Graduation requirements and regulations for each of the School's academic programs are provided in this catalog. For information on graduate program regulations, refer to the School of Education Graduate Regulations tab.  In most cases, you will use the catalog of the year you entered KU (see your advisor for details). Other years’ catalogs»

Introduction

The primary mission of the School of Education is to prepare educators as leaders. Within the university, the School of Education serves Kansas, the nation, and the world by

  1. Preparing individuals to be leaders and practitioners in education and related human-service fields,
  2. Expanding and deepening understanding of education as a fundamental human endeavor, and
  3. Helping society define and respond to its educational responsibilities and challenges.

To accomplish this mission, the School of Education

  1. Offers an extensive curriculum leading to academic degrees and professional licensure,
  2. Requires faculty and students to engage in scholarship, and
  3. Provides a range of professional services to schools, other institutions, and individuals.

The components of preparing educators as leaders that frame this mission for our initial programs are

  1. Research and best practice,
  2. Content and pedagogical knowledge, and
  3. Professionalism.

These three themes build our conceptual framework.

Mission Statement

View the mission statement of the School of Education.

Undergraduate Degree Programs

Degree and Licensure Requirements for Teacher Education Students

Completion of the Teacher Education Program requires 4 years. After completing a minimum of 120 approved hours and the requirements for the specific teacher licensure program, the student receives a bachelor’s degree and is eligible for a Kansas teaching license.

Majors are available in the following teaching fields:

  • Unified Early Childhood (Birth-Grade 3)
  • Elementary (K-6)
  • Secondary English (6-12)
  • Middle Mathematics (5-8)
  • Secondary History and Government (6-12)
  • Middle Science (5-8)
  • Foreign languages (Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Latin, Russian, Spanish) (PreK-12)
  • Health and Physical Education (PreK-12)

Endorsements are available in the following areas:

  • English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)
  • Special Education

(Note: Students must speak to the appropriate advisors while planning these added endorsements.)

A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.75 is required for graduation. However, admission requirements for student teaching in the senior year are based on the following criteria:

  1. Complete an Intent to Student Teach form and pass a criminal background check.
  2. At least a 2.5 grade-point average in the field in which a student intends to teach at the elementary, middle, and secondary level.
  3. A cumulative grade-point average of 2.75.

Students who complete the requirements for teacher licensure in their area, pass with a minimum score of 20 on the Kansas Performance Teaching Portfolio (KPTP), pass the state’s licensure examinations and PRAXIS II subject examination meet Kansas requirements for teacher licensure. Upon application through the Licensure Office, students are recommended to the Kansas State Board of Education for licensure. A handbook issued by the state board contains a summary of rules and regulations governing teachers’ licenses in Kansas. Each state has different requirements. Students planning to teach in other states should check with those states. Information about teaching requirements may be obtained from the Licensure Office. Information about the Kansas licensure examinations is available at Testing Services, 2150 Watkins Memorial Health Center, 785-864-2768.

Professional Development Schools

Before the senior year, teacher candidates may apply to complete their experiences in one of the Professional Development Schools. PDS schools are in 4 different districts, which may include elementary, middle, or secondary sites. The University of Kansas Professional Development School (KUPDS) is an active partnership between the University of Kansas School of Education and 15 public schools in four surrounding school districts. Founded in 1991, our Alliance works to provide collaborative educator preparation, ongoing professional development, reflective inquiry, and continuous school renewal. Within these tenets, the Alliance works for collaborative research, training and professional development opportunities for public school educators, university faculty, and teacher education students with the ultimate goal of improving education for all children. For more information, visit the School of Education.

Degree Requirements for Students in Nonlicensure Areas

Students in the non-teacher-licensure areas of athletic training, exercise science, sport management, and community health usually complete the bachelor’s degree program in 4 years. Students seeking admission to undergraduate sport science and community health programs must have minimum cumulative grade-point averages of 2.75. Achieving the minimum grade-point average is not a guarantee of admission. Admission also is based on performance in core courses, academic preparation for the major, and the number of students each program can admit.

Licensure: Added Endorsements

At least 8 hours of the required course work must be completed at KU if it is to be the recommending institution for adding endorsements to the teaching license. For information about adding endorsements, contact the School of Education at 785-864-3726.

Graduate Degree Programs (refer to the School of Education Graduate Regulations tab)

Undergraduate Programs

The School of Education offers programs that lead to teacher licensure in health & physical education, unified early childhood and at the elementary, middle, and secondary levels, as well as nonlicensure options in athletic training, community health, sport management or exercise science (pre-physical therapy, cardiac rehabilitation, and strength and conditioning).

Students planning to teach must complete programs composed of 3 major parts: General Education (requirements completed primarily in the first 2 years), Major (content areas in which students are specializing), and Professional Education (course work that helps them to understand students as learners and to communicate knowledge effectively).

On admission, students who plan to major in health and physical education report to the Department of Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences. Students who plan to teach all other subjects and in elementary education and unified early childhood are in the Department of Curriculum and Teaching. Course requirements for each of the three parts of the Teacher Education Programs are listed under departmental headings.

University Honors Program

The school encourages qualified students to participate in the University Honors Program.

Data from the Title II Report

The Title II Report provides information about the performance of KU School of Education teacher education program students on required state examinations. This data is part of the Title II report required by the federal government.

Special Programs and Facilities

The School of Education provides these programs and facilities for students, faculty, and, in many cases, the public. Most facilities offer graduate students opportunities for assistantship, laboratory, and research experiences related to their programs of study. Contact the individual programs for information.

Applied Physiology Laboratory and Fitness Evaluation Clinic

This teaching and research laboratory in stress physiology at Robinson Center assesses physical function through physiological tests. Fitness parameters of physical education majors and students in health, sport, and exercise sciences classes are assessed routinely. Demonstrations of physiological and biochemical concepts are performed for exercise physiology classes. Research on the physiological ramifications of exercise stress is conducted. Graduate and undergraduate students assist in service and research projects.

Beach Center on Disability

The Beach Center, is funded by the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, U.S. Department of Education. It is the only federally funded center in the nation conducting research with families with members with disabilities. The center is involved in research and training projects addressing family well-being across the life span. Projects are guided by six fundamental beliefs about families: positive contributions, great expectations, full citizenship, choices, inherent strengths, and relationships.

Center for Economic Education

The center works to increase the economic literacy of pre-service and in-service teachers through credit and noncredit teaching and consultation in economic education. It maintains a library of current materials on economic/consumer education.

Center for Educational Testing and Evaluation

The center engages in research and service in educational assessment and program evaluation. Issues in educational testing are studied and projects are designed and carried out to examine school effectiveness, personnel/student evaluation, and policy implications of educational testing and assessment. There are opportunities for assistantships for interested and qualified students.

Center for Psychoeducational Services

CPS is a training site for students in the Department of Educational Psychology. CPS is staffed by student clinicians in school psychology and counseling psychology who earn credit while they gain practical experience working directly with clients. CPS is a self-sustaining, nonprofit agency.

Center for Research on Learning

The center conducts research centered on solving problems that limit individuals' quality of life and their ability to learn and perform in school, work, home, or the community. It serves as the parent organization for 7 research institutes: Advanced Learning Technologies (ALTEC), Division of Adult Studies, e-Learning Design Lab, Institute for Health and Disability Policy Studies, Institute for Research on Adolescent Learning, Kansas Coaching Project, Professional Development Research Institute, and Transition Coalition.

Advanced Learning Technology in Education

The Advanced Learning Technologies project at the KU Center for Research on Learning, uses the most advanced and innovative technologies available to improve teaching and learning. Faculty and students in ALTEC come from a range of disciplines and programs, including the School of Education, the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, the School of Engineering, the School of Music, and the School of the Arts. This collection of talent gives ALTEC broad capabilities including advanced networking and telecommunication expertise, instructional design, data harvesting and warehousing, distance education experience, and programming.

ALTEC is committed to developing new technologies to empower learners of all types and ages and to redefining the learning experience through innovative resources. ALTEC partners with those who recognize the tremendous capabilities available through electronic strategies for dissemination, communication, and collaboration. They provide support in the development of the initiative, interpreting the intent of the content authors with the latest in design, development, and delivery. ALTEC maintains its partnership with an individual project by contributing specific resources required through the phases of implementation, including design, development, maintenance, and evaluation.

Achievement & Assessment Institute

The Institute serves both the School of Education faculty members and the state of Kansas. This institute has a two-fold mission. The first part of this mission is to provide faculty with infrastructure support for its research. The support includes assistance with identifying funding sources, proposal development, and grant administration. The second part of the institute's mission is to help schools and other educational agencies respond to initiatives that are educationally beneficial to the state and that contribute to the teaching, research, and service missions of the school. The institute also houses the Assembly of Equity Programs, TRIO programs, and the Kansas Enrichment Network. At the heart of these programs lies an interest in promoting educational opportunity for youth and young adults in the state.

Kinesiology/Biomechanics Laboratory

The laboratory analyzes human motion. The primary emphasis is on computer-aided cinematographical analysis, but other research tools such as electromyography (EMG), electrogoniometry, stroboscopy, and force plates are used. Major attention is given to the study of efficient movement techniques, equipment design, strength, flexibility, and body types.

Learning Resource and Technology Center

The center serves faculty and students of the school and the public. Its resources include the Curriculum Laboratory, professional books and journals, K-12 textbooks, curriculum guides and course outlines from school districts throughout the country, selected reference and reserve materials, and mediated instructional packages for pre-service and in-service teacher education. It supports teaching, research, and service involving educational applications of media and microcomputers. Teacher education students develop skills in operating media equipment and producing materials to support their teaching. A representative cross section of instructional equipment found in schools is available, along with emerging technologies used in distance learning and interactive video instruction. The center offers production support for instructional materials and research support for design, evaluation, use, and dissemination of instructional technology.

Microcomputer Laboratories

Microcomputer laboratories in Joseph R. Pearson Hall and Robinson and Dole Centers prepare students to use computers in administrative, instructional, and research applications. The laboratories offer a range of equipment found in schools, including PC and Macintosh computers. Computers are networked to KU’s backbone and resources such as scanners, laser printers, CD-ROM, CD, and DVD players. The laboratories contain application, programming, data management, data analysis, and instructional software that can be used for all grade levels and disciplines.

School of Education Student Organization

The School of Education offers a variety of ways to get involved; to meet and engage with fellow students; to explore academic opportunities; and to gain more than an education while at KU.  In addition to the student organizations available in education, there are more than 600 clubs on campus to get involved with.  The KU Student Involvement & Leadership Center (SILC) prepares students to become contributing citizens of society by providing meaningful co-curricular experiences.  

For more information about our KU School of Education student organizations, please go to our website or stop by the Welcome Center, 208 J.R. Pearson Hall.

Athletic Training Club (KUATC)

America Reads

Council for the Social Studies

Exercise Science Club

International Students Education Association (ISEA)

KU Edwards Campus Student Advisory Board (KUEC SAB)

Pre-Occupational Therapy Club 

Pre-Physical Therapy Club

Professionals for Disability (KUPD)

Reach To Teach (R2T)

TESOL Club

Graduate Programs

To facilitate preparation for specific types of professional service and teaching, graduate study in education has been organized into the program areas encompassed by these departments:

  • Curriculum and Teaching includes programs in curriculum and instruction, including the fields relating to elementary and secondary education.
  • Educational Leadership and Policy Studies comprises programs in educational administration, social and cultural studies in education, higher education, and educational technology.
  • Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences offers areas of study in exercise science, health science, pedagogy, and sports studies.
  • Educational Psychology and Research offers programs in counseling psychology, school psychology, and educational psychology and research.
  • Special Education conducts graduate degree programs in autism spectrum disorders, early childhood unified, high-incidence disabilities, low-incidence/significant intellectual disabilities, and secondary transition education and services.

Further information on graduate study may be found on the departmental sections of the online catalog.

Most graduate students are expected to complete work in education areas other than their program areas, as well as in liberal arts or other noneducation areas. The amount of such work depends on the degree sought and the major area. A student must be enrolled for the period during which the comprehensive or final examination is taken. Full-time graduate student enrollment in the School of Education is 9 graduate credit hours or the equivalent.

Special Programs and Facilities

The School of Education provides these programs and facilities for students, faculty, and, in many cases, the public. Most facilities offer graduate students opportunities for assistantship, laboratory, and research experiences related to their programs of study. Contact the individual programs for information.

Applied Physiology Laboratory and Fitness Evaluation Clinic

This teaching and research laboratory in stress physiology at Robinson Center assesses physical function through physiological tests. Fitness parameters of physical education majors and students in health, sport, and exercise sciences classes are assessed routinely. Demonstrations of physiological and biochemical concepts are performed for exercise physiology classes. Research on the physiological ramifications of exercise stress is conducted. Graduate and undergraduate students assist in service and research projects.

Beach Center on Disability

The Beach Center, is funded by the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, U.S. Department of Education. It is the only federally funded center in the nation conducting research with families with members with disabilities. The center is involved in research and training projects addressing family well-being across the life span. Projects are guided by six fundamental beliefs about families: positive contributions, great expectations, full citizenship, choices, inherent strengths, and relationships.

Center for Economic Education

The center works to increase the economic literacy of pre-service and in-service teachers through credit and noncredit teaching and consultation in economic education. It maintains a library of current materials on economic/consumer education.

Center for Educational Testing and Evaluation

The center engages in research and service in educational assessment and program evaluation. Issues in educational testing are studied and projects are designed and carried out to examine school effectiveness, personnel/student evaluation, and policy implications of educational testing and assessment. There are opportunities for assistantships for interested and qualified students.

Center for Psychoeducational Services

CPS is a training site for students in the Department of Educational Psychology. CPS is staffed by student clinicians in school psychology and counseling psychology who earn credit while they gain practical experience working directly with clients. CPS is a self-sustaining, nonprofit agency.

Center for Research on Learning

The center conducts research centered on solving problems that limit individuals' quality of life and their ability to learn and perform in school, work, home, or the community. It serves as the parent organization for 7 research institutes: Advanced Learning Technologies (ALTEC), Division of Adult Studies, e-Learning Design Lab, Institute for Health and Disability Policy Studies, Institute for Research on Adolescent Learning, Kansas Coaching Project, Professional Development Research Institute, and Transition Coalition.

Advanced Learning Technology in Education

The Advanced Learning Technologies project at the KU Center for Research on Learning, uses the most advanced and innovative technologies available to improve teaching and learning. Faculty and students in ALTEC come from a range of disciplines and programs, including the School of Education, the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, the School of Engineering, the School of Music, and the School of the Arts. This collection of talent gives ALTEC broad capabilities including advanced networking and telecommunication expertise, instructional design, data harvesting and warehousing, distance education experience, and programming.

ALTEC is committed to developing new technologies to empower learners of all types and ages and to redefining the learning experience through innovative resources. ALTEC partners with those who recognize the tremendous capabilities available through electronic strategies for dissemination, communication, and collaboration. They provide support in the development of the initiative, interpreting the intent of the content authors with the latest in design, development, and delivery. ALTEC maintains its partnership with an individual project by contributing specific resources required through the phases of implementation, including design, development, maintenance, and evaluation.

Achievement & Assessment Institute

The Institute serves both the School of Education faculty members and the state of Kansas. This institute has a two-fold mission. The first part of this mission is to provide faculty with infrastructure support for its research. The support includes assistance with identifying funding sources, proposal development, and grant administration. The second part of the institute's mission is to help schools and other educational agencies respond to initiatives that are educationally beneficial to the state and that contribute to the teaching, research, and service missions of the school. The institute also houses the Assembly of Equity Programs, TRIO programs, and the Kansas Enrichment Network. At the heart of these programs lies an interest in promoting educational opportunity for youth and young adults in the state.

Kinesiology/Biomechanics Laboratory

The laboratory analyzes human motion. The primary emphasis is on computer-aided cinematographical analysis, but other research tools such as electromyography (EMG), electrogoniometry, stroboscopy, and force plates are used. Major attention is given to the study of efficient movement techniques, equipment design, strength, flexibility, and body types.

Learning Resource and Technology Center

The center serves faculty and students of the school and the public. Its resources include the Curriculum Laboratory, professional books and journals, K-12 textbooks, curriculum guides and course outlines from school districts throughout the country, selected reference and reserve materials, and mediated instructional packages for pre-service and in-service teacher education. It supports teaching, research, and service involving educational applications of media and microcomputers. Teacher education students develop skills in operating media equipment and producing materials to support their teaching. A representative cross section of instructional equipment found in schools is available, along with emerging technologies used in distance learning and interactive video instruction. The center offers production support for instructional materials and research support for design, evaluation, use, and dissemination of instructional technology.

Microcomputer Laboratories

Microcomputer laboratories in Joseph R. Pearson Hall and Robinson and Dole Centers prepare students to use computers in administrative, instructional, and research applications. The laboratories offer a range of equipment found in schools, including PC and Macintosh computers. Computers are networked to KU’s backbone and resources such as scanners, laser printers, CD-ROM, CD, and DVD players. The laboratories contain application, programming, data management, data analysis, and instructional software that can be used for all grade levels and disciplines.

Undergraduate Advising

Early in the first year, prospective students in all areas should make appointments with a pre-education advisor at the Advising Center in 208 J.R. Pearson Hall (Welcome Center) to ensure fulfillment of admission requirements and to plan efficient programs of study. Education staff members advise pre-education students individually and in group sessions.

Walk-in appointments are available through the Welcome Center, 208 J.R. Pearson Hall. Call 785-864-9616 to make an appointment to meet with an advisor.

Graduate Advising

Graduate advising is done at the department and program level. For more information, please contact the director of graduate studies in your department or program.

All education students have a graduate advisor and should know and be in contact with the advisor to whom they have been assigned. Students who are unsure of their advisor should contact their academic department or an advisor for information.

Undergraduate & Graduate Scholarships and Financial Aid

In addition to scholarships and financial aid administered by Financial Aid and Scholarships, the school administers a number of special scholarships.

Online applications are available in early December each year. The deadline is early February; contact the school for the specific date.

Graduate Fellowships and Assistantships

For information about graduate assistantships, contact the School of Education.

Visit the Graduate Studies website for information about funding opportunities for graduate students at KU.

Financial Aid and Scholarships administers grants, loans, and need-based financial aid.

Undergraduate University Regulations

For information about university regulations, see Regulations or visit the University of Kansas Policy Library.

Absences

A student with excessive absences may be withdrawn from the course by the dean.

Change of School

To change from one school to another, you must submit a Change of School form in the dean’s office of the school you plan to enter. Follow the deadlines on the form.

  • Students are admitted to C&T programs once a year; online applications are due September 14 for spring semester.
  • Students are admitted to the HSES teaching, athletic training and community health programs once a year; online applications are due February 2 for next fall semester.
  • Students are admitted to HSES exercise science and sport management programs twice a year; applications are due February 2 for fall and September 14 for spring semester.

Consult the School of Education Welcome Center, 208 J.R. Pearson Hall, 785-864-3726, for information.

Course Substitutions

Course substitutions in any program may require approval of the advisor, department, and associate dean. In addition, some requests must be approved by the school curriculum committee. Approval requires submission of a written petition initiated by the student and approved by the advisor. The associate dean communicates the action taken to the advisor and the student. A copy is placed in the student’s file.

Credit/No Credit

A Credit/No Credit option is available to all degree-seeking undergraduates. You may enroll in one course a semester under the option, if the course is not in your major or minor. For more information, visit the KU Policy Library.

Warning: Certain undesirable consequences may result from exercising the option. Some schools, scholarship committees, and honorary societies do not accept this grading system and convert grades of No Credit to F when computing grade-point averages.

Students planning to enter education programs who are not formally admitted to the school are strongly discouraged from taking any course required for graduation for Credit/No Credit.

Any course not required for graduation and up to 6 hours of courses required for graduation may be taken for Credit/No Credit. No more than 6 hours of courses required for graduation may be taken for Credit/No Credit.

Graduation with Distinction and Highest Distinction

Students who rank in the upper 10 percent of their graduating class graduate with distinction. The upper third of those awarded distinction graduate with highest distinction. Grade-point averages are based on total credits (KU and transfer credit). To be considered for distinction, students must have completed a minimum of 75 hours at KU. The list is compiled each spring and includes July, December, and May graduates.

Honor Roll

Students with grade-point averages of 3.75 who have completed at least 12 hours with letter grades are recognized on the honor roll or dean’s list in fall and spring. An Honor Roll notation appears on the transcript.

Maximum and Minimum Semester Enrollment

A 12-hour enrollment is a minimum full-time enrollment. Enrollment for more than 19 hours during fall or spring semesters or more than 9 hours during the summer session requires special permission from the associate dean and is not considered unless the student has demonstrated academic ability and has the advisor’s approval.

Maximum Community College Credit Allowed

A maximum of 64 community college hours may be counted toward a student's degree. 

Probation

Placed on Probation

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.75. Students whose cumulative grade-point averages are below 2.75 at the end of any semester are placed on academic probation.

Dismissed

If at the end of the following semester (spring or fall) the cumulative grade-point average is not 2.75 or above, the student is dismissed from the school. Those students are dropped from all courses for the next semester and required to complete a Change of School form to enroll. They are not allowed to enroll in any courses restricted to School of Education students until they are reinstated. Students admitted provisionally who don’t fulfill specified criteria for admission revert to the school in which they were previously enrolled. In these cases, only courses restricted for School of Education students are dropped from the student’s schedule.

Readmission after Dismissal

Programs are subject to change. Within 1 year of dismissal, if the cumulative grade-point average is at least 2.75, students are readmitted to the program to which they had been admitted. After 1 year, students who wish to follow the program to which they had been admitted must submit a petition to the associate dean. If the petition is denied, students must follow the current program (if different from the one to which they had been admitted).

Required Work in Residence

To be eligible for the B.S.E. degree, a student must complete at least 30 hours at KU and at least 30 hours after being admitted to the school. Up to 6 hours of work done at another institution may be accepted as part of the last 30 hours. Before enrolling in a nonresident course, the student should complete a Request for Tentative Evaluation of Credit in 208 J.R. Pearson Hall. After completing the course, the student must request that an official transcript be sent to KU.

Transfer of Credit

CredTran is a transfer course equivalency system that lists more than 2,200 colleges and universities from which KU has accepted transfer courses in the past. If your school or course is not listed, your evaluation will be completed when you are admitted to KU.

Courses completed at other institutions are accepted to fulfill graduation requirements (e.g., in place of specifically prescribed courses), only if they are substantially equivalent as indicated by course description. At least 62 hours must be completed at an upper-division institution.

The School of Education follows the regulations and policies of the University and of Graduate Studies (for example: Academic probation, enrollment status, grading policies, grievances, etc.).  In some cases, School of Education and departmental policies are more restrictive than those of the broader University.  Students are encouraged to work closely with their department and advisor for specifics.

Certificate Programs

An application is required in order to be admitted to and pursue a Graduate Certificate.  Degree-seeking graduate students who wish to apply to a certificate program must be in good standing in their departments or programs.  An individual who is not currently a degree-seeking graduate student at KU must be admitted directly to a graduate certificate program.

With the consent of the certificate-granting department, degree-seeking or non-degree seeking students may count up to two (2) courses —for a maximum of 8 credit hours— taken at KU prior to admission to the certificate program toward the graduate certificate. Any course credits that are counted are subject to the specific certificate coursework requirements in the certificate program. Graduate certificates are not granted retroactively and no exceptions to this two-course limit will be granted. Students who withdraw from a degree program and subsequently seek admission to a certificate program are subject to these same limits (i.e., 8 hours).  

If students admitted to a graduate certificate program are later admitted to a graduate degree program as degree-seeking students, applicable courses taken for the graduate certificate program may be counted toward the degree with the approval of the degree-granting program as long as the student is enrolled in the degree program prior to completing the last certificate requirement.

While the courses comprising a graduate certificate may be used as evidence in support of a student’s application for admission to a graduate degree program, the certificate itself is not considered to be a prerequisite and does not guarantee admission into any graduate degree program.

Graduate credit from another institution may not be transferred to a KU graduate certificate program.

The courses taken in the graduate certificate program will be listed on the student’s transcript and recognition of the earned certificate will also be posted on the transcript.  The awarding of graduate certificates will coincide with the August, December and May graduations at the University of Kansas

Graduate certificates will not be recognized by any Graduate Studies official graduation ceremony.

View the current graduate certificate policies and processes.

View the current policy on eligibility and admission to a graduate certificate program. A current list of all certificate programs is available on the KU Academics page.

Master's Degree Programs

Master’s degrees are granted on satisfactory completion of not less than 1 academic year, or its equivalent, of graduate study. The school provides 3 options for the master’s degree:

·         The thesis option (minimum 30 graduate credit hours of study)

·         The project or portfolio option (minimum 30 graduate credit hours of study), and

·        The examination option (minimum 36 graduate credit hours of study).

At least 20 of the credit hours required for the thesis and project option master’s programs must be in regular course work, as contrasted with independent study and similar enrollments. Students pursuing the 36-hour examination program option must have 26 hours in regular course work.

All master’s programs require a graduate class in research and evaluation methods (i.e. EPSY 715), successfully completed during the first 12 hours.

Transfer Credit, Count Toward Degree, & Reduced Hours

Transfer Credit

The transfer credit option allows master’s students to count graduate coursework completed at a regionally-accredited institution toward their KU degree. Students can transfer up to 9 credit hours toward their master’s degrees.  The department, advisor, School of Education, and Dean of Graduate Studies must approve the transfer request. The course(s) and grade(s) will then appear on the student's KU transcript as the KU course equivalent.

Some restrictions apply to what non-KU courses can be counted toward a KU master’s degree:

  • Only courses taken for graduate credit and graded B or higher (3.0 on a 4.0 scale or higher) can be transferred.
  • The courses in question cannot have counted toward any previously completed undergraduate or graduate degrees.
  • KU does not accept transfer credit for educational institutes, workshops, or work/life experience.
  • Courses must be approved by the student’s department as fulfilling a specific, regular degree requirement (including elective coursework) and should be equal in rigor to KU's graduate coursework, as reflected in the course description and syllabus.

To begin the transfer process, students should contact their departments to submit the required transfer materials, including an official transcript reflecting the courses from the other institution to be transferred in, as well as descriptions and/or syllabi for the courses in question.  The department, advisor, and department chair will then determine whether the course may count for KU credit and, if so, what KU course is equivalent.

No graduate coursework from another institution may be transferred to a KU graduate certificate.

Count Toward Degree

The count toward degree process is distinct from transfer credit, which only applies to courses taken at another institution.  In the count toward degree process, a student may be allowed to count graduate coursework taken as a graduate non-degree seeking student at KU toward a graduate degree.  No more than 9 credit hours may be counted in this way, assuming the degree-granting department endorses the request and the courses in question meet the University's criteria for graduate credit.   The student must contact the department to complete a Count Toward Degree form, which must then be submitted to the School of Education Graduate Associate Dean for review and approval.  If the form is approved, the School of Education and the department will include the counted courses when verifying that degree requirements have been met. 

Students should be advised that graduate coursework taken as a non-degree-seeking student already counts into the calculation of the student's graduate GPA, but the count towards degree form is still required for the coursework to count toward completion of degree requirements.  However, the change is not otherwise reflected on the student's transcript. 

With the exception of coursework completed via a pre-approved Co-enrollment arrangement, graduate coursework completed as an undergraduate degree-seeking or undergraduate non-degree seeking student may not be counted toward a graduate degree at KU.

Graduate courses taken at KU may count toward both a graduate degree and graduate certificate(s) as long as the student is admitted and enrolled in the intended program prior to completion of the last required course. If the courses were taken as a non-degree seeking student, a Count Toward Degree form must be submitted prior to approval for graduation or approval of the certificate.

Reduced Hour Degree

Kansas Board of Regents policy defines 30 hours as the minimum for master's degrees at KU.  Departments may petition for a reduced-hour master's degree for individual students.  A reduction in hours is distinct from a transfer of credit and is reserved for those students especially well-prepared to complete a graduate-level degree and able to maintain a superior grade point average.  If approved, a student will be allowed to complete his or her degree by enrolling in up to 6 fewer hours of graduate credit than is typically required for that degree.  No coursework is transferred and no modifications to the transcript are made.

To find out more about reduced-hour degrees, please contact your department directly.  Departments can submit reduced credit hour degree petitions on behalf of their students through the Miscellaneous Functions Progress to Degree (PTD) form.  The department must support the petition and the School of Education Graduate Associate Dean must approve it before the reduced degree requirements will be granted.

Minimum KU Hours

In all cases, a minimum of 15 credits toward a master’s degree must be earned in graduate KU coursework.

Final Examinations

For regulations governing final examinations at the master's and doctoral levels, students should consult with their primary advisor and their department's Director of Graduate Studies to ensure compliance with the policies of the School of Education and the Office of Graduate Studies

Master of Arts

A candidate for the Master of Arts degree completes work both in education and in a teaching area (other than physical education). For students who choose the thesis or project option, a minimum of 30 hours of graduate credit is required for this degree, of which no fewer than 10 and no more than 15 hours must be earned in the teaching area. Some work must be elected in at least 2 of the approved graduate program areas in the School of Education.

The candidate must complete a thesis related to the teaching area (6 hours maximum credit applicable to degree requirements) or complete the non-thesis option by enrolling in Master’s Project (4 hours applicable to degree requirements).   Students may also pursue the written examination option (36 hours of coursework applicable to degree requirements). Check with the department for specific requirements for each option.

Master of Science

A candidate for the degree of Master of Science in Counseling Psychology earns a concentration in mental health counseling. A minimum of 60 credit hours is required for this degree, about 50 of which are prescribed, with the rest made up of electives approved by the student's advisor.  The candidate must complete a Master's Thesis (3 hours maximum credit applicable to degree requirements), or complete a Master's Project (3 hours applicable to degree requirements), or complete a written comprehensive examination.  Check with the department for specific requirements for each option.

Master of Science in Education

A candidate for the degree of Master of Science in Education selects 1 of the program areas as a concentration for graduate study.  A minimum of 30 credit hours is required, of which no fewer than 10 hours must be in the concentration.  Credit in Thesis or Master’s Project may not be included in these 10 hours.  The candidate must elect course work in at least 2 graduate program areas outside the concentration.  Normally, these courses would be in the School of Education. 

The candidate must complete a thesis in the concentration by enrolling in Master’s Thesis (6 hours maximum credit applicable to degree requirements) or complete the project option by enrolling in Master’s Project (4 hours applicable to degree requirements).  Students may also pursue the written examination option (36 hours of coursework applicable to degree requirements).  Check with the department for specific requirements for each option.

Specialist in Education Degree Program (School Psychology)

The Specialist in Education program consists of 2 years of full-time graduate study (about 70 semester credit hours) followed by a third year of internship.  Check with the department for specific requirements.

Doctoral Degree Programs

Doctor of Philosophy with a Major in Education (Ph.D.)

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is awarded for mastering a field of scholarship, learning the methods of investigation appropriate to that field, and completing a substantial piece of original research. The degree is intended to produce highly competent scholars who are prepared to be university faculty members and other professionals, to conduct and evaluate original research, to teach at the college/university level, and to provide discipline-related leadership to the field and to the public. The Ph.D. is offered in all education graduate programs.

Although the courses and the research leading to the Ph.D. are necessarily specialized, the attainment of this degree should not be an isolated event in the enterprise of learning. The aspirant for the Ph.D. is expected to be a well-educated person and should have acquired a broad base of general knowledge, both as preparation for more advanced work and as a means of knowing how the concentration is related to other fields of human thought.

Advisory Committee

A student admitted to study for the Ph.D. is known as an aspirant for the degree until the comprehensive examination has been passed. After passing this examination, the student is known as a candidate for the degree.

Each student must have an advisory committee consisting of at least three members of the Graduate Faculty. One member of the committee serves as the chair. One member must be from the graduate department representing the student’s minor area if the student's program or department requires a minor area.

The student meets with this committee before completing 12 hours of course work to plan and formally approve an appropriate program leading to the Ph.D. The approved program, signed by members of the committee and the student, is placed in the student’s file in the School of Education Graduate Division office.

Requirements

Students must acquaint themselves thoroughly with departmental requirements for the degree, which may be in addition to general requirements and those of the School of Education. Consistent with Graduate Studies’ general regulations, it is the student’s responsibility to know and observe all university, school, department, and academic program regulations and procedures relating to the graduate program.

In no case will a regulation be waived or an exception be granted because a student pleads ignorance of, or contends that he or she was not informed of requirements, regulations, procedures, or deadlines.

Responsibility for following all policies and meeting all requirements and deadlines rests with the student.

1.      Time Limit-Maximum Tenure
After being admitted to doctoral programs at KU, students must complete all degree requirements in eight years.  In cases in which compelling circumstances recommend a one-year extension, the School’s Graduate Division has authority to grant the extension on the written advice of the department and dissertation committee.  Students who complete the master’s degree at KU and subsequently begin doctoral studies have a maximum total enrolled time of 10 years to complete both degrees.  Normal expectations, however, are that most master’s degrees (excluding some professional terminal degrees) should be completed in two years of full-time study, and both master’s and doctorate in six years of full-time study.   Some graduate degree programs may have more stringent time restrictions.  Students should inquire about the policy in effect in the department in which they plan to study.

