popular Culture. 3 Hours H.

An overview of the art and cultural history of Kansas (and Kansas City) from territorial days to the present. Emphasis is placed on key issues, figures and events. A general familiarity with American history is recommended. May be taken as FMS 714, but with additional requirements. (Same as HA 584.) LEC.

FMS 475. Advanced Video Production. 3 Hours H.

Special projects in video production, using both studio and remote locations. Prerequisite: FMS 375 and consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 477. Sound Design. 3 Hours H.

Students will study and produce film and video work with an emphasis on sound design theory and practice. Course projects consist of several short works in response to readings and screenings, which include a survey of sound in cinema, internet and radio. Students will also become conversant with related equipment, software and techniques. Prerequisite: FMS 275 and consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 478. Experimental Production. 3 Hours H.

Students will produce experimental film and video projects, including installation art and performance art pieces, in both collaborative and a collaborative production modes. Practical production aspects of historical experimental works will be studied, with emphasis on creation of works inspired by these earlier artists and their work. Unorthodox video and film production concepts and modes will also be studied and used in the creation of original works. The incorporation of experimental elements in the creation of mainstream works, and the creation of such projects, will also be a key area of study and experimentation. By pushing their individual creative limits, students will gain an appreciation for the experimental film and video genre, as well as an expansion of their production skills. Prerequisite: FMS 275 and consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 479. Broadcast Documentary Production. 3 Hours H.

This is a hands-on production course in which students will research, plan and produce short-form non-fiction documentaries. The class is dedicated to training young professionals in the principles, skills, techniques, habits and practices of documentary production. We will focus also on the aesthetics of our craft and the documentary form. The objective is to ground students in the fundamental skills of good non-fiction storytelling-conceptualization, research, story structure, theme development, writing, producing and directing. The goal is the production of several short-form compositions (videos) where storytelling is employed to communicate a concept or idea effectively. Students will form into teams to research, develop and produce a course-long short-form documentary. Prerequisite: FMS 275 and consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 480. Music Video Production. 3 Hours H.

This course will cover elements of the history, aesthetics, and business of music video and music video production. Students will view and discuss many different types of music videos, and will learn how to classify and critique these videos in a professional manner. Students will gain familiarity with the genres, themes, forms, and iconography of music video; an understanding of the place of music video in media culture; an exploration of the ideological, cultural, and historical contexts of music video; and an ability to create or assist in the creation of professional-quality music videos. Prerequisite: FMS 275 and consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 498. Honors Seminar. 2-6 Hours AE61 / H.

Study may be directed toward either (a) reading for integration of knowledge and insight in film and media, or (b) original research (i.e., investigation of a specific problem in film and media). Six hours maximum credit. Prerequisite: Consent of Departmental Honors Coordinator. LEC.

FMS 499. Directed Study in Film. 1-6 Hours AE61 / H.

Investigation of a special topic or project selected by the student with advice, approval, and supervision by an instructor. Such study may take the form of directed reading or special research. Individual reports and conferences. A maximum of six hours credit may be counted toward a degree. Prerequisite: At least seven hours credit in the department and consent of instructor. IND.

FMS 530. Classical Film/Media Theory. 3 Hours H.

Comprehensive examination of most significant theories and theorists of film. Organized around specific questions, e.g., what qualities make film art unique, and how is film related to other visual and literary arts? Class discussion, individual projects. Prerequisite: FMS 100 or equivalent (determined by instructor). LEC.

FMS 531. Contemporary Concepts in Media Studies. 3 Hours H.

This course emphasizes a theoretical understanding of media and media production skills. It is a critical cultural study of the media, focusing on the relationships between media representations and society. Students explore different conceptual perspectives on the role and power of visual media in society in influencing social values, political beliefs, identities and behaviors; analyze specific media texts, such as film and television shows; and examine the dynamics of how class, gender, generation, and race influence the production and reception of media. LEC.

FMS 540. Cuban Cinema. 3 Hours H.

This course explores Cuban cinema from 1959 to the present day. Special attention is paid to the representations of Cuban history, cultural politics, and the political-economic conditions of production in Cuba. In addition, the Cuban-American community and their contributions or reactions to Cuban film are discussed. Through readings, lectures, discussion, and viewing Cuban films, the class examines a variety of topics related to Cuban cinema, history, and contemporary concerns. This course is offered at the 500 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. Prerequisite: Junior standing. LEC.

FMS 541. Asian Film. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H.

Seminar on various national film cultures of East and Southeast Asia. Representative films are studied from formal, stylistic, and socio-historic perspectives. Addresses the impact of key cultural, economic, and political issues on each film industry. Class discussion, reports, and individual research papers. The course is offered at the 500 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. (Same as EALC 541.) Prerequisite: Junior status. LEC.

FMS 542. Latin American Film. 3 Hours H.

The course explores the national cinemas and film industries of various nations in Latin America, as well as films made by Indigenous and Chicano/a filmmakers. Films are analyzed both as artistic works (formal qualities, cinematic styles, and influences) and as documents that provide windows to the socio-historical context of the nation. The course focuses on the political-economic factors surrounding the production of Latin American national cinema (the role of the state, coproductions, film markets). Prerequisite: Junior status. May be taken as FMS 842. There will be additional requirements for graduate students taking FMS 842. LEC.

FMS 543. Contemporary Japanese Film. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H.

Seminar on the major developments in the contemporary (1980-present) Japanese film industry examining how filmmaking practices and film criticism have been influenced by such issues as transnationalism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, postmodernism, and new media. We survey recent industrial and stylistic trends as well as key critical debates. Class discussion, reports, and individual research papers. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as EALC 543.) Prerequisite: Junior status. LEC.

FMS 544. African Film. 3 Hours NW / H.

A critical study of Africa and its peoples as depicted in films. The aesthetic, cultural, economic, political, historical, and ideological aspects of African films are examined. (Same as AAAS 555.) LEC.

FMS 585. Capstone in Film and Media Studies. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

This course integrates the knowledge and skills acquired across the curriculum of Film & Media Studies including academic studies, but also production and other related disciplines to enable the student to demonstrate achievement through the production of a major creative research project. Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Film and Media Studies B.A. or B.G.S. degree. Must have completed one FMS production course. LEC.

FMS 592. Documentary Film and Video. 3 Hours H.

An historical and theoretical survey of that major genre of film and video typically termed "documentary." The course will trace the main historical developments from documentary's beginnings through contemporary innovations. Prerequisite: FMS 100 and FMS 310, FMS 311, or consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 593. Experimental Film and Video. 3 Hours H.

A history of experimental film and video through an examination of major artists, movements, theories, and films/tapes. Prerequisite: FMS 100 and FMS 310, or consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 620. International Women Filmmakers. 3 Hours H.

This course examines films made by women around the world. Mainstream and independent fiction, documentary, and experimental works will be screened and discussed. The objectives of the course are: 1) to learn the variety of films made by women and the conditions of their production, distribution reception. 2) to interrogate the idea of women's cinema as `counter-cinema'. We will acquire tools for analyzing films in terms of economic, aesthetic, cultural, and political circumstance by women of different countries, classes, races, ethnicities, genders, and sexual preferences. LEC.

FMS 621. American Film Criticism. 3 Hours H.

An analysis of the evolution, methods and impact of American film criticism as practiced by such critics as James Agee, Robert Warshow, Andrew Sarris, John Simon, Pauline Kael, Stanley Kauffman, and Dwight Macdonald. Prerequisite: FMS 310 or FMS 311. LEC.

FMS 673. Problems in Basic Screenwriting. 3 Hours U.

The principles of screenwriting are developed through scene writing and analysis culminating in the writing and structure of a full-length, three-act screenplay. In addition to the class sessions taught with FMS 273 Basic Screenwriting, separate consultations and specific research assignments for graduate students in FMS 673 are also required. LEC.

FMS 675. Problems in Basic Video Production. 3 Hours U.

Theory and practice of single-camera video production with emphasis on preproduction planning, scripting, directing, lighting, camera operation and audio. In addition to the class sessions taught with FMS 275 Basic Video Production, separate consultations and specific research assignments for graduate students in FMS 675 are also required. Lecture-laboratory. LEC.

FMS 676. Problems in Basic Film Production. 3 Hours U.

An introduction to 16mm film techniques and structures, requiring construction of brief, individually produced fictive-narrative films employing classical continuity. In addition to the class sessions taught with FMS 276 Basic Film Production, separate consultations and specific research assignments for graduate students in FMS 676 are also required. Lecture-laboratory. LEC.

FMS 702. Graduate Seminar in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Course organized any given semester to study particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competency by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. SEM.

FMS 704. Study Abroad Topics in: ______. 1-6 Hours.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Film. Credit for coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

FMS 707. Film/Media Internship. 3-12 Hours.

Study with an approved film or media company. Emphasis may be in one or all of the following areas: acting, directing, or promotion management. No more than six hours may be applied to an M.A. degree. Course will be graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. INT.

FMS 714. Kansas Art, History and Popular Culture. 3 Hours.

An overview of the art and cultural history of Kansas (and Kansas City) from territorial days to the present. Emphasis is placed on key issues, figures and events. A general familiarity with American history is recommended. In addition to the lecture sessions taught in tandem with FMS 414, additional research component, lecture presentation, and class meeting are also required. LEC.

FMS 715. Survey of Japanese Film. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the major developments in patterns of distribution, exhibition, and reception and their influence on film aesthetics in twentieth century Japanese film. Through secondary readings, lectures, and discussions students will examine how Japanese cinema, as an institution, responds to and intervenes in the social, cultural, and political history of twentieth century Japan. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as EALC 715.) LEC.

FMS 716. Cinemas of the Southern Cone: Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the cinemas of three neighboring South American countries to find similar themes and some differences between them historically, politically, and culturally. Themes will include: gender and nation, political repression during dictatorship, globalization and the cinema, youth culture in the Southern Cone, and representations of race and ethnicity, immigration and identity in contemporary cinema. In addition to the lecture sessions taught in tandem with FMS 316, additional research component, lecture presentation, and class meeting are also required. LEC.

FMS 717. Race and the American Documentary. 3 Hours.

This course will survey a range of documentaries in which race is a key part of the film's text. There are two class objectives: to broaden the student's knowledge of American social history and culture, especially around issues of identity, representation and race, and to heighten the student's ability as a critical viewer of films. This course will include: film viewing, scholarly readings, and lectures. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. LEC.

FMS 718. Anti-war Films. 3 Hours.

An overview and exploration of the history of the portrayal of anti-war film and media themes to show how anti-war attitudes and political policy can be affected by positive and negative depictions of conflict. Analysis of selected films. FMS 318 and FMS 718 will meet concurrently, though separate consultations and specific research assignments for FMS 718 are also required. LEC.

FMS 722. Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Cinema. 3 Hours H.

A comprehensive introduction to Soviet cinema and its legacies in post-Soviet Russia. The course will examine what distinguished Soviet film industry from those in other countries and the ways in which it impacted the development of cinema worldwide. Films are analyzed both as artistic works (with attention to formal qualities, cinematic styles, and influences) and as documents that provide insight into the socio-political contexts of the times when they were made. We will also discuss influential contributions by Soviet filmmakers to our understanding of what makes film unique as an art form. The course is offered at the undergraduate and graduate level, with additional assignments at the graduate level. Not open to students with credit in SLAV 322/FMS 322. (Same as SLAV 622.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor permission. LEC.

FMS 743. Contemporary Japanese Film. 3 Hours.

Seminar on the major developments in the contemporary (1980-present) Japanese film industry examining how filmmaking practices and film criticism have been influenced by such issues as transnationalism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, postmodernism, and new media. We will survey recent industrial and stylistic trends as well as key critical debates. Class includes discussion, reports, and individual research papers. This course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as EALC 743.) SEM.

FMS 745. New Media and Society. 3 Hours.

Students will be introduced to major themes and debates in digital media studies and apply critical approaches for understanding new media practices, technologies, and theories. In addition to readings and lectures, students will engage in a variety of digital activities and participate in production-oriented projects. By the end of this course students will gain a foundational understanding of historical and emerging relationships between new media (internet, cell phones, digital games, etc.) and society, acquire key digital skills, and experience a variety of new media texts and services. This course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. LEC.

FMS 773. Problems in Intermediate Screenwriting. 3 Hours.

The principles of screenwriting are developed through scene writing and analysis culminating in the writing and structuring of a full-length, three act screenplay. In addition to the class sessions taught with FMS 373 Intermediate Screenwriting, separate consultations and specific research assignments for graduate students in FMS 773 are also required. LEC.

FMS 774. Animation. 3 Hours.

A survey that combines animation history, theory, and production by examining animated works of all kinds and exploring various styles utilizing both hands-on techniques and digital animation programs. This course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Lecture-laboratory LEC.

FMS 775. Problems in Intermediate Video Production. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of multiple-camera video production with emphasis on preproduction planning, scripting, directing, lighting, camera operation, and audio. In addition to the class sessions taught with FMS 375 Intermediate Video Production, separate consultations and specific research assignments for graduate students in FMS 775 are also required. Lecture-laboratory. LEC.

FMS 776. Problems in Cinematography. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of cinematography, with emphasis on creation of film, video, and digital imagery. FMS 776 meets concurrently with FMS 376; students enrolled in the graduate-level course will have separate consultations and specific research assignments. Lecture-laboratory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and FMS 675 or FMS 676. LEC.

FMS 777. Post-Production. 3 Hours.

Students will become familiar with techniques and processes in film and video post-production including, but not limited to, editing, sound, post-production management, marketing, and distribution. This course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 800. Introduction to Graduate Study in Film/Media. 3 Hours.

Major emphasis is placed upon the principles of research, bibliographical data, and research methods useful in film and television. The course should be taken at the beginning of the graduate student's program. LEC.

FMS 801. Professional Development Seminar. 1 Hour.

Preparation and training for faculty careers in film and related fields, including research skills and methods, responsible scholarship, teaching, and service. Other topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit. SEM.

FMS 802. Master's Projects. 3-6 Hours.

Advanced creative projects which may be elected by master's degree candidates in lieu of thesis. RSH.

FMS 810. Development of the Silent Film. 3 Hours.

Intensive study of the artistic, economic, and sociological development of the silent narrative film with emphasis on the evolution of the American studio system, German Expressionism, and Soviet Expressive Realism. LEC.

FMS 811. Development of the American Sound Film. 3 Hours.

Intensive study of the artistic, economic, and sociological development of the American sound film with emphasis on the studio system, major directors, genres, and the impact of television. LEC.

FMS 813. Development of the International Sound Film. 3 Hours.

Intensive study of the artistic, economic, and sociological development of the international sound film with emphasis on the cinemas of England, France, Italy, Germany, Sweden, and Eastern Europe. LEC.

FMS 814. Development of African-American Images in Film. 3 Hours.

A history and critical assessment of the development of diverse images of African-Americans in American cinema and the impact of those images of American society. Screenings of feature and independent films, including those by African-Americans. In addition to the lecture/screening sessions taught in tandem with FMS 314, a separate discussion section and specific research assignments for graduate students enrolled in FMS 814 are also required. LEC.

FMS 840. Cuban Cinema. 3 Hours.

This course explores Cuban cinema from 1959 to the present day. Special attention will be paid to the representations of Cuban history, cultural politics, and the political-economic conditions of production in Cuba. In addition, the Cuban-American community and their contributions or reactions to Cuban film will be discussed. Through readings, lectures, discussion, and viewing Cuban films, the class will examine a variety of topics related to Cuban cinema, history, and contemporary concerns. This course is offered at the 500 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. LEC.

FMS 841. Asian Film. 3 Hours.

Seminar on various national film cultures of East and Southeast Asia. Representative films are studied from formal, stylistic, and socio-historic perspectives. Addresses the impact of key cultural, economic and political issues on each film industry. Class includes discussion, reports, and individual research papers. This course is offered at the 500 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. (Same as EALC 841.) SEM.

FMS 842. Latin American Film. 3 Hours.

The course explores the national cinemas and film industries of various nations in Latin America, as well as films made by indigenous and Chicano/a filmmakers. Films are analyzed both as artistic works (formal qualities, cinematic styles, and influences) and as documents that provide windows to the socio-historical context of the nation. The course focuses on the political-economic factors surrounding the production of Latin American national cinema (the role of the state, co-productions, film markets). LEC.

FMS 862. Survey of Film and Media History. 3 Hours.

This seminar will be primarily international in scope and will concentrate on the following: technological and production issues relating to the transition in 1927-1931 of silent to sound film; the constructions of national identity, including those of recently emerging cultures; a comparison and contrast of the censorial agencies in America and abroad; and current revisionist perspectives on received film and media history. SEM.

FMS 863. Survey of Documentary and Experimental Film and Media. 3 Hours.

Surveys the important historical and theoretical issues pertinent to both the documentary and experimental approaches as expressed in film, video and new technologies. Includes major documentary and experimental genres, directors, national schools, artistic movements, and landmark works. Screenings reflect a chronology from origins to present-day. LEC.

FMS 864. Classical Film and Media Theory. 3 Hours.

This seminar is a comprehensive survey of the major classical film and media theories and theorists, such as Munsterberg, Eisenstein, Arnheim, Bazin, and Adorno. Organized around specific questions, e.g.: What qualities differentiate film and media from other art and communications forms? What qualities do film and media share with other art and communication forms? What qualities differentiate film from other forms of media such as television? Readings from primary sources stressed. Class discussion, individual research papers. SEM.

FMS 865. Contemporary Film and Media Theory. 3 Hours.

This seminar is a study of the theories applied to the study of film and media since the 1970s moving through structuralism, and into the posts: -structuralism, -modernism, -colonialism, and beyond. Within these broad paradigms some of the theories examined in depth are cinesemiotics, Marxism, cinematic apparatus, feminist film theory, reception theory, new media and virtual reality. SEM.

FMS 875. Problems in Advanced Video Production. 3 Hours.

Special projects in video production, using both studio and remote locations. In addition to the class sessions taught with FMS 475 Advanced Video Production, separate consultations and specific research assignments for graduate students in FMS 875 are also required. Prerequisite: FMS 775 or consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 880. Development of American Popular Culture in the: _____. 3 Hours.

Intensive interdisciplinary examination of popular culture forms and their relationships with the social, political, and economic dynamics of America in a specific decade, with emphasis on film, broadcasting, theatre, music literature (including magazines and newspapers), and the graphic arts. Decade to be studied changes as resources and needs develop. LEC.

FMS 887. Film and the Public. 3 Hours.

A study of the actual and implied responsibilities of film and video to the public, as seen in regulations, self-regulatory codes, and the critical literature of the field. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 888. Special Problems in Film History and Criticism. 1-4 Hours.

RSH.

FMS 895. Intensive Film Project Seminar. 1-4 Hours.

The student plans and executes an intensive special project which requires the professional skills of investigation and performance appropriate to radio, television and/or film. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of six credit hours. (This seminar is to the special project program what "thesis" is to the traditional program.) RSH.

FMS 897. Practicum in Film. 1-3 Hours.

Various approaches to the illustration of principles of production in film and/or video through the supervision of laboratory exercises and subsequent evaluation by the Theatre and Film graduate faculty. FLD.

FMS 898. Investigation and Conference (for Master's Students). 1-8 Hours.

Directed research and experimentation in film or media. Limited to eight hours credit toward the Master's degree. RSH.

FMS 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

THE.

FMS 902. Film Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours.

A graduate seminar devoted to selected historical, theoretical, or critical issues. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

FMS 998. Investigation and Conference (for Doctoral Students). 1-8 Hours.

RSH.

FMS 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

THE.

Theatre Courses

THR 100. Introduction to the Theatre. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

Designed to help students by means of experience with theatre as well as study about it to achieve an understanding of its cultural role in contemporary society, to develop a sensitive and informed appreciation of its art, and to make it an integral part of their cultural lives. Lectures, discussion groups, special interest groups, theatre attendance. LEC.

THR 101. Theatre Practicum I. 1 Hour H.

Involvement in theatre performance and/or production. One acting role in a University Theatre production or classroom project plus one crew assignment, or two crew assignments qualify for credit. May be repeated for credit ACT.

THR 105. Improvisation. 3 Hours H.

Designed to free the beginning actor physically, vocally, and emotionally. Beginning with basic physical action and sense memory exercises performed by individuals, the work will progress to pair and small-group improvisations in preparation for scene work. Open to freshmen and sophomores only. LEC.

THR 106. Acting I. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

Fundamental techniques in acting. Practice in character creation, body language, and effective stage speech. LEC.

THR 111. Make-Up. 1 Hour H.

The techniques in application of make-up for specific characterizations, both straight and character. Study of the structure of the face and hands for stage make-up. Should be taken concurrently with THR 106, if possible. LEC.

THR 116. Scenographic Techniques. 3 Hours H.

Emphasis on drafting, model building, and presentational techniques for the theatrical designer or art director. Some work in computer drafting for the designer-technician. Lecture and laboratory periods. LEC.

THR 120. Public Speaking as Performance. 3 Hours GE22 / H.

This course offers students a unique embodied approach to public speaking. Students will compose and deliver presentations. Theatre games, improvisational techniques, and vocal exercises will help students gain awareness of how mind, body, and speech interrelate. Students will learn to manage performance anxiety, organize a narrative, speak extemporaneously and articulate clearly. Texts used in acting training will supplement a public speaking textbook. Through a combination of speech assignments and theatre exercises, this course will teach students to generate, explore, organize, interpret, and express ideas orally; to use language and media to express ideas clearly and confidently; and integrate body and mind to serve speaking needs in a variety of contexts and across social, cultural, and disciplinary boundaries. LEC.

THR 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours HT GE11.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, organized around current issues in Theatre. May not contribute to major requirements in theatre. First year seminar topics are coordinated and approved through the Office of First Year Experiences. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

THR 201. Theatre Practicum II. 1 Hour H.

Involvement in theatre performance and/or production. One acting role inUniversity Theatre production or classroom project plus one crew assignment, or two crew assignments qualify for credit. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: THR 101. ACT.

THR 204. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-6 Hours H.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Theatre at the freshman/sophomore level. Credit for coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

THR 206. Acting II. 3 Hours H.

The study of roles and scenes from plays. Practice in character analysis, creation of roles, rehearsal of scenes, and ensemble work. Prerequisite: THR 106. LEC.

THR 210. Musical Performance for the Actor I. 3 Hours H.

Beginning Studies in Musical Theatre Performance: practical application of voice, acting and movement techniques for musical theatre, solo and group performance. LEC.

THR 212. Beginning Voice and Speech for Actors. 3 Hours H.

A foundation course; introduction to phonetics; training in Standard American Stage Speech; articulation skills; resonance and voice placement. LEC.

THR 213. Movement I: The Acting Instrument. 3 Hours H.

A foundational course in discovering ease and efficient use of the body in a performance context, developing non-verbal communication and partnering skills, and establishing the connection of movement to voice production. Trains actors in proper warm-up technique, alignment and balance, physical safety, and basic tumbling skills. LEC.

THR 215. Approaching Design. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

Conceptualization and visualization of the elements involved in creative design for theatre, dance, television, and film. LEC.

THR 216. Scenic Production. 2 Hours H.

Introduction to the planning, construction, and mounting of scenery for theatre, television, and film. Concentration on the technical organization of scenic production. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory periods. LEC.

THR 220. Costume Production. 2 Hours H.

Introduction to techniques of costume construction, including study of fabrics, color, fundamentals of pattern making, and draping of costumes for theatre, television, and film. Concentration on the technical organization of costume production. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory periods. LEC.

THR 224. Lighting Production. 2 Hours H.

Introduction to the planning and execution of lighting for theatre, television, and film. Concentration organized any given semester to study particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. LEC.

THR 301. Theatre Practicum III. 1 Hour H.

Involvement in theatre performance and/or production. One acting role in a University Theatre production or classroom project plus one crew assignment, or two crew assignments qualify for credit. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: THR 201. ACT.

THR 302. Undergraduate Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours H.

Course organized any given semester to study a particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. LEC.

THR 303. Summer Theatre. 1-6 Hours H.

Provides experience in a wide range of theatre activity related to the summer theatre production or productions. Work may include activity in the following areas: acting, directing, design, technical theatre, voice and/or movement. Specialized skills are developed through individual classes, production preparation and performance. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. ACT.

THR 304. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-6 Hours H.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Theatre at the junior/senior level. Credit for coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

THR 305. Honors Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours H.

Special topics seminar serving students enrolled in the University Honors Program. Course organized any given semester to study a particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the University Honors Program. LEC.

THR 306. Acting III. 3 Hours H.

Advanced projects in acting. Character and scene analysis, scoring the role, rehearsal, and performance. Prerequisite: THR 206. LEC.

THR 307. Undergraduate Theatre Internship. 1-3 Hours AE61 / H.

Supervised study with an approved theater company or project. May be repeated for credit. No more than six hours may be applied to the B.A. or B.G.S. degrees. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and at least seven hours credit in the department. INT.

THR 308. Script Analysis. 3 Hours H.

This course provides knowledge and methods enabling students to conduct in-depth study of dramatic scripts. Emphasis is given to the analysis skills appropriate to practitioners of stage and screen arts. LEC.