A student may petition the Graduate Division through the department for a leave of absence during either the pre- or post-comprehensive period to pursue full-time professional activities related to the doctoral program, extraordinary circumstances (e.g. cases of illness, emergency, financial hardship, military leave), to pursue family responsibilities, or to pursue full-time activities related to long-range professional goals. 

Appropriate documentation related to these extraordinary circumstances may be requested from the student directly.  Evidence of progress towards degree will also be a determining factor in the decision to grant an exception.

Ordinarily a leave of absence is granted for one year, with the possibility of extension upon request. The time taken for a leave of absence does not count against the student’s time to degree. However,  after an absence of five years, a doctoral aspirant or candidate loses status as such and must apply for readmission to the program and the Graduate Division.

2.      Resident Study
The student must spend the equivalent of 3 academic years, including the time spent attaining the master’s degree, in resident study at KU.  Because general requirements do not specify a minimum number of hours for the degree, no transfer of credits is appropriate. Departments do, however, consider relevant prior graduate work in setting up programs of study leading to the doctorate.

Residence Requirement. Two semesters, which may include one summer session, must be spent in resident study at KU.  During this period, the student must be involved full time in academic or professional pursuits, which may include an appointment for teaching or research if it is directed specifically toward degree objectives.  Enrollment in distance-learning courses offered through KU cannot be used to meet the doctoral residency requirement.  The student must be enrolled in a minimum of 6 credit hours per semester, and the increased research involvement must be fully supported and documented by the dissertation supervisor as contributing to the student’s dissertation or program objectives.  Research must be performed under the direct supervision of the major advisor if on campus, or with adequate liaison if off campus.

Special circumstances such as internal employment for more than half time as a teaching or research assistant, or as another type of university employee, must have advance approval on an individual basis by petition to the Graduate Division of the School of Education. The student, with the help of the advisory committee, must file in the Graduate Division office a residence plan congruent with School of Education requirements before the beginning of the formal residence period. This plan may be filed as a part of the overall program plan. Because residence is not merely a requirement measured in hours of enrollment or of credit in courses toward a degree, the plan may include other academic and professional activities appropriate to the field of study.

Note: Hourly enrollment requirements must be met through courses at the program’s home campus, and if appropriate internal employment is not involved, at least 9 hours must be in regularly scheduled courses.

3.      Program Area
In applying for doctoral study, the student specifies a program area in which formal classes and research work are to be done and in which she or he expects to become a scholar. A minimum of 36 credit hours is required in the major area, excluding credits used to fulfill research skills and the dissertation requirements. The doctoral core requirement (EDUC 800) may be included as part of the major if it is consistent with the student’s area of study and if doing so is supported by the student’s department and doctoral committee. Fifty-percent of the student’s major must be 800-level or above (18 credit hours). The program must include at least 6 credit hours outside of the student’s home department, not including courses required to fulfill the student’s research skills component or the doctoral core (EDUC 800).

Note: Course work completed at KU or at another institution as part of a previous graduate degree, cannot be used to meet the credit hour requirements for this degree.

Upon admission to doctoral study, students who have not completed a research and evaluation methods course for the education master’s degree must take the course, e.g. EPSY 715, during the first doctoral enrollment. The course taken to fulfill this requirement, whether taken at KU or at another institution, does not count toward any doctoral requirements.

4.      Core Requirement
All students are required to complete EDUC 800: Education as a Field of Scholarship, in their first year of doctoral enrollment.

5.      Teaching Experience
In addition to the requirements above, the student must satisfactorily complete at least 1 semester of supervised college teaching experience under the direction of a KU faculty member. This may be completed during the semester in which the student takes the comprehensive examination, but ordinarily it should be completed before admission to the comprehensive examination. This experience does not count towards the 36 credit hour requirement.  Documentation of the student’s supervised college teaching experience must be submitted to the Graduate Division office.

6.      Research Skills
Before being admitted to the comprehensive examination, the student must have completed the research skills requirements established for the degree. Specific research skills requirements vary with department and program, but all reflect the expectation of a significant research skills component distinct from the dissertation but strongly supportive of it. The Ph.D. research skills requirement includes completion of at least 12 graduate hours relevant to the aspirant’s research: statistics, measurement and assessment, qualitative methods, historical and philosophical methods, or foreign language (a reading knowledge in one foreign language is equivalent to 6 hours of credit). Up to 6 hours, excluding credit hours for the required master’s course in research methods and evaluation, whether taken at KU or elsewhere, may be waived using prior B-level or higher graduate course work. A statement concerning specific research skills should be secured from the student’s major department. At least 9 of the 12 credit hours must be 800 level or above. The 12 credit hours cannot include EPSY 715 or its program equivalent.

When the student has met the requirements for research skills, the committee chair must report this to the Graduate Division on the appropriate form, certifying that the student is prepared to proceed to the comprehensive oral examination. If a program requires research skills that are tested separately rather than integrally with the program, the completion of each requirement should be reported immediately to the Graduate Division so that it may be recorded on the student’s permanent record.

Responsible Conduct of Research: All students must satisfy departmental and university requirements regarding the responsible conduct of research. In order to meet this requirement, students are required to complete EDUC 800 Education as a Field of Scholarship, in their first years of doctorate enrollment.  Students in HSES and Counseling Psychology doctoral programs are exempt from EDUC 800 but must meet the Responsible Conduct of Research.

7.      Comprehensive Examination
When a Ph.D. aspirant has completed the major portion of the course work at a satisfactory level (having no more than 6 credits of required regularly scheduled coursework in the degree program remaining) and has completed the research skills requirement and all other departmental requirements prerequisite to the comprehensive examination, the department asks the School of Education Graduate Division office to schedule the comprehensive examination. This request must be made at least 2 weeks before the date of the written portion of the examination. Students must be enrolled when they take the exam.

The examining committee must consist of at least 5 members (usually including the advisory committee). All must be graduate faculty, and 3 of the 5 must be regular faculty from the student’s home department. For more information visit the KU Policy library:  Doctoral Student Oral Exam Committee Composition and Graduate Studies Representative on Doctoral Exam Committees.

The comprehensive examination consists of both written and oral parts and covers the major area pursued by the student, as well as the minor area, if one is required by the student's program. The student passes the comprehensive examination if a majority of the official examining committee (including the chair) approves the student’s performance. The grade on this examination is Honors, Satisfactory, or Unsatisfactory. An aspirant who receives a grade of Unsatisfactory may be allowed, upon the recommendation of the department, to repeat it, but it may not be taken more than 3 times. The aspirant may not repeat the oral examination until at least 90 days have elapsed since the last unsuccessful attempt.

Note: Students in Ph.D. education programs must pass both written and oral components of the comprehensive examination. Satisfactory performance on the written component must be attained before the oral component may be attempted. To fail either component is to fail the examination. All 5 members of the student’s comprehensive examination committee are involved in the evaluation process. The written component of the comprehensive examination, like the oral, focuses on advanced knowledge in the major and any appropriate related areas. To pass, the student must be evaluated as having responded satisfactorily to questions in the major areas. If a student fails any portion of the written comprehensive component, a failure of the examination is recorded. The examining committee determines if the entire written component of the examination, or only the failed portion(s), must be retaken. The entire written component lasts a minimum of 16 hours. If a student passes the written component but fails the oral, the examining committee determines if both components or only the oral must be repeated, after the minimum 90-day interim period.

8.      Dissertation Proposal Committee and Proposal

Upon passing the comprehensive examination, the aspirant becomes a candidate for the Ph.D.

The Graduate Division, using the recommendations of the candidate’s department, designates the dissertation/proposal committee at this time. The dissertation committee must consist of at least five members and may include members from other departments and divisions or, on occasion, members from outside the university.  All members of the committee must be chosen from the Graduate Faculty, and the chair must, in addition, be authorized to chair doctoral dissertations. A prospective member of the committee from outside the university must have gained appointment as a Special member of the Graduate Faculty before appointment to the committee.

Doctoral aspirants may begin work on the dissertation after they complete the equivalent of one full-time semester of doctoral study in regular student status and may use their research practicum experience in preparation for the dissertation. However, students may first enroll in dissertation credit hours only during the semester in which they take their comprehensive examinations. Dissertation hours taken during that semester count toward the minimum of 18 hours of dissertation credit only if the examinations are passed during that same semester.

The dissertation proposal must be read by a minimum of 3 dissertation committee members. One copy of the approved dissertation proposal title sheet, signed by these members of the dissertation committee, along with an electronic copy of the proposal must be submitted to the School of Education Graduate Division office.

9.      Continuous Enrollment
After passing the comprehensive examination, the candidate must be continuously enrolled, including summer sessions, until the degree is completed. A student must be continuously enrolled in accordance with the following schedule: Until the degree is completed or until 18 post-comprehensive hours have been completed (whichever comes first), the student must enroll for at least 6 hours a semester and 3 hours a summer session. Students who have not completed the degree after completing 18 hours of post-comprehensive enrollment must continue to enroll for the amount of credit that best reflects their demands on faculty time and university resources each semester and each summer session until they pass the final oral examination.

Post-comprehensive enrollment may include enrollment during the semester or summer session in which the comprehensive examination has been passed if the student is enrolled for the appropriate number of credit hours (6 during a regular semester, 3 during the summer session). Students may enroll for dissertation hours as well as other courses when the examination is taken. Students who do not pass the examination cannot apply dissertation hours to degree requirements. Under certain conditions, the candidate may petition the School of Education Graduate Division for a leave of absence during the period between the comprehensive examination and the final dissertation oral.

10.  Dissertation

The candidate must present a dissertation showing the results of original research. The dissertation for the Ph.D. considers applied or basic concerns and results in conclusions that have broad theoretical implications. The format and style of a student’s dissertation is left to the discretion of the student, the advisor, and the dissertation committee, but format and style options may be constrained or dictated by Graduate Studies policies. The dissertation is prepared under the direction of the dissertation committee. The minimum number of post-comprehensive dissertation hours in the Ph.D. program is 18. Instructions regarding the proper form of the final document may be obtained from the School of Education Graduate Division office.

11.  Final Oral Examination

When the dissertation has been tentatively accepted by the dissertation committee, and approved as ready for defense, the chair of the dissertation committee may request the School of Education Graduate Division office to schedule the final oral examination. This request must be made at least two weeks before the desired examination date. At least five months must have elapsed between the successful completion of the comprehensive examination and the date of the final dissertation oral examination.

The committee for the final oral examination must consist of at least five members (the members of the dissertation committee plus other members of the Graduate Faculty recommended by the committee chair and the department and appointed by the Graduate Division).  At least one member must be from a department other than the major department.  This member represents Graduate Studies and must be a member of the Graduate Faculty with Regular or Dissertation status. A majority of the committee members must be from the student's department.

The examination covers the dissertation and the candidate’s concentration area and, if appropriate, minor area. The candidate passes the final examination if a majority of the official examining committee members (including the chair) approves the candidate’s performance. When the final oral examination has been passed, the dissertation committee reports a grade of Honors, Satisfactory, or Unsatisfactory. Candidates who fail the final oral examination may be allowed to repeat it upon the recommendation of the dissertation committee.

12.  Dissertation Copies 

When the final oral examination has been passed and the dissertation has been signed by the members of the dissertation committee, a title page and acceptance page with original signatures and ETD Release form are to be delivered to the Graduate Division so that completion of degree requirements may be officially certified.

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

The Doctor of Education is awarded upon completion of 3 years of advanced training in both the theory and the practice of education. It is a professional degree intended primarily for practitioners in education rather than for researchers, for whom the Ph.D. is the appropriate degree plan. The Ed.D. is offered in curriculum and instruction, educational administration, higher education, and special education.

Advisory Committee

A student admitted to study for the Ed.D. is considered an aspirant for the degree until the comprehensive examination has been passed. After passing this examination, the student is considered a candidate for the degree. Each student must have an advisory committee of at least 3 members of the Graduate Faculty. One member of the committee serves as the chair. The student meets with this committee before completing 12 hours of course work to plan and formally approve an appropriate program leading to the Ed.D. The approved program, signed by members of the committee and the student, is placed in the student’s file in the School of Education Graduate Division office.

Requirements

Students must acquaint themselves thoroughly with departmental requirements for the degree, which may be in addition to general requirements and those of the School of Education. Consistent with Graduate Studies’ general regulations, it is each student’s responsibility to know and observe all university, school, departmental, and academic program regulations and procedures relating to the graduate program. In no case will a regulation be waived or an exception be granted because a student pleads ignorance of, or contends he or she was not informed of requirements, regulations, procedures, or deadlines. Responsibility for following all policies and meeting all requirements and deadlines rests with the student.

1. Time Limit-Maximum Tenure
After being admitted to doctoral programs at KU, students must complete all degree requirements in eight years.  In cases in which compelling circumstances recommend a one-year extension, the School’s Graduate Division has authority to grant the extension on the written advice of the department and dissertation committee.  Students who complete the master’s degree at KU and subsequently begin doctoral studies have a maximum total enrolled time of 10 years to complete both degrees.  Normal expectations, however, are that most master’s degrees (excluding some professional terminal degrees) should be completed in two years of full-time study, and both master’s and doctorate in six years of full-time study.   Some graduate degree programs may have more stringent time restrictions.  Students should inquire about the policy in effect in the department in which they plan to study.

A student in any of the above categories may petition the Graduate Division through the department for a leave of absence during either the pre- or post-comprehensive period to pursue full-time professional activities related to the doctoral program, extraordinary circumstances (e.g. cases of illness, emergency, financial hardship, military leave), to pursue family responsibilities, or to pursue full-time activities related to long-range professional goals.

Appropriate documentation related to these extraordinary circumstances may be requested from the student directly.  Evidence of progress towards degree will also be a determining factor in the decision to grant an exception.

Ordinarily a leave of absence is granted for one year, with the possibility of extension upon request. The time taken for a leave of absence does not count against the student’s time to degree. However, after an absence of five years, a doctoral aspirant or candidate loses status as such and must apply for readmission to the program and the Graduate Division.

2. Period of Continuous Study
This agreement is established to help assure that the Ed.D. period of continuous study requirement is fulfilled according to its purpose and with maximal benefit to the doctoral aspirant. In all options it has been recognized that continuous involvement in formal study and the close association with faculty and graduate student colleagues, which are the general goals of this requirement may be enhanced, particularly for the professional practitioner degree aspirant, by related professional activities—if such experiences are directly related, contributory to and coordinated with on-campus courses and research. The following options are available:

A. Two consecutive semesters, one of which may be a summer, of full-time enrollment in regularly scheduled courses normally at the program’s home campus (full-time = 9 hrs, fall or spring, and 6 hrs in the summer).

B. Two consecutive semesters of at least 6 hours and adjacent summer session of at least 3 hours, all in regularly scheduled courses at the program’s home campus.

C.  Three consecutive semester enrollments (excluding summer session) of at least 6 hours each in regularly scheduled courses at the program’s home campus.

D.  Eighteen (18) hours taken during the period encompassed by two consecutive summer sessions with enrollment in each of the four semesters: Summer, Fall, Spring, Summer.

E. Twenty-seven (27) hours taken during any five consecutive semesters (including summer sessions), with enrollments in each semester. During the period, the student must be employed full-time in a field directly related to the student’s academic field.

These options include the following stipulations:

  • Only course work taken after the first year of graduate study, that is, after the master’s degree or its equivalent, may satisfy the period-of-continuous-study requirement.
  • Dissertation, individual study, field experience, and off-campus practicum hours may not be included in the stated minimal requirements
  • For all enrollments of 8 hours or more, 1 course may be taken away from the program’s home campus, e.g., on the KU Edwards Campus, if need can be demonstrated from a scheduling standpoint.
  • For options B. C. and D., at least qurter-time, appropriately related, professional involvement on or off campus is required.

The period of continuous study is not merely a requirement measured in hours of enrollment or of credit in courses counted toward a degree but may include other academic and professional activities appropriate to the field of study.

The student, with the help of the advisory committee, must file in the Graduate Division office a period of continuous study plan congruent with School of Education requirements before the beginning of the formal period of continuous study.  This plan may be filed as a part of the overall program plan.

The period of continuous study requirement for the Ed.D. ensures a minimum period of bona fide on-campus study and related academic and professional involvement.  Because of the particular professional nature of the degree, appropriately related professional endeavors may

3.  Program Area
All candidates for the Ed.D. must complete a minimum of 27 credit hours in their major area, excluding credits used to fulfill Research Skills, Dissertation, and the doctoral practicum requirements. Coursework completed at KU or at another institution as part of a previous graduate degree, cannot be used to meet the credit hour requirements for this degree.

4.      Research Skills
Upon admission to doctoral study, students who have not completed a research and evaluation methods course for the education master’s degree must take the course, e.g., EPSY 715, during the first doctoral enrollment. The course used to fulfill this requirement, whether taken at KU or at another institution, does not count toward any doctoral requirements.

Before being admitted to the comprehensive examination, students must present satisfactory evidence that they possess the professional research skills of advanced practitioners in their concentrations by meeting the following research skills requirements: Complete a minimum of 9 hours of graduate study in 1 or more supporting areas that develop skills relevant to understanding, promoting, and evaluating professional practice. Supporting areas may include statistics, assessment and evaluation, qualitative methods, or historical or philosophical methods. Up to 6 hours, excluding credit hours for the required master’s course in research methods and evaluation, whether taken at KU or elsewhere, may be waived using prior B-level or higher graduate course work. Research skills requirements vary among programs to meet the individual needs of students. The student must secure the most recent information on research skills requirements from the appropriate department.

The research skills requirements chosen by the student must be approved and passed upon by the advisory committee. The chair must file the results in the School of Education Graduate Division office on the appropriate form so that they may be recorded on the student’s permanent record.

Responsible Conduct of Research: All students must satisfy departmental and university requirements regarding the responsible conduct of research. Contact your department or program for more information about research skills and responsible scholarship, and the current requirements for doctoral students. Current Lawrence and Edwards Campus policies on Doctoral Research Skills and Responsible Scholarship are listed in the KU Policy Library.

5.      Doctoral Practicum Enrollment
Ed.D. aspirants must complete at least 1 structured 3-credit-hour practicum in a supervised internship setting. A description of the practicum prepared by the student and approved by the advisory committee must be filed with the department and the graduate records office. Specific requirements for this practicum experience are available from students’ departments.

6.      Comprehensive Examination

When a Ed.D. aspirant has completed the major portion of the course work at a satisfactory level (having no more than 6 credits of required regularly scheduled coursework in the degree program remaining) and has completed the research skills requirement and all other departmental requirements prerequisite to the comprehensive examination, the department asks the School of Education Graduate Division office to schedule the comprehensive examination.

This request must be made at least 2 weeks before the date of the written portion of the examination. Students must be enrolled when they take the exam.

The examining committee must consist of at least 5 members (usually including the advisory committee). All must be members of the graduate faculty, and a majority must be faculty from the student’s home department. For more information visit the KU Policy library:  Doctoral Student Oral Exam Committee Composition and Graduate Studies Representative on Doctoral Exam Committees.

The comprehensive examination consists of both written and oral parts and covers the major area pursued by the student, as well as the minor area, if one is required by the student's program. The student passes the comprehensive examination if a majority of the official examining committee (including the chair) approves the student’s performance. The grade on this examination is Honors, Satisfactory, or Unsatisfactory. An aspirant who receives a grade of Unsatisfactory may be allowed, upon the recommendation of the department, to repeat it, but it may not be taken more than 3 times. The aspirant may not repeat the oral examination until at least 90 days have elapsed since the last unsuccessful attempt.

Note: Students in Ed.D. programs must pass both written and oral components of the comprehensive examination. Satisfactory performance on the written component must be attained before the oral component may be attempted. To fail either component is to fail the examination. All 5 members of the student’s comprehensive examination committee are involved in the evaluation process. The written component of the comprehensive examination, like the oral, focuses on advanced knowledge in the major and any appropriate related areas. The focus of the examination is the ability to relate this knowledge to tasks and problems faced by practitioners. To pass, the student must be evaluated as having responded satisfactorily to questions in the major areas. If a student fails any portion of the written comprehensive component, a failure of the examination is recorded. The examining committee determines if the entire written component of the examination, or only the failed portion(s), must be retaken.

The entire written component lasts a minimum of 16 hours. If a student passes the written component but fails the oral, the examining committee determines if both components or only the oral must be repeated, after the minimum 90-day interim period.

7.      Dissertation Proposal Committee and Proposal

          Upon passing the comprehensive examination, the aspirant becomes a candidate for the Ed.D.

The Graduate Division, using the recommendations of the candidate’s department, designates the dissertation/proposal committee at this time. The dissertation committee must consist of at least five members and may include members from other departments and divisions or, on occasion, members from outside the university.  All members of the committee must be chosen from the Graduate Faculty, and the chair must, in addition, be authorized to chair doctoral dissertations. A prospective member of the committee from outside the university must have gained appointment as a Special member of the Graduate Faculty before appointment to the committee.

Doctoral aspirants may begin work on the dissertation after they complete the equivalent of one full-time semester of doctoral study in regular student status and may use their research practicum experience in preparation for the dissertation. However, students may first enroll in dissertation credit hours only during the semester in which they take their comprehensive examinations. Dissertation hours taken during that semester count toward the minimum of 12 hours of dissertation credit only if the examinations are passed during that same semester.

The dissertation proposal must be read by a minimum of 3 members of the dissertation committee. 1 copy of the approved dissertation proposal title sheet, signed by 3 members of the dissertation committee, along with an electronic copy of the proposal must be submitted to the School of Education Graduate Division office.

8.  Continuous Enrollment
After passing the comprehensive examination, the candidate must be continuously enrolled, including summer sessions, until the degree is completed. A student must be continuously enrolled in accordance with the following schedule: Until the degree is completed or until 18 post-comprehensive hours have been completed (whichever comes first), the student must enroll for at least 6 hours a semester and 3 hours a summer session. Students who have not completed the degree after completing 18 hours of post-comprehensive enrollment must continue to enroll for the amount of credit that best reflects their demands on faculty time and university resources each semester and each summer session until they pass the final oral examination.

Post-comprehensive enrollment may include enrollment during the semester or summer session in which the comprehensive examination has been passed if the student is enrolled for the appropriate number of credit hours (6 during a regular semester, 3 during the summer session). Students may enroll for dissertation hours as well as other courses when the examination is taken. Students who do not pass the examination cannot apply dissertation hours to degree requirements. Under certain conditions, the candidate may petition the School of Education Graduate Division for a leave of absence during the period between the comprehensive examination and the final dissertation oral examination.

9.      Dissertation
The candidate must present a dissertation that exhibits the application of existing knowledge in the major field of professional study. Ed.D. candidates may satisfy the dissertation requirement by completing a comprehensive, critical assessment of the relevant literature on a major educational issue or problem. This study should demonstrate the application of existing knowledge to the author’s area of professional practice. The format and style of a student’s dissertation is left to the discretion of the student,  advisor, and committee, but format and style options may be constrained or dictated by the policy of the department from which the student is to receive the degree and by the Office of Graduate Studies. The dissertation is prepared under the direction of the dissertation committee.  The minimum number of dissertation hours in the Ed.D. program is 12. Instructions regarding the proper form of the final document may be obtained from the School of Education Graduate Division office.

10.  Final Oral Examination

When the dissertation has been tentatively accepted by the dissertation committee, the chair of the dissertation committee may request the School of Education Graduate Division office to schedule the final oral examination. This request must be made at least two weeks before the desired examination date. At least five months must have elapsed between the successful completion of the comprehensive examination and the date of the final oral examination.

The committee for the final oral examination must consist of at least five members (the members of the dissertation committee plus other members of the Graduate Faculty recommended by the committee chair and the department and appointed by the Graduate Division).  At least one member must be from a department other than the major department.  This member represents Graduate Studies and must be a member of the Graduate Faculty with Regular or Dissertation status. A majority of the committee must be members of the student's home department. 

The examination covers the dissertation and the candidate’s concentration area and, if appropriate, minor area. The candidate passes the final examination if a majority of the official examining committee members (including the chair) approves the candidate’s performance. When the final oral examination has been passed, the dissertation committee reports a grade of Honors, Satisfactory, or Unsatisfactory. Candidates who fail the final oral examination may be allowed to repeat it upon the recommendation of the dissertation committee.

11.  Dissertation Copies

When the final oral examination has been passed and the dissertation has been signed by the members of the dissertation committee, a title page and acceptance page with original signatures and ETD Release form are to be delivered to the Graduate Division so that completion of degree requirements may be officially certified.

Licensure: Added Endorsements

At least 8 hours of the required course work must be completed at KU if it is to be the recommending institution for adding endorsements to the teaching license. For information about adding endorsements, contact the School of Education at 785-864-3726.

University Career Center

The University Career Center, 110 Burge Union, 785-864-3624, provides career counseling and services for all KU students, including students in the School of Education.

Curriculum and Teaching Courses

C&T 100. Introduction to the Education Profession. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to acquaint students with the profession of education by helping to increase an awareness of the role and characteristics of an effective teacher. Large and small group activities and assignments are dispersed throughout the semester to facilitate these outcomes. Students will be involved in observation of and participation with teachers and pupils in public school classrooms, which complement course activities and assignments. Students will work with a mentor pre-service teacher from the KU School of Education to provide discussions about each of the course objectives. C&T 100 is a pre-professional course. Successful completion of the course does not guarantee eventual admission to the School of Education's Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 177. First Year Seminar: _____. 3 Hours GE11 / U.

A limited-enrollment seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues related to curriculum and instruction in the field of education. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First -time freshman status. LEC.

C&T 235. Multicultural Education. 3 Hours AE41.

The course is designed to provide the student with an awareness of and sensitivity of the concept of multicultural education. Topics related to the rationale for and processes of providing a multicultural perspective within the schools will be addressed. Field experiences will be structured to provide students with opportunities to observe the diversity within the educational setting. LEC.

C&T 322. Curriculum and the Learner in the Elementary School. 3 Hours.

Building on the experiences in C&T 100 and C&T 200, this course will focus on the learner in the elementary setting. Learning occurs as a result of interaction among learners, teacher and subject matter in the classroom within a school in a community. The impact of the interactions of these students of learning of young children is studied in this course. Emphasis is given to the factors that influence curriculum decision-making, and methods that are considered in elementary grades curriculum and how it is delivered. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 324. Curriculum Learner in the Middle School and High School. 3 Hours.

Building on experiences in C&T 100 and C&T 200, this course will focus on the learner within the high school setting. Learning occurs in a classroom within a school in a community, and the nature and structure of these settings as well as their impact on learning is studied in this course. Emphasis is given to the curriculum, the factors that influence the curriculum, and the ways that goals for high school students are reflected in the high school curriculum. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 330. Instructional Approaches for ESOL Learners in the Elementary/Early Childhood Classroom. 3 Hours.

Teaching English as a Second or Additional Language/Bilingual Education is designed to provide preservice elementary teachers with an understanding of the history and methodology of teaching English to speakers of other languages, both as a foreign language and as an additional language within American English settings. Future ESL/EFL/EB teachers will be prepared to develop the investigative, decision-making, and reflective teaching skills needed to work with English language learners of elementary age, and to impart language instruction in the appropriate context. Emphasis is placed on developing a clear understanding of who English language learners are; what programs and services are-or should be-available to the ESOLs/EBs; the critical pedagogical aspects of teaching ESL/EFL/EB; and the preparation of teaching materials for classroom use. Prerequisite: Admission to the teacher education program. LEC.

C&T 331. Instructional Approaches for ESOL Learners in the Middle/Secondary Classroom. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide preservice middle/secondary discipline specific teachers with an understanding of the history and methodology of teaching English to speakers of other languages, both as a foreign language and as an additional language within American English settings. Future ESL/EFL/EB teachers will be prepared to develop the investigative, decision-making, and reflective teachings skills needed to work with English language learners of all ages, and to impart language instruction in the appropriate context. Emphasis is placed on developing a clear understanding of who English language learners are; what programs and services are-or should be- available to the ESOLs/EBs; the critical pedagogical aspects of teaching ESL/EFL/EB; and the preparation of teaching materials for classroom use. Prerequisite: Admission to the teacher education program. LEC.

C&T 335. Curriculum and Instruction in Middle and Secondary History and Government Classrooms. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to help prepare students to teach social studies in the middle and secondary grades. Prerequisite: Admission to the teacher education program. LEC.

C&T 344. Children's Literature in the Elementary School. 2 Hours.

A study of literature (poetry, folk literature, fiction, and nonfiction) appropriate for elementary school children with a focus on contemporary children's books. Emphasis will be on selection of literature based on child development, literary quality, curriculum, and pluralism and the engagement of children in literature experiences from the interactive, reader response, and critical perspectives. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 347. Social Studies in the Elementary Classroom. 3 Hours.

A study of curricula, instructional strategies, and classroom organization for social studies education K-6. Emphasis is placed on the effective implementation of social studies programs in classroom settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education in elementary, middle, or secondary, or the Unified Early Childhood programs. LEC.

C&T 349. Science in the Elementary Classroom. 3 Hours.

In this course, you will develop an understanding of how children learn science and why science education is important. You will examine effective approaches to teaching, instructional materials, and student assessment and will learn how to plan and implement a science unit. The course will emphasize a guided-inquiry approach to science instruction appropriate for the abilities and interests of children in grades K-6. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education. LEC.

C&T 351. Mathematics for the Elementary Classroom. 3 Hours.

This course is a study of the curriculum, instructional strategies, and classroom organization for mathematics in grades K-6. Emphasis is placed on the effective implementation of mathematics programs in classroom settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education. LEC.

C&T 352. Literacy Instruction in the Primary Grades (K-3). 3 Hours.

This course is intended to develop the attitudes, knowledge, and skills necessary to effectively instruct primary grades (K-3) children through the development of literacy skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking, spelling, and handwriting. The major goals of this course are for the prospective teacher to develop an understanding of literacy development of the primary-grades child, current literacy theories, and the ability to work with a number of approaches to promote literacy learning and a positive attitude toward literacy in all primary-grades students who may have different needs due to language, culture, learning challenges, and/or differing stages of development. This course is to be taken concurrently with C&T 353, Literacy Practicum in the Primary Grades. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 353. Literacy Practicum in the Primary Grades. 1 Hour.

This supervised practicum is intended to allow the pre-service teacher to apply the knowledge gained in C&T 352, Literacy Instruction in the primary grades (K-3), by teaching children in the primary grades. To be taken concurrently with C&T 352 Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 354. Literacy Instruction in the Intermediate Grades. 2 Hours.

This course is intended to develop the attitudes, knowledge, and skills necessary to effectively instruct intermediate-grades children (4-6) through the development of literacy skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking, and spelling. The major goals of this course are for the prospective teacher to develop an understanding of literacy development of the intermediate-grades child, current literacy theories, and the ability to work with a number of approaches to promote literacy learning and a positive attitude toward literacy in all intermediate-grades students who may have different needs due to language, culture, learning challenges, and/or differing stages of development. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. This course is to be taken concurrently with C&T 355, Literacy Practicum in the Intermediate Grades. LEC.

C&T 355. Literacy Practicum in the Intermediate Grades (4-6). 1 Hour.

This supervised practicum is intended to allow the preservice teacher to apply the knowledge gained in C&T 354, Literacy Instruction in the intermediate grades (4-6), by teaching children in the intermediate grades. To be taken concurrently with C&T 354. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 359. Literacy in the Content Areas. 1 Hour.

An introduction to reading in relation to specific areas of art, music and health and physical education. Focus on specialized vocabulary and literature related to each area. Introduction of specific strategies to teach vocabulary and comprehension and to integrated units of study. Prerequisite: Admission to certification program in music education, art education, health education, or physical education. LEC.

C&T 360. Knowing and Learning in Mathematics and Science. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on issues of what it means to learn and know science and mathematics. What are the standards for knowing we will use? How is knowing and learning structured and how does what we know change and develop? For the science and mathematics educator, what are the tensions between general, cross-disciplinary characterizations of knowing (e.g. intelligence) and the specifics of coming to understand powerful ideas in mathematics and science? What are the links between knowing and developing in learning theory, and the content and evolution of scientific ideas. Also, current issues and tensions in education will be discussed, especially as it relates to mathematics and science instruction. LEC.

C&T 366. Classroom Interactions in Mathematics and Science. 3 Hours GE22.