THR 310. Musical Performance for the Actor II. 3 Hours H.

Intermediate Studies in Musical Theatre Performance: practical application of voice, acting and movement techniques for musical theatre, solo and group performance. Prerequisite: THR 106 and THR 210. LEC.

THR 312. Acting with an Accent. 3 Hours H.

A performance class for actors using monologues and scenes involving the use of accents and dialects. The course will also provide instruction in many of the most used American regional, British regional dialects, and foreign language accents. Prerequisite: THR 212, or by permission of instructor after the student demonstrates an ability in the International Phonetic Alphabet. LEC.

THR 313. Movement II: Physical Characterization. 3 Hours H.

The study of diverse physical acting techniques, and an investigation into creating a character through manipulation of the acting instrument. Actor training in performance neutrality, mask work, age, and gender distinctions. Prerequisite: THR 213 and permission of instructor. LEC.

THR 316. Beginning Scene Design. 3 Hours H.

Study of scenic design process with beginning problems in textual analysis, style, historical research, and preliminary and finished methods of design presentation. Concentration on developing fundamental design skills and awareness. Prerequisite: THR 116 and THR 215, or permission of instructor. LEC.

THR 320. Beginning Costume Design. 3 Hours H.

Study of the costume design process with beginning problems in textual analysis, style, historical research, and preliminary and finished methods of design presentation. Concentration on developing fundamental design skills and awareness. Prerequisite: THR 215. LEC.

THR 324. Beginning Lighting Design. 3 Hours H.

Study of the lighting design process with beginning problems in textual analysis, style, historical research, with preliminary and finished methods of design presentation. Concentration on developing fundamental design skills and awareness. Prerequisite: THR 116 and THR 215, or permission of instructor. LEC.

THR 326. African Theatre and Drama. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A study of the origin and development of continental African theatre and its affinity to the Levant. Traditional, colonial and contemporary dramatic theories and experiments will be examined in play selections. (Same as AAAS 355.) LEC.

THR 327. African-American Theatre and Drama. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

A historical study of Black Theatre in the U.S.A. from its African genesis to its contemporary Americanness. Epochs in African-American dramaturgy will be critically examined. (Same as AAAS 356.) LEC.

THR 334. Introduction to African Dance Theatre. 2 Hours NW / U.

An introduction to the general techniques of non-verbal theatrical conventions in African cultures. Practical training in movement vocabulary will be supplemented by lectures on the "text" of performance. (Same as AAAS 334 and DANC 334.) LEC.

THR 380. Popular Culture: _____. 3 Hours HL GE3H / H.

Interdisciplinary examination of popular culture oriented around a specific genre or theme. Objects of study may include popular forms of live performance such as musicals or vaudeville, as well as media-based performances (radio, television, film, internet). Specific topic to be studied changes as needs and resources develop. May be repeated for credit for different topics. LEC.

THR 401. Stage Management and Assistant Direction. 1 Hour H.

Majors are assigned to stage manage or assistant direct a University Theatre production, or to take related workshops in stage management or assistant directing. May be repeated for credit ACT.

THR 404. Children and Drama. 3 Hours HL / H.

Exploration of forms, methods, and materials appropriate for development of elementary-age children in dramatic arts. LEC.

THR 405. Children and Media. 3 Hours H.

The applied study of child development theories and research methods on the influences and effects of television and related visual media on childhood in the contexts of families, schools, and society. (Same as ABSC 405 and PSYC 405.) LEC.

THR 406. Audition Techniques. 3 Hours H.

This course prepares students for all types of audition experiences. It includes study in techniques of prepared auditions, cold readings, interviews, and the musical audition for actors. Emphasis is placed upon developing resumes and photo portfolios as well as concentrated study in professional contracts, unions, and agent acquisition. Prerequisite: THR 206. LEC.

THR 407. Advanced Acting Special Topic. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in performance techniques involving advanced skills for the actor at the junior/senior level. Prerequisite: THR 306. Theatre major or minor students. LEC.

THR 410. Musical Performance for the Actor III. 3 Hours H.

Advanced Studies in Musical Theatre Performance: practical application of voice, acting and movement techniques for musical theatre, solo and group performance. Prerequisite: THR 106, THR 210, and THR 310. LEC.

THR 413. Stage Combat Skills. 3 Hours U.

Study of the illusion of violence in a dramatic context and the special skills necessary for creating believable and safe stage fights. Actor training in armed and unarmed combat, including one or more of the following: rapier and dagger, broadsword, and quarter staff. Prerequisite: THR 313 and permission of instructor. LEC.

THR 416. Design Forum. 3 Hours U.

Depending on student qualifications and specialization, focus is on scenic, costume, and/or lighting design. Special attention placed on developing collaborative awareness and the conceptual and presentation skills that underlie and inform the design process. Prerequisite: THR 316 or THR 320 or THR 324. LEC.

THR 429. Postcolonial Theatre and Drama. 3 Hours NW AE42/GE3H / H.

The course develops an understanding of the postcolonial concept and its different manifestations in theatre and drama across nations and cultures. It approaches postcolonialism as a way of reading theatre, and as a genre within theatre by exploring how the "colonial project" has reconfigured the concept, content, and context of theatre in both colonized and colonizing cultures. In addition to the study of postcolonial playwrights and their works, the course is also an introduction to postcolonial theory and its critics. (Same as AAAS 429.) LEC.

THR 445. Teaching Theatre in the Middle/Secondary Schools. 3 Hours H.

Study of philosophy and methods appropriate to teaching improvisation, acting, stagecraft, directing, playwriting, dramatic literature, and theatre history in middle/secondary schools. Includes curriculum development, instructional and evaluative strategies, and management of co-curricular theatre programs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

THR 498. Honors Directed Study in Theatre. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

Individual creation of an original product that integrates theatre knowledge and skills. Selected in advance with advice, approval, and supervision by an instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, senior level status, and 3.5 GPA in Theatre and 3.25 GPA overall at the time of enrollment. IND.

THR 499. Directed Study in Theatre. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

Individual creation of an original product that integrates theatre knowledge and skills. Selected in advance with advice, approval, and supervision by an instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and junior or senior level status. IND.

THR 506. Acting for the Camera. 3 Hours H.

A study of acting techniques appropriate to the requirements of the camera. Emphasis is placed on developing audition skills necessary to compete for roles in dramatic features, corporate videos, and commercials. Actors acquire skills essential to the transition from stage to camera. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

THR 507. Acting Professionally. 3 Hours.

This course prepares students for entering the world of professional acting. It includes study in audition techniques such as prepared auditions, cold readings, interviews, and musical auditions. Emphasis is placed on developing portfolios as well as acquainting students with professional contract, unions, and agents and other aspects of the profession. Open to theatre major and minor students. Prerequisite: THR 306. LEC.

THR 508. Fundamentals of Directing. 3 Hours H.

Offered as a first course in play directing. Designed primarily for theatre majors and secondary education majors in language arts with a theatre and drama concentration. The content is principally descriptive in nature with some practical experience. Lecture and laboratory periods. Prerequisite: THR 308. LEC.

THR 509. Dramatic Script Writing. 3 Hours H.

Study and practice in the fundamental techniques of dramatic writing and the application of such techniques most specifically to theatre. Open upon consent of instructor to students who have completed one course in advanced composition and one course in the theory or history of drama. LEC.

THR 512. A Vocal Approach to the Classics. 3 Hours H.

This is an advanced voice and speech course for actors aiming to further increase their command over tone, rhythm, pacing, and diction. Their range and power will be extended. Through discovery of the demands of a variety of classical texts, the actor will be challenged both in verse and in prose to develop the skills necessary to fully interpret that material. Prerequisite: THR 212. LEC.

THR 516. Scenic Painting Techniques. 3 Hours H.

Study of painting equipment, tools, pigments, binders, and vehicles, and their relationship to the surfaces to be painted. Instruction in basic painting techniques. Prerequisite: THR 115 and THR 215. LEC.

THR 517. Computer-Aided Design. 3 Hours U.

Study of new media in theatre and film/video production, primarily computer technologies and methods for the theatrical designer or art director. Emphasis on computer 3-D modeling and color rendering. Prerequisite: THR 116, THR 215, or permission of instructor. LEC.

THR 518. Scenography and the Classic Script. 3 Hours H.

Holistic production design, including lighting, scenery, and costumes, for classic theatre scripts. Contrasts historical styles of production with styles for contemporary spaces and audiences. Projects tailored to the needs and level of the students. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

THR 519. Scenography and the Modern Script. 3 Hours H.

Holistic production design, including lighting, scenery, and costumes, for modern theatre scripts. Examines modern styles of production. Projects tailored to the needs and level of the students. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

THR 520. History of Period Style I. 3 Hours H.

A survey of Western style from ancient Egypt to the Restoration. Focus is placed on developing a comprehensive understanding of the stylistic relationships between art, architecture, clothing, decor, manners, and social and political history. Prerequisite: Nine hours in theatre/design/technical courses or consent of instructor. LEC.

THR 521. History of Period Style II. 3 Hours H.

Continuation of THR 520, from the Restoration to the present day. Prerequisite: Nine hours in theatre/design/technical courses or consent of instructor. LEC.

THR 525. History of Theatre. 3 Hours H.

Study of developments in world theatre and drama from the ancient world to the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: THR 308. LEC.

THR 526. History of Theatre II. 3 Hours H.

Study of developments in world theatre and drama since the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: THR 308. LEC.

THR 527. Asian Theatre and Performance. 3 Hours NW / H/W.

A survey of traditional and modern theatre and performance in Asia, with greatest attention given to India, China, and Japan. A study of plays, dramatic genres, history, conventions of play production, acting styles and other performance forms. (Same as EALC 527.) LEC.

THR 528. History of U.S. Theatre and Drama. 3 Hours H.

Historical approach to the development of theatre and performing arts in the United States. Prerequisite: THR 308. LEC.

THR 529. Race and the American Theatre. 3 Hours U.

The representation(s) of race in significant texts and performance styles in American theatre analyzed according to political ideologies, dramatic movements and the impact of these factors on the representation of the "other" in the theatre. (Same as AAAS 585 and AMS 529.) LEC.

THR 550. Applied and Interactive Theatre. 3 Hours H.

This course is an exploration of interactive drama techniques and practices of the evolving field of applied theatre. The tools of applied theatre serve varied purposes and are being used around the world for community-building, personal empowerment, to address social and political issues, and to strengthen communication skills. The class will work specifically on community-based dialogue and classroom situations that students and professors encounter in their daily lives. LEC.

THR 560. Collaborative Production. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

Seniors collaborate as a theatre company to create an original production that integrates several of the following areas: improvisation, playwriting, acting, directing, dramaturgy, design, technical production, and stage management. Collaboration of group project approved in advance with advice, approval, and supervision by at least one instructor. Prerequisite: Senior level and consent of at least one instructor. IND.

THR 599. Special Topics in Scenography. 1-6 Hours U.

Individual studio activity. Course content to be determined by the student under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. IND.

THR 603. Theatre for Young Audiences. 3 Hours U.

A survey of theories, history, literature, criticism, production methods, and audience research about theatre performed by adults for children and adolescents. Emphasis is on child development and community outreach. Prerequisite: THR 308 or consent of instructor. LEC.

THR 604. Drama with Young People. 1-3 Hours U.

A laboratory experience in developing and conducting improvisational drama workshops with children or adolescents in local schools. Includes readings by leading theorists and practitioners. Prerequisite: Actors cast in current KU Theatre for Young People production, or THR 404, or consent of instructor. LEC.

THR 609. Play Directing. 3 Hours H.

Readings, lectures, and practice dealing with the relationship between actor and director. Prerequisite: THR 508. LEC.

THR 617. Computer-Aided Design II. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of THR 517. Emphasis on computer-generated images as scenic media in production situations. Prerequisite: THR 517, or permission of instructor. LEC.

THR 618. Scenography and the Musical Theatre. 3 Hours H.

Holistic production design, including lighting, scenery, and costumes, for musical theatre, opera, and dance. Examines development and changes in design styles in the evolution of musical theatre, opera, and dance and the special requirements of these forms. Projects tailored to the needs and level of the students. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

THR 619. Scenography and the Contemporary Script. 3 Hours H.

Holistic production design, including lighting, scenery, and costumes, for contemporary scripts. Examines contemporary episodic scripts written for the stage that are based on a filmic structure, the special problems of these kinds of scripts, and the respective problems of designing for theatre and film. Projects tailored to the needs and level of the students. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

THR 620. Scenography and the Experimental Production. 3 Hours H.

Holistic production design, including lighting, scenery, and costumes, for experimental scripts/scenarios. Examines experimental approaches to a variety of script/scenarios, including mixed-media production. Projects tailored to the needs and level of the students. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

THR 626. Myth and the Dramatist. 3 Hours U.

This seminar critically explores myths in dramatic literature from ancient to contemporary times, using select authors from different cultures. Analysis of the works will be based on both conventional and post-structuralist theories and specific emphasis will be on myths that have been adapted cross-culturally and/or in different time perspectives. LEC.

THR 702. Graduate Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours.

Course organized any given semester to study particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competency by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. LEC.

THR 703. Directed Readings in Theatre. 1-3 Hours.

Research reading and presentation of reports on specific subjects related to the students major area of specialization. May be repeated up to a total of six credits on petition. Required of all MFA Scenography students. IND.

THR 704. Study Abroad Topics in: ______. 1-6 Hours.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Theatre. Credit for coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC.

THR 707. Theatre Internship. 3-12 Hours.

Study with an approved theatre company. Emphasis may be in one or all of the following areas: acting, directing, stage management, technical theatre, promotion management. No more than six hours may be applied to an M.A. degree. Course will be graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. INT.

THR 715. Problems and Techniques of Direction. 3 Hours.

Practical experience in directing. Prerequisite: THR 609. RSH.

THR 719. M.F.A. Production Seminar. 3 Hours.

To be taken by M.F.A. candidates during those semesters in which they are assigned to design one or more elements in a production to be mounted on one of our stages. Weekly critique and discussion of solutions to practical design problems from conception through execution. May be repeated for a total of no more than six hours credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND.

THR 725. Russian Theatre and Drama from Stanislavski and Chekhov to the Present. 3 Hours.

A study of the development of Russian theatre and dramatic literature from 1898 to the present. Lectures and readings in English. (Same as SLAV 562.) LEC.

THR 800. Introduction to Graduate Study in Theatre. 3 Hours.

Major emphasis is placed upon the principles of research, bibliographical data, and research methods useful in theatre and performance studies. The course should be taken at the beginning of the graduate student's program. LEC.

THR 801. Professional Development Seminar. 1 Hour.

Preparation for faculty careers in theatre and related fields, including issues of research, teaching, and service. At least three hours per semester will be devoted to training in responsible scholarship. May be repeated for credit. RSH.

THR 802. Master's Projects. 3-6 Hours.

Advanced creative projects which may be elected by MFA degree candidates in lieu of thesis. RSH.

THR 803. Summer Theatre: Graduate. 1-3 Hours.

Provides graduate level experience in a wide range of theatre activity related to the summer theatre production or productions. Work may include activity in the following areas: acting, directing, design, technical theatre, voice and/or movement. Specialized skills are developed through individual classes, production preparation, and performance. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. FLD.

THR 815. Advanced Play Production. 1-3 Hours.

Individually supervised directing of theatre pieces for public presentation. In special cases credit may be given for musical direction, choreography, or stage management. Prerequisite: THR 715. FLD.

THR 817. Theory of Acting and Directing. 3 Hours.

Readings, lectures, discussions and papers on acting and directing theory; is concerned with the divergence between presentational and representational acting methods and the emergence of directing art. Prerequisite: THR 609 or THR 715. LEC.

THR 819. Advanced M.F.A. Production Seminar. 3 Hours.

Continuation of THR 719, but production design assignments will be more complex and larger in scope. May be repeated for maximum of six hours credit. Prerequisite: Six hours of THR 719 and consent of instructor. IND.

THR 826. Seminar in African Theatre. 3 Hours.

A study of developments in African theatre in the 20th Century focusing on themes, concepts, styles, and critical perspectives. The course will investigate the idea of an "African theatre" and identify different periods and movements within national and international contexts. The analysis of representative works and authors will be grounded within appropriate theoretical frameworks. LEC.

THR 828. Seminar in American Theatre and Drama. 3 Hours.

Intensive investigation of selected topics. Individual study emphasized. LEC.

THR 898. Investigation and Conference (for Master's Students). 1-8 Hours.

Directed research and experimentation in theatre. Limited to eight hours credit toward the Master's degree. RSH.

THR 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

THE.

THR 901. Theatre Seminar in: _____. 3 Hours.

A graduate seminar devoted to selected historical, theoretical, or critical issues in theatre. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

THR 914. Theories of Race and Performance. 3 Hours.

Theories of Race and Performance is an inter-textual graduate course that explores interdisciplinary scholarship on race and performance. It seeks to translate these theories into practical application in various visual, audio and performance texts in popular culture. The course is divided into modules aimed at gaining an understanding of the shifting meaning of race over time and its relationship to ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, nation, and power. How do we perform our identities? How is race constructed and maintained through performance? To begin to answer these questions, we will examine the ways in which racial identities are created through performance. SEM.

THR 915. Modern Theatre and Drama. 3 Hours.

A study of the movements in playwriting and theatrical production in Europe and America from the mid-19th century to World War II. Prerequisite: THR 525 and THR 526 or comparable courses. LEC.

THR 916. Postmodern Theatre and Drama. 3 Hours.

A study of developments in Europe and American playwriting, directing, acting, and design from World War II to the present. SEM.

THR 917. Dramatic Theory I. 3 Hours.

A survey of dramatic theory from Plato to Lessing. LEC.

THR 918. Dramatic Theory II. 3 Hours.

A survey of dramatic theory from Lessing to Langer. LEC.

THR 919. Dramatic Theory Seminar. 3 Hours.

Study in depth of selected theorists. Offered as determined by faculty availability and student interest. LEC.

THR 920. Practicum in Criticism. 3 Hours.

Contemporary approaches to theatre and drama criticism. Emphasis on actual practice, using a variety of critical methods. FLD.

THR 922. Theatre Historiography. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the advanced study of research methods, subjects, interpretative paradigms, theoretical frameworks, and philosophies of history employed in contemporary approaches to writing and teaching theatre history. Prerequisite: THR 525 and THR 526 or equivalent. LEC.

THR 998. Investigation and Conference (for Doctoral Students). 1-8 Hours.

RSH.

THR 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

THE.

Visual Art Courses

ADSC 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Advanced Design Studies College. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

ADSC 560. Topics in Design: _____. 1-3 Hours.

A study of different topics in different semesters in a special area of interest to a staff member and suitable qualified students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Junior standing in department. LAB.

ADSC 580. Special Problems in Design. 1-6 Hours.

A study of current problems in design or crafts with an emphasis on research. Special problems proposals must be discussed with and approved by the instructor and advisor prior to enrollment in the course. A student may not take more than six credit hours of special problems in any one semester. Prerequisite: Junior standing in department. IND.

ADSC 810. Orientation Seminar. 1 Hour.

Studies directed to development of a thesis plan. Required of all graduate students. Offered in fall semester only. Graded S or F. LEC.

Visual Art Courses

ART 101. Drawing I. 3 Hours GE3H.

Basic problems in drawing. LAB.

ART 102. Drawing II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of ART 101. Prerequisite: ART 101. LAB.

ART 103. Art Concepts and Practice. 3 Hours U.

A companion course to ART 104. Lecture and studio experiences across disciplines emphasizing conceptual fundamentals, technical/skill development, visual sensibility, critical thinking and professional topics in art. LEC.

ART 104. Art Principles and Practice. 3 Hours U.

A companion course to ART 103. Lecture and studio experiences across disciplines emphasizing conceptual fundamentals, technical/skill development, visual sensibility, critical thinking and professional topics in art. LEC.

ART 105. Visual Art Seminar. 1 Hour.

An introduction to campus and community resources for students interested in Visual Arts. Resources in the Department, the University and the larger community will be discussed and explored. LEC.

ART 120. Fundamentals of Drawing and Painting. 3 Hours.

Open to all university students. Specifically for students with limited or no previous experience. An exploration of basic technical and expressive possibilities in drawing and painting; may include field trips, films, visiting lecturers. Six hours scheduled studio activity and three hours outside work weekly. LAB.

ART 121. Fundamentals of Printmaking. 3 Hours.

Open to all university students. Specifically for students with limited or no previous experience. An exploration of basic technical and expressive possibilities in printmaking, including woodcut, etching, lithography and silk screen; may include field trips, films, visiting lecturers. Six hours scheduled studio activity and three hours outside work weekly.. LAB.

ART 122. Fundamentals of Sculpture. 3 Hours.

Open to all university students. Specifically for students with limited or no previous experience. An exploration of basic technical and expressive possibilities in three-dimensional form and space, including sculpture, modeling, carving, and construction; may include field trips, films, visiting lecturers. Six hours scheduled studio activity and three hours outside work weekly. LAB.

ART 123. Fundamentals of Expanded Media. 3 Hours GE3H / U.

Open to all university students. Specifically for students with limited or no previous experience. An exploration of basic technical and expressive possibilities in Expanded Media, including Installation, Performance, Video and other Digital technologies; may include field trips, films, and/or visiting lecturers. Six hours scheduled studio activity and three hours outside work weekly. LAB.

ART 130. Fundamentals of Fiber Forms. 3 Hours U.

Open to all university students. Studio exploration of fibers as an art form and means of personal expression. Emphasis is placed on three-dimensional objects. A variety of interlacement, construction, and dye techniques are introduced. LAB.

ART 131. Fundamentals of Ceramics. 3 Hours.

Open to all university students. Specifically for students with limited or no previous experience. An introduction to ceramics including throwing, handbuilding, glazing, firing, and related activities. LAB.

ART 132. Fundamentals of Metalsmithing/Jewelry. 3 Hours GE3H.

Open to all university students. Specifically for students with limited or no previous experience. A comprehensive study of the field of jewelry and metalsmithing with an emphasis on the tools, processes, and techniques used in the design and fabrication of objects from metals such as aluminum, brass, copper, bronze, sterling and related materials. Studio experience will include lectures, slide presentations, demonstrations, visiting artist, and student projects. LAB.

ART 133. Fundamentals of Fibers. 3 Hours GE3H / U.

Open to all university students. Studio exploration of fibers as an art form and means of personal expression. A variety of dyeing, construction, and surface embellishment techniques will be introduced. LAB.

ART 177. First Year Seminar: ______. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Art. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

ART 201. Color Theory. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the basic color theories and their application. Presentation of the relationship between pigment and light, and of additive and subtractive color mixing. Prerequisite: ART 101, and ART 103 or ART 104. LAB.

ART 300. Special Topics in Visual Art: _____. 3 Hours.

Course to be offered in related areas of research, mixed media or interdisciplinary exploration. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; or permission of instructor. LAB.

ART 305. Visual Language. 3 Hours H.

This course explores visual language and its relationship to cultural meaning. We examine the ways that cultural experience both influences and is influenced by artistic expression. An investigation of artistic practice and its basic elements and principles is used to demonstrate the connections between visual perception and the interpretation of visual experience. Examples from the arts and popular culture are used to illustrate the ways that we create meaning from the things we see. This course is open to all university students. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and ENGL 102 or equivalent, or completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirements (Goal 2.1). LEC.

ART 310. Build Smart. 3 Hours U.

Introduction to the experience and culture of building projects by hand. Students analyze and determine the best ways to build. Students also become familiar with tools, machines, building practices and material necessary for wood and steel fabrication. Prerequisite: ART 103, ART 104, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

ART 375. Directed Readings in Visual Art. 1-3 Hours U.

Directed reading in specific areas of visual art. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103 and ART 104; and six hours of Visual Art courses, or permission of instructor. IND.

ART 395. Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-6 Hours H.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Visual Art. Credit for course work must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Open to all students. LEC.

ART 500. Advanced Special Topics in Visual Art: _____. 3 Hours.

Course to be offered in related areas of research, mixed media or interdisciplinary exploration. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Visual Art courses, or permission of instructor. LAB.

ART 540. Professional Activities Seminar. 3 Hours.

Comprehensive development of skills and strategies needed to pursue a career as a professional studio artist. Prerequisite: Twenty-four hours of departmental electives or permission of instructor. LEC.

ART 575. Advanced Directed Reading in Visual Art. 1-3 Hours.

Directed reading in specific areas of visual art. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Visual Art courses, or permission of instructor. IND.

ART 590. Internship in Visual Art. 1-3 Hours U.

Practical experience in the use of artistic skills in approved and supervised academic or professional settings. May be repeated for credit; no more than six hours may be applied to the B.A. or B.F.A. degree. Credit hours are graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, according to the written recommendation provided by the internship supervisor to the faculty advisor. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and fifteen hours of Visual Art courses; and prerequisite of instructor. INT.

ART 595. Advanced Study Abroad Topics in: _____. 1-6 Hours H.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in Visual Art at the senior/graduate level. Credit for course work must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Open to seniors and graduate level students. LEC.