To make prospective teachers aware of multiple models of teaching (including direct instruction, inquiry teaching and use of small groups); the advantages, disadvantages and uses of each; and what each model requires of teachers. To allow prospective teachers to explore ways of probing student understanding through authentic assessment, evaluating student understanding through student artifacts, and enhancing student understanding through lesson plans built around models of how people learn. To make prospective teachers aware of equity and diversity issues in classroom teaching and ways of ensuring that all students have an opportunity to learn. To make students aware of the proficiencies for licensure recognized by UKanTeach and Kansas State Board of Education and facilitate students' demonstration and documentation of these through their development of a professional portfolio. To develop students' capacity to identify and evaluate best teaching practices as presented in research literature. Prerequisite: C&T 360. LEC.

C&T 420. Teaching Kansas Government and Contemporary Public Policy Issues: _____. 3 Hours.

A study of the constitution, organization, functions, and processes of Kansas government, of contemporary public policy issues with local, state and national implications, and of strategies for teaching these in middle and secondary classrooms. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education and POLS 110. LEC.

C&T 430. Teaching Literature for Young Adults. 3 Hours.

Teaching literature (novel, short story, poetry, drama, nonfiction) suitable for students in the middle school, the junior high school, and the senior high school. Ethnic literature, censorship, bibliographies, and other relevant sources of information about books for young adults will be studied. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education. LEC.

C&T 448. Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum. 3 Hours.

Content area teachers do far more than impart information to students. They play an important role in guiding middle/secondary students as they use reading and writing as tools for learning. This course includes an overview of the state and national reading and writing scores of adolescents. Students will then be introduced to the basic processes or ways in which individuals may learn to read and write. The course continues with a focus on the instructional strategies and materials that promote the development of reading and writing in the context of teaching new information. Additionally, the course emphasizes the informal methods educators can use, on an on-going basis, to diagnose their students ability to comprehend content material. Finally, appropriate fix-up strategies will be modeled. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 460. Project Based Instruction in Mathematics and Science. 3 Hours.

This course will have three essential components. The first will be a theory driven perspective accounting for what we know of how people learn and how project-based instruction improves student learning in math and science. The second component will provide the students with support as they develop their own project-based unit. The third component will be field experiences consisting of two parts: 1) observation of well-implemented project-based instruction in local schools and 2) teaching project-based activities in an informal education setting. Prerequisite: C&T 360. LEC.

C&T 489. Advanced Teaching Practicum. 1 Hour.

This supervised practicum is intended to allow the pre-service teacher to apply knowledge gained in SPED 507; C&T 448, ELPS 537; and C&T 540, C&T 541, C&T 542, C&T 543 and C&T 544: Advanced (Content Area) Methods by teaching children in the middle/secondary grades. To be taken concurrently with SPED 507; C&T 448, ELPS 537; and C&T 540, C&T 541, C&T 542, C&T 543 and C&T 544: Advanced (Content Area) Methods. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 490. Student Teaching. 6 Hours.

A supervised teaching experience in an approved school setting, with level and subject area to be selected according to the teaching field. Prerequisite: Successful completion of fall practicum experiences and demonstration of appropriate professional dispositions. LEC.

C&T 491. TESOL Practicum for Kansas State Endorsement. 3 Hours.

The TESOL Practicum allows individuals to gain supervised experience in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) for a professional KSDE ESOL endorsement and advancement. Prerequisite: Completion of all TESOL endorsement courses. LEC.

C&T 494. Internship. 6 Hours.

A supervised internship experience leading to initial certification. The student assumes the total professional role as a teacher in an approved school setting, with level and subject area to be selected according to the teaching field. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all practicum experiences and demonstration of appropriate professional dispositions. LEC.

C&T 495. Seminar: Developing the Teaching Portfolio. 3 Hours AE61.

This course serves to instruct students in the research, teaching, and writing components of developing a teaching portfolio. The seminar will provide a forum for discussion and deeper exploration into topics and issues related to working in the school setting, teaching, and developing a professional teaching philosophy. Course is graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. Prerequisite: Enrollment in Student Teaching or Internship during the Spring semester. LEC.

C&T 497. Independent Study in: _____. 1-2 Hours.

Only one enrollment permitted each semester. A maximum of four hours will apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Recommendation of advisor and consent of instructor. IND.

C&T 499. Bachelor's Project. 4-6 Hours.

A formal report of some aspect of the field experience that relates formal learning and in situ experience to program planning, implementation, and evaluation. Topic will be selected in consultation with the project advisor. Prerequisite: C&T490 and C&T 491 (C&T 491 may be taken concurrently). IND.

C&T 500. Student Teaching in: _____. 1-6 Hours AE61.

A supervised teaching experience in an approved school setting, with level and subject area to be selected according to the teaching field. Prerequisite: Admission to the Student Teaching program. FLD.

C&T 501. Student Teaching Practicum in: _____. 1-6 Hours.

A supervised classroom teaching experience under the direction of an experienced teacher and in close relationship with a university supervisor. Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Certification Program and approval of advisor. FLD.

C&T 503. International Perspectives in Primary and Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

This course is will expose students to a variety of debates and developments related to primary and secondary education in our globalized era. Students will survey educational systems from the US and selected world regions, comparing and contrasting them in terms of access, funding, curriculum, and pedagogy. They will investigate educational systems from the perspective of international development while addressing issues of local vs. national or international control, tradition vs. global advancement, and other challenges and trade-offs. Prerequisite: Junior standing or higher, or permission of instructor: The course is suitable for advanced undergraduate and master's degree seeking students. LEC.

C&T 530. Curriculum and Instruction in Foreign Language Classrooms. 3 Hours.

A study of philosophy, objectives, curriculum, instructional strategies, and evaluation in teaching foreign language at the K-12 levels. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 533. Curriculum and Instruction in Middle & Secondary English/Language Arts Classrooms. 3 Hours.

This is an English/Language Arts methods course that focuses on curriculum development and instructional strategies appropriate for teaching English/Language Arts in grades 5-12. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 537. Curriculum and Instruction in Middle and Secondary Science Classrooms. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to help you prepare to teach science in the middle and secondary grades. The instructor designed the class sessions and learning tasks to enable you to make progress toward achieving the Kansas Science Teaching Standards and Kansas Professional Education Standards. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 539. Curriculum and Instruction in Middle and Secondary Mathematics Classrooms. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide focused study of curriculum development and instructional strategies appropriate for teaching mathematics in grades 5-12. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 540. Advanced Practices in Teaching English in the Middle and Secondary Schools. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to provide continued study of curriculum development and instructional strategies appropriate for teaching English/Language Arts in grades 5-12 and as a final readiness for the undergraduate student teaching experience. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 541. Advanced Practices in Teaching Social Studies in Middle/Secondary Schools. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of curriculum development and instructional strategies appropriate for teaching social studies in grades 6-12 and application of learning in a middle/secondary classroom. Prerequisite: C&T 335; SPED 326 and, C&T 324 LEC.

C&T 542. Advanced Practices in Teaching Science in the Middle and Secondary Schools. 3 Hours.

This course is designed as a final readiness for the semester-long student teaching experience and the Kansas Performance Teaching Portfolio to be completed during that student teaching experience. The course deals with the analysis, adaptation, and application of varied instructional designs to implement curricula in specific science areas in grades 5-12. Prerequisite: Admission to the middle-level licensure program in science education at the undergraduate level or one of the graduate licensure programs in middle/secondary science. Successful completion of C&T 537. LEC.

C&T 543. Advanced Practices in Teaching Mathematics in the Middle and Secondary Schools. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to provide continued study of curriculum development and instructional strategies appropriate for teaching mathematics in grades 5-12 and as a final readiness for the undergraduate of GLP student teaching experience. Prerequisite: Admission to the middle-level licensure program in mathematics education at the undergraduate level or the GLP in middle or secondary mathematics. Successful completion of C&T 539. LEC.

C&T 544. Advanced Practices:Situating Foreign Language Content, Dispositions, Skills&Tools Language Classroom. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced Foreign Language methods course that focuses on the critical importance of the socio-linguistic environment of foreign language classrooms. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

C&T 598. Special Course: _____. 1-5 Hours AE61.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education students, primarily for undergraduates. LEC.

C&T 620. Teaching English as a Second Language/Bilingual Education. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to study the objectives and methods of ESL/Bilingual education. Students will examine methods and techniques of teaching: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the ESL/Bilingual Education settings. The course will also emphasize the importance of culture in second language teaching, and self-evaluation of teaching and instructional materials. Undergraduate course that will meet with C&T 820 Teaching English as a Second Language/Bilingual Education. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education. LEC.

C&T 621. Diagnosis and Remediation in Second Language Education. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of diagnostic techniques and instruments used to identify and remediate specific learning difficulties associated with normal second language development in the area of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course includes a review of research concerning assessment as it relates to error analysis in the second language context. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education. LEC.

C&T 622. Second Language Acquisition. 3 Hours.

This course provides an intensive review of the theory and research base of second language acquisition. Particular attention is given to the influence of research trends in linguistics and psychology on second language education theory and practice. Current trends in second language education are examined in light of the historical theory base. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education. LEC.

C&T 630. Understanding the Nature of Talent in Children and Youth. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the social, cognitive, affective, and other developmental aspects of talent as manifested in children and youth with high potential. The course provides an opportunity to examine characteristics, strengths, and needs of children and their families. The course focuses on the foundational aspects of gifted/talented education: educational and political history of the field, etiology of extraordinary potential, and identification and assessment techniques, instruments, and systems. Included in the course are relevant research, policies and regulations, services, and information resources. Prerequisite: SPED 325, SPED 425, SPED 431, SPED 725 or equivalent. LEC.

C&T 631. Teaching for Talent Development. 3 Hours.

The course introduces key theories and basic principles of curriculum development and introduction for students with high potential and/or high achievement. Frameworks and models for modifying general education content, cognitive processes, and learning outcomes are applied to enhancing talent development. The course addresses affective considerations, peer relations, and working with families. Prerequisite: C&T 630 or C&T 730. LEC.

C&T 649. An International Teaching Experience. 3 Hours.

This study abroad focuses on professional growth in teaching and understanding education based on an international experience. Students learn about curriculum and teaching from an international perspective, and engage in professional discussions with Italian teachers and administrators. Students engage in culturally responsive teaching in preschool-secondary settings, they participate in family and community activities/events, and they visit renowned museums and cities. Prerequisite: Application through the Office of Study Abroad and interview with the director. LEC.

C&T 707. Project Based Instruction. 3 Hours.

This course will emphasize exploring, designing, and evaluating materials and pedagogy to work toward the design of project-based curriculum and instruction. Topics focus on the principles of project-based instruction as well as multiple models for its use in the classroom. LEC.

C&T 709. Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction. 3 Hours.

Basic concepts and processes of curriculum and instruction, including theories, planning models, resources for decision-making, current trends, research, and proposals for improvement of curriculum and instruction. LEC.

C&T 710. Writing, Language, and Learning. 3 Hours.

This course will situate issues about writing and learning in the context of more general inquiry about language and learning. We will read research related to classroom discourse and the teaching of writing in secondary classrooms. We will then connect this body of research to the teaching of English in middle/secondary classrooms. LEC.

C&T 711. Teaching Young Adult Literature (Grades 7-12). 3 Hours.

A study of the characteristics of adolescents with respect to their interest and reading habits; criteria for choosing books for junior and senior high school in-class and out-of-class reading; selection of materials; methods for helping poor readers; literary discrimination and appreciation; censorship; ethnic literature; techniques for presenting literary selection in class. Wide reading among best of current and classical literature. LEC.

C&T 730. Understanding Talent. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the social, cognitive, affective, and other developmental aspects of talent as manifested in children and youth with high potential. The course provides an opportunity to examine characteristics, strengths, and needs of these children and their families. The course focuses on the foundational aspects of gifted/talented education: educational and political history of the field, etiology of extraordinary potential, and identification and assessment techniques, instruments, and systems. Included in the course are relevant research, policies and regulations, services, and information resources. Prerequisite: SPED 425, SPED 431, SPED 725, or equivalent introductory course on exceptional children and youth. LEC.

C&T 731. Teaching for Talent Development. 3 Hours.

The course introduces key theories and basic principles of curriculum development and introduction for students with high potential and/or high achievement. Frameworks and models for modifying general education content, cognitive processes, and learning outcomes are applied to enhancing talent development. The course addresses affective considerations, peer relations, and working with families. Prerequisite: C&T 644 or C&T 730 or equivalent course on exceptional children and youth. LEC.

C&T 732. Teaching for Talent in General Education Settings. 3 Hours.

This course is for classroom teachers concerned about meeting the needs of students with high potential in their classrooms. Students will be introduced to various curriculum models and teaching strategies commonly employed in special programs for gifted/talented students. There will be opportunities to apply gifted education models to modify existing curriculum or to develop new curricula which enhances the abilities of all students. Prerequisite: C&T 644 or C&T 730 or equivalent introductory course on exceptional children and youth. LEC.

C&T 733. Practicum in Gifted and Talented Education. 1-10 Hours.

A course designed to provide experiences for students to work intensively and to teach identified gifted and high potential students in educational settings. Students will develop competencies relative to implementing individual group and individual education plans through a variety of instructional alternatives. Arranged service delivery options are possible. Prerequisite: C&T 645, C&T 731, C&T 732, or equivalent course. FLD.

C&T 738. Applied Research in the Classroom. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to facilitate the implementation and completion of an action research project during the internship experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of student teaching. LEC.

C&T 739. Internship in Teaching: _____. 1-15 Hours.

A supervised internship experience leading to initial certification. The student assumes the total professional role as a teacher in an approved school setting, with level and subject area to be selected according to the teaching field. Prerequisite: C&T 500 and C&T 736 appropriate to the student's teaching level and area, or equivalent. FLD.

C&T 740. Foundations of Reading: Process, Theory, and Instruction. 3 Hours.

It is the purpose of this course to introduce students to the foundations of the reading process, developmental levels, theory, models, and procedures at the emergent, elementary, and secondary levels. Elements of cultural, linguistic, and ethnic diversity that affect the reading process are included. Students work with research related to the reading process, remediation, and assessment. LEC.

C&T 741. Comprehension and Study Strategies for Use with Multiple Texts. 3 Hours.

It is the purpose of this course to examine research, theory, and practice in reading comprehension. Emphasis is placed on the application of strategies for various text types (expository, narrative, persuasive, and technical) for teaching reading comprehension and study skills across content areas in the K-12 classrooms. Prerequisite: C&T 740 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

C&T 742. Language and Literature in the Reading Program. 3 Hours.

A study of linguistic and literary aspects of reading instruction, focusing on language and cognitive development as they relate to reading. Emphasis will be on approaches for differentiating reading instruction to provide for less proficient to gifted readers, research and issues related to reader response, techniques for assessing children's reading attitudes and interests, procedures for selecting literature, and strategies for integrating literature into the elementary school reading program. Prerequisite: C&T 740 or permission of instructor. LEC.

C&T 743. Writing and Spelling Development and Instruction. 3 Hours.

A study of the research base on writing, spelling, speaking, and listening for teaching the language arts; an overview of development in writing and spelling, the writing and spelling processes and instruction, and strategies for integrating the language arts. Prerequisite: Admission to a masters program within the School of Education, C&T 740 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

C&T 744. Teaching Literature to Children. 3 Hours.

An opportunity to survey the broad range of trade books published for children; criteria for book selection; children's reading interests and tastes; illustrations of children's books; sources for selecting literature; poetry; the role of children's literature in today's elementary curriculum. LEC.

C&T 745. Reading and the English Language Learner. 3 Hours.

LEC.

C&T 748. Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum. 3 Hours.

In C&T 748, preservice content teachers, who have had no previous literacy courses, are introduced to the basic processes of reading and to instructional strategies and materials that promote the development of reading, writing, and studying in the context of teaching new information. Additionally, we discuss the ways in which teachers diagnose, in an informal, on-going basis, their students' abilities to comprehend the material they are teaching. LEC.

C&T 749. An International Teaching Experience. 3 Hours.

This study abroad focuses on professional growth in teaching and understanding education based on an international experience. Students learn about curriculum and teaching from an international perspective, and engage in professional discussions with Italian teachers and administrators. Students engage in culturally responsive teaching in preschool-secondary settings, they participate in family and community activities/events, and they visit renowned museums and cities. Prerequisite: Application through the Office of Study Abroad and interview with the director. LEC.

C&T 750. Connecting Research to Classroom Practice in Elementary Mathematics and Science. 3 Hours.

The primary purpose of this course is to examine current research on issues important to elementary mathematics and science programs. The course will explore issues important to the classroom practices of elementary mathematics and science teachers. Provides a broad background for understanding current issues related to elementary mathematics and science curriculum, instruction, and assessment. LEC.

C&T 760. Modern Approaches to Elementary Social Studies. 3 Hours.

A study of the purpose, content, psychology, and materials and methods for teaching the social sciences in the elementary school. Emphasis on principles and procedures for combining the social studies with other areas of the curriculum in broad unit instruction. Prerequisite: Nine hours of Education including educational psychology. LEC.

C&T 762. Modern Approaches to Middle/Secondary Social Studies. 3 Hours.

The purpose of the course is to offer preservice and practicing K-12 social studies educators the following: (1) an overview of theoretical bases for social studies education and of the social studies and discipline specific curriculum standards; (2) a review of the major curricular and extracurricular K-12 social studies programs; (3) strategies for the design, implementation, and evaluation of social studies programs; and (4) experience with the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of a social studies program. Prerequisite: Nine hours of Education including educational psychology. LEC.

C&T 763. Economic Education. 2-3 Hours.

An examination of the concepts, theories, and resource materials utilized in teaching economics in the K-12 curriculum. Particular attention is given to the functional integration of economic concepts into the elementary and secondary social studies curriculum. The use of economic resource material is considered. Participants develop projects for use in their own classrooms. LEC.

C&T 764. Teaching Economics in: _____. 3 Hours.

A critical analysis of the relationship between economics and a designated school subject selected from history, geography, or consumer education; a determination of the economic concepts that can be appropriately integrated into the particular discipline; and a comprehensive search of the particular curriculum area to identify the most effective and efficient points at which the economic concepts can be integrated. Prerequisite: C&T 763. LEC.

C&T 765. Teaching with Community, Contemporary, and Primary Resources. 3 Hours.

A practical course designed for grades 4-12 teachers who wish to utilize community-based, mass media, and/or primary resources. The course focuses on the use of community resources such as local historical societies, museums, and government agencies; on the use of mass media such as newspapers, magazines, organizations' newsletters, television, and film; and on the use of primary resources such as artifacts, documents, recordings, and oral historians. Participants receive sample resources from each of the three areas along with accompanying activities. LEC.

C&T 770. Pedagogical Considerations in the 21st Century Classrooms. 3 Hours.

Exploration of pedagogy in the 21st century classroom and examination of current learning environments and strategies available to enhance student learning and engagement. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program in the School of Education. Admission to a non-degree program in the School of Education. LEC.

C&T 797. Special Project in: _____. 2 Hours.

Implementation of the curriculum project planned in C&T 734 or C&T 735; implementation and assessment of the special project will occur during the internship. Prerequisite: C&T 734, C&T 735, and C&T 736. RSH.

C&T 798. Special Course: _____. 1-5 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals--primarily for graduate students. LEC.

C&T 800. Foundations of Curriculum Development. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students to gain a functional understanding of the historical, philosophical, political, psychological, and cultural factors which affect the designing and implementation of curriculum at several levels: the individual classroom, the team, the school, the larger administrative unit, the state, and the nation. Prerequisite: C&T 709 or permission of instructor. LEC.

C&T 801. Planning for School Improvement. 2-3 Hours.

The course will emphasize the latest research and practice related to school improvement. Students will function as a member of a school improvement team to assimilate and synthesize research and practice into the development, revision, and/or assessment of a school improvement plan for a specific school site. Corequisite: Enrollment in the summer institute on school improvement. LEC.

C&T 802. Curriculum Planning for Educational Settings. 3 Hours.

A focus on organizing and managing curriculum development in educational settings. Such curricular decisions as writing philosophies, setting goals and objectives, selecting and organizing content, and designing and monitoring evaluation procedures will be emphasized. Providing leadership for the collaborative process of curriculum planning in organizational settings will receive attention. Prerequisite: C&T 709, admission to Building Principal Certification program, or permission of instructor. LEC.

C&T 803. Differentiating Curriculum and Instruction. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for educators interested in expanding curriculum and instruction to accommodate diverse learners in the classroom, K-12. Topics include: models, methods, and resources for differentiating curriculum and instruction, designing and modifying differentiated curriculum, evaluating student learning, and introducing students, parents and colleagues to differentiation. An evidence-based, practical course for teachers, administrators, and support personnel. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate School. LEC.

C&T 804. Trends and Issues in Middle Level Education. 3 Hours.

Information from current research, area specialists and exemplary practitioners will be used to extend appropriate teaching strategies and supplement background knowledge on special topics related to social, emotional and physical development as it relates to the curricula and young adolescents. LEC.

C&T 805. Planning Instruction and Instructional Strategies in Urban Settings. 3 Hours.

This course will prepare students to become cognizant of the particular contextual variables that pertain to the urban setting, engage in instructional planning utilizing pertinent instructional strategies for urban classrooms. Students will become familiar with conceptual frameworks appropriate to education in the urban environment, review research on education in the urban setting, and discuss goals and options for effectively coping with the demands of the urban classroom. FLD.

C&T 806. Instructional Strategies and Models. 3 Hours.

Analysis of models of teaching which represent distinct orientations toward students and how they learn. The application of these models is complemented by the study of research evidence on effective teaching strategies. Prerequisite: C&T 709. LEC.

C&T 807. Multicultural Education. 3 Hours.

In order to provide the student with an understanding of multicultural education, the course will examine the effects of such issues as ethnicity in America, the melting pot theory, separatism, cultural pluralism, legal issues, and bilingual education upon the curriculum and instruction in today's classrooms. It will include an evaluation of materials for bias and stereotypes. Field experiences are a part of this course. LEC.

C&T 808. Qualitative Research: Curriculum Inquiry. 3 Hours.

Curriculum Inquiry provides an opportunity to reflect, explore, understand, and broaden perspectives of curriculum through examining the theories, methodologies, strategies, and design of qualitative research. This course is designed to develop a common understanding of the major elements of qualitative research, while offering each student an opportunity to examine research topics and methods of personal interest, with particular attention to curricular issues. The course also includes practical experience with various modes of data collection and analysis. LEC.

C&T 809. Creative Thinking and Learning. 3 Hours.

This course provides an opportunity to investigate the nature of the creative process in educational settings. The knowledge base for the course builds from foundations of creativity, principles and theories of identifying and enhancing creative production, and affective learner variables. The course blends classic and contemporary works in creativity, and features the application of theories and models of the origins and development of creativity to promoting creative thinking and learning among children, youth and adults. Participants learn about, apply, and adapt techniques for defining and identifying creative potential and for encouraging creative thinking in educational settings. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate school. LEC.

C&T 810. Issues in Teaching Language Arts. 3 Hours.

A study of present curricula in junior and senior high school English and speech; current thinking in grammar and usage; language development in oral and written communication; problems of teaching reading and literature in the junior and senior high school; construction and reorganization of language arts courses. Students will be permitted to make an intensive study of an individual problem relating to more effective instruction in the language arts. LEC.

C&T 819. Foreign Language/EFL Teaching Methods. 3 Hours.

This course addresses foreign language/EFL teaching methods and techniques that are related to second language acquisition theories and appropriate for the teaching of foreign languages/EFL to children, adolescents, and adult learners. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate program (Master or Doctorate.) LEC.

C&T 820. Methods of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to study the objectives and methods of ESL/Bilingual education. Students will examine methods and techniques of teaching: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the ESL/Bilingual Education settings. The course will also emphasize the importance of culture in second language teaching, and self-evaluation of teaching and instructional materials. Prerequisite: Corequisite: C&T 709. LEC.

C&T 821. Assessment in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of diagnostic techniques and instruments used to identify and remediate specific learning difficulties associated with normal second language development in the area of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course includes a review of research concerning assessment as it relates to error analysis in the second language context. Prerequsite: Corequisite: C&T 820. LEC.

C&T 822. Second Language Acquisition for Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Educators (TESOL). 3 Hours.

This course provides an intensive review of the theory and research base of second language acquisition. Particular attention is given to the influence of research trends in linguistics and psychology on second language education theory and practice. Current trends in second language education are examined in light of the historical theory base. Prerequisite: C&T 820. LEC.

C&T 823. Intercultural Competence for Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Educators (TESOL). 3 Hours.

This course includes the study of the interrelationship of language and culture and the use of multicultural training techniques to develop cultural awareness and positive attitudes in the second language classroom. Emphasis is on the integration of culture in the second language curriculum. Prerequisite: C&T 820 or C&T 803. LEC.

C&T 824. Problems in Second Language Instruction. 3 Hours.

This course presents a study of curricula and instruction in the second language setting at all levels with emphasis on educational research concerning these issues. Particular attention is given to developing competency in locating and utilizing sources of information and to preparing the research document. The course facilitates practical problem solving in the second language learning context. Prerequisite: C&T 820. LEC.

C&T 825. Advanced Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). 3 Hours.

This course provides a supervised teaching experience in a setting appropriate to the goals of the prospective ESL/Bilingual teacher: elementary, secondary, or adult. Particular attention is given to lesson planning, classroom management, and the development of self-evaluation techniques. This course will also emphasize structured classroom observation prior to teaching and techniques for developing and maintaining positive working relationships with other professionals in the school setting. Prerequisite: C&T 820, C&T 821, and C&T 822 or C&T 824. FLD.

C&T 826. Linguistic Analysis for Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages Educators (TESOL). 3 Hours.

This course offers pre- and in-service teachers the basic foundations of language analysis necessary for the teaching of second/foreign languages. The course covers basic linguistic topics common to all human languages (grammatical, phonological, and semantic aspects) with the intent to help teachers understand and address common languages problems that students face when learning English as a second/foreign language. LEC.

C&T 827. Teaching Pronunciation for Foreign Lanuage/Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). 3 Hours.

The objective of this course is to give prospective language teachers the requisite theoretical and practical background for making decisions concerning pronunciation teaching. This course provides second and foreign language teachers with the necessary knowledge and skills to address the teaching of pronunciation in the foreign /language classroom. After a review of theoretical and practical research dealing with universal human speech perception and production, implications for the design of appropriate strategies and lessons to teaching pronunciation, both at the segmental and suprasegmental levels, are addressed. Prerequisite: C&T 444, C&T 820 or C&T 822. LEC.

C&T 828. Language and Identity. 3 Hours.

This interdisciplinary seminar explores the interrelationship between language and identity, and the role of language in developing identities of second language learners. LEC.

C&T 829. Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages in Global Context (TESOL). 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to investigate contemporary issues in and key concepts pertaining to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) throughout the world. We will examine primary research and employ a sociocultural lens to better understand how the phenomenon of globalization has shaped how, why, and the conditions under which English is taught and learned on different continents, as well as critiquing research methods and approaches to studying English language teaching and learning. LAB.

C&T 830. Classroom Applications of Assessment Information. 1 Hour.

The primary purpose of this course is to examine classroom-based practices for identifying intellectual and creative potential in school-aged children and youth, and to apply that information to classroom instruction as well as to individual education planning. Particular attention is paid to populations who are traditionally underserved due to language status, ethnicity, socio-economic status, geography, or multiple exceptionality. Parent and student roles are also emphasized. An evidence-based practice course for teachers, administrators, and support personnel. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate School. LEC.

C&T 831. Personal Dimensions of Talent. 1 Hour.

The course focuses on affective aspects of individuals with high potential. Particular attention is paid to populations who are traditionally underserved due to ethnicity, socio-economic status, geography, or multiple exceptionality. The course focuses on theories, models and methods for understanding and addressing the successful personal development of talented individuals, supporting families, and personal issues linked to high potential. An evidence-based practice course for teachers, administrators, and support personnel. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate School in Education. LEC.

C&T 840. Emergent Literacy and Beginning Reading. 3 Hours.

A study of emergent literacy through the beginning stages of literacy development. Course content focuses on the history, theory, and research that supports instructional reading practices for children Pre-kindergarten through grade 2. Prerequisite: C&T 740, C&T 741, or permission of instructor. LEC.

C&T 841. Early Intervention in Reading Practicum. 3 Hours.

A case study approach to the instruction of children in need of early intervention in reading. Requires assessment, instruction, and case reports of tutored children. Prerequisite: C&T 740, C&T 741, C&T 840, or permission of instructor. FLD.

C&T 842. Supporting Striving Readers: Adolescent through Adult. 3 Hours.

A study of the characteristics and multiple causes of reading and writing difficulties, principles and procedures for diagnosing and remediating reading difficulties, how to provide individual and group intervention strategies, communicate diagnostic information, and gain awareness of the impact of research on instructional decision-making for students with reading difficulties. Prerequisite: Admission to a masters program within the School of Education, C&T 740, C&T 741, C&T 840, and C&T 841, or permission of instructor. LEC.

C&T 843. Supporting Striving Readers Practicum. 3 Hours.

Case study approach to the treatment of pre-adolescent through adults with reading disabilities. Requires diagnostic testing of the learner, compilation of case study reports, and participating in staffing for the purpose of designing remedial reading programs. Students also participate in implementation of remedial programs with pre-adolescent through adults through tutoring in either a clinical setting or a public school setting. Prerequisite: Admission to a masters program within the School of Education, C&T 740, C&T 741, C&T 840, C&T 841, C&T 842, or permission of instructor. LEC.

C&T 844. The Reading Program: Coordination and Supervision. 3 Hours.

An overview of the role of the reading coordinator/supervisor and that individual's responsibility for the components of a balanced reading program. Emphasis will be given to assessment of the reading program, strategies for change, improving the reading program, in-service programs, working with other school personnel, providing services, and public relations. Prerequisite: C&T 740, C&T 741, C&T 840, C&T 841, C&T 842, and C&T 843. LEC.

C&T 845. Reading Specialist Internship. 1-2 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences to develop the necessary instructional and leadership competencies of a reading specialist. Activities will include district and building level needs assessment, data analysis, professional development of teachers and paraprofessionals, and cooperative planning with teachers and administrators around issues of literacy instruction and achievement. Prerequisite: Completion (at the University of Kansas) of course requirements for the Reading Specialist program. The Reading Specialist course requirements may be a part of a graduate degree. FLD.

C&T 850. Seminar in Science and Mathematics Educational Research. 3 Hours.

The primary purpose of this course is to examine literature in science and mathematics education in order to better understand research in these fields from both a historical and contemporary perspective. The process of examining literature in these fields will be used to help understand how to plan, conduct, and evaluate research in science and math education. This course emphasizes both qualitative and quantitative research in science and math education. LEC.

C&T 851. Modern Approaches to Middle/Secondary School Mathematics. 3 Hours.

A study of aspects of curriculum and instruction in middle/secondary school mathematics programs, including research on teaching and learning mathematics. Prerequisite: Teaching experience in middle-level or high school mathematics or permission of instructor. LEC.

C&T 852. Instruction in Mathematics and Science. 3 Hours.

In this course, students will explore a variety of research-based instructional theories, models, and strategies for teaching and learning of mathematics and science. They will apply and evaluate the usage of one instructional strategy in an action research project in their classrooms. Prerequisite: C&T 709. LEC.

C&T 853. Connecting Research to Classroom Practice in Middle/Secondary Science. 3 Hours.

This course will explore current research on issues important to middle and high school science teachers so they can use research to support and improve their classroom practice. Prerequisite: Teaching experience in middle level or high school science or permission of instructor. LEC.

C&T 854. Assessment and Evaluation in Science and Mathematics. 3 Hours.

The primary purpose of this course is to examine assessment and evaluation in science and mathematics, including assessment of students, teachers, schools, and educational programs. The course will examine technical characteristics of various assessment methods including both traditional and alternative methods. In additional and alternative methods. In addition, the course will analyze and discuss various controversial issues in assessment such as authentic assessment, and large scale assessment, and large scale assessments, assessment for accountability, and equity issues. LEC.

C&T 855. Curriculum in Science and Mathematics. 3 Hours.

A survey of the concepts and processes that provide the focus of modern science and mathematics curricula will be central to the course. Students develop a standards-based framework for a school science or mathematics program. The course includes an analysis of national and state recommendations for the reform of science and mathematics education in the context of our state and local educational systems, which is applied by evaluating exemplary instructional materials and activities appropriate for classroom use. Prerequisite: C&T 709. LEC.

C&T 856. Practicum in Science Education. 1-3 Hours.

Intensive supervised experience working with improvement of science curriculum and/or instruction in an educational setting. Credit in any one semester may range from one to three hours; and total credit may not exceed three hours. Prerequisite: Two graduate courses in science education and prior consent of practicum supervisor. FLD.

C&T 857. Practicum in Mathematics Education. 1-3 Hours.

Intensive supervised experience working with improvement of mathematics curriculum and/or instruction in an educational setting. Credit in any one semester may range from one to three hours; and total credit may not exceed three hours. Prerequisite: Two graduate courses in mathematics education and prior consent of practicum supervisor. FLD.

C&T 858. Connecting Research to Classroom Practice in Mathematics. 3 Hours.