ART 598. Special Topics: Studio Theory and Criticism. 3 Hours.

Lecture, discussion, and supervised research in current topics related to contemporary studio theory and criticism. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. This course will be counted as free electives in course distribution. Prerequisite: Eighteen hours of departmental electives. LEC.

ART 599. Individual Studies in Visual Art. 1-6 Hours AE61.

Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours may apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Visual Art courses; and permission of instructor. Does not fulfill ART 695/ART 696 requirement. IND.

ART 650. Senior Seminar I. 3 Hours H.

This course explores issues and themes in creative practice while critically examining works of visual art and culture; capstone experience. Concurrent enrollment in at least one upper level Visual Art studio course is required. Typically taken during a student's final two semesters. Prerequisite: 30 hours of departmental electives and instructor permission. Corequisite: Any 300 level or above Visual Art studio course. SEM.

ART 660. Senior Seminar II. 3 Hours AE61 / H.

Continuation of ART 650; capstone experience. Participation in BFA exhibition required. Concurrent enrollment in at least one upper level Visual Art studio course is required. Prerequisite: ART 650 and instructor permission. Corequisite: Any 300 level or above Visual Art studio course. LEC.

ART 695. Directed Study I. 3 Hours.

Individual studio activity under direction of faculty advisor; capstone experience. Prerequisite: Thirty hours of departmental electives, consent of department, and permission of instructor. IND.

ART 696. Directed Study II. 3 Hours AE61.

Continuation of ART 695; capstone experience. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: ART 695. IND.

ART 801. Directed Study III. 2-5 Hours.

Individual studio activity under the direction of faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate director and enrollment in the Visual Art MFA program. RSH.

ART 802. Directed Study IV. 2-5 Hours.

Continuation of Directed Study III. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Visual Art MFA Program. RSH.

ART 803. Directed Study V. 2-5 Hours.

Continuation of Directed Study IV. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Visual Art MFA Program. RSH.

ART 805. Graduate Studio. 1-3 Hours.

Individual graduate studio research in visual art. Course content to be determined by the student under the supervision of a graduate faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in The School of The Arts and permission of the instructor. RSH.

ART 861. Directed Reading in Visual Art. 1-3 Hours.

Research reading and presentation of reports on specific subjects related to the student's major area of specialization. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the MFA Program in the Department of Visual Art. RSH.

ART 877. Graduate Seminar. 3 Hours.

The graduate seminar emphasizes professional preparation for contemporary artists focusing on writing skills, oral presentations, critiques of individual creative research/artwork, critical thinking about and visual analysis of current art forms and contemporary approaches to the teaching of studio art. Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Program in Visual Art. SEM.

ART 898. Special Topics: Studio Theory and Criticism. 3 Hours.

Lecture, discussion, and supervised research in current topics related to contemporary studio theory and criticism. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. This course will be counted as a graduate level academic elective in course and credit distribution. LEC.

ART 899. Graduate Seminar. 1 Hour.

Weekly discussion of issues and/or work in art. (Graded on a satisfactory/or F basis.) Repeat for credit in subsequent semesters. SEM.

ART 906. Graduate Studio. 1-3 Hours.

Individual graduate studio research in visual art. Course content to be determined by the student under the supervision of a graduate faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 805 and permission of the instructor. RSH.

ART 950. Thesis in Visual Art. 1-6 Hours.

Original research in visual art culminating in a thesis exhibition. May be repeat for credit. Prerequisite: Thirty-six credit hours of graduate credit and permission of the graduate review committee. THE.

Visual Art Courses

CER 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Ceramics. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

CER 208. Ceramics I. 3 Hours.

The development of form and surface through the use of handbuilding and wheel thrown techniques. Stoneware and Raku are explored. Prerequisite: ART 102 and ART 104. LAB.

CER 300. Special Topics in Ceramics: _____. 1-4 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; or permission of instructor. LEC.

CER 301. Concepts and Methods: Wheel Throwing. 3 Hours.

Intermediate ceramics course focusing on the potters' wheel as a tool. Coursework focuses on throwing skills and three-dimensional design concepts related to the functional ceramic vessel, wheel thrown sculpture, and creative problem-solving. Technical information supports an understanding of forming, surface development, glazing, and firing. Prerequisite: ART 131 or CER 208. LAB.

CER 302. Concepts & Methods: Hand Building. 3 Hours.

Intermediate ceramics course using hand-building techniques and processes supported by design and idea development. Techniques will include press molding, slab construction and coil-building, color and surface development through glazing and firing. Emphasis is placed on creative expression and communication of personal ideas. Prerequisite: ART 131 or CER 208. LAB.

CER 402. Mold Making and Slip Casting. 3 Hours.

Intermediate ceramics course focusing on the production of plaster molds and the slipcasting process. Students will make molds and prototypes, produce porcelain casting slip, and develop strategies in casting as well as consider the use of the slipcasting technique as a conceptual tool. Undergraduate students who wish to take this for a second/continuing semester should enroll in CER 502. Prerequisite: ART 131 or CER 208. LAB.

CER 403. Advanced Topics in Ceramics. 3 Hours.

Advanced ceramics course using traditional and non-traditional approaches to ceramic art-making. Topics may include: wood firing, ephemeral art, large-scale sculpture, and/or digital technologies. This course can be repeated if topic varies. If same topic is repeated, students should enroll in CER 503. Prerequisite: CER 301 or CER 302 or permission of instructor. LAB.

CER 500. Advanced Special Topics Ceramics: _____. 1-4 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of specific interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Ceramics courses, or permission of instructor. LEC.

CER 502. Advanced Mold Making and Slip Casting. 3 Hours.

Advanced ceramics course focusing on the production of plaster molds and the slipcasting process. Students will make molds and prototypes, produce porcelain casting slip, and develop strategies in casting as well as consider the use of the slip-casting technique as a conceptual tool. Prerequisite: ART 131 or CER 208, and CER 402. Graduate students may enroll without prerequisites by instructor permission. LAB.

CER 503. Advanced Topics in Ceramics. 3 Hours.

Advanced ceramics course using traditional and non-traditional approaches to ceramic art-making. Topics may include: wood firing, ephemeral art, large-scale sculpture, and/or digital technologies. This course is intended as a continuation for a specific topic course in CER 403. Graduate students should enroll in CER 503 with no prerequisite required. Prerequisite: CER 301 or CER 302, CER 403, or permission of instructor. LAB.

CER 504. Kilns. 3 Hours.

The principles in kiln design, including up-draft, down-draft, cross-draft, and electric kilns, and burner technology. Prerequisite: CER 301. LEC.

CER 505. Clay and Glaze Formulation. 3 Hours.

Formulation of the various clay bodies and glazes associated with ceramics. Prerequisite: CER 301. LEC.

CER 506. Production. 6 Hours.

Procedures, techniques, problems, and solutions for setting up and operating a production pottery studio, including the development of ceramic forms and glazes related to marketability and design and mold production for industry. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: CER 301 and CER 302. LAB.

CER 510. History of Ceramics. 3 Hours.

This course examines historical ceramics across the globe. Emphasis will be placed on the development and transmission of design, materials, and technique across various traditions. This course number is intended for undergraduate students. Graduate students should enroll in CER 710 History of Ceramics. Prerequisite: CER 131 or CER 208, or permission of instructor. LEC.

CER 515. Advanced Ceramics I. 3-6 Hours AE61.

Development of individual direction in ceramics based on experience, research, and skills acquired in previous courses; capstone experience. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: CER 301 and CER 402. LAB.

CER 520. Advanced Ceramics II. 3-6 Hours AE61 / U.

Continuation of CER 515; capstone experience. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: CER 515. LAB.

CER 590. Internship in Ceramics. 1-3 Hours U.

Practical experience in the use of artistic skills in approved and supervised academic or professional settings. May be repeated for credit; no more than six hours may be applied to the B.A. or B.F.A. degree. Credit hours are graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, according to the written recommendation provided by the internship supervisor to the faculty advisor. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and fifteen hours of Visual Art courses; and permission of instructor. INT.

CER 599. Individual Studies in Ceramics. 1-6 Hours AE61 / U.

Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours may apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Ceramics courses or permission of instructor. IND.

CER 710. History of Ceramics. 3 Hours.

This course examines historical ceramics across the globe. Emphasis will be placed on the development and transmission of design, materials, and technique across various traditions. This course is for Graduate students. Undergraduate students should enroll in CER 510 History of Ceramics. LEC.

CER 715. Ceramics. 2-6 Hours.

Individual research. Prerequisite: CER 515 or equivalent. RSH.

CER 725. Glass. 2-6 Hours.

Individual research. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. RSH.

CER 815. Ceramics. 2-6 Hours.

Continuation of CER 805. RSH.

CER 825. Glass. 2-6 Hours.

Individual research. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. RSH.

Visual Art Courses

DRWG 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Drawing. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

DRWG 203. Drawing III. 3 Hours.

Advanced problems in drawing. Prerequisite: ART 102. LAB.

DRWG 213. Life Drawing I. 3 Hours.

Figure drawing. Prerequisite: ART 102 and ART 103 or ART 104. LAB.

DRWG 300. Special Topics in Drawing: _____. 3 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; or permission of instructor. LAB.

DRWG 304. Drawing IV. 3 Hours.

Continuation of DRWG 203. Prerequisite: DRWG 203. LAB.

DRWG 314. Life Drawing II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of DRWG 213. Prerequisite: DRWG 213. LAB.

DRWG 318. Life Drawing II, Honors. 3 Hours.

Figure drawing, a continuation of DRWG 213. Prerequisite: DRWG 213; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

DRWG 335. Special Topics in Drawing: _____. 3 Hours.

Course to be offered in area of special interest to individual faculty, and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: DRWG 203, or DRWG 213, or permission of instructor. LAB.

DRWG 500. Advanced Special Topics in Drawing: _____. 3 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Drawing courses, or permission of instructor. LAB.

DRWG 505. Drawing V. 3 Hours.

Continuation of DRWG 304. Prerequisite: DRWG 304. LAB.

DRWG 506. Drawing VI. 3 Hours.

Continuation of DRWG 505. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: DRWG 505. LAB.

DRWG 515. Life Drawing III. 3 Hours.

Continuation of DRWG 314. Prerequisite: DRWG 314. LAB.

DRWG 516. Life Drawing IV. 3 Hours.

Continuation of DRWG 515. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: DRWG 515. LAB.

DRWG 518. Life Drawing III, Honors. 3 Hours.

Figure drawing, a continuation of DRWG 314 or DRWG 318. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: DRWG 314 or DRWG 318; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

DRWG 519. Life Drawing IV, Honors. 3 Hours.

Figure drawing, a continuation of DRWG 515 or DRWG 518. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: DRWG 515 or DRWG 518; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

DRWG 535. Special Topics in Drawing: _____. 3 Hours.

Course to be offered in area of special interest to individual faculty, and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 12 hours of drawing and permission of instructor. LAB.

DRWG 599. Individual Studies in Drawing. 1-6 Hours AE61 / U.

Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours may apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Drawing courses, or permission of instructor. IND.

DRWG 807. Drawing VII. 3 Hours.

Individual research in drawing. Prerequisite: DRWG 506. RSH.

DRWG 817. Life Drawing V. 3 Hours.

Individual research in figure drawing. Prerequisite: DRWG 516. RSH.

DRWG 908. Drawing VIII. 3 Hours.

Continuation of DRWG 807. Prerequisite: DRWG 807. RSH.

DRWG 918. Life Drawing VI. 3 Hours.

Continuation of DRWG 817. Prerequisite: DRWG 817. RSH.

Visual Art Courses

EXM 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Expanded Media. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

EXM 274. Expanded Media. 3 Hours U.

Beginning course to introduce the fundamental concepts, strategies, and technologies that comprise the Expanded Media area of the Department of Visual Art: Installation, Performance, and Digital Image. Emphasis is placed on forming ideas and strategies, and creating artwork that considers the core connections within Expanded Media: time, space, the body, the viewer, and society at large. Computer-based technologies and time-based media that are inherent to Expanded Media practice support studio assignments. Coursework includes the investigation and discussion of historic precedents and the development of an appropriate critical dialogue with which to discuss their work. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104. LAB.

EXM 300. Special Topics in Expanded Media: _____. 3 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; or permission of instructor. LAB.

EXM 301. The Digital Image I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to various still digital processes and skills that encourage the use of digital imagery within a variety of other media. Focus on content issues as they relate to development of artwork incorporating digital imagery. LAB.

EXM 302. Performance Art I. 3 Hours U.

An introduction to the understanding and production of performance art. Students gain proficiency in conceptualization and production of performance time-based art in an Interdisciplinary art-making environment. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104. LAB.

EXM 303. Intermedia I. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the use/handling and integration of diverse, new and traditional materials, techniques and processes. Problems will involve strategies for discovering and managing combinations of drawn, painted, digital and constructed forms. Studio sessions will include research, lecture, demos, and guest speakers. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB.

EXM 307. Installation Art I. 3 Hours U.

An introduction to the understanding and production of installed art environments using a variety of media and approaches to art-making. Students gain proficiency in conceptualization and production of installation art in an interdisciplinary art-making environment. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104. LAB.

EXM 314. Alternative Approaches in Photography I. 3 Hours U.

An introduction to the understanding and production of art-making using alternative approaches in photography. Students gain proficiency in conceptualization and production of artwork using alternative approaches in photography in an interdisciplinary art-making environment. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104. LAB.

EXM 326. Video and Time-Based Media I. 3 Hours U.

An introduction to the understanding and production of video and time-based art. Students gain proficiency in conceptualization and production of video and time-based art in an interdisciplinary art-making environment. Prerequisite: EXM 274. LAB.

EXM 500. Advanced Special Topics in Expanded Media: ______. 3 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; or permission of instructor. LAB.

EXM 501. The Digital Image II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of EXM 301, The Digital Image I. May be repeated for credit. LAB.

EXM 503. Intermedia II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of EXM 303, Intermedia I. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB.

EXM 514. Alternative Approaches in Photography II. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of EXM 314. Prerequisite: EXM 314. LAB.

EXM 526. Video and Time-Based Media II. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of EXM 326. Prerequisite: EXM 326. LAB.

EXM 535. Intermediate Expanded Media. 3 Hours.

Continuation of Expanded Media studio research. Prerequisite: Two (200-and/or 300-level) Expanded Media courses. LAB.

EXM 536. Intermediate Expanded Media, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of Expanded Media studio research. Prerequisite: Two (200- and/or 300-level) Expanded Media courses; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade point average with permission of the department. LAB.

EXM 537. Advanced Expanded Media. 3 Hours.

Continuation of EXM 535. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: EXM 535 or EXM 536. LAB.

EXM 538. Advanced Expanded Media, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of EXM 536. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: EXM 535 or EXM 536; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade point average with permission of the department. LAB.

EXM 541. Graduate Performance Art. 3 Hours.

Students will gain proficiency in conceptualization and production of performance time-based art in an interdisciplinary art-making environment. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB.

EXM 542. Graduate Installation Art. 3 Hours.

Advanced problems toward the creation of environments using a variety of media including traditional and non-traditional approaches to art-making. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB.

EXM 543. Graduate: The Digital Image. 3 Hours.

Advanced work focusing on content issues as they relate to development of artwork incorporating digital imagery. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB.

EXM 545. Graduate Intermedia. 3 Hours.

Advanced work in the use/handling and integration of diverse, new and traditional materials, techniques and processes. Advanced problems will involve strategies for discovering and managing combinations of drawn, painted, digital, and constructed forms. Studio sessions will include research, lecture, demos, and quest speakers. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB.

EXM 546. Graduate Expanded Media V. 3 Hours.

Continuation of Expanded Media studio research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB.

EXM 573. Performance Art II. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of EXM 302. Prerequisite: EXM 302. LAB.

EXM 574. Performance Art II, Honors. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of EXM 302. Prerequisite: EXM 302; and membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade point average with permission of the department. LAB.

EXM 577. Installation Art II. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of EXM 307. Prerequisite: EXM 307. LAB.

EXM 578. Installation Art II, Honors. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of EXM 307. Prerequisite: EXM 307; and membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade point average with permission of the department. LAB.

EXM 599. Individual Studies in Expanded Media. 1-6 Hours AE61 / U.

Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours may apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Expanded Media courses, of permission of instructor. IND.

EXM 846. Graduate Expanded Media VI. 3 Hours.

Continuation of Expanded Media studio research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB.

EXM 946. Graduate Expanded Media VII. 3 Hours.

Continuation of Expanded Media studio research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB.

Visual Art Courses

METL 177. First Year Seminar: ______. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Metalsmithing/Jewelry. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

METL 211. Jewelry. 3 Hours GE3S.

Introduction to metalsmithing and jewelry design, materials and processes. Student projects explore the joining, forming, and surface embellishment of metals such as copper, brass, bronze, and sterling. Prerequisite: ART 102 and ART 104. LAB.

METL 300. Special Topics in Metalsmithing: _____. 3 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; or permission of instructor. LAB.

METL 301. Introduction to Casting for Jewelry. 3 Hours.

Introduction to casting and mold making processes used for jewelry and small sculpture. Students explore various methods and materials for creating models for casting in bronze or silver including wax carving, wax modeling, and the use of natural and synthetic materials as models. Models are cast using centrifugal and vacuum casting processes. Basic mold making in clay and silicone are also explored. Prerequisite: ART 132 or METL 211. LAB.

METL 302. Professional Practices. 3 Hours.

The development of a portfolio including designing, rendering, and model making for future projects. Photographing completed objects and discussing professional aspects of the jewelry/metalsmithing field. Prerequisite: Six hours of metalsmithing. LAB.

METL 360. Holloware. 3 Hours.

Problems related to specific smithing techniques such as raising, stretching, shell structures and seam fabrications. Metal manipulation on a large scale. Prerequisite: METL 301. LAB.

METL 362. Metalsmithing. 3-6 Hours H.

Advanced metalworking with an emphasis on the refinement of design and techniques. Processes may include linkage, marriage of metals, metal inlays, hinge and catch fabrication. Prerequisite: METL 301. LAB.

METL 364. Enameling. 3-6 Hours.

Problems of basic and advanced enameling as applied to jewelry design and metalsmithing objects. Exploration of major enameling techniques: such as limoges, cloissone, champleve, and bassetaille. Prerequisite: Six hours of metalsmithing or consent of instructor. LAB.

METL 500. Advanced Special Topics in Metalsmithing: _____. 3 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; or permission of instructor. LAB.

METL 501. Seminar. 3 Hours.

Lectures and demonstrations on techniques of contemporary interest outside of typical classroom activity. Prerequisite: Six hours of metalsmithing. LEC.

METL 503. Gemology. 3 Hours H.

Students study the optical and physical characteristics of gemstones in order to identify them using gemological instruments. This laboratory and discussion class explores related topics including the principles of optics that support this methodology, history and geographical distribution of gemstones, gemstone cutting and pearl farming, the history of DeBeers and the development of the world demand for diamond, quality analysis of diamond, colored gemstones and pearls, including the history of diamond grading, the development and identification of synthetics, imitations and laboratory enhancements as well as the use of gemstones in designing jewelry. Prerequisite: ART 132. LAB.

METL 504. A History of Jewelry. 3 Hours H.

This course explores the history from Sumeria to the 21st century of the use of metals and gemstones in the creation of decorative art for personal adornment. Students explore the evolution of the role of jewelry in ancient culture and modern society and survey individuals whose ideas and work influenced generations of goldsmiths and jewelers around the globe. The class studies primitive tools and modern manufacturing techniques, the history of gemstone cutting and setting and the origin and development of gemstones as symbols. Prerequisite: ART 132. LEC.

METL 505. Digital Jewelry Design I. 3 Hours H.

Matrix is a 3-D CAD program based on Rhino developed by Rhino, specifically for jewelry design. The goal of this course is to instruct beginners in the Matrix design program. Students learn to transform their 2-D designs from their sketchbooks into 3-D models in Matrix, which can be milled in wax, and cast in metal. Students also learn how to render their 3-D Matrix models to appear as if they were a finished object. The class time is structured as a combination of instructor-led tutorials and working labs. Prerequisite: ART 132. LAB.

METL 506. Digital Jewelry Design II. 3 Hours H.

The second semester of Matrix increases the operating and design skills building on the knowledge of DG I. The focus of the class is producing wax models on the Revo Digital Mill.Digi II covers the advanced modeling skills including T-spline and Rhino. Students also learn how to make a customized tool path for Revo C mill program and how to solve milling problems. Students also learn how to convert Rhino files to produce a 3D print for outsourcing to other 3D modeling programs. Prerequisite: ART 132, METL 301, METL 505. LAB.

METL 515. Advanced Metals I. 3-6 Hours AE61 / H.

Emphasis on individual design aesthetic through intensive designing, rendering, and modelmaking as preparation for fabricated pieces of jewelry, holloware, and/or small objects; capstone experience. Prerequisite: METL 362. LAB.

METL 520. Advanced Metals II. 3-6 Hours AE61 / U.

Continuation of METL 515; capstone experience. This course requires a final presentation of a complete portfolio including resume, renderings and photographs of the finished work. Prerequisite: METL 515. LAB.

METL 590. Internship in Metalsmithing/Jewelry. 1-3 Hours U.

Practical experience in the use of artistic skills in approved and supervised academic or professional settings. May be repeated for credit; no more than six hours may be applied to the B.A. or B.F.A. degree. Credit hours are graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, according to the written recommendation provided by the internship supervisor to the faculty advisor. Prerequisite: ART 102, and ART 103, and ART 104; and fifteen hours of Visual Art Courses; and permission of instructor. FLD.

METL 599. Individual Studies in Metalsmithing/Jewelry. 1-6 Hours AE61 / U.

Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours may apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Metalsmithing/Jewelry courses, or permission of instructor. IND.

METL 715. Metals/Jewelry. 2-6 Hours.

Individual research. Prerequisite: METL 515 or equivalent. RSH.

METL 815. Metals/Jewelry. 2-6 Hours.

Continuation of METL 715. RSH.

Visual Art Courses

PNTG 177. First Year Seminar: ______. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Painting. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

PNTG 263. Painting I. 3 Hours.

Basic problems in painting. Prerequisite: ART 102, and ART 103 or ART 104. LAB.

PNTG 300. Special Topics in Painting: _____. 3 Hours.

Course to be offered in area of studio activity of specific interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; or permission of instructor. LAB.

PNTG 337. Watercolor. 3 Hours.

Sessions deal with the preparation of watercolor paints and equipment, but the main emphasis is placed on relational concepts affecting tone, structure, and unity in work. While the students are expected to explore some of the traditional approaches to watercolor, they also are encouraged to work with new and innovative ones. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PNTG 263 or permission of instructor. LAB.

PNTG 338. Landscape Painting. 3 Hours.

An introduction to landscape painting. Considerable work is done out-of-doors. Emphasis is placed upon experiencing the environment and the development of individual approach. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PNTG 263 and permission of instructor. LAB.

PNTG 364. Painting II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 263. Prerequisite: PNTG 263. LAB.

PNTG 368. Painting II, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 263. Prerequisite: PNTG 263; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

PNTG 500. Advanced Special Topics in Painting: _____. 3 Hours.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Painting courses, or permission of instructor. LAB.

PNTG 565. Painting III. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 364. Prerequisite: PNTG 364. LAB.

PNTG 566. Painting IV. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 565. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PNTG 565. LAB.

PNTG 567. Painting III, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 364 or PNTG 368. Prerequisite: PNTG 364 or PNTG 368; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

PNTG 569. Painting IV, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 565 or PNTG 568. Prerequisite: PNTG 565 or PNTG 568; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

PNTG 585. The Figure I. 3 Hours.

The figure and its environment in various media. Prerequisite: DRWG 314 and PNTG 364. LAB.

PNTG 586. The Figure II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 585. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PNTG 585. LAB.

PNTG 588. The Figure I, Honors. 3 Hours.

The figure and its environment in various media. Prerequisite: DRWG 314 or DRWG 318 and PNTG 364 and PNTG 368; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

PNTG 589. The Figure II, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 585 or PNTG 588. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PNTG 585 or PNTG 588; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

PNTG 599. Individual Studies in Painting. 1-6 Hours AE61 / U.

Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours may apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Painting courses, or permission of instructor. IND.

PNTG 667. Painting V. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 566. Prerequisite: PNTG 566. LAB.

PNTG 668. Painting VI. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 667. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: PNTG 667. LAB.

PNTG 687. The Figure III. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 586. Prerequisite: PNTG 586. LAB.

PNTG 688. The Figure IV. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 687. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PNTG 687. LAB.

PNTG 869. Painting VII. 3 Hours.

Individual research in painting. Prerequisite: PNTG 668. RSH.

PNTG 889. The Figure V. 3 Hours.

Individual research in the figure and its environment in various media. Prerequisite: PNTG 688. RSH.

PNTG 970. Painting VIII. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 869. Prerequisite: PNTG 869. RSH.

PNTG 990. The Figure VI. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PNTG 889. Prerequisite: PNTG 889. RSH.