This course will explore current research on issues important to mathematics teachers so they can use research to support and improve their classroom practice. Prerequisite: Teaching experience or permission of instructor. LEC.

C&T 859. Issues in Mathematics or Science Education: _____. 1-3 Hours.

A study of issues in a particular area of mathematics or science education. The course may be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC.

C&T 860. Topics in Teaching and Learning Social Studies: _____. 3 Hours.

An examination of current topics and issues from social science perspectives. Special emphasis is given to effective integration of one of the social sciences, such as anthropology, geography, political science, science technology and society, and these topics affect issues of curriculum at both elementary and secondary levels. Students will need to confer with the instructor of record to determine which topic will be the current focus of the course. LEC.

C&T 861. Curriculum and Assessment in Social Studies Programs K-12. 3 Hours.

The purpose of the course is to offer preservice and practicing K-12 social studies educators the following: (1) an overview of theoretical bases for social studies education and of the social studies and discipline specific curriculum standards; (2) a review of the major curricular and extracurricular K-12 social studies programs; (3) strategies for the design, implementation, and evaluation of social studies programs; and (4) experience with the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of a social studies program. LEC.

C&T 862. Trends and Issues in Social Studies Instruction. 3 Hours.

A study of trends and issues relating to, and needed changes in the content, organization, emphasis, resources and equipment, methods, devices and evaluation in the social studies. Consideration of related problems such as achieving meaning and understanding, providing for individual differences, providing motivation, the cooperative assignment and socialized recitation. Students will be permitted to concentrate on those problems of particular interest to them. Prerequisite: Nine hours of Education including educational psychology. LEC.

C&T 863. Curriculum Development in Economic Education. 3 Hours.

Extension and application of economic concepts and theories through integration into the scope and sequence of the school curriculum. The process will include the development and field testing of a project that utilizes appropriate concepts, materials, community resources and techniques for integrating economics into the total curriculum. Prerequisite: C&T 763. LEC.

C&T 864. International Issues in the K-12 Classroom. 3 Hours.

An examination of current international topics and issues from an economic education perspective. Special emphasis is given to effective integration of global topics and issues into the curriculum at both elementary and secondary levels. Students survey and analyze economic education resource materials and develop international lessons for use in their own classrooms. This course is offered during summer term, locally, and as a study abroad option. This course has been offered two times previously as T&L 798-summer 1993 at the Regents Center and in Great Britain. LEC.

C&T 868. Connecting Research to Classroom Practice in Social Studies. 3 Hours.

The purpose of the course is to explore readings on effective practice and current research on issues important to social studies teachers. Knowledge gained from the exploration of readings will be used to develop a plan and implementation procedures for improving classroom practice. Prerequisite: Teaching experience in social studies education or permission of the instructor. LEC.

C&T 896. Seminar in: _____. 1-4 Hours.

LEC.

C&T 897. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and instructor. RSH.

C&T 898. Master's Project. 1-4 Hours.

RSH.

C&T 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

THE.

C&T 900. Current Trends & Issues in Curriculum & Instruction. 3 Hours.

The course, taught as a capstone seminar, will provide a review of current trends and issues in theories, practices, and events within curricular and instructional efforts in American education. Topics studied may include constructivism, connectivism in the digital age, contemporary theories and theorists such as Vygotsky, online instruction and the Internet's potential and growth, the new Cult of Efficiency, stigmatization and standardized testing, and charter schools. Student composition of each class will influence the final syllabus, which may include other topics reflective of student interests and goals. The class is designed for those in the final course phase of their doctoral studies. Students in their first or second semester of their programs will not be encouraged to enroll in the class. LEC.

C&T 901. Contemporary Research of Teaching Effectiveness. 3 Hours.

A review of recent research on the conceptualization, measurement, and improvement of teaching effectiveness. Particular attention is given to the history of efforts to improve teaching, to the reasons why such efforts have often been unsuccessful, and to the recent contributions of the "micro-criteria" approach to the problem. LEC.

C&T 903. Curriculum Supervision. 3 Hours.

An intensive study of the theoretical and research bases for curriculum supervision and improvement. Topics include models and practices in supervision and staff development, skills and instruments used in curriculum assessment, coordination of both human and material resources, and the dynamics of change strategies. LEC.

C&T 904. Philosophical Questions in Curriculum and Teaching. 3 Hours.

This course addresses philosophical questions pertaining to curriculum and teaching across a range of educational contexts. These questions center on epistemology, ethics, and the assumptions underlying alternative approaches to research in education. Students completing this course should be able to engage in philosophical inquiry and apply relevant philosophical literature and principles to the examination of curriculum and teaching. LEC.

C&T 905. Teacher Education in the U.S.. 2 Hours.

A study of the development, issues, and programs for the preparation of teachers. Open to all regular graduate students. LEC.

C&T 906. Qualitative and Curriculum Inquiry: Analysis and Interpretation. 3 Hours.

Supports novice researchers in extending their understanding of the theoretical frameworks underlying qualitative research, qualitative methodologies, the research process and its relationship with curriculum inquiry. During the course we will discuss various forms of qualitative research methods, approaches to research, and perspectives in methodology relate to curriculum inquiry. We will explore the intertwining of data generation, analysis, and writing. In addition, we will focus on refining data generation techniques, strategies for data analysis, data interpretation, and various forms of reporting/writing. Prior coursework: Introduction to a graduate level qualitative research course or permission from the instructor. Prerequisite: Introduction to a graduate level qualitative research course or permission from the instructor. LEC.

C&T 907. Critical Pedagogies. 3 Hours.

This course examines the theories and practices of several educational orientations that comprise "critical pedagogy." Students examine the historical roots and evolution of this broad orientation toward education. Recurring themes in the class are relations between knowledge and curriculum, the school and society, and teachers and students. Students completing the course should be able to analyze educational phenomena through a critical theoretical lens. Open to all doctoral students and advanced masters students with instructor permission. LEC.

C&T 910. Research Seminar in English Education. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on both the conduct and findings of research related to English/Language Arts Education. Its purpose will be to foster discussion among students concerning paradigms that have shaped the field of English/Language Arts as well as encourage critique of the ways in which these paradigms are enacted in research. In this course, each student will develop a reading list on a topic of interest related to research in English/Language Arts Education and/or pursue the writing of an individual research proposal. Prerequisite: Admission to master's or doctoral program in C&T, emphasis in English/Language Arts Education. LEC.

C&T 940. Evaluation of Research in Reading. 3 Hours.

LEC.

C&T 944. Diagnosis and Evaluation of Instruction in Higher Education. 2-3 Hours.

The course will focus on (1) a review of the practical and theoretical problems of developing, in institutions of higher education, programs for the diagnosis and/or evaluation of classroom instruction, including use of videotape feedback for diagnosis, and the development of surveys for evaluation for diagnosis of teaching, and (2) the importance of careful administrative and review procedures as the evaluation of teaching becomes more formal and consequential. Three hours of credit will be awarded to those enrolled in the laboratory section of the course. LEC.

C&T 951. Research and Evaluation in Mathematics and Science. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the processes of planning, conducting, and evaluating mathematics and science research and evaluation in education. This course emphasizes the methods and techniques used in both quantitative mathematics and science research and evaluation methodologies. Prerequisite: A PRE course in statistics. LEC.

C&T 960. Theory and Research in Social Studies Education. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this graduate level course is to stimulate and communicate systematic research and thinking in Social Studies Education. Its purpose is to foster the creation and exchange of ideas and research findings that will expand knowledge about purposes, conditions, and effects of schooling and education about society and social relations. LEC.

C&T 968. Readings in Economic Education Research. 3 Hours.

A survey of research in elementary, secondary, and higher education economic education. After initial, mutual readings, and discussions, class members will determine a list of broad research questions around which we will focus our readings. Each student is responsible for developing a reading list on one of the topics and reporting on selected readings. Class meetings will focus on summarizing and critiquing published research. Purpose of this course is to prepare doctoral students for comprehensive examinations and dissertation research. LEC.

C&T 970. Fostering Teacher Growth and Inquiry. 3 Hours.

Students will explore theory and research related to professional learning with a focus on the professional learner, professional contexts, and professional learning activities. Students also will learn about and design a pilot study that is set in a relevant professional context. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ed.D. program in the Department of Curriculum & Teaching or consent of instructor. LEC.

C&T 971. Planning and Conducting Educator Inquiry in Professional Settings. 3 Hours.

Students will explore theory and research related to student learning and its relationship to the professional learner, professional contexts, and professional learning activities. Students will learn how to conduct a needs assessment in educational settings, and design and implement professional learning based on the needs assessment data. Students will also implement the pilot study that they designed in C&T 970. Prerequisite: C&T 970. LEC.

C&T 972. Connecting Professional Growth and Student Learning. 3 Hours.

Students will synthesize theory and research related to (a) curriculum and instruction, and (b) the relationship between student learning and professional learner, with respect to their career goals. Students will write a report and present findings from their pilot study and the professional learning they implemented in C&T 971. Prerequisite: C&T 970 and C&T 971. LEC.

C&T 994. Advanced Topics: _____. 1-3 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for post-master's level students. LEC.

C&T 995. Field Experience in: _____. 1-5 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences in selected educational settings. The advisor will schedule regular observations of the field experience and conferences with the student. Written summaries and evaluations of the field experiences will be prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agencies, and the advisor. Open only to advanced students. Field experience credit in any one semester may not exceed five hours, and total credit may not exceed eight hours. FLD.

C&T 996. College Teaching Experience in: _____. 2 Hours.

To meet the college teaching experience requirement for doctoral programs, a student shall engage in a semester-long, planned, instructional activity that shall include college classroom teaching under supervision. Planning shall be done with the advisor and/or the member of the faculty who will supervise the experience. The activity shall be done under the supervision of a member of the University of Kansas faculty or by an individual or individuals designated by the candidate's committee. FLD.

C&T 997. Individual Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Prior graduate course work in the area of study and consent of instructor. RSH.

C&T 998. Seminar in: _____. 1-4 Hours.

LEC.

C&T 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 Hours.

THE.

Deaf Education Courses

DE 702. Intermediate Signing Exact English. 3 Hours.

Intermediate vocabulary (700 words) for basic school routines and subjects will be taught using curricular materials to practice SEE 2 vocabulary and affix markers. Two college sign classes of any kind. LEC.

DE 717. Pidgin Sign English/American Sign Language. 3 Hours.

An intermediate level, educationally oriented vocabulary (450 words) taught in PSE/ASL. Comparison of literally and conceptually signed sentences. Prerequisite: Any sign course, admittance into Deaf Education Masters Program. LEC.

DE 808. Family Focus With Young Hearing-Impaired Children. 3 Hours.

Focus on the family as the primary teachers of deaf and hard-of-hearing infants and toddlers. The purpose of the class is twofold: to develop an understanding of the effect of deafness and to develop skills to deal with its intervention. Future teachers, early-childhood specialists, and related service providers will participate in discussion, simulations, and applied exercises in acquiring course competencies. Prerequisite: Sign class of any type. LEC.

Educ Leadership & Policy Stds Courses

ELPS 200. Making Connections Between Schools and Community. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to increase the students' awareness of learning in the classroom and to familiarize them with the role of the school and the community. Institutions and resources that support children and families will be addressed through large and small group sessions and field experiences. Emphasis is given to the diverse nature of schools, communities, and their populations. In addition, the course will acclimate students with the School of Education programs, admissions procedures, and curriculum offerings. Successful completion of this course does not guarantee eventual admission of the School of Education's Teacher Education Program. Prerequisite: Successful completion of C&T 100. LEC.

ELPS 250. Education and Society. 3 Hours AE41/AE51.

This course provides students with an introduction to key ideas and socio- historical forces that have shaped the contemporary educational system in the United States, drawing upon the disciplines of the historical, philosophical, and social foundations of education. The development of school and community relations will be a point of emphasis. LEC.

ELPS 301. Educational Technology in Elementary-Middle Education. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is on developing integration strategies and acquiring computer skills for using instructional technology and educational software, digital media, and information technologies appropriate to elementary and middle school teaching environments. Students will gain expertise in (a) the selection of appropriate instructional technologies and digital media for use in the classroom; (b) production of technology-based instructional materials; and (c) the evaluation and validation of a variety of electronic information sources. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

ELPS 302. Educational Technology in Middle/Secondary Education. 3 Hours.

The focus of this course is on developing integration strategies and acquiring computer skills for using instructional technology and educational software, digital media, and information technologies appropriate to middle school and high school teaching environments. Students will gain expertise in (a) the selection of appropriate instructional technologies and digital media for use in the classroom; (b) production of technology-based instructional materials; and (c) the evaluation and validation of a variety of electronic information sources. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

ELPS 437. Politics and Governance of Public Schools. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students not pursuing K-12 teaching or administrative positions to the organizational and legal foundations of the American educational system. LEC.

ELPS 450. Foundations of Education. 3 Hours.

A historical approach to the major social and philosophical foundations of American education, with an emphasis on the relation of educational theory to classroom practice. LEC.

ELPS 497. Independent Study in:. 1-2 Hours.

Only one enrollment permitted each semester. A maximum of four hours will apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Recommendation of advisor and consent of instructor. IND.

ELPS 537. The Governance and Organization of Schools. 3 Hours.

The course provides the prospective teacher with an overview of the legal foundations of the American educational system including the ways schools and school districts are organized and run; the role of various levels of government and various governmental and educational officials in controlling education; the rights of students and teachers; the terms, conditions, and responsibilities of teacher employment. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

ELPS 540. Ethics in Education. 3 Hours.

This course examines practices and policies occurring in k-12 and postsecondary educational institutions through the lenses provided by ethics. During the semester, we will read, discuss, and write about ethics in education from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Prerequisite: Junior standing or higher. The course is suitable for advanced undergraduate and master's degree seeking students. LEC.

ELPS 598. Special Course:. 1-5 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education students, primarily for undergraduates. LEC.

ELPS 627. Growing Up in Urbanizing America. 3 Hours.

A study of the changing role and character of childhood and youth as stages of life in the context of American urban and social history, with particular attention to education and human development. Prerequisite: Junior standing or higher. LEC.

ELPS 712. Instructional Media Development. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to help students acquire fundamental technical skills required for developing various instructional media products. This course takes a hands-on, practical approach to creating various computer-based instructional materials, such as digital image, audio, video, and computer animation for Web and mobile devices. This course is prerequisite for several courses in the program. No previous design or development experience is required. LEC.

ELPS 714. Foundations of Learning Technology. 3 Hours.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the historical and theoretical foundations of learning technologies. The goal of this course is to provide students with a survey of the research literature and definitions of terminology central to the field. Special emphasis is on current and emerging learning science research and how it can be applied to the creation of technology supported learning environments. LEC.

ELPS 715. Understanding Research in Education. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the concepts and skills involved in understanding and analyzing research in education and related areas. The course provides an overview of basic, general knowledge of various research methodologies. Students should expect to study much of this material in greater depth through additional course work before being prepared to conduct independent research. However, this course should enhance their ability to locate, read, comprehend, and critically analyze research artilces and reports. Topics in the course include quantitative and qualitative methods and designs, historical and descriptive research, and program evaluation. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate standing in the School of Education. LEC.

ELPS 718. Human Performance Technology. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to the field of human performance technology (HPT) and how it is applied to productivity and efficiency problems in the workplace. Performance improvement methods include data gathering, analysis, change management, implementation, measurement and the integration of technology. The goal of this course is to provide students with a survey of the research literature and definitions of terminology central to the field of performance improvement. Special emphasis is on current and emerging technology and how it can be applied to human performance improvement in education and the workplace. LEC.

ELPS 720. Social Media Technology. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an introduction to the use of social media and cloud computing. Social media and cloud computing enable individuals to create, collaborate, and share information. Students will develop implementation strategies and acceptable use policies for the use of social media and cloud computing in the context of K-16 education, government, and corporate settings. LEC.

ELPS 750. Principalship. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the role, responsibilities, expectations and major duties of elementary, middle, and high school building administrators. Students are presented typical problems faced by school administrators through simulations and role playing and are expected, through reflection and discussion, to develop viable solutions. LEC.

ELPS 752. Education Law. 3 Hours.

A study of legal principles and issues affecting educational policy making and practice with emphasis on student and teacher rights, equity, and the administration of schools. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC.

ELPS 754. Analysis of Administrative Problems. 3 Hours.

An introduction to various methods of problem identification; strategies of information gathering; schemes for the analysis of qualitative and quantitative data; models of problem resolution and decision making; and communication methods appropriate for differing audiences. Students will build basic computer, library, decision and communication skills useful in future administrative practice and subsequent coursework. LEC.

ELPS 755. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

An overview of the theory and practice of the management, recruitment, selection, compensation, placement, and development of personnel in the school setting. LEC.

ELPS 756. Data-Driven Leadership. 3 Hours.

The course focuses on the role and effective use of school related data and its analysis in making decisions regarding school improvement, meeting the needs of students with exceptionalities, evaluating educational programs, developing student management strategies, and using instructional technology. LEC.

ELPS 757. Education in American Society. 3 Hours.

A study of the roles and goals of education in the United States, the interrelationships among schools and students, teachers, administrators, and parents, and the culture of schools. LEC.

ELPS 760. Integration of Learning Technology. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on strategies for integrating learning technologies in K-12 schools, universities, corporate and government settings. Topics cover the National Educational Technology Standards that apply information technology to: a) inspire learning and creativity, b) develop digital-age learning experiences and assessments, c) model digital-age work, d) advance digital citizenship, and e) engage in professional growth and leadership. Students produce a comprehensive electronic portfolio that describes the theoretical perspectives that guide their technology integrations strategies and presents evidence that demonstrates their competencies. LEC.

ELPS 772. Philosophical Problems in Comparative Education. 3 Hours.

A study of significant philosophical problems encountered when comparing educational systems. Special emphasis on the implications of axiological analysis for educational theory and practice in different areas of the world. Relationships among the social sciences, philosophy, and the international or cross-cultural venture in education. The importance of systematic value-theory in comparative research and international education. LEC.

ELPS 773. School and Society in Comparative Education. 3 Hours.

Analysis of the role of social science in comparative education as perceived by different philosophies or schools of thought, such as Marxism, phenomenology, empiricism, pragmatism, and linguistic analysis. LEC.

ELPS 774. Modern Educational Theorists. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of prominent European thinkers who have contributed to educational theory and practice (e.g., Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Herbert, Froebel, Montessori, Nietzsche, Freud, Piaget, Ortegay Gassit, etc.). Prerequisite: ELPS 770 or ELPS 771 is recommended. LEC.

ELPS 777. Problems in Contemporary Educational Theory. 3 Hours.

Select explorations into such provocative and problematic trends in current educational theory as Marxism, behaviorism, phenomenology, existentialism, analytic philosophy, hedonism, nonverbal education, etc. Prerequisite: ELPS 770 or ELPS 771 is recommended. LEC.

ELPS 780. Introduction to Higher Education Administration. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for beginning master's degree students and for doctoral students who have had no previous administrative experience in college or university settings. Students will be introduced to the function and responsibilities of major administrative divisions of a college or university and to the major tasks of administration: planning, programming, budgeting, staffing, managing. An emphasis will be placed on current issues facing higher education and students will be introduced to the major journals of the field. As part of the course requirements, students will spend some time familiarizing themselves with one or more administrative offices on a college campus. Prerequisite: Admission to study in higher education at the graduate level. LEC.

ELPS 781. Student Affairs Administration in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to include the study of the history and development of student personnel services in higher education, the role and function of the student affairs administrator, contemporary issues and problems, and an understanding of the organization and role of student affairs administration within higher education settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the higher education program or permission of instructor. LEC.

ELPS 798. Special Course:. 1-5 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for graduate students. LEC.

ELPS 811. Constructivist Learning Technology. 3 Hours.

To be effective, educational technologies must be designed based on what we know about how people learn. This course explores (1) important constructivist learning theories, (2) how such learning theories can be used in designing and developing computer-based learning environments, and (3) how student learning can be assessed in those environments. This course is suitable for students who wish to learn how constructivist learning technologies can change the way we teach and learn new knowledge to improve student learning. LEC.

ELPS 812. Design of Learning Technology. 3 Hours.

This course introduces instructional design theories and production techniques for developing and evaluating learning technology resources and systems. Students apply their understandings of instructional systems design and learning theories as they work in teams to develop learning technology solutions for specific clients in real-world settings. LEC.

ELPS 814. Online Learning Design and Development. 3 Hours.

The course provides an overview of the knowledge and skills for that are essential for designing and developing online instruction. The goal of the course is for students to acquire the analysis, design, development, and evaluation skills needed to facilitate learning in both asynchronous and synchronous online learning environments. Special emphasis is on learning design, and the evaluation of online learning solutions for education, medicine, military, business, and industry. LEC.

ELPS 818. Games and Simulations for Learning. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the design and development of games, gamification, and simulations for learning and instruction. Emphasis is on the selection and design of interactive learning environments for K-16 education and workforce training. Topics include a review of the essential elements of game design, rapid prototyping, the psychology of gaming, game technology, and research related to the use of games, gamification, and simulations in K-16 education and workforce training. LEC.

ELPS 820. Practicum in Educational Technology. 1-3 Hours.

Supervised practice in a media center in selection, classifying, designing, producing, and/or managing instructional materials. Prerequisite: C&T 770 and C&T 871. FLD.

ELPS 830. Foundations of Multicultural Education. 3 Hours.

This class provides students with an understanding multicultural education as an instructional concept, educational reform movement, and systemic process meant to ensure educational equity for all people, especially those who have been inadequately served and/or historically discriminated against because of their racial/ethnic or linguistic backgrounds, gender or sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and special needs. Students will examine different theoretical approaches that inform the practice of multicultural education and explore the contribution of various social sciences to the field. LEC.

ELPS 831. Sociology of Education. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to the sociology of education. Specific topics will include: conflict over the purposes of education; how those purposes are-or are not-translated into actual classroom life; how educational systems have developed historically, how status, and more specifically race, class and gender relations, affect student experiences; and contemporary policy and reform movements. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. LEC.

ELPS 832. History of Educational Thought. 3 Hours.

An examination of the major ideas that have shaped practice in the schools. Emphasis is placed on assisting the student with the development of a coherent and consistent personal philosophy of education upon which administrative practice can be based. LEC.

ELPS 833. Social Context of Urban Education. 3 Hours.

This course examines education in urban communities through the foundational disciplines of history, philosophy, and the social sciences. Particular attention is given to ways in which the changing social and political contexts of American cities affect the educational process. LEC.

ELPS 834. History and Philosophy of Education. 3 Hours.

A comprehensive study of influential persons and movements in the development of educational thought, Eastern and Western, from ancient times to the present. Emphasis on those ideas and historical roots which are relevant to contemporary issues in teaching and school administration. LEC.

ELPS 835. Philosophy of Education. 3 Hours.

An analytic inquiry into basic philosophical positions and issues relevant to education. The difference between ELPS 770 and ELPS 771 is that the latter is topically arranged and does not necessarily follow a historical sequence; it normally proceeds by problems and schools of thought. LEC.

ELPS 837. History of Education and Culture in America. 3 Hours.

A study of the relation between education and culture in America from colonial times to the present. American schools are considered in the wider context of cultural and social change. LEC.

ELPS 838. History of Childhood and Youth in America. 3 Hours.

An exploration of changing attitudes toward children and youth, their subjective experience, their impact on adults, and the conditions that shaped their development. Special attention will be given to the relationship between the changing nature of childhood as a social and cultural category and the development of the education profession. LEC.

ELPS 839. Historical Inquiry in Education. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to the methodology of historical research in education. This course is designed to fulfill the doctoral core requirement for research methods in education for students interested in doing this type of research. Specific topics will include: the historiography of education; working with primary and secondary documents; oral history as method and documentation, quantitative approaches to history; constructing historical narratives; the question of interpretation. LEC.

ELPS 852. School Resource Management. 3 Hours.

An examination of the sources and uses of fiscal resources in education including underlying concepts from economic theory, the impact of values on fiscal policy, state funding formulas, and school budgeting and accounting practices. LEC.

ELPS 853. Staff Evaluation and Development. 3 Hours.

An examination of current trends in personnel evaluation with a focus on clinical supervision and adult development. Students will participate in simulation exercises to develop skills in classroom observation, conferencing techniques, evaluation of teaching artifacts, and the construction of staff development plans. LEC.

ELPS 854. The Student in Society. 3 Hours.

A study of children and youth with particular emphasis on demographic characteristics of the population served by schools and implications of those characteristics for schools and schooling. LEC.

ELPS 856. Law and Special Education. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on laws that apply to special education. The American legal system, particularly in respect to special education, the constitutional and statutory provisions of federal and state law and the judicial decisions interpreting those laws are reviewed. The course relates equal protection, procedural due process, and substantive due process doctrines to school practices affecting disabled children and examines the sex principles of P.L. 94-142 and similar principles in state legislation. This course is not the equivalent of or a substitute for ELPS 752. (Same as SPED 851.) Prerequisite: SPED 750 or permission of instructor. LEC.

ELPS 870. Philosophy of Education II. 3 Hours.

An exploration of select areas in philosophy, such as emphasis on value-theory or epistemology or metaphysics, and their implications for educational theory. Normally a limited number of authors will also be selected for monographic treatment. Prerequisite: ELPS 770 or ELPS 771 is recommended. LEC.

ELPS 871. Introduction to Qualitative Research. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the foundations of and techniques associated with qualitative research methods. Students will practice interview and participant observation skills and will analyze and interpret data. Additional topics include crafting qualitative research questions, ethics of fieldwork, and establishing trustworthiness of data. Common traditions of qualitative methods employed in education and other related fields will be introduced. LEC.

ELPS 880. The Community/Junior College. 3 Hours.

A survey of the history and development of the community/junior college. Particular emphasis will be given to the student, the faculty, the curricula, administration, and finance. The course is intended to provide a general understanding of the operation and concerns of today's community/junior college for the current or potential community/junior college staff member. LEC.

ELPS 881. Seminar in Leadership. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this seminar is to explore leadership in education, particularly higher education, from a variety of perspectives. Readings come from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, such as sociology, organizational behavior, and psychology. We consider various aspects of leadership and analyze the leader from a symbolic perspective, as a manager of meaning and critical change agent. We then challenge ourselves to deconstruct our leadership realities with the help of several critical perspectives as we prepare to examine who the leaders are as well as who they will, and need to, be in the educational organizations of tomorrow. LEC.

ELPS 882. Higher Education in the United States. 3 Hours.

The purpose of the course is to acquaint students in higher education, and students from other areas who intend to work in the post-secondary setting, with the history, philosophy and development of higher education in the United States. The course focuses on three periods: 1) the founding of Harvard to 1965; 2) dissent, disruption, and change, 1965-1979; and 3) the future and crucial issues, the 1980's. European higher education and its early influence on higher education in the United States is also examined. LEC.

ELPS 883. The College Student. 3 Hours.

The characteristics of college students; impact of college on student behavior, changing attitudes, values, beliefs, and the implications of recent research on traditional and new students for instructional and administrative practices. LEC.

ELPS 884. Research on College Students. 3 Hours.

Examination of the American college student from societal, development, research, and institutional perspectives and to review the policy implications of these findings for college and university administrators and faculty. Topics include research and theory concerning the college student experience, the diverse nature of the student body and its implications for institutional policy and practice, and formulation of individual philosophies and priorities applicable to working with college students. LEC.

ELPS 885. Assessment and Program Evaluation in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Nature, objectives, and basic procedures of assessment and program evaluation as applied to the various aspects of higher education settings. In addition to basic procedures for evaluating programs, topics covered include accreditation, program review, benchmarking, student outcomes assessment, and evaluation of teaching in colleges and universities. Prerequisite: ELPS 715 or equivalent. LEC.

ELPS 886. Theory into Practice in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

This course is required as a final course for all master's students in higher education. It is designed to prepare students for professional life after graduation. Using a case study approach, students will examine the reality of practice in a variety of higher educational settings including relevant political and ethical factors. Prerequisite: Higher education students in last semester of master's coursework. LEC.

ELPS 893. Advanced Building Leadership Internship. 2 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences to enhance the necessary leadership skills of a building/district leaders. Activities will include building/district level resource assessment, data analysis, professional development of teachers/principals (and district level professionals), and cooperative planning with teachers and administrators around responsibilities of curriculum, instruction, resource management and student achievement. Prerequisite: Completion (at the University of Kansas) of all certification program (MS/EdD) requirements for the Building/District Leadership Licenses. FLD.

ELPS 895. Internship. 1-5 Hours.

The on site development of the skills necessary to effectively function as a school building leader. Activities will be tailored to the needs of individual students in consultation with a university advisor and a field advisor. INT.

ELPS 896. Seminar in:. 1-4 Hours.

LEC.

ELPS 897. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and instructor. IND.

ELPS 898. Master's Project. 1-4 Hours.

RSH.

ELPS 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

THE.

ELPS 948. Research in Education Policy and Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to methods of inquiry in education policy and leadership studies. It is designed to help doctoral students explore possible research interests, formulate research questions, and to review a rich variety of approaches to inquiry in the field of education. Specific topics include: interview- and observation-driven studies, ethnography, feminist and narrative methods, legal and historical methods, questionnaire-driven studies, quantitative evaluation studies, and studies using administrative and large national data sources. LEC.

ELPS 951. Supervision of Instruction. 3 Hours.

A study of the principles and techniques necessary for coordinating, monitoring, and improving the educational programs of elementary and secondary schools. LEC.

ELPS 952. School Finance: Policy and Practice. 3 Hours.

The objective of this course is to understand the financial systems and mechanisms used by states in the funding of elementary and secondary education in the United States. In simple language, we will be concerned with five basic issues: (1) Where the money comes from; (2) How it is redistributed; (3) How it is spent; (4) The relative effectiveness of spending decisions including selected international comparisons; and (5) How the previous four financial activities participate in a common financial ecology. The course provides an overview of theory and concepts central to the understanding of school finance with an emphasis on policy issues. It also examines the mechanics of school finance funding in light of state policies. LEC.

ELPS 953. District Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study of theory and research in personnel administration. The focus will be on current literature dealing with empirical assessments of personnel theory and techniques. Specific concepts to be considered include the following: educator characteristics, job analysis and design, personnel recruitment, selection and evaluation techniques, staffing and development, and labor relations. Prerequisite: ELPS 753 or its equivalent. LEC.

ELPS 954. Sociology of Educational Organizations. 3 Hours.

This class is an overview of basic and advanced sociological and political theories of organization, with specific application to issues and problems in K-12 education. It is designed for graduate students and practicing educational leaders and administrators who intend to utilize research on organizations in their studies of the governance of schools, the sociology and politics of education, and education policy. The topics covered include the origins and nature of modern bureaucracy, formal structure and function, organizational control, transaction cost economics, population ecology, resource dependence, the new institutionalism, organizational effectiveness and legitimacy, organizational culture, power and politics, and change. LEC.

ELPS 955. District Business Management. 3 Hours.

This course emphasizes skills for effective and efficient business and financial management of school districts in a Kansas or Missouri context. Basic topics include: Short range and long range financial planning, analysis of financial statements, budget preparation, fund accounting and financial reporting, contracting of services including transportation and food services, staff salaries and benefits and insurance. The course also includes a number of strategic methods for institutional planning including: Cost Benefit Analysis, Cost Effectiveness Analysis, and enrollment, revenue and expenditure forecasting techniques. Prerequisite: ELPS 952. LEC.

ELPS 956. District Leadership. 3 Hours.

The focus of the course is the role of the public school district superintendent. Organized study will include assigned readings, lectures, guest speakers, discussion, and the completion of a study project. The course will include consideration of such topics as boardsmanship, community relations, district leadership, professional accountability, district maintenance and operations, professional employment and relationships with other agencies. The course is designed to serve the needs of those graduate students pursuing advanced study with the intention of completing requirements for district certification. Some students will also find the field appealing as an area for dissertation research. Prerequisite: Doctoral status in education administration or permission of instructor. LEC.

ELPS 957. Educational Policy, Ethics and Law. 3 Hours.

Course focuses on use of legal and moral reasoning in analysis of educational policy issues. Specific topics will vary depending on interests of instructor and students and current controversy. Examples of possible topics to be included: school desegregation, teacher collective bargaining, separation of church and school, equal educational opportunity. Prerequisite: ELPS 752, equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

ELPS 958. American Educational Reform Movements: Past and Present. 3 Hours.

An examination of the origin, nature, and consequences of educational reform in the United States. The primary goal is to attain a balanced evaluation of current educational reform. LEC.

ELPS 959. Organization and Administration of Services for Exceptional Children. 3 Hours.

To aid administrators and prospective administrators responsible for organizing and administering programs of education for exceptional children, state and federal guidelines and regulations, legal aspects and financing of special education, planning a program, administering special services. (Same as SPED 971.) Prerequisite: Nine hours of Education including educational psychology and SPED 725. LEC.

ELPS 969. Dissertation Seminar. 3 Hours.