Visual Art Courses

PRNT 177. First Year Seminar: ______. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Printmaking. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

PRNT 223. Intaglio I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to intaglio. Prerequisite: ART 102, and ART 103 or ART 104. LAB.

PRNT 224. Relief I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to relief printing. Prerequisite: ART 102, and ART 103 or ART 104. LAB.

PRNT 233. Lithography I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to lithography. Prerequisite: ART 102, and ART 103 or ART 104. LAB.

PRNT 243. Serigraphy I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to serigraphy. Prerequisite: ART 102, and ART 103 or ART 104. LAB.

PRNT 300. Special Topics in Printmaking: _____. 3 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART102, ART 103, and ART 104; or permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 324. Intaglio II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PRNT 223. Prerequisite: PRNT 223, or permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 325. Relief II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PRNT 224. Prerequisite: PRNT 224, or permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 328. Intaglio II, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PRNT 223. Prerequisite: PRNT 223; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

PRNT 329. Relief II, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PRNT 224. Prerequisite: PRNT 224; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

PRNT 334. Lithography II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PRNT 233. Prerequisite: PRNT 233 or permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 338. Lithography II, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PRNT 233. Prerequisite: PRNT 233; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

PRNT 344. Serigraphy II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PRNT 243. Prerequisite: PRNT 243 or permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 348. Special Problems in Printmaking--Color Printing in Relief and Intaglio. 3 Hours.

Multiple block and plate printing in color. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) Prerequisite: PRNT 223 and permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 349. Serigraphy II, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PRNT 243. Prerequisite: PRNT 243; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

PRNT 500. Advanced Special Topics in Printmaking: _____. 3 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Printmaking courses, or permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 523. Printmaking III A (Intaglio). 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PRNT 324 or permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 524. Printmaking III B (Lithography). 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PRNT 334 or permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 525. Printmaking III C (Serigraphy). 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PRNT 344 or permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 526. Printmaking IV A (Intaglio). 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PRNT 523 or permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 527. Printmaking IV B (Lithography). 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PRNT 524 or permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 528. Printmaking IV C (Serigraphy). 3 Hours.

Prerequisite: PRNT 525 or permission of instructor. LAB.

PRNT 599. Individual Studies in Printmaking. 1-6 Hours AE61 / U.

Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours may apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Printmaking courses, or permission of instructor. IND.

PRNT 662. Printmaking V. 3 Hours.

Individual research in printmaking. Prerequisite: PRNT 526 or PRNT 527 or PRNT 528. LAB.

PRNT 663. Printmaking VI. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PRNT 662. Prerequisite: PRNT 662. LAB.

PRNT 802. Special Problems in Printmaking. 3 Hours.

Individual research in printmaking: course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: PRNT 579 and permission of instructor. RSH.

PRNT 827. Printmaking VII. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PRNT 663. Prerequisite: PRNT 663. LAB.

PRNT 903. Special Problems in Printmaking. 3 Hours.

Individual research in printmaking: course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: PRNT 802 and permission of instructor. RSH.

PRNT 928. Printmaking VIII. 3 Hours.

Continuation of PRNT 827. Prerequisite: PRNT 827. LAB.

Visual Art Courses

SCUL 177. First Year Seminar: ______. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Sculpture. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

SCUL 253. Sculpture I. 3 Hours.

Introduction to sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104, or permission of instructor. LAB.

SCUL 300. Special Topics in Sculpture: _____. 3 Hours.

Course to be offered in an area of studio activity of specific interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104, or permission of instructor. LAB.

SCUL 330. Sculpture Intercepting the Waste Stream. 3 Hours N.

An introductory course using engaged learning to exploring the genre of ecological art practice (eco-art.) Class focuses on the waste stream particularly as it affects the Kansas River. Through remediation events, students build works of art from trash, in turn auctioned for environmental efforts. Creative attention is focused on ecological imbalance. Prerequisite: Visual Art major or minor, or instructor permission. LAB.

SCUL 349. Metal and Glass Casting. 3 Hours.

A course in foundry techniques as related to sculpture. Both traditional and experimental procedures for casting bronze, aluminum, and iron sculpture are explored. This course is taught at the 300 and 500 levels, with additional assignments at the 500 level. LAB.

SCUL 350. Direct Metal Fabrication. 3 Hours.

The course will present a variety of techniques for fabricating metal sculpture. Oxyacetylene and electric arc welding processes will be included. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: SCUL 253. LAB.

SCUL 353. The Figure 3D: Modeling and Molding. 3 Hours H.

Sculpting a figure is radically different form drawing one! You will develop a more comprehensive understanding of the human form while creating art addressing contemporary aesthetic concerns. Prerequisite: Visual Art major or minor, or instructor permission. LAB.

SCUL 354. Sculpture II. 3 Hours.

Continuation of SCUL 253. Prerequisite: SCUL 253. LAB.

SCUL 355. Sculpture III. 3 Hours.

Continuation of SCUL 354. Prerequisite: SCUL 354. LAB.

SCUL 356. Public Art. 3 Hours H.

Students in this class investigate the nature of contemporary public art as well as creating their own artworks. Public Art covers a wide spectrum of art making from interventions, to street art, to murals and on to monumental sculpture. This class also covers how to present for commissions, budgeting, and legal liability. Previous work created in this class has won national awards. Prerequisite: Visual Art major or minor, or instructor permission. LAB.

SCUL 358. Sculpture II, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of SCUL 253. Prerequisite: SCUL 253; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

SCUL 359. Sculpture III, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of SCUL 354 or SCUL 358. Prerequisite: SCUL 354 or SCUL 358; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

SCUL 360. Build Smart. 3 Hours H.

An introductory woodworking course that emphasizes planning, fabricating, and assembly techniques. Material handling and best practice building methods are introduced and reinforced through a series of individual woodworking projects that expose the student to the properties of wood, as well as, hand and machine woodworking tools. Significant out of class work required. Prerequisite: Visual Art major or minor, or instructor permission. LAB.

SCUL 362. Art and Ecology: Inhabiting the Ecosphere. 3 Hours N.

An introductory course exploring the genre of ecological art practice (eco-art) through a series of engaged learning projects that focus on habitat, the waste stream and natural resources, local ecologies and interventionist creative strategies that focus attention on ecological imbalance. Prerequisite: Visual Art major or minor, or instructor permission. LAB.

SCUL 500. Advanced Special Topics in Sculpture: _____. 3 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Sculpture courses, or permission of instructor. LAB.

SCUL 549. Metal and Glass Casting. 3 Hours U.

A course in foundry techniques as related to sculpture. Both traditional and experimental procedures for casting bronze, aluminum, and iron sculpture are explored. May be repeated for credit. This course is taught at the 300 and 500 levels, with additional assignments at the 500-level. Prerequisite: SCUL 253. LAB.

SCUL 556. Sculpture IV. 3 Hours.

Continuation of SCUL 355. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: SCUL 355. LAB.

SCUL 558. Sculpture IV, Honors. 3 Hours.

Continuation of SCUL 355 or SCUL 359. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: SCUL 355 or SCUL 359; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC.

SCUL 599. Individual Studies in Sculpture. 1-6 Hours AE61 / U.

Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours can apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Sculpture courses, or permission of instructor. IND.

SCUL 630. Sculpture Intercepting the Waste Stream. 3 Hours N.

An introductory course using engaged learning to exploring the genre of ecological art practice (eco-art.) Class focuses on the waste stream particularly as it affects the Kansas River. Through remediation events, students build works of art from trash, in turn auctioned for environmental efforts. Creative attention is focused on ecological imbalance. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. LAB.

SCUL 653. The Figure 3D: Modeling and Molding. 3 Hours H.

Sculpting a figure is radically different form drawing one! Students will develop a more comprehensive understanding of the human form while creating art addressing contemporary aesthetic concerns. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. LAB.

SCUL 656. Public Art. 3 Hours H.

Students in this class investigate the nature of contemporary public art as well as creating their own artworks. Public Art covers a wide spectrum of art making from interventions, to street art, to murals and on to monumental sculpture. This class also covers how to present for commissions, budgeting, and legal liability. Previous work created in this class has won national awards. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. LAB.

SCUL 657. Sculpture V. 3 Hours.

Continuation of SCUL 556. Prerequisite: SCUL 556. LAB.

SCUL 658. Sculpture VI. 3 Hours.

Continuation of SCUL 657. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: SCUL 657. LAB.

SCUL 660. Build Smart. 3 Hours H.

This course is an introductory woodworking course that emphasizes planning, fabricating, and assembly techniques. Material handling and best practice building methods are introduced and reinforced through a series of individual woodworking projects that expose the student to the properties of wood, as well as, hand and machine woodworking tools. Significant out of class work required. Non Visual Art students require permission number from Department. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. LAB.

SCUL 662. Art and Ecology: Inhabiting the Ecosphere. 3 Hours N.

An introductory course exploring the genre of ecological art practice (eco-art) through a series of engaged learning projects that focus on habitat, the waste stream and natural resources, local ecologies and interventionist creative strategies that focus attention on ecological imbalance. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. LAB.

SCUL 804. Special Problems in Sculpture. 3 Hours.

Individual research in sculpture: course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: SCUL 559 and permission of instructor. RSH.

SCUL 859. Sculpture VII. 3 Hours.

Individual research in sculpture. Prerequisite: SCUL 658. RSH.

SCUL 905. Special Problems in Sculpture. 3 Hours.

Individual research in sculpture: course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: SCUL 804 and permission of instructor. RSH.

SCUL 960. Sculpture VIII. 3 Hours.

Continuation of SCUL 859. Prerequisite: SCUL 859. RSH.

Visual Art Courses

TD 130. Introduction to Weaving. 3 Hours.

Specifically for students with limited or no previous experience. Application to art and design principles to four-harness loom structures. Emphasis on the use of color and texture in loom controlled and weaver controlled techniques. Counts only as a studio elective or general elective for a B.F.A. in Art or Design. LAB.

TD 133. Introduction to Fibers. 3 Hours.

Studio exploration of fibers as an art and design form. Techniques include dyeing, spinning yarn, soft sculpture, embellishment, crochet. Open to all university students. LAB.

TD 177. First Year Seminar: ______. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Textile Design. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

TD 300. Special Topics in Textiles/Fibers: _____. 3 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104, or permission of instructor. LAB.

TD 313. Fiber Forms. 3 Hours.

Studio exploration of fibers as an art form. Techniques include feltmaking, papermaking, basketry, and dyeing. Prerequisite: ART 101, and ART 130 or ART 133. LAB.

TD 314. Introduction to Weaving. 3 Hours U.

Application of art and design principles to four-harness loom structures. Emphasis on the use of color and texture in loom controlled and weaver controlled techniques. Prerequisite: ART 101, and ART 130 or ART 133. LAB.

TD 315. Textile Handprinting and Resist Processes. 3 Hours U.

Fundamentals of resist and dye techniques on textiles: batik, tie-dye, discharge, and direct application. Prerequisite: ART 101, and ART 130 or ART 133. LAB.

TD 316. Screenprinting Textiles. 3 Hours.

Design problems in textile printing with emphasis on screenprinting and photo techniques. Prerequisite: ART 101, and ART 130 or ART 133. LAB.

TD 401. Weave Structures. 3 Hours U.

Continuation of TD 314. Research and analysis of multiple-harness weave structures. Weave drafts. Design problems to develop the use of color, form, and surface in simple and compound weaves. Prerequisite: TD 314. LAB.

TD 402. Techniques in Weaving. 3 Hours U.

Development of individual art and design concepts in relation to woven structures and/or forms. Emphasis on weaver-controlled techniques used to create images and composition. Prerequisite: TD 314. LAB.

TD 403. Intermediate Textile Printing. 3 Hours.

Individual problems in textile printing and dyeing processes. Prerequisite: TD 316. LAB.

TD 404. Surface Design. 3 Hours.

Textile pattern design for art and/or industry. Prerequisite: Twelve hours in Visual Art or Design, or permission of the instructor. LAB.

TD 414. Experimental Concepts in Weaving. 3 Hours.

Experimentation with resist dyeing, painted warps and/or "Fiber Forms" techniques in woven structures. Individual research and development of thematic concepts. Prerequisite: TD 313, and TD 301 or TD 302. LAB.

TD 500. Advanced Special Topics in Textiles/Fibers: _____. 3 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Textiles/Fibers courses, or permission of instructor. LAB.

TD 503. Advanced Surface Design/Screenprinting. 1-6 Hours U.

Directed study of advanced surface design and screenprinting methods. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: TD 403. IND.

TD 504. History of Textiles, Lecture. 3 Hours.

Study of historical textiles, their design development, and the techniques employed. Prerequisite: Junior standing in department or permission of instructor. LEC.