This seminar is designed to facilitate proposal development for doctoral-level research in educational leadership and policy studies. The objective is to help students select and refine a topic, critically analyze existing research, set forth a theoretical framework, and design a research methodology suitable for your topic. LEC.

ELPS 970. Theory and Research in Administration. 3 Hours.

This course is designed as a graduate seminar to support advanced doctoral students as they begin the early stages of developing a dissertation. Students will explore and develop a research topic of interest for the purposes of their culminating project. The course will introduce students to various approaches to research and published scholarship. Major emphasis is devoted to developing competencies and research skills to complete the dissertation and to engage in future research. LEC.

ELPS 971. Comparative Education. 2 Hours.

A factual, descriptive, and analytical study of national systems of formal education, or schooling, as exemplified in contemporary educational establishments. Organizational and administrative policies and teaching practices, with emphasis on Germany, France, England, U.S.S.R., People's Republic of China and Japan. Other nations may be examined on an individual project basis. The difference between ELPS 971 and ELPS 772 is the philosophical emphasis of the latter. LEC.

ELPS 975. Education, Technology and Social Change. 3 Hours.

This interdisciplinary course provides an opportunity to read, reflect upon, and discuss ideas drawn from the emerging field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) in connection with education. Its focus is the interrelationships between technology, society, and education (defined broadly to include non-school and adult learning settings). It explores how knowledge, expertise, and authority are constructed within and across social and cultural groups, with particular attention social and economic inequality. It also considers the relationship between emerging technologies, educational experiences and the nature of "the self" in society, among other issues. Prerequisite: Admission to ELPS doctoral program, or permission of instructor. LEC.

ELPS 980. Postsecondary Finance. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for advanced doctoral students in higher education, particularly those who will be preparing unit budgets or budget presentations and those who make and implement fiscal policy (e.g., financial aid offers). The course material covers different types of college and university budgeting -- incremental, zero-based and formula -- and their impact on university revenues; statewide coordination and its impact on programs, program duplication and funding; retrenchment and quality issues; the legislative role in budget preparation; unified and comparative management systems (e.g., WICHE and NCHEMS); and the impact of federal contracting and student aid policies. LEC.

ELPS 981. Higher Education Law. 3 Hours.

An overview of the developing law of higher education, with emphasis on and analysis of employer-employee relationships, student-faculty/administration relationships, and the impact of federal and state regulation on these relationships. LEC.

ELPS 982. Faculty in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

This course considers the role and circumstances of faculty in higher education including variations among different types of institutions. Topics include the history and demographics of the professoriate, the academic work environment and labor market, the role of faculty in institutional governance and policy making, and the social and political context of academia. LEC.

ELPS 983. Curriculum Innovation in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

A study of contemporary post-secondary curriculum with particular emphasis on the nature of curriculum, the organization and structure of academic programs, the nature of change in academic communities and exemplary innovative institutions. LEC.

ELPS 985. Evaluations of Programs in Higher Education. 2 Hours.

Nature, objectives, and basic procedures of evaluation as applied to the various aspects of higher education. Open to all regular graduate students. LEC.

ELPS 986. The Governance and Administration of Higher Education. 3 Hours.

A theory-based course aimed at providing an understanding of the governance and administration of academic institutions -- particularly universities. Emphasis is directed toward an analysis of decision-making in these complex organizations. LEC.

ELPS 993. Advanced District Leadership Internship. 2 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences to enhance the necessary leadership skills of a building/district leaders. Activities will include building/district level resource assessment, data analysis, professional development of teachers/principals (and district level professionals), and cooperative planning with teachers and administrators around responsibilities of curriculum, instruction, resource management and student achievement. Prerequisite: Completion (at the University of Kansas) of all certification program (MS/EdD) requirements for the Building/District Leadership Licenses. FLD.

ELPS 994. Advanced Topics:. 1-3 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for post-master's level students. LEC.

ELPS 995. Field Experience in:. 1-5 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences in selected educational settings. The advisor will schedule regular observations of the field experience and conferences with the student. Written summaries and evaluations of the field experience will be prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agencies, and the advisor. Open only to advanced students. Field experience credit in any one semester may not exceed five hours, and total credit may not exceed eight hours. INT.

ELPS 996. College Teaching Experience in: _____. 2 Hours.

To meet the college teaching experience requirement for doctoral programs, a student shall engage in a semester-long, planned, instructional activity that shall include college classroom teaching under supervision. Planning shall be done with the advisor and/or the member of the faculty who will supervise the experience. The activity shall be done under the supervision of a member of the University of Kansas faculty or by an individual or individuals designated by the candidate's committee. FLD.

ELPS 997. Individual Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Prior graduate course work in the area of study and consent of instructor. RSH.

ELPS 998. Seminar in: _____. 1-4 Hours.

LEC.

ELPS 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 Hours.

THE.

Educational Psychology Courses

EPSY 106. Multicultural Student Leadership Seminar. 2 Hours.

This course will introduce students of color to leadership theory and develop personal skills in the areas of organizational, career, and community leadership. Topics covered include public speaking, group process, time management, and discussion of the special challenges for leaders of color. Prerequisite: Must have taken Hawk Link UNIV 101 and fewer than 60 hours credit from the University of Kansas. LEC.

EPSY 210. Career and Life Planning: Decision-Making for College Students. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to assist college students in career and life planning choices by first understanding the current theories of career decision-making and then by applying those theories to their own choices. The course will meet twice each week, the first being a lecture session, with the second session consisting of smaller groups of six to eight students. Students will be exposed to information related to the career development process, factors that affect the career choice process, knowledge of work environments, sex role socialization, career and decision making processes, and how to approach the job search. Experiential learnings will include exercises related to values clarification, self understanding, knowledge of interests, competencies and personality characteristics, decision making, use of career information, and implementing a plan of action. Weekly course assignments will include activities in class and homework units. Prerequisite: Enrollment in this course is limited to students with fewer than 60 hours of college credit. LEC.

EPSY 305. Development and Learning of the Child. 3 Hours GE3S.

An introduction to the study of children's thinking, behavior, and development in school, home, and community settings. Classic and contemporary theories of developmental and educational psychology will be addressed; these theories will provide a foundation for thinking about important contemporary issues in child development. Specific topics covered will include research methods for studying children's development, cognitive development, intelligence, language, emotional development, aggression, moral development, and family and peer relationships. Emphasis will be placed the study of individuals and groups, describing the process of development, and considering educational implications of theory and research. LEC.

EPSY 306. Development and Learning of the Adolescent. 3 Hours GE3S.

An introduction to the study of adolescence (puberty to roughly age 18), with a focus on implications and applications for optimal adolescent development. Approaching development from an applied lens, the course will cover foundational information on brain and biological changes that occur during adolescence, as well as on integrating this foundational knowledge with theories of learning, motivation, cognition, and emotional and social development. LEC.

EPSY 450. Introduction to Counseling Psychology. 3 Hours.

An historical and contemporary overview of the science and practice of counseling psychology, including trends in the roles and functions of counseling psychology practitioners, the research and scientific foundations of counseling practice, the psychological theories of counseling and psychotherapy that guide professional practice, and the ethical and professional issues confronting counseling practitioners. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC.

EPSY 455. Managing and Motivating Learners in the Pre K-6th Grade Classroom. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to help elementary preservice teachers organize an enriched learning environment and develop strategies for managing and motivating students to help them become better and more responsible learners. Prerequisite: C&T 322, EPSY 305 or equivalent. LEC.

EPSY 456. Managing and Motivating Learners in the Middle and Secondary Classroom. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to help middle and secondary preservice teachers organize an enriched learning environment and develop strategies for managing and motivating students to help them become better and more responsible learners. Prerequisite: C&T 324, EPSY 306 or equivalent. LEC.

EPSY 497. Independent Study. 1-2 Hours.

Only one enrollment permitted each semester, a maximum of four hours will apply toward the bachelor's degree. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Recommendation of advisor and consent of instructor. IND.

EPSY 515. Research Methods for McNair Scholars. 3 Hours.

This course provides participants in the McNair Scholars program with an understanding of research methods appropriate to their field so they can write proposals for their summer research projects. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the McNair Scholars Program. LEC.

EPSY 520. Classroom Assessment. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the concepts and skills required to develop and evaluate various forms of formal and informal classroom assessments to determine student learning and teacher instructional effectiveness. LEC.

EPSY 575. Internship Exploration. 1-5 Hours AE61.

This course provides academic credit for a supervised practical experience in an occupational area of interest. In addition to the work-related activity, students will complete reading and writing assignments, participate in on-line discussion and create a final portfolio of internship accomplishments. Credit hours (1-5) are based on number of hours at internship site in agreement with instructor. Prerequisite: Secured internship of 8 hours per week or more for semester in which student will be enrolled in the course; permission from instructor. INT.

EPSY 580. Positive Psychology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the core assumptions and research findings associated with human strengths and positive emotions. Also an exploration of interventions and applications informed by positive psychology in counseling and psychotherapy, and its application to school, work, family and other close relationships. (Same as PSYC 598.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or consent of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 598. Special Course: _____. 1-5 Hours AE61.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education students--primarily for undergraduates. LEC.

EPSY 700. Advanced Educational Psychology: Development and Education of the Adolescent. 2-3 Hours.

An introduction, from a psychological perspective, to topics and problems in the development of adolescents and youth, with emphasis on application to educational issues. Note: To be offered annually. LEC.

EPSY 702. Advanced Educational Psychology: The Development and Education of the Child. 3 Hours.

Study of children from a cognitive developmental perspective. Changes in children are examined in light of environmental influences including social factors, educational practices, and child-rearing as they interact with conditions internal to children. Key issues include the study of cognition, language, motives, social-emotional issues, the self, and the problem of developmental delays. A major concern is the role of adults in supporting positive development, particularly in educational settings. LEC.

EPSY 703. Constructive Classroom Discipline. 3 Hours.

This course will examine concepts and techniques of constructive classroom management. Various theoretical orientations including humanism and behaviorism will be considered. Emphasis will be on the identification of strategies that teachers can use (1) to facilitate an environment that reduces the likelihood of misbehavior occurring, and (2) to cope constructively with individuals and groups of children to resolve difficulties that arise in the classroom. The class should have value to classroom teachers, school psychologists, counselors, and other school consultants. LEC.

EPSY 704. Advanced Educational Psychology: Learning Processes in Education. 3 Hours.

A study of the mental processes that influence learning and comprehension. The scope of the course will include individuals at all developmental levels and in a variety of educational settings. Key issues include the study of language, memory, concepts, motivation and social factors affecting learning processes. LEC.

EPSY 705. Human Development through the Lifespan. 3 Hours.

This course will cover the social, emotional, psychological, and cognitive changes that occur from conception through death. Methodological issues will also be addressed. Prerequisite: A graduate or undergraduate course in psychology. LEC.

EPSY 710. Introduction to Statistical Analysis. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on the conceptual underpinnings of statistical analysis of educational data. Includes univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics, sampling distributions, statistical estimation, hypothesis testing and procedures in testing statistical hypothesis for one and two sample designs. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EPSY 711 required, or with the permission of instructor on the basis of knowledge of statistical packages presented in EPSY 711. LEC.

EPSY 711. Lab for Introduction to Statistical Analysis. 1 Hour.

Creation and manipulation of data sets. Analysis of data with statistical packages, with an emphasis on descriptive statistics, graphical procedures, and univariate parametric methods. Graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EPSY 710 or EPSY 811 or with the permission of the instructor. LAB.

EPSY 715. Understanding Research in Education. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the concepts and skills involved in understanding and analyzing research in education and related areas. The course provides an overview of basic, general knowledge of various research methodologies. Students should expect to study much of this material in greater depth through additional course work before being fully prepared to conduct independent research. However this course should enhance their ability to locate, read, comprehend, and critically analyze research articles and reports. Topics in the course include quantitative and qualitative methods and designs, historical and descriptive research, and program evaluation. (This course fulfills the requirement of a research methods course in the first 12 hours of graduate study.) LEC.

EPSY 725. Educational Measurement. 3 Hours.

The course is an introduction to the application of the concepts of reliability, validity, and practicality to the development, selection, use, and interpretation of tests and other measuring instruments in the field of education. The concepts of norm referenced and criterion referenced tests; the interpretation and use of norms; standard scores, percentiles, quotients, and grade equivalents are among the topics covered. An understanding of the role of measurement in evaluation, diagnosis, selection and placement is included. LEC.

EPSY 740. Counseling and Interviewing Skills. 3 Hours.

An experiential and performance based course having three major objectives: 1) the acquisition of basic counseling skills and strategies by means of microcounseling training; 2) learning to use these skills effectively and appropriately in a simulated counseling session; 3) the students' understanding of their personal characteristics and how these characteristics relate to functioning as an effective helping professional. This course should normally be taken at the earliest possible time in the student's program. Open to counseling majors. Non-majors may be admitted only by permission of the instructor, if space permits. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. LEC.

EPSY 742. Counseling Theory and Techniques. 3 Hours.

An introductory examination of several major theories of counseling and therapy including psychodynamic views, person-centered, behavioral, and cognitive-behavioral approaches. Attention given to research reviews and factors various theories have in common. Designed for graduate students in counseling psychology or allied fields. Prerequisite: Graduate student status or permission of the instructor. LEC.

EPSY 760. Ethics, Law, and Professional Issues in School Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce the student to a) ethical principles, standards, and issues in the profession of psychology; b) legal issues involved in the practice of school psychology; c) problem-solving models to solve ethical and ethical-legal dilemmas; d) roles and functions of a school psychologist; and e) current topics in the field of school psychology. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. LEC.

EPSY 770. Developmental Psychopathology: Diagnosis, Intervention, and Prevention. 3 Hours.

Foundations of child and adolescent psychopathology from a developmental and educational perspective. Classification, assessment, and etiology of clinical disorders. Examination of risk and protective factors associated with these various disorders. Coverage of empirically-based intervention strategies and prevention programs. Graduate student standing. LEC.

EPSY 790. Research and Evaluation Proposal Development. 3 Hours.

A course for students designing a research or evaluation proposal leading to data collection. Specific topics considered include formulating a problem for study, reviewing the literature, and selecting appropriate research and evaluation designs, instrumentation, and data analysis issues. The goal of the course is to aid students in the preparation of research proposals at the master's level. LEC.

EPSY 797. Independent Readings and Research in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Opportunity for students to participate in supervised reading and research in special topics of interest (for which regularly scheduled courses are not given). Topics and credit are arranged by advisement: May not be used to substitute for regularly scheduled course offerings. Intended for students with appropriate undergraduate or graduate preparation but without extensive graduate course background in the area of proposed study. (Students with extensive graduate work should enroll in EPSY 997; undergraduate students may enroll in EPSY 497.) Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. RSH.

EPSY 798. Special Course: _____. 1-5 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals--primarily for graduate students. Course is graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. LEC.

EPSY 800. Development during Youth and Adulthood. 3 Hours.

An examination from a life-span perspective of major issues affecting changes after adolescence. Topics include intelligence, identity, intimacy, the role of work, and moral concepts. Theoretical issues, research findings, and educational and social policy implications will be examined. Students will prepare papers on significant issues in the field and survey extensively the research and theoretical literature. Prerequisite: Prior enrollment in a course on naturalistic or experimental research methods. LEC.

EPSY 803. Computer Applications for Statistical Analyses. 3 Hours.

Computer applications for a variety of statistical techniques. Emphasis may be with applications on microcomputers and/or mainframe. Prerequisite: EPSY 810 or EPSY 811 or equivalent course. LEC.

EPSY 805. Individual Intelligence Testing. 1-3 Hours.

Supervised experience in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of the major individual intelligence tests for children, adolescents, and adults. Other areas to be covered in this course will include models of intelligence and factors influencing intelligence; measurement characteristics of instruments used to assess cognitive abilities; ethical and legal issues in the use of intelligence tests; and the use of cognitive assessments for identification and diagnosis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 806. Issues in Human Growth and Development. 3 Hours.

An overview and analysis of selected issues in the field of human growth and development. The focus will be on current issues of a theoretical and methodological nature that affect the field of developmental psychology and applications to social and educational settings. Prerequisite: Prior completion of a course in developmental psychology. LEC.

EPSY 807. Theories and Research in Human Learning. 3 Hours.

An overview of important models, principles and research findings related to the learning process. Attention is given to theories of learning and information processing which attempt to explain perceptual behavior, verbal learning and memory and social learning processes. Emphasis is placed on student development of research proposals in the area of human learning and achievement. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 810. Regression Analysis. 3 Hours.

Multiple correlation/regression techniques, including polynomials, analysis of interactions, dummy coding, non-orthogonal analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance. Prerequisite: EPSY 710 or equivalent course. LEC.

EPSY 811. Analysis of Variance. 3 Hours.

Analysis of variance techniques including one-way ANOVA, planned and post hoc comparisons, multiway ANOVA, repeated measures ANOVA, and mixed designs. Prerequisite: EPSY 710 and EPSY 711. LEC.

EPSY 812. Meta-Analysis. 3 Hours.

Statistical methods to summarize results from multiple studies. Prerequisite: EPSY 811. LEC.

EPSY 814. Nonparametric Statistics. 3 Hours.

Methods of analysis for nominal and ranked data, multiway contingency table analysis. Prerequisite: EPSY 811. LEC.

EPSY 816. Evaluating School Programs. 3 Hours.

Methods and procedures for evaluating educational programs. Attention is given to the development and evaluation of goals and objectives, creation of designs to monitor processes and outcomes, utilization of test and measurement systems for assessing outcomes, establishing evaluation standards and criteria, and application of statistical analyses. Prerequisite: EPSY 710 or equivalent. LEC.

EPSY 822. Educational Scales, Questionnaires, and Sampling. 3 Hours.

Development, construction, validation and scaling of noncognitive instruments including questionnaires, surveys, checklists, rating scales and unobtrusive measures. The sampling methodology is emphasized. Item construction and analysis and the development of subscales are stressed. Prerequisite: EPSY 720 or EPSY 725 and EPSY 710. LEC.

EPSY 830. Individual and Group Assessment. 3 Hours.

A consideration of basic concepts pertaining to selection and interpretation of both standardized and non-standardized assessment procedures and devices with attention given to communicating assessment information within the context of the counseling relationship. Prerequisite: EPSY 725 or comparable undergraduate principles of measurement course. LEC.

EPSY 835. Clinical Techniques in Academic Assessment and Intervention. 3 Hours.

Students will learn techniques of formal and informal assessment of academic skills in school-aged students. In addition, students will learn consultation and intervention approaches and strategies for use with students who have academic delays. This course has a field-based practicum component. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing in the School Psychology program and permission of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 840. Guidance and Counseling in the Public Schools. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide information about the organization and administration of guidance and counseling programs in the public schools. Non-majors wishing to know more about the role of the counselor can be admitted with approval of the instructor. LEC.

EPSY 842. Counseling Practicum (Elementary, Secondary, Counseling Psychology). 6 Hours.

This course is taken as one of the last courses in the master's degree counseling program. The primary purpose of the course is for the student to develop individual counseling skills while functioning in a counseling setting. In addition to individual skills, students are also encouraged to participate in group counseling and other counseling related activities within the particular counseling setting. Students enroll in practicum for the level most closely related to their professional goals, i.e., elementary, secondary, counseling psychology. Graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. Prerequisite: EPSY 740, EPSY 742, and EPSY 880, and prior or concurrent enrollment in EPSY 830, EPSY 840, EPSY 844, and EPSY 846. Pre-enrollment with practicum coordinator. Students currently on academic probation will not be allowed to enroll in practicum. LEC.

EPSY 844. Theory of Group Counseling. 3 Hours.

Focuses on issues in group counseling. Topics covered are types of groups, theoretical orientation of groups, stages of group development, group leadership, selection of members, ethical issues, and effectiveness of groups. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted to the Program in Counseling Psychology. Nonmajors must have prior written consent of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 845. Substance Abuse Counseling. 3 Hours.

The aim of this course is to provide advanced training in the area of substance abuse and substance addictions counseling to graduate students in the helping professions. Topics covered include practical guidelines, specific intervention strategies, treatment principles, legal and ethical responsibilities, and issues within the field. Prerequisite: EPSY 740, EPSY 742. LEC.

EPSY 846. Career Development. 3 Hours.

Stresses the importance of career development in education, with an emphasis on developmental life planning. Course includes topics such as delivery systems, utility of career development theory, sexism and racism in career development and counseling, the effects of sex role socialization, nature of the world of work, evaluation of career information, use of career information in individual and group counseling, and the role of empirical research in career development theory and practice. LEC.

EPSY 850. Human Relationship Skills in the Classroom. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide educators with an awareness and skill training in basic human relationship/communication skills. The course is focused on skills that provide educators with effective communication skills for working with students, educators, and parents. LEC.

EPSY 855. Psychoeducational Clinic I: Assessment, Consultation, and Intervention. 3 Hours.

This is a practical course where students apply previous learning and gain experience in assessment and intervention with children, families, and school consultation. Team collaboration, peer review, and case conferences are essential elements of this course. Students work with clients in the on campus learning center under supervision. Topical seminars also are included throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing in the School Psychology program and permission of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 860. Assessment of Behavior Problems and Personality. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to examine appropriate assessment techniques for the evaluation of behavior problems. Interview procedures, behavioral observation strategies, behavior rating scales and checklists, self-report inventories, and rational theoretical techniques will be introduced. The intent is to place these assessment approaches in their theoretical contexts and to discuss how they could be used by pupil personnel specialists to understand the problem behavior and plan interventions to enhance students' personal adjustment and achievement in the classroom. Prerequisite: EPSY 770, graduate standing in the School of Psychology program, or permission of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 865. Psychoeducational Clinic 2: Assessment, Consultation, and Intervention. 3 Hours.

A continuation of School Psychology Clinic I where students will be performing the same activities at a higher level of autonomy and independence. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing in the School Psychology program, EPSY 855, and permission of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 870. Quantitative Methods for Research in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the conceptual basis of statistical analysis with an emphasis on applied data analysis. The use of descriptive statistics, distributions, graphic displays, hypothesis testing, group comparison, and analyses of relationships among variables to explore research questions in education will be covered. This course is designed specifically for Ed.D. students in the School of Education. Students in other degree programs may not enroll. Prerequisite: This course is open only to Ed.D. students in the School of Education. LEC.

EPSY 871. Crisis and Disaster Counseling. 3 Hours.

This course provides advanced training in Crisis and Disaster Counseling to graduate students in the helping professions, providing students with the foundation, knowledge, and skills to effectively help those in crisis. Practical guidelines, specific intervention strategies, treatment principles, legal and ethical responsibilities, and self-care regarding crisis work will be discussed and integrated. Prerequisite: EPSY 740 and EPSY 742; or consent from instructor. LEC.

EPSY 875. Individual and Cultural Differences in Counseling Psychology. 3 Hours.

Examines the role of culture in human behavior and its influence in counseling theories, practice, and research. The course will assist students develop multicultural awareness, understanding, and skills in working with people from diverse racial, social, cultural, and individual backgrounds. The course will provide opportunities for self examination of cultural assumptions/values in order to develop multicultural competence. Prerequisite: EPSY 742 or equivalent. LEC.

EPSY 880. Ethical and Legal Issues in Professional Psychology. 3 Hours.

An examination of legal, ethical, and professional standards and issues affecting the practice of professional psychology. Topics include legislative regulation of professional psychology, ethical standards and codes of conduct for psychology and related mental health professions, standards of professional practice, and issue of practice liability and risk management. LEC.

EPSY 882. History and Systems of Psychology. 3 Hours.

A historical survey of the evolution of concepts, theories, and systems of thought in psychology with an emphasis on their relationship to contemporary issues in psychological theory, research, and practice. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in EPSY or consent of the instructor. LEC.

EPSY 885. Projective Assessment. 3 Hours.

The major goal of the course is to integrate information about a person from one or more projective tests into a useful summary. The projective assessment instruments to be used include the Rorschach (using the Exner system of scoring and interpretation), the Thematic Apperception Test, and projective drawings (e.g., Draw-A-Person test). Prerequisite: At least one graduate-level course in measurement and one graduate course in assessment plus consent of the instructor. LEC.

EPSY 888. Evidence Based Practice in Counseling Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the skills involved in a small number of Evidence Based Treatments, in the context of understanding their place in the pursuit of Evidence Based Practice. The course includes readings, videos, and discussion of the treatments, with a heavy experiential component of role plays and reviews on video through the Center for Psychoeducational Services. The emphasis is on developing initial skills in the selected treatments. Prerequisite: Graduate student in Counseling Psychology or permission of the instructor. LEC.

EPSY 890. Diagnosis and Psychopathology. 3 Hours.

An examination of psychological disorders from a counseling psychology perspective that emphasizes strengths. The course will cover the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), as well as alternative taxonomies, exploring personality as it ranges from normal personality styles to personality disorders, and the full range of mental disorders. The emphasis is on identifying and assessing these phenomena and understanding behavioral and possible treatment implications. Prerequisite: Degree seeking status in Counseling Psychology or consent of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 893. Internship in School Counseling. 2 Hours.

Two consecutive enrollments covering a period of one academic year. During this time the student prepares a portfolio of skills competencies, classroom guidance programs presented, and other experiences appropriate to the student's school level. Supervision will be conducted on an individual basis and will include a minimum of two site visits per semester. Prerequisite: Must have school counseling position and a completed Masters degree from K.U. in School Counseling. INT.

EPSY 895. Field Experience in: _____. 1-5 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences in selected educational or mental health settings. The campus-based instructor will schedule regular observations of the field experience and conferences with the student. Written summaries and evaluations of the field experiences will be prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agency, and the campus-based instructor. Open only to advanced students. Field experience credit in any one semester may not exceed five hours, and total credit in this and additional field experience enrollments may not exceed eight hours. Graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. Prerequisite: EPSY 842 and consent of the practicum coordinator. FLD.

EPSY 896. Seminar in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 897. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and instructor. RSH.

EPSY 898. Master's Project. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in EPSY 710, EPSY 715, or EPSY 790. RSH.

EPSY 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in EPSY 710. THE.

EPSY 900. Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in Professional Psychology. 3 Hours.

This proseminar is designed to examine the major legal and ethical principles and areas of concern that affect professional psychology. The course will also examine the historical development of professional psychology and current issues that affect the future direction of research and practice. Prerequisite: Doctoral status in counseling, clinical, clinical child, or school psychology, or consent of the instructor. LEC.

EPSY 901. Research Practicum in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

This course is designed to give students experience in conducting research. It is expected that students will take this course for at least two consecutive semesters. (This course fulfills the requirement by the School of Education for a two semester, research practicum course.) Prerequisite: Doctoral student status in a program in the Department of Educational Psychology. RSH.

EPSY 902. Research Methodology in Education. 3 Hours.

An examination and study of the problems and procedures which relate to the validity of research methods. Emphasis will be placed on reading the current literature on research methodology. Students are required to develop a research proposal. Prerequisite: EPSY 811 and EPSY 720 or EPSY 725. LEC.

EPSY 905. Multivariate Analysis. 3 Hours.

Multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant analysis, logistic regression, and exploratory factor analysis. Prerequisite: EPSY 810, EPSY 811 and experience with a statistical software package. LEC.

EPSY 906. Latent Trait Measurement and Structural Equation Models. 3 Hours.

Contemporary measurement theory and latent variable models for scale construction and evaluation, including confirmatory factor analysis, item response modeling, diagnostic classification models, and structural equation modeling. (Same as CLP 948.) Prerequisite: EPSY 905. LEC.

EPSY 907. The Psychology of Instruction and Human Learning. 4 Hours.

A study of research and theory in the areas of cognitive learning and of instruction, including such topics as motivation, problem solving, discovery learning, conceptualization, theory construction and task analysis. Emphasis placed on independent learning experiences and field-based experimentation with pilot study. Prerequisite: EPSY 807 and EPSY 715 or permission of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 908. Structural Equation Modeling II. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to advanced topics in Structural Equation Modeling. Topics to be covered include multi-level models, latent growth models, mixture models and approaches to handling missing and/or non-normal data. Students will be exposed to the various statistical software programs and will be expected to become proficient in utilizing EQS. Prerequisite: EPSY 906 or equivalent course. LEC.

EPSY 910. Practicum in School Psychology. 3 Hours.

Supervised practice in the application of psychological theory of educational problems. Includes work useful with exceptional children as well as experience in the application of such areas as mental hygiene and learning theory to problems involving the total school population. (Same as SPED 801.) Prerequisite: Permission of advisor and instructor. LEC.

EPSY 911. Advanced Practicum in School Psychology. 3 Hours.

A continuation of EPSY 910 with special emphasis on remedial techniques associated with learning difficulties. (Same as SPED 802.) Prerequisite: EPSY 910 and permission of advisor and instructor. LEC.

EPSY 916. Educational Evaluation: Theory and Practice. 3 Hours.

The course will treat an intensive critical study of various views of evaluation as it exists opposite the experimental research process, emphasizing the operational definitions of objectives, existing models, taxonomies, and structure, and goals and methods of obtaining and summarizing evaluation data. Prerequisite: EPSY 710 and EPSY 816 or equivalents or permission of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 918. Seminar in Current Issues and Trends in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

An examination of selected current issues and trends. (This course fulfills the requirement by the School of Education for a course in current issues and trends.) Prerequisite: Doctoral student status in a program in the Department of Educational Psychology. LEC.

EPSY 921. Theory and Applications of Educational Measurement. 3 Hours.

Application of theory including classical theories of reliability and validity, latent-trait theories, item sampling, and factor analysis to problems in educational test development and use in areas such as evaluation, research, placement, and selection. Prerequisite: EPSY 725 and EPSY 811. LEC.

EPSY 922. Item Response Theory. 3 Hours.

Theoretical foundations and practical applications of item response theory in educational measurement. Prerequisite: EPSY 921. LEC.

EPSY 923. Advanced Theory and Applications of Item Response Theory. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to acquaint students with knowledge of advanced theory and applications in the field of item response theory (IRT). Topics to be covered include: advanced IRT models for dichotomous and polytomous, multidimensional, rater effects, and testlet-based item response data, estimation of parameters for these models and related software, and goodness of fit tests. The course will also focus on some advanced applications using these models, including test development, test score equating, differential item functioning, scoring and score reporting, Monte Carlo simulation studies, and innovative test designs. Prerequisite: EPSY 922 or equivalent course. LEC.

EPSY 925. Computer Programming and Applications for Educational Research, Measurement and Statistics. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide advanced students in the areas of educational research, psychometrics, and statistics with techniques for computer programming, analysis, and carrying out research using computer simulations. The topics covered are: Programming with Fortran languages, data manipulation and management, analysis, simulation of data according to statistical and psychometric models, numerical techniques for matrix operations, sampling from distributions, solutions for non-linear equations, and Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo techniques. There are no prerequisites for this course, but those students who have coursework through the multivariate statistics level will benefit most from this course. Other suggested courses include those related to psychological and educational measurement, classical test theory, item response theory, and research methods. LEC.

EPSY 926. Hierarchical Linear Modeling. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an introductory background in the basic principles and applications of hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). The course will review both the conceptual issues and methodological issues in using hierarchical linear modeling by working step-by-step with real data sets. Prerequisite: EPSY 810 Regression Analysis (formerly EPSY 904). LEC.

EPSY 931. Computer-Based Testing. 3 Hours.

Computer-based testing holds the promise of increasing test validity and reliability while reducing the logistical problems associated with large-scale assessment. This seminar will provide an overview of what we have learned about administering tests on computer between the 1960s and today. The focus will be on measurement issues, but depending on class interest topics will vary. A prior course in item response theory is desirable but not required. Prerequisite: EPSY 725 or equivalent course. LEC.

EPSY 932. Diagnostic Testing. 3 Hours.

There is a great demand for more useful, more actionable test scores. Traditional large-scale group administered tests do not provide this kind of information due to low reliabilities of, or high inter-correlations among, sub-scores. This course will explore approaches used by individually administered tests to provide diagnostic information, new psychometric models that hold promise of providing better diagnostic information, and implications for test design. A primary focus will be on how psychometric models can be used with diagnostic subscores that are more reliable and less correlated than traditional approaches. Prerequisite: PRE 922 or equivalent course. LEC.

EPSY 940. Advanced Studies in Educational Psychology and Research. 3 Hours.

A course designed to offer a comprehensive view of the field of educational psychology and research. The course will treat a series of thematic areas with a focus on latest developments and emerging theories in learning, development and quantitative methods. Intended for post-master's level students. Prerequisite: Prior graduate level course work in development, learning, measurement, and statistics. LEC.

EPSY 941. Bayesian Statistics. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint advanced quantitative students with the fundamentals of Bayesian data analysis. The goals of the class are to introduce Bayesian inference, starting from the philosophical perspective, and provide methods for implementing Bayesian analysis for a variety of different statistical models. Class time is balanced between theoretical perspectives and practical applications. Topics covered include: a review of basic probability, Bayes' rule, probability distributions, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation and software for its implementation, and applications of MCMC to a variety of statistical models. Prerequisite: EPSY 905 or equivalent or consent of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 945. Clinical Supervision and Consultation. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with a knowledge foundation of clinical supervision and consultation theories and models, modes/formats of supervision, the supervisory/consulting relationship, legal and ethical considerations in the provision of supervision/consultation, and supervision research issues. Prerequisite: EPSY 948. LEC.

EPSY 947. Specialist Research. 1-4 Hours.

RSH.

EPSY 948. Advanced Practicum I. 3 Hours.

Designed to be the initial advanced practicum for first year doctoral students. Attention is directed to development of a broad range of basic and advanced skills. Graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. Prerequisite: EPSY 842 or equivalent. LEC.

EPSY 949. Advanced Practicum II. 3 Hours.

Intensive counseling practice, including group and individual supervision, that may be taken either through Counseling and Psychological Services or an approved site outside of the university. Focus is on the acquisition and demonstration of advanced counseling skills. Two consecutive semesters (Fall, Spring) of enrollment are required of doctoral students. Responsibility to the site is for a continuous nine months, with fall semester responsibilities ending on the first day of spring semester classes. A grade of incomplete will be granted at the end of the regular fall grading period, with the regular fall grade being granted after completion of fall semester responsibilities. Graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of EPSY 948 and prior or concurrent enrollment in EPSY 951. LEC.

EPSY 950. Cognitive Theory and Strategies in Counseling Psychology. 3 Hours.

An examination of historical and contemporary cognitive theories and strategies used in the practice of counseling psychology. Consideration of theoretical positions and issues, research functions, assessment strategies, and application of techniques. Prerequisite: EPSY doctoral student status or consent of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 951. Psychodiagnostic Assessment. 3 Hours.

Survey of selected psychodiagnostic instruments currently in use and their administration, scoring, and interpretation. Emphasis will also be placed on the use of the clinical interview as an assessment tool, case conceptualization/diagnosis, and integrative report writing. Prerequisite: Completion of EPSY 830 and degree-seeking status in Counseling Psychology or consent of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 952. Advanced Counseling Theory and Research. 3 Hours.

An advanced treatment of theory, research, and practice issues central to Counseling Psychology. Topics include theoretical and research paradigms in Counseling Psychology; the relationship of theory and research to practice; and evidence on factors influencing counseling processes and outcomes. Prerequisite: Counseling Psychology doctoral student status or consent of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 953. Interactional Perspectives on Counseling and Personality. 3 Hours.

A study of personality and therapeutic change from systems, interactional, and communications perspectives, with implications for research and assessment in counseling. Designed for graduate students at the specialist and doctoral levels. Prerequisite: Counseling Psychology doctoral student status or consent of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 954. Vocational Psychology. 3 Hours.

A survey of the major career development theories in counseling psychology. Models and methods of career counseling will be reviewed and integrated from the different theoretical perspectives. The empirical support of each theory and needed research will be identified. The course will include presentation of theories of career development and their specific applicability in counseling. The career development of special groups (women, the culturally different, non-whites) will be studied as well as alternative methods of delivery in career development and counseling. Prerequisite: Completion of EPSY 846 or equivalent, and Ph.D. degree-seeking status in Counseling Psychology or consent of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 955. Research Methods in Counseling Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course is a foundational course in research methods and design in counseling psychology. The course covers (a) design type and threats to design validity, (b) the formulation of research problems, (c) research instrumentaion/measures, (d) data analytic methods, (e) interpreting data, and (f) ethical issues, research integrity, and the responsible conduct of research. Prerequisite: EPSY 710 and EPSY 711 or equivalent. Doctoral student in Counseling Psychology or consent of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 956. Theory of Couples and Family Counseling. 3 Hours.

A survey of contemporary systems of couples and family counseling. Consideration of couple and family function/dysfunction, theoretical models of family interaction, models of counseling practice and methods, and research on couples and family counseling. Prerequisite: Degree-seeking status in Counseling Psychology or consent of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 960. Assessment of Infants, Toddlers, and Young Children. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the assessment of various domains related to the development of infants, toddlers, and young children. The student will learn how to use formal and informal assessment techniques for screening, diagnostic, educational planning, and educational evaluation purposes. An emphasis will be placed on the linkage between assessment and intervention. This course is designed for students in the applied psychology fields (i.e., school psychology, counseling psychology, clinical child psychology, and clinical psychology). Prerequisite: EPSY 705, EPSY 725, EPSY 805 and permission from the instructor. LEC.

EPSY 965. Foundations of Psychoeducational Consultation. 3 Hours.

This is the first of a two semester sequence of courses on school-based consultation. The course is a combination lecture-laboratory experience that introduces the student to the literature, theory, and techniques of consultation. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 970. Counseling with Adults. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the utilization and integration of adult life span theory and issues with counseling theory and practice. Particular attention is given to the adaptation of counseling practices to the developmental concerns of adult male and female clients. Additional emphasis is given to encouraging research projects related to the adult lifespan and effective counseling practices. Prerequisite: Graduate student status as an advanced master's student or doctoral student in the Program in Counseling Psychology or written permission of instructor. LEC.

EPSY 975. Therapeutic Intervention: Home and School. 3 Hours.

The course includes a review of literature and theory as well as supervised practice. Therapeutic intervention is broadly conceived, including individual and group counseling, and parent and teacher consultation. The importance of the family-school relationship is stressed. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and completion of course on counseling. LEC.

EPSY 980. Advanced Topics: _____. 1-3 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current need of education professionals--primarily for post-master's level students. LEC.

EPSY 990. Internship in Counseling Psychology. 1 Hour.

Three consecutive enrollments, covering a minimum of eleven months of experience in an approved counseling psychology field setting. Supervision and directed experiences coordinated by the student's adviser, the program training director, and internship setting supervisors. Required of all counseling psychology doctoral students. Prerequisite: Doctoral degree-seeking status in counseling psychology, completion of Ph.D. comprehensive examinations, and consent of counseling psychology faculty. INT.

EPSY 991. Ed.S. Internship. 1-5 Hours.

This course has two components: 1) a supervised experience as a practicing school psychologist, and 2) a group supervision class emphasizing case presentations and other integrative practice elements. The student functions as a provisionally certified school psychologist. Prerequisite: Completion of Ed.S. degree. INT.

EPSY 992. Ph.D. Internship in School Psychology. 5 Hours.

This is a one year, supervised experience in an approved setting. The structure and content of the experience follows guidelines of several professional organizations including The American Psychological Association and the National Association of School Psychologists. Prerequisite: Approval of School Psychology committee. INT.

EPSY 995. Field Experience in: _____. 1-5 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences in selected educational settings. The advisor will schedule regular observations of the field experience and conferences with the student. Written summaries and evaluations of the field experiences will be prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agency, and the advisor. Open only to advanced students. Field experience credit in any one semester may not exceed five hours, and total credit may not exceed eight hours. FLD.

EPSY 996. College Teaching Experience in: _____. 1-5 Hours.

To meet the college teaching experience requirement for doctoral programs, a student shall engage in a semester long, planned, instructional activity that shall include college classroom teaching under supervision. Planning shall be done with the advisor and/or member of the faculty who will supervise the experience. The activity shall be done under the supervision of a member of the University of Kansas faculty or by an individual or individuals designated by the candidate's committee. FLD.

EPSY 997. Individual Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Prior graduate course work in the area of study and consent of instructor. Course is graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. RSH.

EPSY 998. Seminar in: _____. 1-4 Hours.

Course is graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. LEC.

EPSY 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 Hours.

THE.

Education Courses

EDUC 800. Education as a Field of Scholarship. 3 Hours.

An intensive interdisciplinary examination of classic and current scholarship in education, for students in Ph.D. programs in the School of Education. It surveys the interdisciplinary range of scholarship and inquiry in education, as preparation for careers in research. The course features discussion of exemplary studies, both for their contributions to various fields, but also with regard to research methods, related ethical issues and the responsible conduct of research. Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. in Education Program. LEC.

Health Sport & Exercise Sci Courses

HSES 104. Physical Activity in: _____. 0.5-1 Hours.

(An accurate description of the activity or activities will be given in the Timetable.) Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. ACT.

HSES 108. Basic Skill Instruction in: _____. 0.5-2 Hours.

(An accurate description of the activity or activities will be given in the Timetable.) ACT.

HSES 110. Intermediate Skill Instruction in: _____. 0.5-2 Hours.

(An accurate description of the activity or activities will be given in the Timetable.) ACT.

HSES 112. Advanced Skill Instruction in: _____. 0.5-2 Hours.

(An accurate description of the activity or activities will be given in the Timetable.) ACT.

HSES 200. Coaching Certification for Youth Sports. 2 Hours.

This course will examine theories, practices, methods and techniques used to coach youth sports. Emphasis will be upon training, conditioning, sports psychology, nutrition, organization and management as prescribed by the National Federation of Interscholastic Coaches' Education Program. Students will have opportunity to receive coaching certification. Prerequisite: Open to physical education majors, or by consent of instructor. Students must pass the National Federation of Interscholastic Coaches' Education Program (NFICEP) examination before exiting the course. LEC.

HSES 201. Team Sports. 2 Hours.

This course will deal with Soccer, Touch Football, Basketball, Softball, and Volleyball. Practice in construction of lesson plans and unit plans, skill performance and peer teaching practicum are emphasized in each of the areas of team sports. Class meets three days per week with one hour being a laboratory session. Prerequisite: Basic fitness and knowledge of the activities. Open to HSES majors and minors, or by consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 202. Individual and Dual Sports. 2 Hours.

Instruction and analysis in individual sports such as track and field, bowling or archery, and dual sports such as tennis, badminton or handball. Development of sport skills and rule knowledge are emphasized. Prerequisite: Basic fitness and knowledge of the activities. Prerequisite: Open to pre-HSES and HSES majors, or by consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 204. Gymnastics. 2 Hours.

Instruction and analysis in the eleven gymnastics events for men and women. Skill performance, spotting and teaching techniques, lesson and unit plan construction, and teaching practicum constitute the basic focus of this course. Class meets three days per week with one hour being a laboratory session. Prerequisite: Basic fitness and gymnastics/tumbling experience. Open to HSES majors and minors, or by consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 210. Instruction and Analysis in: _____. 1-16 Hours.

Study of the skills to be included in the instruction of the indicated activities and the analysis of skill performance involved. Presentation of instructional techniques and practice in construction of lesson and unit plans are included for each activity. Open to majors in physical education only. The activities included in the major program are as follows: (a) Swimming (b) Folk and Square Dance (c) Modern Dance and Women's Gymnastics (d) Weight-Training and Men's Gymnastics (e) Soccer-Speedball, Volleyball, Wrestling (f) Field Hockey, Soccer-Speedball, Volleyball (g) Golf, Tennis, Badminton, Archery (h) Basketball, Softball, Flag Football, Team Handball (i) Track and Field, Handball-Paddleball, Fencing. Prerequisite: Basic fitness and basic skill in the course activities shown through competency tests and/or credit in basic skill courses in the appropriate activity. LAB.

HSES 214. Physical Education Activities for Elementary School Children. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce the student to a variety of physical education activities that are appropriate for children in grades K-6. Age appropriate activities demonstrated in this course include: individual and group games, self testing games, stunts and tumbling experiences, physical fitness, modified sports, and movement exploration. Class participation will be expected for all students. Prerequisite: Open to pre-HPE and HPE majors. LEC.

HSES 218. Lifeguard Training. 2 Hours.

The course involves American Red Cross certification in lifeguarding which includes rescue techniques and safety procedures. It also includes first aid and CPR certifications. Each student will be asked to identify common hazards associated with various types of aquatic facilities and develop skills necessary to recognize a person in a distress or drowning situation and to effectively rescue that person. This course will help each student to understand the lifeguard/employer and lifeguard/patron relationship as well as provide explanations, demonstrations, practice and review of the rescue skills essential for lifeguards. Prerequisite: HSES 112 Advanced Skill Instruction in Swimming or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 220. Officiating of: _____. 1 Hour.

A study of the rules and techniques of officiating. Students will officiate during laboratory sessions. The activities offered in officiating are: basketball, football, gymnastics, softball, swimming, track and field, and volleyball. Prerequisite: Basic competency in the sport to be officiated, or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 222. Water Safety Instruction. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to train instructor candidates to teach American Red Cross Swimming and Water Safety courses. Through practice teaching sessions, students will plan and organize skill development utilizing the various educational methods and approaches applicable to swimming and water safety instruction. Students will also learn the correct swimming styles taught by the Red Cross. Prerequisite: HSES 112 Advanced Skill Instruction in Swimming or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 224. Lifeguard Training Instructor. 2 Hours.

This course is designed as a lecture/laboratory course, meeting for one hour three days per week. Each instructor candidate (student) will have an opportunity for skill development necessary to instruct American Red Cross Lifeguard Training courses. Through practice teaching sessions, emphasis will be placed on enforcing safety precautions, identifying errors, providing effective instruction, and skills correction. After successful completion of this course, the student will be certified to instruct the following American Red Cross Aquatic courses: (1) lifeguard training, (2) waterfront lifeguarding, (3) CPR for professional rescue, and (4) community first aid. Prerequisite: HSES 218 or lifeguard training. LEC.

HSES 236. Practicum in: _____. 1-3 Hours.

A description of the activities offered will be provided in the Timetable. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. FLD.

HSES 240. The Coaching of Football. 2 Hours.

A complete study of the theoretical aspects of the fundamentals of football. Study of defensive and offensive tactics for each position. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. LEC.

HSES 244. Introduction to Physical Education and Sport Studies. 3 Hours GE3H.

The study of the history, foundational concepts, and current principles of physical education and sport programs. LEC.

HSES 248. First Aid. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to teach emergency treatment of injuries, wounds, hemorrhage, burns, and poisoning. Emphasis is placed on the techniques of rescue breathing, CPR, and emergency bandaging. American Red Cross certification is included. LEC.

HSES 250. Introduction to Athletic Training. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the health profession of Athletic Training. Course content includes; risk management, pathology, emergency management, musculoskeletal, and general medical conditions of the injured athlete. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in HSES 251. LEC.

HSES 251. Introduction to Athletic Training Practicum. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to introduce the beginning skills to the pre-professional athletic training student. Emphasis will be placed on basic athletic training procedures including but not limited to preventative taping, bracing, and padding techniques as well as various other procedures and techniques related to the prevention, care, and management of athletic related injuries/illnesses. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in HSES 250 or transfer credit. LAB.

HSES 252. The Coaching of Basketball. 2 Hours.

Theory of basketball, including methods of teaching fundamentals; individual and team offense and defense; various styles of play and methods of coaching. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. LEC.

HSES 260. Personal and Community Health. 3 Hours.

Emphasis on healthful and intelligent living and the application of the fundamental principles of health. LEC.

HSES 262. Life Skills Training for Intercollegiate Athletics. 2 Hours.

This course will focus on issues surrounding drug use, testing, and prevention in sports and will incorporate life skills training in the areas of career transition, stress and time management, performance enhancement, strategic learning skills, and the dynamics of communication and leadership. LEC.

HSES 264. The Coaching of Individual Sports. 2 Hours.

An analysis of coaching techniques and study of materials for the coaching of gymnastics, swimming, golf, tennis, and wrestling. LEC.

HSES 269. Introduction to Exercise Science. 3 Hours.

A study of the various components of physical fitness and the wellness and the implications for developing programs to promote good health and fitness. Lectures and laboratory sessions will be centered on practical knowledge and experiences designed to help individuals enhance their own health, as well as develop sound programs for others. The topics discussed include cardiovascular fitness, body composition, muscular strength, flexibility, evaluation of fitness components, training program design, nutrition, weight management, and facts and fallacies of nutrition and fitness. LEC.

HSES 289. Introduction to Sport Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the field of sport management including the principles of leadership and management and the fundamentals of personnel management, financial management, marketing, strategic planning, sport ethics, sport law, time management, stress management, facility management, and event management applied to sport settings. LEC.

HSES 290. Safety Education. 3 Hours.

A survey of safety problems as they exist in society today, with emphasis on preventive, corrective, and compensatory procedures. LEC.

HSES 302. Practicum in Adaptive Health and Physical Education for Elementary and Secondary Students. 2 Hours.

Emphasis will be on instructional techniques that are used for the inclusion of all students in health and physical education learning experiences. Students will develop an understanding of how to deliver health and physical education activities that may be part of an individual education program. As a part of this course, a practicum experience of 30 hours in a public school adaptive physical education setting will be required. LEC.

HSES 305. Methods of Strength Training and Conditioning. 3 Hours.

This course will provide the students with the scientific principles and the hands-on experience to develop resistance exercise and related conditioning programs for a wide range of populations, including those focusing on general fitness, therapeutic rehabilitation and sport performance. Prerequisite: Anatomy, Physiology, admission to the Exercise Science or Athletic Training undergraduate programs, or permission of instructor. LEC.

HSES 306. Principles of Personal Training. 3 Hours.

Designed to prepare individuals who are interested in becoming certified personal trainers (CPT) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association, or to enhance their own training goals. Instruction is provided describing basic exercise physiology as well as the principles of developing a personal training regimen for a typical gym trainee. Course experiences will reinforce training principles and teach the basic skills necessary for certification. Prerequisite: Accepted to School of Education or instructor permission. LEC.

HSES 308. Drugs and Diseases in Society. 3 Hours.

This course is an overview of human disease processes as well as legal and illegal use of drugs and narcotics for treatment or recreational purposes. Both communicable and degenerative diseases will be covered with regards to prevention, transmission, effects, management, and treatment. Legal drugs and illegal drugs will be discussed with regards to their treatment or abuse potential, legislative issues, and consumer education. Reflective thinking will be used to formulate improved perspectives on the roles of drugs and diseases in society. Prerequisite: Admission to Community Health Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 310. Research and Data Analysis in Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences. 3 Hours.

This course provides formal instruction in the areas of test administration, general statistics, and basic research design. Emphasis will be placed upon the interpretation of statistical data, evaluation of data, and basic methodologies utilized in health, sport, and exercise sciences research. Data collection, analysis, and evaluation will be an integral part of the class. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education. LEC.

HSES 315. Health and Fitness Technology. 2 Hours.

The course will prepare health and physical education majors to use technology effectively to enhance teaching and learning. Students will explore the use of technology appropriate for communication, organization, instruction, and assessment in health and physical education classrooms. Prerequisite: Admission to the HPE Teacher Licensure Program. LEC.

HSES 320. Methods of Teaching Physical Education. 3 Hours.

This course provides a systematic approach to the development of effective teaching skills in physical education. Students receive practical and field experiences that enable them to observe and practice managerial, instructional, and interpersonal skills necessary to produce student learning in K-12 physical education classrooms. Prerequisite: Admission to the HSES Teacher Certification Program. LEC.

HSES 330. Principles of Nutrition and Health. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to the basic principles of nutrition, with an emphasis on application of these principles to improve overall health. Topics include: guidelines for a balanced diet, index of nutritional quality, energy requirements and balance, weight management and obesity, nutritional quackery, sports nutrition, nutrition for children and elderly, and eating disorders. LEC.

HSES 331. Sport and Exercise Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Provides a basic understanding of the influence of nutrition on sport and exercise performance. Nutrition for sport performance, including hydration, nutrient timing strategies for various athletes, and use and regulation of ergogenic aids and nutritional supplements will be covered to apply this knowledge to develop a critical understanding of the nutritional and practical dietary needs of individuals participating in sport and exercise. Prerequisite: Accepted to School of Education or instructor permission LEC.

HSES 335. Clincial Field Experience. 3 Hours.

Clinical Field Experience is designed to allow students who plan to pursue clinical careers the opportunity to observe and assist (as appropriate) in the evaluation and/or treatment of patients by licensed clinicians in fields such as medicine, physical therapy, and cardiac rehabilitation. Only one enrollment permitted each semester. A maximum of six hours will apply towards the bachelor's degree, or a maximum of three credit hours will apply towards the bachelor's degree if the student subsequently enrolls in HSES 580 (Internship). Prerequisite: Admittance to the Community Health or Exercise Science undergraduate degree program in HSES. LEC.

HSES 340. Instructional Strategies in Motor Development. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an examination of current theories of motor development throughout the life cycle. Emphasis is place don content regarding the development of fundamental motor skills, physical growth and development, and assessment. Prerequisite: Admission to the HSES Teacher Certification Program. LEC.

HSES 341. Instructional Strategies in Physical Education for Elementary Classroom Teachers. 1 Hour.

The application of child growth and development principles to physical education. The use of materials as related to a sequential physical education curriculum in the elementary school will also be included. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in C&T 322 or equivalent. LEC.

HSES 350. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. 3 Hours.

The introductory study of the prevention, immediate care, and treatment of athletic related injuries and illnesses. This course is designed to cover the basic fundamentals of injury/illness recognition as well as discuss the various strategies for the prevention and care of injuries to the physically active. Prerequisite: Courses in Human Anatomy and First Aid. LEC.

HSES 351. Foundations of Athletic Training. 1 Hour.

This course is designed to introduce the practical skills and psychomotor clinical competencies of the beginning student-athletic trainer. Emphasis will be placed on basic athletic training procedures including but not limited to preventative taping, bracing, and padding techniques as well as various other procedures and techniques related to the prevention, care, and management of athletic related injuries/illnesses. Prerequisite: Human Anatomy, First Aid, concurrent enrollment in HSES 350. Open to Athletic Training majors only. LEC.

HSES 352. Therapeutic Modalities. 3 Hours.

This course is the study of therapeutic modalities utilized in treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Prerequisite: HSES 250 or the transfer equivalent, Admission to the Athletic Training Program. LEC.

HSES 353. Athletic Training Practicum I. 2 Hours.

The first in a sequence of six practical/clinical experiences for the Athletic Training Student, under the direct supervision of a Preceptor. Prerequisite: Admission to Athletic Training program, HSES 250 and HSES 251. FLD.

HSES 354. Lower Extremity Evaluation. 3 Hours.

This course teaches a systematic approach to athletic injury evaluation of the lower extremity, thorax, and abdomen. Prerequisite: Admission to the Athletic Training Program, HSES 353, concurrent enrollment HSES 355. LEC.

HSES 355. Athletic Training Practicum II. 2 Hours.

This course is the second in a sequence of six practicum/clinical experience courses for the athletic training student. Prerequisite: Admission to Athletic Training program and concurrent enrollment in HSES 354. FLD.

HSES 358. Creative Movement and Dance Appreciation. 3 Hours.

An appreciation for dance will be developed through the study of the pioneers of dance and the critique of local dance performances. Students will experience the following types of dance: creative movement, basic rhythms, ballroom dance, and folk and square dance. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education. LEC.

HSES 365. Peer Health Education. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to train students in peer health education, as peer health educators in college settings, and as trainers, training adolescents in community health settings for grades 6-12 peer health education. Subject content and teaching methodologies will be emphasized in the ten content areas of health with special emphasis on alcohol, drugs, tobacco, stress reduction, mental health and human sexuality. Prerequisite: HSES 260 or instructor consent. LEC.

HSES 369. Kinesiology. 3 Hours.

This course is designed primarily for students in the field of exercise science who already have taken an introductory course in human anatomy and who need a more detailed exposure to concepts of functional movement anatomy. This course will provide a detailed study of the skeletal and muscular systems to include identification of the origin, insertion, and action of the major muscles of the human body. Students will become proficient in the use of directional and movement terminology used to describe movement and be able to identify the plane/axis as well as the agonist and antagonist muscles involved in a movement. Prerequisite: A course in human anatomy, admission to School of Education. LEC.

HSES 370. Anatomical and Physiological Foundations of Heath and Disease. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to assist students in the development of a basic understanding of the anatomical structures and physiological processes that are central to the development of various diseases/disorders. Students will apply this knowledge to an evidence-based model for choosing and developing appropriate lifestyle and health-related interventions (e.g. exercise, nutrition, stress management), both for health enhancement and disease prevention. Prerequisite: BIOL 240 and BIOL 246; or admittance to HSES exercise science, community health, or athletic training programs. LEC.

HSES 375. Neuromuscular Exercise Physiology and Motor Control. 3 Hours.

This course explores the control of human movement from an exercise neurophysiology perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding the interactions between the nervous system and muscular systems in the control of muscle force/power production and the control of movement under a variety of contexts. These contexts include responses and adaptations to exercise training, the aging process, and in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. Prerequisite: BIOL 240 and BIOL 246. LEC.

HSES 378. The Coaching of Volleyball. 2 Hours.

Theory of volleyball, including methods of teaching fundamentals, individual and team offense and defense. Various styles of play and methods of coaching. Efficient performance of the skills during game conditions will be emphasized. LEC.

HSES 379. The Coaching of Softball. 2 Hours.

Theory and fundamentals of coaching softball. Methods of coaching, as well as team offense, defense, and strategies will be stressed. Efficient performance of the skills during game conditions will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 380. Sociology of Sport. 3 Hours GE3S.

A survey of the current literature concerning the scope of sociology in sport, the interaction of people in sport, the social systems controlling sport, and the small group dynamics in sport. Prerequisite: Admission to Sport Management program or permission of instructor. LEC.

HSES 381. Sport Ethics. 3 Hours.

This course will help students develop their abilities to reason morally through an examination within competitive sports of ethical theories, moral values, intimidation, gamesmanship, and violence, eligibility, elimination, winning, commercialization, racial equity, performance-enhancing drugs, and technology. Students will develop a personal philosophy of sport and learn how to apply a principled decision-making process to issues in sport. Prerequisite: Admission to Sport Management program or permission of instructor. LEC.

HSES 382. Sport Facilities and Event Management. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with a solid grasp of the fundamental skills in sport facility and event management and the knowledge base to apply those skills in a real world environment. Students will learn about planning, designing and financing the construction of new sport facilities, sport facility management of regular and special events, sporting event planning and game day operations. Prerequisite: Admission in the Sport Management program or permission of instructor. LEC.

HSES 384. Sport Law. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce undergraduate students to the major legal issues in amateur and professional sports including dispute resolution, tort law, contract law, constitutional law, statutory law, labor and antitrust law and intellectual law. Students will also learn about risk management, gender equity, the Americans with Disabilities Act and agency law and sports agents. Prerequisite: Admission to Sport Management program or permission of instructor. LEC.

HSES 385. Psychological Aspects of Exercise. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students interested in optimizing motivation and adherence to exercise among individuals in a wide range of physical activity settings (e.g., health clubs, corporate fitness, and physical therapy/rehab). The course content will include a review of the literature highlighting the psychological benefits of exercise, the theoretical advances in understanding the psychological aspects influencing individuals' participation in physical activity, and an introduction to strategies and techniques for professionals attempting to foster motivation and adherence to exercise among their clients. Prerequisite: Admission to the Community Health program or instructor consent. LEC.

HSES 390. The Coaching of Track and Field. 2 Hours.

Designed to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of track and field athletics. LEC.

HSES 395. Concepts in Health and Wellness. 3 Hours.

This is designed as an introductory course into the profession of School and Community Health Education. Regardless of a person's areas of specialization in Health Education, there are commonalities shared by all of us who are charged with the responsibility of providing education about health. Course emphasis will focus on: defining health education; history of health education; roles and competencies of health educators; theoretical bases for the profession; planning, implementing, administering, and evaluating health programs; settings for health education; future issues. Prerequisite: HSES 260. LEC.

HSES 403. Health Behavior Theory. 3 Hours.

This class will be an introduction to the primary models and theories used in health behavior research and health promotion practice. These models and theories undergird the development of successful health-related programs and interventions, and will help guide educators in the development of innovative and effective programming. The course will cover individual, interpersonal, community-level, and ecological theories, and students will have the opportunity to apply these theories to health behaviors of interest. LEC.

HSES 410. Program Design in Physical Education. 3 Hours.

The study of physical education curriculum models and extraclass programs appropriate for students in grades PK-12. Students will receive practical and field experiences related to program design and implementation. They will learn techniques appropriate for program evaluation as well as the assessment of student sport skills and fitness. Prerequisite: Admission to the HSES Teacher Certification Program. LEC.

HSES 418. Health Aspects of Aging. 3 Hours.

This course will consist of a Holistic Health approach to the various components of the aging process. Special emphasis will be placed on the demographic aspects of aging; normal aging changes and deviations in the aging process (pathophysiology); the relationship between mental and physical health, and the implications for the promotion of risk reduction and prevention principles that can effectively improve the quality of life for older individuals. Prerequisite: A course in personal and community health. LEC.

HSES 434. Consumer Health. 3 Hours.

This course will be a comprehensive examination of the factors involved in the selection of health products and services. Topics of discussion will be: protection laws and services, fraudulent practices and products, consumerism, and traditional and alternative health care. There will also be an in-depth examination of how to assess and evaluate health based products that are available to consumers. Prerequisite: Admission to the Community Health Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 440. Applied Sport and Performance Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the psychological principles and techniques that are applied to improve sport performance and other fields of achievement (e.g., exercise and wellness, music, and academics). Special attention will be given to psychological aspects of injury and rehabilitation, psychological conditioning, psychological training methods, coaching philosophy, the social psychology of team members, and components of peak performances. LEC.

HSES 453. Communicable and Degenerative Diseases. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of the basic concepts/principles of disease process. Special emphasis will be placed on the etiology, origin, symptoms, treatment, body defenses, primary prevention, host, agent, (microbes) and environmental factors affecting disease occurrence, prevention and control measures. Topical application of the fundamental concepts of microbiology in school/community health practice will be critically discussed. The natural history of disease and disease classification will be highlighted. Many disease topics (both communicable and chronic, degenerative diseases) will be discussed. Prerequisite: A course in personal and community health. LEC.

HSES 455. Manual Therapy Techniques and Emergency Care Instructor Training. 3 Hours.

The purpose of the course is to train students in a Manual Therapy Technique for use in the clinical setting. The course is also designed to certify students as instructors in American Red Cross First Aid, CPR and AED courses as well as instructors for the CPR/AED for the Healthcare Provider. Prerequisite: Completion of HSES 352, HSES 354, HSES 456 and HSES 459 or equivalency from an accredited Athletic Training Education Program or have current First Aid and CPR/AED for the Healthcare Provider certification. LEC.

HSES 456. Upper Extremity Evaluation. 3 Hours.

This course teaches a systematic approach to athletic injury evaluation of the upper extremity, head and spine. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training program, HSES 354, and HSES 355. Corequisite: HSES 457. LEC.

HSES 457. Athletic Training Practicum III. 2 Hours.

This course is third in a sequence of six practicum/clinical experience courses for the athletic training student. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training program and concurrent enrollment in HSES 456. FLD.

HSES 458. General Medical/Pharmacology. 3 Hours.

This course will cover general medical conditions/illnesses and over the counter, prescription, and illegal pharmacologic agents commonly encountered in physically active populations. The course will cover recognition of illnesses and diseases, immediate care and medical referral, basic principles of pharmacology, pharmacological agents used in the treatment of various pathologies, and other general medical and pharmacological topics encountered by athletic trainers. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program, HSES 459 and HSES 460. LEC.

HSES 459. Rehabilitation. 3 Hours.

This course is the study of rehabilitation principles and techniques used to safely return a physically active individual to their sport/ activity following injury. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training program, HSES 456, and HSES 457. LEC.

HSES 460. Athletic Training Practicum IV. 2 Hours.

This course provides a practical experience for the athletic training student. Students gain experience through a hands-on approach via clinical settings and field experiences. Practical experiences are supervised by a Certified Athletic Trainer and provide opportunities for students to apply the knowledge and skills obtained during previous coursework as well as apply rehabilitation skills obtained in HSES 459. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Education program, HSES 457, and concurrent enrollment in HSES 459. FLD.

HSES 461. Organization and Administration of Athletic Training. 3 Hours.

This course examines the organizational and administrative aspects of the Athletic Training profession. Course content includes; program management, employment, budget, facility design, risk management, documentation and medical records, insurance, legal and practice regulations, prevention and health promotion, history, and organization of the profession. Prerequisite: HSES 459, HSES 460, and concurrent enrollment in HSES 462. LEC.

HSES 462. Athletic Training Practicum V. 2 Hours.

This course is the fifth in a sequence of six practicum/clinical experience courses for the athletic training student. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program and concurrent enrollment in HSES 461. FLD.

HSES 463. Senior Capstone in Athletic Training. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to allow senior Athletic Training Students to review previous content and prepare for the BOC certification exam as well as explore areas of professional development. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training program, HSES 561, and HSES 562. LEC.

HSES 464. Athletic Training Practicum VI. 2 Hours.

This course is the final practicum/clinical experience course for the athletic training student. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training program and concurrent enrollment in HSES 463. FLD.

HSES 465. Program Assessment and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

This course will offer an introduction and hands-on application of program assessment and evaluation techniques in health education. As health educators and program planners, we are required not only to develop innovative programs and interventions to address community- and school-based health concerns, but also to give evidence that our efforts are both adequate and effective. Successful program assessment and evaluation incorporate knowledge of basic research methods as well as the theoretical understanding of health behaviors. LEC.