TD 506. Advanced Fiber Forms. 1-6 Hours U.

Directed study of three-dimensional and off-loom methods and techniques. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: TD 313. IND.

TD 514. Advanced Techniques in Weaving. 1-6 Hours U.

Directed study of advanced loom-controlled and weaver-controlled methods. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: TD 401 and TD 402. IND.

TD 515. Advanced Textiles/Fibers I. 3-6 Hours AE61.

Development of individual direction in textiles based on experience, research, and skills acquired in preceding courses; capstone experience. Prerequisite: Twenty-four credits in Textiles/Fibers and consent of instructor. LAB.

TD 520. Advanced Textiles/Fibers II. 3-6 Hours AE61.

Continuation of TD 515, capstone experience. Prerequisite: TD 515. LAB.

TD 590. Internship in Textiles/Fibers. 1-3 Hours U.

Practical experience in the use of artistic skills in approved and supervised academic or professional settings. May be repeated for credit; no more than six hours may be applied to the B.A. or B.F.A. degree. Credit hours are graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, according to the written recommendation provided by the internship supervisor to the faculty advisor. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and fifteen hours of Visual Art courses. INT.

TD 599. Individual Studies in Textiles/Fibers. 1-6 Hours AE61 / U.

Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours can apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Textiles/Fibers courses, or permission of instructor. IND.

TD 715. Textile Design in Weaving, Printing, and Dyeing. 2-6 Hours.

Individual research. Prerequisite: TD 520 or TD 525 or equivalent. RSH.

TD 750. Graduate Seminar. 0.5 Hours.

Discussion of issues and/or work in textiles. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC.

TD 815. Textile Design in Weaving, Printing, and Dyeing. 2-6 Hours.

Continuation of TD 715. RSH.

Visual Art Courses

VAE 100. Introduction to the Profession of Art Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to acquaint students with the profession of art education by helping to increase an awareness of the role and characteristics of an effective art teacher. Large and small group activities and assignments are dispersed throughout the semester to facilitate these outcomes. Students are involved in observation of and participation with art teachers and pupils in the public school classrooms, which complement course activities and assignments. VAE 100 is a professional course. LEC.

VAE 130. Art and Design in Daily Life. 3 Hours U.

The course aims to develop students' appreciation of designed objects in contemporary life whether they are historical icons or everyday items in the immediate environment. The instructional materials and activities assist students in acquiring the knowledge and skills for critically analyzing, discussing, and evaluating objects. Course content is interdisciplinary with a focus on design history. The class is open to all students and is relevant to those who have taken classes in art, design, architecture, and art history. Not open to students with credit in VAE 530. LEC.

VAE 177. First Year Seminar: ______. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Visual Art Education. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. LEC.

VAE 300. Special Topics in Visual Art Education: _____. 3 Hours U.

Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104, or permission of instructor. LEC.

VAE 320. Instruction and Curriculum I. 3 Hours.

This methods course provides an overview of the professional practices of K-12 art educators. Course content deals with the art education program, K-12, in relationship to the rest of the curriculum. This encompasses goals, objective sequence, courses offered at various levels, finance, staffing and administration. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor. LEC.

VAE 325. Education in Multicultural Society. 2 Hours.

The course is designed to provide the student with an awareness of and sensitivity to the concept of multicultural education. Topics related to the rationale for and processes of providing a multicultural perspective within the schools will be addressed. Field experiences will be structured to provide students with opportunities to observe the diversity within our society. LEC.

VAE 330. Fundamentals of Art. 3 Hours.

An introduction to art designed for the general university student. Designed to facilitate understanding and viewing works of art. Basic information including elements and principles of art, materials and techniques used by artists, and the function of art in society. LEC.

VAE 341. Instructional Strategies in Art for Elementary Classroom Teachers. 2 Hours.

Child growth and development in art. Materials as they relate to a sequential art education curriculum in the elementary school. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education or the education division of the graduate school. LEC.

VAE 395. Community Collaborations in Art Education. 3 Hours U.

A focused examination of existing community organizations, models, and resources alongside collaborative strategies for working with these entities to achieve common goals for art education. Students in this class will learn of collaborative community models, explore entrepreneurial and other educational initiatives that contribute to the general purpose of art education, and recognize the role of families and other community members in contributing to the arts. LEC.

VAE 410. Instruction and Curriculum II. 3 Hours.

This methods course provides an overview of the professional practices of K-12 art educators. Course content deals with the art education program, K-12, in relationship to the rest of the curriculum. This encompasses goals, objective sequence, courses offered at various levels, finance, staffing and administration. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor. LEC.

VAE 420. Artistic Media and Processes in Art Education. 3 Hours.

Building on course content in VAE 320, this course concentrates on instructional strategies and presentation models in art education. Students examine and explore the media appropriate to teaching art in various settings and levels as well as how art program budgets are derived and impact overall curriculum development. Prerequisite: VAE 320 or permission of instructor. LEC.

VAE 497. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Only one enrollment permitted each semester; a maximum of four hours will apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Recommendation of advisor and consent of instructor. IND.

VAE 500. Student Teaching. 9 Hours AE61.

A supervised teaching experience in an approved school setting, with level and subject area to be selected according to the teaching field. Individual activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours can apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Admission to the student teaching program; and ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Visual Art Education courses, or permission of instructor. FLD.

VAE 520. Instructional Technology in Art Education. 3 Hours.

This course addresses technology that is pertinent to professional art educators. Students use technology to develop a professional portfolio and technology-related resources for teaching art in PreK-12 schools and community settings. LEC.

VAE 530. Art and Design in Daily Life. 3 Hours.

The course aims to develop students' appreciation of designed objects in contemporary life whether they are historical icons or everyday items in the immediate environment. The instructional materials and activities will assist students in acquiring the knowledge and skills for critically analyzing, discussing, and evaluating objects. Course content is interdisciplinary with a focus on design history. The class is open to all students and is relevant to those who have taken classes in art, design, architecture, and art history. Not open to students with credit in VAE 130. LEC.

VAE 596. Practicum in Teaching Art. 2 Hours.

A supervised art teaching practicum in which students will learn to employ different teaching strategies with children pre-school through high school in the school or museum setting. Prerequisite: VAE 320, VAE 410, VAE 795 or consent of instructor. LEC.

VAE 598. Special Course: _____. 1-5 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education students; primarily for undergraduates. LEC.

VAE 599. Community Based Project in Art Education. 1-6 Hours AE61 / U.

Individual activity and project that serves as an alternate capstone experience to VAE 500 (Student Teaching). Will involve the development of an independent, community-based arts education project developed by the student under the supervision of a VAE faculty member. Prerequisite: Forty credits of Visual Art , fifteen credits of Visual Art Education Courses, and permission of the instructor. IND.

VAE 600. Evaluation and Measurement in Art Education. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the concepts and skills for the development and implementation of evaluation procedures for art education. Topics will include the development of student evaluation, the relationship between instructional objectives and evaluation, various evaluation techniques for art education, grading, and providing grades and feedback (to) students, parents, and schools. Prerequisite: VAE 320 and VAE 410. LEC.

VAE 680. Internship in Teaching Art. 5-16 Hours.

A supervised internship experience leading to initial art teacher certification. The student assumes the total professional role as a teacher of art in an approved school setting. INT.

VAE 698. Education of Women in the Arts. 2-3 Hours.

This course will examine the education of women in the arts at all levels of schooling (preschool, primary, secondary, and university) and in nonformal settings (art clubs, women's leagues, tutoring, etc.). The intent is to further a historical and contemporary based understanding of gender characteristics and discrimination as they affect the education of women in the arts. Students enrolled in three hours credit will be required to write a case study on the education of a woman artist. LEC.

VAE 710. Assessment in Art Education. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to introduce students to evaluation procedures in art education as they apply to public school teaching K-12. The material will incorporate methods of evaluating student learning in art, the effectiveness of instruction, the designing of instruments, grading procedures including the provision of feedback to students, parents, and schools. Concepts and skills for both formative and summative evaluation will be related to the development of objectives, instruction, and curriculum development as a whole. LEC.

VAE 716. Teaching Art: _____. 1-4 Hours.

Instructional techniques, methodology, materials, and evaluation. Processes for the specific art area named. May be repeated for credit in different media. LEC.

VAE 750. Introduction to Art Museum Education. 1-4 Hours.

This course provides a general overview to the museum education field. Course readings include current ideas and issues on learning, art education, criticism, the museum in education, and museum education practices. LEC.

VAE 774. Art for Exceptional Children. 2 Hours.

A study of the psychology, philosophy, content, and media in art expression and its relationship to mental and creative growth with exceptional children. Prerequisite: SPED 741, which may be taken concurrently. LEC.

VAE 780. Internship in Teaching Art. 9 Hours.

A supervised internship experience leading to initial art teacher certification. The student assumes the total professional role as a teacher of art in an approved school setting. INT.

VAE 790. Applications of Technology in Art Education. 1-3 Hours.

The course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary for using and assessing the impact of microcomputers, video recorders, and other technological developments in art education. Prerequisite: T&L 601 or equivalent. LEC.

VAE 798. Special Course: _____. 1-5 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals; primarily for graduate students. LEC.

VAE 800. Visual Art Education Curriculum Development. 1-3 Hours.

A study of research, resources, and media as they relate to learning goals in a sequential art curriculum for use by teachers. The amount of credit reflects the extent of the curriculum being developed and the amount of work involved in the development process. LEC.

VAE 825. Seminar in: _____. 1-4 Hours.

LEC.

VAE 830. Seminar in: _____. 1-4 Hours.

LEC.

VAE 842. Teaching Art Criticism. 3 Hours.

An examination of the four phases of art criticism (description, analysis, interpretation and judgment) will be followed by practice in using these phases in the development of effective art curriculum for all developmental levels. Prerequisite: PRE 702 and PRE 704 or equivalents. LEC.

VAE 850. Aesthetics, the Arts and Education. 3 Hours.

Theoretical introduction to the problems involved in teaching critical appreciation of the arts; examination of materials from aesthetics, art history, and criticism. LEC.

VAE 869. History of Art Education. 3 Hours.

A study of the historical development of art education. Prerequisite: Nine hours of education. LEC.

VAE 875. Research in Art Education. 3 Hours.

This course examines the issues and procedures commonly used to conduct research in art education in preparation for students' graduate theses or projects. Research methods are adapted and applied to students' professional needs and interests in the form of a research proposal. LEC.

VAE 890. Preparation for the M.A. Examination. 1 Hour.

An independent reading course in preparation for the M.A. Examination. The grade will be an S or U, as determined by the performance on the examination. The examination will be evaluated separately. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. LEC.

VAE 895. Field Experience in: _____. 1-6 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences in selected professional settings and cooperating agencies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. FLD.

VAE 897. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and instructor. RSH.

VAE 898. Master's Project. 1-4 Hours.

RSH.

VAE 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

THE.

VAE 900. Supervision and Evaluation of Visual Arts Programs. 3 Hours.

A study of the administration of school, museum, and community arts education programs. Topics will include curriculum development, personnel supervision, finance, and the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of arts programs. Prerequisite: T&L 703 or equivalent. LEC.

VAE 929. Research in Art Education. 3 Hours.

An examination of research methodology in visual arts education. Emphasis will be on philosophical, historical, qualitative, and quantitative research development. Prerequisite: PRE 715 or equivalent. LEC.

VAE 949. Artistic Learning and Development. 3 Hours.

Research from psychology, sociology, and anthropology will be examined for its implications for the artistic development of the child. Topics include cross-cultural and age comparisons of children's graphic symbol development, aesthetic judgments, and perceptual skills. Prerequisite: PRE 702 and PRE 704 or equivalents. LEC.

VAE 995. Field Experience in: _____. 1-5 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences in selected educational settings. The advisor will schedule regular observations of the field experience and conferences with the student. Written summaries and evaluations of the field experiences will be prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agency, and the advisor. Open only to advanced students. Field experience credit in any one semester may not exceed five hours, and total credit may not exceed eight hours. LEC.

VAE 996. College Teaching Experience in: _____. 2 Hours.

To meet the college teaching experience requirement for doctoral programs, a student shall engage in a semester long, planned, instructional activity that shall include college classroom teaching under supervision. Planning shall be done with the advisor and/or member of the faculty who will supervise the experience. The activity shall be done under the supervision of a member of the University of Kansas faculty or by an individual or individuals designated by the candidate's committee. RSH.

VAE 997. Individual Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Prior graduate course work in the area of study and consent of instructor. RSH.

VAE 998. Seminar in: _____. 1-4 Hours.

LEC.

VAE 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 Hours.

THE.