HSES 466. Program Planning in Health Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the students with an in-depth knowledge of proven health planning models that can be used for program development and intervention. Students will learn how to develop attainable program goals and objectives which will allow programs and interventions to evolve into useful forms of community based health education. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted to the School of Education and the Community Health Program. LEC.

HSES 467. Introduction to Health Education. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an overview the various health education professions. Topics emphasized in the course are: the nature of health education, an in-depth description of community health, the school health program, and identifying program and services of voluntary and services of voluntary and official health and welfare organizations. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education and the Community Health Program. LEC.

HSES 468. Methods and Materials in Health Education. 3 Hours.

Emphasis is placed on the presentation and preparation of health topics along with the recommended resources and materials available. The teaching method is emphasized and student participation is stressed. Students will observe health teachers in the public schools and identify and discuss these methods as they relate to the methods present in the class. Prerequisite: Admission to HPE teacher certification program or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 470. Biomechanics. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to cover a basic understanding of the anatomical and mechanical principles of human movement. Areas covered will be joint and segmental movement, muscle actions, time-displacement motion description, forces causing or inhibiting motion, and stability. Special attention will be given to the application of the theoretical concepts in movement activities. Prerequisite: Anatomy, admission to the Exercise Science program, or permission of instructor. LEC.

HSES 472. Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

A fundamental study of the physiological adjustments that occur within the body during exercise. The presentation of this material is particularly oriented toward a basic understanding of the physiological systems as they are affected by the activity of a normal coaching or teaching situation. The physiological values of exercise are also stressed. Prerequisite: Three hours of physiology . LEC.

HSES 473. Clinical Fitness Evaluation Techniques. 3 Hours AE61.

This course will provide the student with the knowledge and skills to assess components of physical fitness in adults including cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, strength, and flexibility. In addition, specific emphasis will be placed on the development of exercise and weight management prescriptions. Students completing the course will have the skills to take the Health Fitness Instructor Certification exam given by the American College of Sports Medicine. Prerequisite: Exercise physiology or equivalent. LEC.

HSES 474. Exercise Biochemistry. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the processes that underlies the use and production of energy for exercise. Topics that will be explored include glycogenolysis and glycolysis in muscle, cellular oxidation of pyruvate, lipid metabolism, metabolism of proteins and amino acids, molecular biology, neural and endocrine control of metabolism, and local fatigue during exercise. Emphasis will be placed on carbohydrates, protein, and lipid metabolism and the acute and chronic effects that exercise has on these processes. Prerequisite: HSES 472. LEC.

HSES 475. Undergraduate Research in Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to allow students to collaborate on an active research project under the supervision of a faculty member in HSES. Only one enrollment permitted each semester. A maximum of six hours will apply towards the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Enrollment by Instructor permission only. Successful completion of IRB training via the CITI training program in the KU eCompliance system. LEC.

HSES 480. Physical Activity and Exercise Management Individuals with Disabilities. 3 Hours AE41.

An in-depth study of how physical activity and exercise can be a part of the treatment plan for people who have chronic disease or a disability. A variety of physical activity and exercise intervention programs and models will be presented and discussed, as well as protocols for baseline testing and post-treatment testing. A portion of this course will focus on how physical activity and exercise can prevent motor functioning deterioration in people who have a disability or limited functional movement. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education Exercise Science or Athletic Training programs and a course in human anatomy and physiology, or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 482. Drugs in Society. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide an in-depth exposure to basic drug classification, pharmacological effects, causes of drug abuse to society, common treatment modalities, and effective prevention/intervention strategies. In addition, consumer issues related to drug use, drug legislation, and drug education programs for school and community implementation will be discussed. Prerequisite: A course in personal and community health or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 483. Sport Finance and Economics. 3 Hours.

This course will help students gain an understanding of the critical importance of budgeting and financing sports-related industries based on sound financial principles and methods of financial control. Students will learn how economic principles shape the major national industry of sport. Prerequisite: Admission to Sport Management program or permission of instructor and completion of or concurrent registration in FIN 305 or FIN 310. LEC.

HSES 484. Sport in Film. 3 Hours.

In the course, students will critically engage and interpret a series of popular sport-related films. By the end of the course, students will be able to write and think critically about the role that film in general, and sport-based films in particular, play in promoting and challenging dominant perceptions of gender, sexuality, nationalism, race, social class, and ability. LEC.

HSES 485. Sport Communication. 3 Hours.

This course examines the complex and evolving field of sport communication including personal, organizational, and external perspectives of sport communication. LEC.

HSES 486. Sport Marketing. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to provide undergraduate students with basic knowledge and competencies in definitions of marketing and sport marketing, understanding the unique aspects of sport marketing, marketing planning process, consumer demographics and psychographics, the marketing mix, segmentation and target marketing, marketing proposal preparation, sponsorship, endorsement, merchandising, fundraising, marketing goals and objectives, sport consumer and consumer behavior, industry segmentation, special events, ticket sales and their use in promotion, the role of the media, television marketing ratings and shares and venue and event marketing. The proposed content of this course will address each of these expectations. Prerequisite: Admission to the Sport Management program or permission of instructor. LEC.

HSES 487. Personnel Management in Sport. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an overview of the requisite communication skills and concepts of leadership and management as they relate to sport managers. Students will learn how leadership and management practitioners, utilizing effective communication techniques, shape successful sport organizations. Additional emphasis will be placed on building and nurturing relationships with people as a key to effective management. Prerequisite: Admission to Sport Management program or permission of instructor. LEC.

HSES 488. Pre-Internship Seminar. 1 Hour.

This course will prepare students for their actual semester-long Internship experience. Students will be provided with background information on available internship sites to assist in their site-selection decision. Students will learn about different management styles they may encounter, the traits and characteristics of effective and productive employees, common rules of the workplace and internship experiences of previous HSES Interns. Prerequisite: All HSES students must be in final semester prior to Internship. LEC.

HSES 489. Health and Human Sexuality. 3 Hours.

The course is designed to encompass the various components of human sexuality as well as to demonstrate applicable teaching techniques for sex education. Included in the content of the course are: human sexual response, sexually transmitted diseases, family planning, sex roles, rape, sexual preferences, and topics such as sexuality and the handicapped, sexuality and the mass media, and sexuality and the church. Teaching techniques such as values clarification, non-verbal communications, role playing, tape recordings, and problem solving are demonstrated with appropriate topics. LEC.

HSES 497. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Only one enrollment permitted each semester; a maximum of six hours will apply toward the bachelor's degree. This course cannot be taken as a substitute for a required course. Prerequisite: Recommendation of advisor and consent of instructor and department chairperson. IND.

HSES 499. Internship in Sport Management. 2-16 Hours AE61.

A full-time work experience in the sport industry (40 hours per week). This experience is actual work in a sport management setting in which management practices are applied. Student interns are directed and evaluated by a faculty member with appropriate supervision by an on-site professional. Student interns must keep an accurate accounting of hours with a performance work diary. Grades/credit for the internship are determined by a faculty member with input from the on-site supervisor. Prerequisite: Completion of all Sport Management coursework. Admission to the Sport Management Internship program. FLD.

HSES 500. Student Teaching in: _____. 14 Hours GE11.

A supervised teaching experience in an approved school setting, teaching physical education at the elementary level and health and physical education at the secondary level. The student must teach 8 weeks at the elementary level and 8 weeks at the secondary level. Prerequisite: A cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher and admission to the HSES teacher certification program. FLD.

HSES 501. Seminar in Teaching Health and Physical Education. 2 Hours AE61.

Student teachers will learn to analyze teaching styles and instructional methods that apply and/or relate to their student teaching experience. Discussions of various teaching practices will be facilitated by the university supervisor with input from the student teachers. Topics will include: curriculum, teaching methods, discipline, safety, equipment, and communicating with teachers, parents, and students. Prerequisite: Admission to the HSES Teacher Certification Program. LEC.

HSES 502. Camp Leadership and Counseling. 2 Hours.

Involves a complete study of the organization and administration of the various types of camps. It is designed to familiarize the student with camp leadership responsibilities; the development of the camp, the program involving camp crafts, outdoor cookery, hikes and outings, singing, and simple guidance of the individual camper. Prerequisite: General psychology plus three hours in sociology. LEC.

HSES 515. Assessment of Motor Development and Motor Control of Exceptional Children. 3 Hours.

Standardized motor assessment tools appropriate for use with exceptional children with motor difficulty will be critiqued and practiced. A battery of tests to measure developmental lag or structural deviation will be selected and administered to determine the motor control of exceptional children and the results will be interpreted. Prerequisite: Six hours of physical education course work. LEC.

HSES 528. Techniques of Athletic Training - I Lower Extremity. 3 Hours.

This course provides a comprehensive study of the techniques used by the Athletic Trainer in regard to the assessment and evaluation of athletic injuries/illnesses of the lower extremity, abdomen, and thorax, as well as the study of common illnesses/diseases that affect the physically active. Procedures for reporting and evaluating injuries/illnesses will be discussed so that appropriate injury management and referral may take place. The etiological factors common to athletic injuries, as well as specific signs and symptoms of various athletic related pathological conditions, will be discussed. Prerequisite: Human Anatomy, Human Anatomy Lab, Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries, and admission to the Athletic Training Program. LEC.

HSES 529. Techniques of Athletic Training - II Upper Extremity. 3 Hours.

The comprehensive study of the techniques used by the Athletic Trainer in regard to the assessment and evaluation of athletic injuries/illnesses of the upper extremity, head, and spine. Procedures for evaluating and reporting injuries/illnesses will be discussed as well as etiological factors and common signs/symptoms of various related pathological conditions. The purpose of this course is to prepare students with the skills necessary to accurately recognize the signs/symptoms of injuries and conditions in order to determine the nature and severity of the problem as well as establishing a proper care plan and medical referral when appropriate. Prerequisite: HSES 528 Techniques of Athletic Training - I Lower Extremity. LEC.

HSES 578. Health Internship Seminar. 2 Hours AE61.

Students enrolled in the internship will learn how to analyze professional health environments, examine intervention programs, and understand models used to develop health based programs. Discussions surrounding the internship experience will be facilitated by the health education faculty. Topics will relate to all phases of the internship experience. The intent of this course is to better prepare the student for entering the health profession. Discussions will be held on conflict resolution in the work place, professional development, professional behavior and etiquette. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in HSES 580 Internship in Health. LEC.

HSES 580. Internship in: _____. 2-16 Hours.

A supervised internship experience in an approved setting. The specific type of internship experience and the credits for that particular experience will be outlined in the appropriate program of the student. Prerequisite: Admission to a HSES Internship Program. FLD.

HSES 581. Athletic Training Practicum I: Recognition and Evaluation. 4 Hours.

This course provides a practical experience for the student-athletic trainer. Students gain experience through a hands-on approach via clinical settings and field experiences. Practical experiences are supervised by a Certified Athletic Trainer and provide opportunities for students to apply the knowledge and skills of injury/illness recognition and evaluation during their clinical and field experience. Specific skills addressed in HSES 528 will be practiced, applied, and mastered during this experience. Prerequisite: Admission to the Athletic Training program. Concurrent enrollment in HSES 528. LEC.

HSES 582. Athletic Training Practicum II: Management and Treatment. 4 Hours AE61.

This course provides a practical experience for the student-athletic trainer. Students gain experience through a hands-on approach via clinical settings and field experiences. Practical experiences are supervised by a Certified Athletic Trainer and provide opportunities for students to apply the knowledge and skills of injury/illness evaluation, and the management and treatment of athletic injuries through a variety of therapeutic modalities during their clinical and field experience. Specific skills addressed in HSES 529 and HSES 654 will be practiced, applied, and mastered during this experience. Prerequisite: HSES 581 and concurrent enrollment in HSES 529 and HSES 654. LEC.

HSES 583. Athletic Training Practicum III: Rehabilitation. 4 Hours.

This course provides a practical experience for the student-athletic trainer. Students gain experience through a hands-on approach via clinical settings and field experiences. Practical experiences are supervised by a Certified Athletic Trainer and provide opportunities for students to apply the knowledge and skills of injury rehabilitation/reconditioning through a variety of therapeutic exercise techniques during their clinical and field experience. Specific skills addressed in HSES 656 will be practiced, applied, and mastered during this experience. Prerequisite: HSES 582, concurrent enrollment in HSES 656. LEC.

HSES 584. Athletic Training Practicum IV: Senior Sport Experience. 4 Hours.

This course provides a culminating practical experience for the student-athletic trainer. Students gain experience through a hands-on approach via clinical settings and field experiences. Practical experiences are supervised by a Certified Athletic Trainer and provide opportunities for students to apply the knowledge and skills obtained during previous coursework as well as apply administrative and management skills obtained in HSES 658. This course is intended to allow the Senior student more freedom and responsibility in decision making regarding the health care of an athletic team. Prerequisite: HSES 583, concurrent enrollment in HSES 658. LEC.

HSES 598. Special Course: _____. 1-5 Hours.

A special course of study to explore current trends and issues in health and physical eduction - primarily for undergraduates. LEC.

HSES 605. Administrating Health Related Programs. 3 Hours.

This course will consist of an analysis of administration as it relates to both school and community health programs. The focus will be on administrative models and techniques used to establish and maintain sound health programs in school and community settings. Prerequisite: Six hours of health education or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 671. Applied Biomechanics. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the qualitative biomechanical analysis of human movement directed towards the goals of performance improvement and injury prevention and rehabilitation. Specifically, this course will provide students with a basis knowledge of the biomechanical foundations of human movement, the knowledge and skills necessary to complete a systematic analysis and evaluation of human motor performance, and the ability to determine and provide interventions that are likely to improve movement in athletic, clinical, educational, and work environments. Prerequisite: A course in human anatomy, admission to the HSES Teacher Certification Program or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 714. Motor Development During Growth. 3 Hours.

Motor development in childhood and adolescence and its relationship to physical growth. Factors influencing motor learning and development will be explored. This course provides basic understanding of the neuromuscular changes and abilities of children and adolescents. Prerequisite: A course in kinesiology and anatomy. LEC.

HSES 715. Understanding Research in HSES. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the concepts and skills involved in understanding and analyzing research in education and related areas. The course provides an overview of basic, general knowledge of various research methodologies. Students should expect to study much of this material in greater depth through additional work before being fully prepared to conduct independent research. However, this course should enhance their ability to locate, read, comprehend, and critically analyze research articles and reports. Topics in the course include quantitative and qualitative methods and designs, historical and descriptive research, and program evaluation. (This course fulfills the requirement of a research methods course in the first 12 hours of graduate study.) Prerequisite: Must be an admitted HSES graduate student. LEC.

HSES 730. Advanced Concepts in Nutrition. 3 Hours.

A study of the nutritional factors that affect health at all ages. Specific nutritional needs and effects of deficiency states on health will also be addressed. The course will also include the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in the use of nutrients for human growth and development as well as the production of energy through the metabolic process. Prerequisite: HSES 330 or equivalent experience and permission of instructor. LEC.

HSES 771. Internship in Exercise Science. 6 Hours.

A supervised internship experience in an approved exercise science setting. Students will gain experience through a hands-on approach via clinical and/or research settings. The specific type of internship experience will be agreed upon by the student and their academic advisor. Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 24 graduate credit hours. LEC.

HSES 777. Practicum in Health Education and Wellness Promotion. 1-3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide practical community health experiences in health education and wellness promotion, including: assessment, planning, implementation and program evaluation. With approval of the instructor, students may choose their practicum focus in any of the ten content areas of health: mental and emotional, family living, growth and development, nutrition, personal health, alcohol tobacco and other drugs, communicable and chronic diseases, injury prevention and safety, consumer health and environmental health. Prerequisite: Enrolled in graduate school and consent of the instructor. LAB.

HSES 779. Physiology of Functional Aging. 3 Hours.

The course has been designed to address issues and concepts relating to the biological aging process as a foundation for physical performance, general fitness, and health status. The biological concepts are applied to the human physiological aging process and the systems involved as well as the possible interventions that may effect that process. The several theories associated with physiological aging are also addressed as related to the physiological systems and current research that may impact the understanding of these theories. Prerequisite: A course in basic biology. LEC.

HSES 780. Internship in Teaching Physical Education: _____. 1-16 Hours.

A supervised internship experience leading to initial physical education teacher certification. The student assumes the total professional role as a teacher of physical education in an approved school setting. FLD.

HSES 795. Traditions and Principles in Health Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to explore the philosophy and principles which provide the foundation of health education as an academic discipline. Specific topics include: history of the profession, theories of health behavior and behavior change, principles of learning applied to health communications, health promotion practices, professional preparation, and the integration of philosophical and ethical ideals into program planning and implementation. LEC.

HSES 798. Special Course: _____. 1-5 Hours.

A special course of in-depth study exploring current trends and issues in health and physical education - primarily for undergraduates. LEC.

HSES 801. Sport Facilities. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to study current developments and trends in the financing, programming, design, and construction of facilities for intercollegiate athletics and professional sports. Prerequisite: Admitted to graduate school. A course in the administration/management of sport or consent of the instructor. LEC.

HSES 803. Health Behavior Theory. 3 Hours.

Given that theories of health behavior drive research and practice in health education, the purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the major theories and planning models related to health behavior change. Particular focus will be applied to the role of theory in health promotion and critical analysis of the application of theory to guide research practices. Prerequisite: Health major or consent of the instructor. LEC.

HSES 804. Sport Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to the current research and theoretical perspectives in the sport psychology literature. Specifically, students will gain a broad understanding of the three major areas of sport psychology: social psychology (e.g., motivation), performance enhancement (e.g., mental skills training), and psycho-physiology (e.g., impact of anxiety on performance). Prerequisite: Admission in the health program or consent of the instructor. LEC.

HSES 805. Laboratory Experiments and Analysis--Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

Students will learn the techniques of operating various types of laboratory equipment and will conduct small-scale lab experiments in areas such as respiration, circulation, metabolism, strength, neuromuscular function, cardiac function, and body composition. Special emphasis will be placed on laboratory techniques of assessing physical fitness. Prerequisite: A course in exercise physiology. LAB.

HSES 806. Stress Management. 3 Hours.

The long range objectives of this course are to assist students in gaining stress management knowledge; to help them to formulate improved perspectives on various stress management techniques; and consequently apply the developing constructs in their lives with a sense of purpose and self-responsibility. Prerequisite: Two courses in health education or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 807. Current Literature in Exercise Physiology. 2 Hours.

A wide range of topics from the exercise physiology literature will be discussed. Instructor and students will present reports to the group centered on current research findings with discussion aimed at application of these results to physical exercise and training. Prerequisite: A basic course in exercise physiology or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 808. Biomechanics of Human Movement. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the movements and the structure and function of human beings by means of the methods of mechanics. An emphasis will be placed on the two primary goals of biomechanics: performance improvement and injury prevention and rehabilitation. Topics to be covered include the kinematics and kinetics of human movement, muscle mechanics, bone and joint mechanics, and the biomechanics of musculoskeletal injury. Prerequisite: Courses in calculus, physics, anatomy, and biomechanics, or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 810. Advanced Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

An advanced study of the physiological and biomechanical aspects of muscular, cardiovascular, and respiratory function as the human is engaging in exercise. The topics of energy metabolism, hormones, and nutrition as related to exercise also are presented. Prerequisite: A basic course in exercise physiology. LEC.

HSES 812. Current Issues in Health. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to review and discuss current issues in various health related areas. The focus will be on relevant issues and topics that are guiding and directing the health profession. The range of topics discussed will vary from popular literature to scientific research and cover such areas as health education, community health, and health over the lifespan. Students in the course will be expected to report, discuss, and interact with each other concerning the issues as they are reported. Prerequisite: A graduate course in health or consent of the instructor. LEC.

HSES 814. Implementing Health Programs. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to explore planning models used for designing, implementing and managing health promotion programs. Students will be trained to develop objectives, assess determinants, select methods and strategies, pre-test program materials, and adopt and implement promotional plans. Problem based and community based learning experiences will be provided. Prerequisite: A health major or permission from the instructor. LEC.

HSES 817. Practical Aspects of Aerobic and Resistance Training. 3 Hours.

This course will be a discussion of various concepts related to aerobic and resistance training. By the end of the semester, the student should be able to demonstrate an understanding of information presented in this course by achieving satisfactory evaluations of presentations, papers, and an examination of the following topics: energy metabolism, general adaptations of aerobic and resistance training, exercise techniques for aerobic and resistance training, periodization of training, testing and evaluation of aerobic and resistance training performance, and exercise prescription for aerobic and resistance training. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in exercise physiology or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 818. Legal Aspects of Public Health Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to enhance understanding of the variety of legal issues which affect health educators and their audiences. Specifically, this course will survey federal, state, and local public health laws and regulations which may proscribe health education content and the health educator's actions. Legislation will be analyzed and the practical impact of the health educator upon the legislative process will be emphasized. Prerequisite: A course in community health or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 823. Behavior Modification in Health and Exercise. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the behavioral principles that influence health and exercise practices. Theories of human behavior, reinforcement theory, and models of self-esteem will serve as the foundation for studying behavior change. Society influences will be strongly emphasized. Course topics will include exercise determinants, motivation, media representation, negative behaviors, self-efficacy, social support, and effective promotion strategies. Prerequisite: Admitted to Graduate School or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 824. Epidemiology and Concepts of Disease Causation. 3 Hours.

This course involves the study of the etiology and natural history of infectious and non-infectious diseases including vector control, host defenses and resistance, investigation of disease outbreaks, mental health and public health. The course deals with detailed analytic and descriptive epidemiology and their implications for improving our understanding of health and diseases; epidemiologic consequences of nuclear war and retrospective and prospective approaches in epidemiological research. Contemporary developmental methods for disease prevention will be critically reviewed. Prerequisite: HSES 573, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 825. Skeletal Muscle Physiology. 3 Hours.

This course will provide the student with an in-depth study of the structure and development, contractile mechanics, and neuromuscular system as it relates to the skeletal musculature. Structure and Development - muscle fiber, motor neuron, neuromuscular junction, muscle receptors, muscle formation, development of muscle innervation. Putting Muscles to Work - ion channels, pumps, and binding proteins, axoplasmic transport, resting and action potentials, neuromuscular transmission, muscle contraction, motor units, exercise, muscle metabolism. The Adaptable Neuromuscular System - fatigue, loss of muscle innervation, recovery of muscle innervation, neurotrophism, disuse, muscle training, injury and repair, aging. Prerequisite: HSES 810 or equivalent. LEC.

HSES 828. Sport Finance. 3 Hours.

A study of the principles and applications of finance and economics in the sport industry. Strategic financial planning as a part of managements responsibilities is highlighted. Prerequisite: Admitted to Graduate School. LEC.

HSES 830. Socio-Cultural Dimensions of Sport. 3 Hours.

Current literature concerning the impact of American social values and cultural patterns of sport and physical activity will be studied. Critiques of related research involving sport and social institutions, and socio-cultural groups in sport will be emphasized. Prerequisite: A course in Sociology of Sport or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 831. Ethics in the Sport Industry. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to help students learn to make morally reasoned decisions in various sport settings. This course will help prepare students to respond more responsibly when faced with challenging ethical dilemmas and guide them in learning to serve as role models for ethical conduct. LEC.

HSES 832. Physical Education Instructional and Assessment Methods. 3 Hours.

The study of research-based instructional and assessment methods appropriate for PK-12 physical education. Managerial, instructional, and supervisory skills will be developed. Traditional and alternative assessment tools will be discussed. Readings, observations (live and video), and practice teaching will prepare students to complete a practical experience and an action research project in a PK-12 school. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate School. LEC.

HSES 833. Public Health Aspects of Exercise. 3 Hours.

This course describes the timeline for physiologic adaptations to long-term physical activity. It describes the effects of physical activity on chronic disease. It describes, from a population perspective, the effects of physical activity on the health of the nation. Prerequisite: 12 hours of HSES courses, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 836. Physical Education Curriculum Models. 3 Hours.

An examination of the elements and processes of curriculum construction in physical education for elementary, secondary, and post-secondary institution, and the institutional and professional issues that affect these processes. A study of contemporary curricula structures in regard to planning, implementation, and evaluation of K-12 curricula and professional preparation curricula in physical education programs. Prerequisite: A course in physical education curriculum, or equivalent. LEC.

HSES 840. Organizational Behavior in Sport. 3 Hours.

This course utilizes a micro perspective to analyze the behavior and culture within sport organizations. Specifically, the student will study and learn how to apply management and leadership theories that have the potential to shape the work environment and will discuss how current topics in organizational behavior are particularly relevant to the sport industry. Prerequisite: Admitted to Graduate School. Consent of the instructor. LEC.

HSES 842. Sports Marketing. 3 Hours.

This course helps students gain a deeper understanding of sport marketing by examining in-depth the sport marketing mix of product, price, place, and promotion as well as marketing research, marketing strategy, market segmentation, branding, sponsorships, licensing, venue and event marketing, public relations, and global sport marketing. LEC.

HSES 850. Analysis Techniques for Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences Laboratory and Field Data. 3 Hours.

Techniques for analyzing data gathered in Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences laboratories and field studies will be presented in this course. Techniques for the recording of raw data, appropriate organization of raw data, selection of test for analysis of data, use of computer software, and computer programming for analysis and reporting results of the data will also be included. Prerequisite: PRE 710, PRE 720, or PRE 725. LEC.

HSES 866. Contemporary Trends in Elementary and Secondary Physical Education. 3 Hours.

An in-depth study into the research and other forms of literature will be made to study and examine the latest trends in elementary and secondary school physical education. Games, activities, dances, and rhythms will be presented and discussed relative to developmental levels of students grades K-12. Prerequisite: A methods course in teaching physical education or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 872. Exercise and the Cardiovascular System. 3 Hours.

This course will be a discussion of various concepts specifically related to exercise and the cardiovascular system. By the end of the semester, the student should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the interaction of exercise and cardiovascular system by achieving satisfactory evaluations on examinations, abstracts, and classroom presentations. The following topics will be discussed as they relate specifically to exercise: homeostasis and cardiovascular transport mechanisms, basic structure and function; characteristics of cardiac cells; the heart as a pump; the peripheral vascular system; vascular control; venous return and cardiac output; regulation of arterial pressure; cardiovascular responses to stress; and cardiovascular function in pathological situations. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in exercise physiology or consent of instructor. LEC.

HSES 880. Internship in Sport Management. 1-10 Hours.

This course will provide for supervised and directed experiences in selected sport management settings. The graduate advisor will schedule observations of the internship, as well as regular conferences with the student. Written summaries and evaluations of the internship will be prepared by the student, the agency supervisor, and the university graduate faculty member. Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Program in Sport Management. FLD.

HSES 884. Legal Aspects of Sport. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to the basic concepts of the American legal system and the application of them to intercollegiate and professional sports. Particular emphasis will be given to risk management and preventive law. Other topics include: governance issues in intercollegiate and professional sports, contract law, employment discrimination, labor relations and collective bargaining, agency law and athlete agents, regulation of participation in intercollegiate and high school athletics, sport facility and event issues, participant liability issues, product liability issues, premises and spectator liability, participant violence in sports, and intellectual property law. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program in School of Education LEC.

HSES 890. Seminar in HSES. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a general research seminar learning experience for graduate students in HSES. In particular, students will learn about faculty research activities and interests from a variety of specialty areas both within KU and outside of KU. Through faculty and guest presentations, students will be exposed to a variety of design and methodologies used to conduct research in the specialty areas of HSES. LEC.

HSES 892. Psychology of Physical Activity. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for students interested in optimizing motivation and adherence to exercise among individuals in a wide range of physical activity settings (e.g., health clubs, corporate fitness, physical therapy). The course content includes a review of the literature highlighting the psychological benefits of exercise, the theoretical advances in understanding the psychological aspects of individuals' participation in physical activity, and strategies and techniques for professionals attempting to foster motivation and adherence to exercise among their clients/members. Prerequisite: Admission in the health program or consent of the instructor. LEC.

HSES 897. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and instructor. RSH.

HSES 898. Master's Project. 1-4 Hours.

RSH.

HSES 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

THE.

HSES 905. Advanced Concepts in Health Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed as an in-depth study of the pedagogy of health education. It is concerned with the effects of various health education models, new materials, and innovative teaching techniques. The effectiveness of various media such as films, slides, transparencies, microcomputers, and assessment tools will be analyzed. Research concerning innovations in education will be investigated along with a study of future trends in the field. Timely issues of controversy about health education practices and the effectiveness of values clarification activities will also be discussed. LEC.

HSES 910. Biochemistry of Exercise. 3 Hours.

This course will include an in-depth examination of metabolic and endocrine principles as they relate to physical exercise and training. Specific topics will include: substrate utilization in exercise, metabolic controls, muscle biochemistry, body composition, nutritional aspects and hormonal influences in exercise. Both instructor and students will report on the most current literature relating to the topics. Prerequisite: Human biodynamics or a course in biochemistry. LEC.

HSES 926. Grant and Research Proposal Writing. 3 Hours.

This is a course for students to examine the sources and areas which provide financial support for research projects. The areas of study include types of research funding available on a local, state, and federal level, the elements and design of writing a proposal and strategies involved in securing financial support for research. A focus for the course will center upon preparing a research proposal for funding. Prerequisite: PRE 710. LEC.

HSES 940. Scientific Dimensions of Exercise and Health. 3 Hours.

This course has been designed to bring together the many scientific factors relating exercise and physical activity to health and human function. The course focuses on the interdisciplinary nature of this relationship and reviews the physiological, sociological, psychological, and behavioral factors involved. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of graduate level course work in health or physical education and admission to health or physical education doctoral program. LEC.

HSES 980. Advanced Topics: _____. 1-3 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for post-master's level students. LEC.

HSES 981. Current Issues in Health and Physical Education. 3 Hours.

This course will explore the latest philosophical issues and controversies which are impacting the fields of health, physical education, and athletics. The student will explore the current and future ramifications of each issue and its potential effects on the profession. Prerequisite: Admission to the Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences Doctoral Program. LEC.

HSES 990. Doctoral Seminar. 3 Hours.

This seminar based course will be designed to prepare the doctoral student for academic careers or careers in industry after they graduate. The topics covered will be promotion and tenure procedures and expectations, including but not limited to teaching, responsible conduct of research, professional ethics, historical ethical issues, evaluation of ethical dilemmas, and service expectations at research intensive institutions, regional comprehensive institutions and small liberal arts colleges. Industry career options will be discussed and guest speakers from various disciplines will be brought in to discuss options and expectations with this career path. Prerequisite: Doctoral student or permission of the instructor. LEC.

HSES 995. Field Experience in: _____. 1-5 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences in selected educational settings. The advisor will schedule regular observations of the field experience and conferences with the student. Written summaries and evaluations of the field experiences will be prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agency, and the advisor. Open only to advanced students. Field experience credit in any one semester may not exceed five hours, and total credit may not exceed eight hours. FLD.

HSES 996. College Teaching Experience in: _____. 3 Hours.

To meet the college teaching experience requirement for doctoral programs, a student shall engage in a semester long, planned, instructional activity that shall include college classroom teaching under supervision. Planning shall be done with the advisor and/or member of the faculty who will supervise the experience. The activity shall be done under the supervision of a member of the University of Kansas faculty or by an individual or individuals designated by the candidate's committee. FLD.

HSES 997. Individual Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Prior graduate course work in the area of study and consent of instructor. RSH.

HSES 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 Hours.

THE.

Special Education Courses

SPED 261. Families and Professional Partnerships. 3 Hours.

This course provides information on issues and practices related to working together in partnership with families of young children including those who have a young child with special needs. Emphasis will be placed on taking a family systems prospective and a family-centered approach to family support. Strategies for effective communication for the purpose of information sharing and collaborative planning with families are provided. Relevant current scientifically based evidence will be reviewed and discussed pertaining to these topics. LEC.

SPED 326. Teaching Exceptional Children and Youth in General Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for general education teacher trainees. It will provide them information about students with disabilities that they will have in their classrooms and the law governing special education and its implications for them as general educators. The course will address Individualized Educational Plans that are developed for students with disabilities and how general educators contribute to these plans. Students will learn about planning instruction that is differentiated to meet various learner needs, universal design principles and instructional tools, providing meaningful access to general education classrooms and curriculum for students with disabilities and designing and delivering appropriate accommodations and modifications to assist student learning. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

SPED 362. Introduction to Early Education and Early Childhood Special Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide an overview of the field of early education including early childhood education and early childhood special education. The historical, philosophical, research- base, policy and legal foundations for the field are discussed to provide the students with the knowledge to become an advocate for early learning opportunities (birth through grade 3) for all children and their families. LEC.

SPED 425. Introduction to Exceptional Children and Youth. 3 Hours.

Designed for regular education teacher trainees, those in training for support roles in public schools and/or residential facilities (music educators/therapists, speech clinicians, etc.), and others interested in providing services for exceptional children and youth. Emphasis on the learning and adjustment problems of exceptional children and youth. Includes fieldwork experiences in residential and/or public school settings. LEC.

SPED 431. Introduction to the Exceptional Child/Adolescent. 1 Hour.

The course is designed to provide the student with knowledge of and direct experiences within instructional settings that include one or more exceptional children. Structured experiences will be provided to (a) ensure mastery of skills in differentiating normal from atypical patterns of behavior in children or adolescents, (b) promote acquisition of skill in understanding the educational needs of exceptional learners as well as the procedures used to identify and provide instruction for them, (c) ensure the generalization of communication skills to the unique needs of exceptional learners in instructional settings, and (d) promote a positive attitude toward atypical students. LEC.

SPED 439. Student Teaching: Unified Early Childhood. 1-6 Hours AE61.

A supervised student teaching experience leading to initial teaching licensure in Kansas Unified Early Childhood (birth through grade 3). The student assumes the professional role as a teacher in an approved inclusive early childhood infant/toddler or preschool. Prerequisite: Admission to the Unified Early Childhood program. Approved application of intent to student teach. LEC.

SPED 450. Dis/ability in an American Context. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students of any major to important theoretical and practical concepts regarding special education, disability, and diversity. Successful completion of this course fulfills one requirement for the School of Education minor in Education. LEC.

SPED 497. Independent Study. 1-2 Hours.

Only one enrollment permitted each semester, a maximum of four hours will apply toward a bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Recommendation of advisor and consent of instructor. IND.

SPED 500. Introduction to Sign Language. 3 Hours.

This is an introductory course in Sign Language and includes ASL and English sign vocabulary, a description of all manual sign systems, medical aspects of hearing loss, communication and language, and Deaf culture and community. LEC.

SPED 501. American Sign Language I (ASL I). 3 Hours / F1.

This course will cover the development of American Sign Language and its application within the Deaf Community. It is based on the functional-notational approach to learning sign language. This approach organizes language around communicative purposes of everyday interaction. LEC.

SPED 502. American Sign Language II (ASL II). 3 Hours / F2.

This is the second level course in American Sign Language and its application within the Deaf Community. It is based on the functional-notational approach to learning sign language. This approach organizes language around communicative purposes of everyday interaction. Prerequisite: SPED 501. LEC.

SPED 503. American Sign Language III (ASL III). 3 Hours / F3.

This is the third level course in American Sign Language. The primary objective of the American Sign Language III "Signing Naturally" Level 2 curriculum is for students to continue using the two basic language skills: visual listening and signing. Prerequisite: SPED 502. LEC.

SPED 504. American Sign Language IV (ASL IV). 3 Hours / F4.

This is the fourth level course in American Sign Language. The primary objective of the American Sign Language IV "Signing Naturally" Level 3 curriculum is for students to continue using the two basic language skills -- visual listening and signing. Prerequisite: SPED 503. LEC.

SPED 506. Advanced Practices for Children with Disabilities in the Elementary General Education Classroom. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to enable novice teachers to master and apply the instructional and communicative skills that will facilitate appropriate and productive inclusion of children and youth with exceptionalities within general education classrooms and other school settings. Specific research-based strategies in curriculum content acquisition (content enhancements, learning strategies, classwide-peer tutoring), and specific research-based strategies in behavior management will be learned and applied to real teaching experiences. Novice teachers will learn about collaborative structures found in schools to support student learning in general education settings (co-teaching, collaborative consultation, teacher/student support teams) and roles and responsibilities of teachers within these structures. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

SPED 507. Advanced Practices for Children with Disabilities Middle/Secondary General Education Classroom. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to enable novice teachers to master and apply the instructional and communicative skills that will facilitate appropriate and productive inclusion of middle and secondary age students with disabilities within general education classrooms and other school settings. Specific research-based strategies in curriculum content acquisition (content enhancements, learning strategies, classwide-peer tutoring), and specific research-based strategies in behavior management will be learned and applied to real teaching experiences. Novice teachers will learn about collaborative structures found in schools to support student learning in general education settings (co-teaching, collaborative consultation, teacher/student support teams) and roles and responsibilities of teachers within these structures. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

SPED 598. Special Course: _____. 1-5 Hours.

A special course of study designed to meet current needs of education students; primarily for undergraduates. LEC.

SPED 631. Characteristics of Students Needing an Adaptive Curriculum. 3 Hours.

This course is designed as an introduction to the definition, characteristics, causes, assessment, and specific remedial techniques for students needing an adaptive curriculum. The needs for specialized services to meet specific learning and/or behavioral needs will be presented. Students will learn about the history of serving children and youth with high incidence disabilities associated with specific learning, emotional/behavioral, mild mental retardation and a range of physical and health needs. Key individuals in the research of specific disabilities associated with these needs and how they helped expand our understanding of who these individuals are and how to address specific needs, will also be addressed. Learning characteristics will be addressed in relation to why and how specialized instruction can meet the learning and developmental needs of these individuals, specifically in the areas of instructional and assistive technology. LEC.

SPED 632. Characteristics of Students Needing a Functional Curriculum. 3 Hours.

This introductory course provides an overview of the characteristics of learners with significant support needs. Students will learn to define and understand various classification systems and the implications of: low-incidence disabilities, significant cognitive disability, various vision and/or hearing impairments, including deaf-blindness motor disabilities, and health impairments. Students will be introduced to various etiologies: pre-, peri-, and post-natal causes, syndromes and chromosomal disorders, and biomedical causes of severe disability. Additional content includes anatomy of sensory organs, interpretation of pertinent medical reports, assessment procedures, and in school settings considerations (e.g., orientation and mobility, cochlear implants, medications, tube feeding, physical therapy, occupational therapy). Prerequisite: An introductory course in special education. LEC.

SPED 633. Characteristics of Learners with Hearing Loss -- Deaf Studies. 3 Hours.

Deaf Studies is the basic characteristics course for both the Master's degree in Deaf Education and for Kansas and Missouri endorsement in Deaf/HOH. The course includes medical aspects/etiology of hearing loss, history, pertinent laws, Deaf culture and community, issues in assessment and psychology, language and sign systems, multicultural education, multiple disabilities and hearing loss, and specific issues in the field. LEC.

SPED 635. Introduction to Teaching Learners with Low-Incidence Disabilities in Inclusive Settings. 3 Hours.

This course examines current principles and inclusive practices for learners with significant disabilities. The course will focus on the extant research base concerning inclusive practices, characteristics of learners with low-incidence disabilities, and instructional strategies. Prerequisite: SPED 326 or equivalent. LEC.

SPED 641. Methods & Assessment:Literacy Interventions Struggling Learners&Students High-Incidence Disabilities. 3 Hours.

This course will provide in depth learning experiences targeting literacy; both reading and writing. Students will learn about assessment tools and assessment systems used in tiered support frameworks to determine the required intensity of literacy support and instruction needed by children/adolescents with adaptive special education needs, and will learn about evidence-based instructional approaches and curriculum developed for students with disabilities and struggling students in general. The course is intended for persons working toward the Kansas teaching license in teaching students needing an adapted curriculum. Prerequisite: SPED 730, admittance into the Adaptive program in the Department of Special Education, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

SPED 642. Assessment and Methods of Teaching Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities in Inclusive Settings. 3 Hours.

This course prepares teacher candidates to assess students with disabilities using formal and informal measures, to use assessment information to develop a strengths-based inclusive Individual Education Program (IEP), to design instruction related to IEP goals and state standards, and to evaluate the effectiveness of that instruction using progress-monitoring techniques. Prerequisite: SPED 326. LEC.

SPED 644. Assessment and Instructional Methods I: Learners with Hearing Loss. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to appropriate instructional methodology for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing at the early childhood, elementary, and secondary levels. Upon completion students will be familiar with legal issues, teaming, assessment, IEP development, curriculum planning, instructional methods, and transition. LEC.

SPED 650. Constructing Early Childhood Curriculum. 3 Hours.

Students in this course will learn to design, implement and evaluate developmentally appropriate curricula and programs for children from birth through kindergarten. Issues of curriculum design and assessment are introduced as interrelated processes that include structuring learning environments and experiences that are responsive to children's interests and abilities. Students analyze and evaluate curriculum that focuses on the five developmental domains a) social emotional development; b) cognitive development; c) language and communication development; d) adaptive behavior development; and e) gross and fine motor development and in addition the content domains of literacy, science, math, and fine art. Strategies for developing learning opportunities that are appropriate for young children, including children with special needs and children from diverse cultural, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds, will be explored. Prerequisite: Admission to School of Education UEC program. LEC.

SPED 660. Education of Children and Youth with Disabilities I: _____. 3 Hours.

This is a methods course that covers instructional approaches and procedures that offer developmentally appropriate, effective and inclusive early intervention for preschool and kindergarten age children who experience developmental delays, disabling conditions or who are at-risk for developmental problems and disabilities. It is directed toward: (a) "how" to teach, or the technical components of developing and delivering effective instruction that provide access to the general early childhood curriculum within recognized approaches to early childhood education for young children, and (b) the "what" to teach, or the selection of developmentally and individually appropriate child objectives as well as specific materials and specialized instructional approaches. The relationship of instructional planning to state and federal mandates will also be considered. The course is primarily intended for persons who are currently working toward certification in the ECSE program area. Prerequisite: SPED 425 or SPED 725, and SPED 735, which can be taken concurrently. LEC.

SPED 661. Supporting Children with Significant Learning and Behavioral Challenges. 3 Hours.

Students in this course will gain knowledge of the causes, and intervention and support approaches for young children with multiple and significant disabilities including neurological impairments, physical disabilities, sensory impairments, significant developmental disabilities and challenging behavior. Emphasis is placed on environmental adaptions and direct instructional techniques to maximize independence as determined through systematic ecological inventories tailored to the individual child's strengths and needs. Information is also provided on assistive technology designed to provide appropriate supports. Functional behavioral assessment procedures, proactive intervention strategies, and developing collaborative support plans will be studied. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

SPED 663. Assessment Strategies in Early Education. 3 Hours.

Examines the practice of gathering information for the purpose of making individual referral and instructional decisions for infants, toddlers, and young children with and without special needs. Discusses effective informal assessment techniques and emphasizes an ecological approach to gathering information. Introduces standardized assessment and screening instruments and provides an overview of the purposes and limitations of such tests. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

SPED 664. Inclusive Strategies and Intervention for Infants and Toddlers. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes curriculum development and early intervention provision for infants and toddlers through the planning of appropriate learning experiences, the design of learning environments, developing Individual Family Service Plans (IFSP), promoting collaboration among families and the use of various methods of enhancing the child's development across the five (social-emotional, adaptive, cognitive, physical/movement, communication) development domains. The role of the educator/early interventionist in relation to the family and the child is examined. Curriculum resources and intervention strategies for infants and toddlers with special needs are reviewed with emphasis on interdisciplinary planning and implementation. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

SPED 665. Inclusive Strategies and Intervention for Preschoolers. 3 Hours.

Provides the opportunity for students to develop and evaluate inclusive environments for young children. This course emphasizes meeting the needs of all young children through an integrated approach to planning, implementing and assessing instruction in all areas; linking assessment information to individualized instruction; developing Individual Educational Plans (IEPs) and promoting collaboration among families, schools and communities. Service delivery systems and transitions between early childhood programs are reviewed in relation to curriculum. Curriculum development for early childhood content areas (literacy and language, numeracy, science, social studies, physical education and the arts) and domains (language, social/emotional, physical, and cognitive) will be explored. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

SPED 667. Field Experience in Preschool. 1 Hour.

This supervised field experience is intended to allow the pre-service teacher to apply the knowledge gained in SPED 665 Inclusive Strategies and Intervention for Preschoolers, by working with infants and toddlers in early intervention settings/programs. To be taken concurrently SPED 665. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. FLD.

SPED 668. Field Experience Infant/Toddler. 1 Hour.

This supervised field experience is intended to allow the pre-service teacher to apply the knowledge gained SPED 664 Inclusive Strategies and Intervention for Infants and Toddlers, by working with infants and toddlers in early intervention settings/programs. To be taken concurrently SPED 664. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. FLD.

SPED 672. Field Experiences with Exceptional Children and Youth: _____. 1-3 Hours.

A course designed to provide experiences for students to participate with exceptional children in public schools and/or residential facilities and with professional personnel associated with the lives of exceptional students including special education teachers, child care workers, therapists, etc. Students will have opportunities to participate as aides, tutors, and instructors with individual and small groups of exceptional youth in one or more placements. Through weekly meetings with the instructor students are guided to relate their experiences to the needs and services for exceptional children and youth. Prerequisite: SPED 635. FLD.

SPED 675. Practicum with Children and Youth with Disabilities: _____. 1-10 Hours.

Intensive diverse and direct teaching experiences with children and youth with disabilities in educational settings. The course is differentiated from SPED 775 through the amount of scaffolding undergraduate students will receive when demonstrating skill application (e.g., undergraduates report and receive feedback on practicum experiences on a more frequent basis, reduced data collection requirements, more emphasis on cooperating teacher providing guidance, etc.). This practicum is a requirement for provisional endorsement according to KSDE. Students who have completed SPED 675 cannot enroll in SPED 775 within in same curricular area. Prerequisite: SPED 326. LEC.

SPED 700. Introduction to Sign Language. 3 Hours.

This is an introductory course in Sign Language and includes ASL and English sign vocabulary, a description of all manual sign systems, medical aspects of hearing loss, communication and language, and Deaf culture and community. LEC.

SPED 701. American Sign Language I (ASL I). 3 Hours.

This course will cover the development of American Sign Language and its application within the Deaf Community. It is based on the functional-notational approach to learning sign language. This approach organizes language around communicative purposes of everyday interaction. LEC.

SPED 702. American Sign Language II (ASL II). 3 Hours.

This is the second level course American Sign Language and its application within the Deaf Community. It is based on the functional-notational approach to learning sign language. This approach organizes language around communicative purposes of everyday interaction. Prerequisite: SPED 701. LEC.

SPED 703. American Sign Language III (ASL III). 3 Hours.

This is the third level course in American Sign Language. The primary objective of the American Sign Language III "Signing Naturally" Level 2 curriculum is for students to continue using the two basic language skills: visual listening and signing. Prerequisite: SPED 702. LEC.

SPED 704. American Sign Language IV (ASL IV). 3 Hours.

This is the fourth level course in American Sign Language. The primary objective of the American Sign Language IV "Signing Naturally" Level 3 curriculum is for students to continue using the two basic language skills -- visual listening and signing. Prerequisite: SPED 703. LEC.

SPED 706. Advanced Practices for Children with Disabilities in the Elementary General Education Classroom. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to enable novice teachers to master and apply the instructional and communicative skills that will facilitate appropriate and productive inclusion of children and youth with exceptionalities within general education classrooms and other school settings. Specific research-based strategies in curriculum content acquisition (content enhancements, learning strategies, classwide-peer tutoring), and specific research-based strategies in behavior management will be learned and applied to real teaching experiences. Novice teachers will learn about collaborative structures found in schools to support student learning in general education settings (co-teaching, collaborative consultation, teacher/student support teams) and roles and responsibilities of teachers within these structures. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

SPED 707. Advanced Practices for Adolescents with Disabilities in the Middle/Secondary General Classroom. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to enable novice teachers to master and apply the instructional and communicative skills that will facilitate appropriate and productive inclusion of middle and secondary age students with disabilities within general education classrooms and other school settings. Specific research-based strategies in curriculum content acquisition (content enhancements, learning strategies, classwide-peer tutoring), and specific research-based strategies in behavior management will be learned and applied to real teaching experiences. Novice teachers will learn about collaborative structures found in schools to support student learning in general education settings (coteaching, collaborative consultation, teacher/student support teams) and roles and responsibilities of teachers within these structures. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC.

SPED 708. Introduction to Hearing Impaired. 2 Hours.

A study of hearing defects and methods of diagnosis. The course also covers remedial work which teachers can use in treating such defects and meeting problems of hearing defective children. Prerequisite: Nine hours of education including educational psychology. LEC.

SPED 710. Methods of Teaching Language to the Deaf I. 3 Hours.

The effects of hearing loss on language acquisition and development. Systems for teaching language to individuals with hearing loss are introduced. Prerequisite: Course in normal language development and nine hours of education including educational psychology. LEC.

SPED 715. Understanding Research in Education. 3 Hours.

This course introduces concepts and skills involved in understanding and analyzing research in special education. The course provides an overview of basic, general knowledge of various research methodologies. In addition, this course will teach students to locate, read, comprehend, and critically analyze research articles and reports. Students will become familiar with the principles of educational research to become good "consumers" of this research. LEC.

SPED 717. Exceptional Children in Regular Classrooms. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to explore the relationship between regular and special education. Educational service delivery systems for exceptional children are identified and analyzed. Emphasis is placed upon procedures and special services that regular class teachers can use to provide instructional services to exceptional children assigned to regular classrooms. Procedures for enabling normal children to understand and appreciate the interaction with children who exhibit physical and behavioral variance from established norms are conveyed. Especially for regular class teachers and students desiring a career in teaching exceptional children. Will be offered by designated area sections or as a general overview of several areas. LEC.

SPED 718. Instructional Planning for Children and Youth with Disabilities: _____. 1-3 Hours.

This course provides knowledge and skills to select, adapt, and sequence instructional methods and materials to facilitate general education curriculum mastery. LEC.

SPED 719. Learning and Technology. 1 Hour.

The central framework of "human learning" provides a context for understanding technology-based educational innovations. The lessons in this course explore how various "features of learning" and "features of technology" intersect. They discuss realistic options for improving the learning of students, and the learning of teachers, as they use technology in education. (Life-span range of levels.) LEC.

SPED 724. Data-Driven Instructional Decision Making. 1 Hour.

The lessons in this course present research-based methods for monitoring student behavior and academic progress. They explain how teachers may use this information to evaluate current and plan future instructional and behavioral interventions following a decision making model. It is also explored how computer and information management technology tools support and facilitate the collection, storage, and analysis of observational data. LEC.

SPED 725. Introduction to the Psychology and Education of Children and Youth with Disabilities. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of current practices in the identification, placement, and education of students with disabilities. This course emphasizes on patterns of social, cognitive, language, and physical development. Social, political, and economic advocacy issues are also addressed. Prerequisite: One course in Child Development. LEC.

SPED 726. Exceptionality and Technology. 1 Hour.

Technology has the potential to dramatically improve the education and quality of life for people with disabilities. This course presents you with a basic foundation for understanding technology in special education, a functional model for selecting the best technology applications for students with special needs, and strategies for applying your knowledge to practical situations. LEC.

SPED 727. Designing Instruction for Diverse Learners. 3 Hours.

This course explores to design, development, and implementation of technology-based solutions for struggling learners in the preK-12 instructional environment. Throughout the course, students will (1) gain an understanding of the Principles of Universal Design for Learning, (2) examine how technology has and can be developed in a manner to meet multiple needs, especially those with disabilities, and (3) analyze how professionals can identify and assess what technology-based solution would meet the needs of a particular individual or group of individuals. LEC.

SPED 729. Introduction to Computing in Special Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide an introduction to basic concepts of computer literacy, with particular emphasis on the uses of microcomputers in educational settings for individuals with special needs. Topics include an overview of computing specific to the needs of individuals with special needs including: a)applications and the impact of computers on society; b) an introduction to computer hardware and associated concepts; c) introductory programming concepts; d) a survey of instructional and instructional-support applications of computers including examples of related software; e) software evaluation techniques; and f) an overview of resources in educational computing. Students will acquire hands-on operating experience with microcomputers through scheduled laboratory periods. LEC.

SPED 730. Characteristcs, Methods & Assessment:Intro Struggling Learners & Studnts High-Incidence Disabilities. 3 Hours.

The course is designed as an introduction to the characteristics, assessment and identification process, and initial instructional and behavioral interventions needed in meeting the needs of students with high-incidence disabilities under the Kansas Adaptive Teacher Education Standards. The needs for specialized services to meet specific learning and/or behavioral needs will be presented. Frameworks for instruction and conceptualizing best practice will be introduced including the principles of Universal Design for Learning and the Multi-Tier System of Support. The role of the educator in identifying, understanding and implementing evidence-based practices is also examined. Curriculum resources and intervention strategies for students with high-incidence disabilities will be introduced with emphasis on tiered planning and implementation. The course is intended for persons working toward the Kansas teaching endorsement in the Special Education Adaptive Area. Prerequisite: Admittance into the Adaptive endorsement teacher education program in the Department of Special Education or permission of the instructor. LEC.

SPED 731. Supporting Children with Significant Learning and Behavioral Concerns. 3 Hours.

Students in this course will gain knowledge of the causes, and intervention and support approaches for young children birth through 5 years with significant support needs. These include young learners with multiple and significant disabilities including neurological impairments, physical disabilities, sensory impairments including dual sensory impairments, complex health care needs, significant developmental disabilities and challenging behavior. Emphasis is placed on environmental adaptations and direct instructional techniques to maximize independence as determined through systematic ecological inventories tailored to the individual child's strengths and needs. Information is also provided on assistive technology designed to provide appropriate supports. Functional behavioral assessment procedures, proactive intervention strategies, and developing collaborative support plans will be studied. Prerequisite: Admittance into the ECU - Birth through Kindergarten graduate initial licensure teacher education program in the Department of Special Education or permission of the instructor. SPED 752 or its equivalent, SPED 734 or its equivalent, and SPED 755 or its equivalent. LEC.

SPED 733. Characteristics of Learners with Hearing Loss -- Deaf Studies. 3 Hours.

Deaf Studies is the basic characteristics course for both the Master's degree in Deaf Education and for Kansas and Missouri endorsement in Deaf/HOH. The course includes medical aspects/etiology of hearing loss, history, pertinent laws, Deaf culture and community, issues in assessment and psychology, language and sign systems, multicultural education, multiple disabilities and hearing loss, and specific issues in the field. LEC.

SPED 734. Inclusive Strategies and Intervention for Infants and Toddlers: _____. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes curriculum development and early intervention provision for infants and toddlers through the planning of appropriate learning experiences, the design of learning environments, developing Individual Family Service Plans (IFSP), promoting collaboration among families and the use of various methods of enhancing the child's development across the five (social-emotional, adaptive, cognitive, physical, communication) developmental domains. The role of the educator/early interventionist in relation to the family and the child is examined. Curriculum resources and intervention strategies for infants and toddlers with special needs are reviewed with emphasis on interdisciplinary planning and implementation. Prerequisite: Admittance into the ECU - Birth through Kindergarten graduate initial licensure teacher education program in the Department of Special Education or permission of the instructor. LEC.

SPED 735. Introduction to Teaching Learners with Low-Incidence Disabilities in Inclusive Settings. 3 Hours.

This course examines current principles and inclusive practices for learners with significant disabilities. The course will focus on the extant research base concerning inclusive practices, characteristics of learners with low-incidence disabilities, and instructional strategies. Prerequisite: SPED 326 or equivalent. LEC.

SPED 738. Unified Early Childhood Applied Research. 1 Hour.

This seminar is designed to facilitate the UEC teacher candidate's completion of a Teaching Work Sample during the UEC Student Teaching experience. The purpose of the seminar together with the UEC student teaching experience is to provide the UEC teacher candidate with the opportunity to study and experience the fundamentals of teaching young children with and without disabilities with the aim of evolving a set of values, principles, and skills which will guide future early education teaching situations. Prerequisite: Admission to UEC Student Teaching. Corequisite: SPED 739 UEC Student Teaching. LEC.

SPED 739. Special Education Early Childhood Unified Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

A supervised field experience leading to initial teaching licensure in Kansas early childhood unified (birth through kindergarten). The student assumes the total professional role as a teacher in an approved inclusive early childhood program to include infant/toddler and preschool or kindergarten. Prerequisite: Admission to ECU licensure program. FLD.

SPED 740. Managing Classroom Behavior of Exceptional Children and Youth. 3 Hours.

Designed to acquaint regular and special education teachers, principals, school psychologists, counselors, and speech pathologists with principles and application of classroom management techniques applicable to exceptional children and youth. Methods of changing inappropriate behaviors and prompting the acquisition of adaptive behaviors through positive management procedures will be stressed. Includes an introduction to behavior analysis. Prerequisite: SPED 425 or SPED 725. LEC.

SPED 741. Methods & Assessment:Literacy Interventions Struggling Learners&Students High-Incidence Disabilities. 3 Hours.

This course will provide in depth learning experiences targeting literacy; both reading and writing. Students will learn about assessment tools and assessment systems used in tiered support frameworks to determine the required intensity of literacy support and instruction needed by children/adolescents with adaptive special education needs, and will learn about evidence-based instructional approaches and curriculum developed for students with disabilities and struggling students in general. The course is intended for persons working toward the Kansas teaching license in teaching students needing an adapted curriculum. Prerequisite: SPED 730, admittance into the Adaptive program in the Department of Special Education, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

SPED 742. Assessment and Methods of Teaching Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities in Inclusive Settings. 3 Hours.

This course prepares teacher candidates to assess students with disabilities using formal and informal measures, to use assessment information to develop a strengths-based inclusive Individual Education Program (IEP), to design instruction related to IEP goals and state standards, and to evaluate the effectiveness of that instruction using progress-monitoring techniques. Prerequisite: SPED 635 or 735. LEC.

SPED 743. Methods: Functional Behavioral Assessment, Positive Behavior Support and Classroom Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides a problem-solving approach and the framework for teaching and assessment strategies to develop pro-social behavior in students with disabilities and their typical peers in classrooms and whole school contexts. Students assess problem behavior, discover the functions of problem behavior, and learn pro-social alternatives in home, school, and community settings. Prerequisite: SPED 631 or SPED 731, and SPED 632 or SPED 732. LEC.

SPED 744. Assessment and Instructional Methods I: Learners with Hearing Loss. 3 Hours.

This course will provide an introduction to appropriate instructional methodology for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing at the early childhood, elementary, and secondary levels. Upon completion students will be familiar with legal issues, teaming, assessment, IEP development, curriculum planning, instructional methods, and transition. LEC.

SPED 745. Audiology and Aural Rehabilitation. 3 Hours.

This course will provide a broad overview of the components of an aural rehabilitation service delivery model including audiological diagnostics and assessment, selection and fitting of a variety of listening devices, and intervention strategies for auditory training and speech perception training. The emphasis of this course will be on the aural habilitation of children; therefore, each of the components of an aural (re)habilitation plan will be considered in relation to the needs of individual children and their families. LEC.

SPED 750. Curriculum and Methods in Early Childhood. 3 Hours.

This is a curriculum and methods course that addresses how to design, implement and evaluate developmentally appropriate curricula and programs for children from birth to six years of age. Issues of curriculum design and assessment are introduced as interrelated processes that include structuring learning environments and experiences that are responsive to children's interests and abilities. Strategies for developing learning opportunities that are appropriate for young children, including children with special needs and children from diverse cultural, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds, will be explored. Students analyze and evaluate curriculum that focuses on facilitating progress in the domains of a) social emotional development; b) cognitive development; c) language and communication development; d) adaptive behavior development and e) gross and fine motor development. Students also analyze and evaluate curriculum standards and frameworks for the young child's acquisition of concepts, skills and dispositions that support the development of early competencies and interest in literacy, mathematics, the sciences, social studies, the arts and individual and group sports. Prerequisite: Admittance into the ECU - Birth through Kindergarten graduate initial licensure teacher education program in the Department of Special Education or permission of the instructor. SPED 752 or its equivalent (may be taken concurrently). LEC.

SPED 751. Appl of Assessment Info in Planning Instr for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities (Adaptive). 3 Hours.

This course is designed for teachers seeking the Adaptive certification to teach students with High-Incidence Disabilities (Adaptive). Students will learn how to select, administer, score, and interpret formal and informal assessments; make data-based instructional decisions for students with specific learning disabilities, with social and emotional needs and disorders in behavior, mild mental retardation, and/or who experience other chronic health impairments. Individually chosen and administered tests, as well as high-stakes assessments, and will be discussed. Prerequisite: SPED 631 or SPED 731. LEC.

SPED 752. Overview of Early Childhood and Early Childhood Special Education. 3 Hours.

The course serves as an introduction to the profession including historical, philosophical, social and psychological foundations, awareness of value, ethical and legal issues, staff relations and the importance of becoming an advocate for children and families. Students will analyze/interpret trends in early education, including diversity, early childhood special education, family centered practices, legislation, public policy, and developmentally appropriate practice. The two key professional organizations, National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and Division of Early Childhood for the Council for Exceptional Children (DEC), recommended practices serve as the foundation for understanding the roles, knowledge and competencies of the early educator. Prerequisite: Admittance into the ECU - Birth through Kindergarten graduate initial licensure teacher education program in the Department of Special Education or permission of the instructor. LEC.

SPED 753. Assessment in Early Education. 3 Hours.

This course examines the practice of gathering information for the purpose of making individual referral and instructional decisions for infants, toddlers, and young children with and without special needs. Discusses effective informal assessment techniques and emphasizes an ecological approach to gathering information. Introduces standardized assessment and screening instruments and provides an overview of the purposes and limitations of such tests. Prerequisite: Admittance into the ECU - Birth through Kindergarten graduate initial licensure teacher education program in the Department of Special Education or permission of the instructor. LEC.

SPED 755. Inclusive Strategies and Interventions for Preschoolers: _____. 3 Hours.

This is a methods course that covers instructional approaches and procedures that offer developmentally appropriate, effective and inclusive early intervention for preschool and kindergarten age children who experience developmental delays, disabling conditions or who are at-risk for developmental problems and disabilities. It is directed toward: (a) "how" to teach, or the technical components of developing and delivering effective instruction that provide access to the general early childhood curriculum within recognized approaches to early childhood education for young children, and (b) the "what" to teach, or the selection of developmentally and individually appropriate child objectives as well as specific materials and specialized instructional approaches. The relationship of instructional planning to state and federal mandates will also be considered. The course is primarily intended for persons who are currently working toward certification in the ECSE program area. Prerequisite: Admittance into the ECU - Birth through Kindergarten graduate initial licensure teacher education program in the Department of Special Education or permission of the instructor. SPED 752 (may be taken concurrently). LEC.

SPED 756. Special Education Leadership. 3 Hours.

This is an introductory course in special education law and policy implementation. It is designed to provide school and district administrators, and other special education stakeholders, with a basic understanding of key points in the history of special education law and policy. It focuses primarily on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and its core concepts, with particular attention to Least Restrictive Environment (LRE). This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of IDEA's procedural requirements, the preferred practices associated with implementing the procedures in schools, criticism of these practices and their implementation, and ideas for addressing these criticisms in ways that promote more equitable and inclusive special education practices. Prerequisite: Degree in Special Education, School Psychology, or related fields. LEC.

SPED 757. History, Context, and Critique of Special Education. 3 Hours.

This is course is designed to provide school and district administrators, and other special education stakeholders, with a general understanding of the history of the treatment of individuals with disabilities and the development of special education law and policy over time. It foregrounds current issues in the post-IDEA organization of the field, highlighting the goals and challenges of democratic leadership and civic professionalism in relation to special education. The course concludes with a final paper and online presentation examining how history, disability, difference and justice inform special education leadership, both in theory and in practice. Prerequisite: Degree in Special Education, School Psychology, or related fields. LEC.

SPED 758. Appropriate Education and Least Restrictive Environment. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to give school and district administrators, and other special education stakeholders interested in special education leadership, a deep understanding of two core principles of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). These are: (1) appropriate education; and (2) least restrictive environment. The course continues the same pattern established in the previous courses for this four-course program. It introduces these core IDEA concepts, features a week of criticisms of those concepts, and follows with a week on remedies to address key issues identified. The last two modules of the course focus on the Individualized Educational Plan and inclusive practices. The course concludes with a final project. Prerequisite: Degree in Special Education, School Psychology, or related fields. LEC.

SPED 759. Non-Discriminatory Evaluation, Parent Participation, and Procedural Due Process. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to give school and district administrators, and other special education stakeholders interested in special education leadership, a deep understanding of three of the core principles of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). These are: (1) non-discriminatory evaluation; (2) parent participation; and (3) procedural due process. The course continues the same pattern established in the previous courses for this four-course program. It introduces these three core IDEA concepts, features a week of criticisms of those concepts, and follows with a week on remedies to address key issues identified. The last two modules of the course focus on the Individualized Educational Plan and inclusive practices. The course concludes with a final project. Prerequisite: Degree in Special Education, School Psychology, or related fields. LEC.

SPED 760. Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders. 3 Hours.

An introductory graduate-level course on autism spectrum disorders. It addresses characteristics of children and youth with autism spectrum disorders; trends and issues associated with autism spectrum disorders; and effective practices and strategies for structuring, managing, and promoting social skill development and social interactions among learners with autism spectrum disorders. LEC.

SPED 761. Foundations of Positive Behavioral Support (PBS). 1 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to positive behavioral support (PBS). The lessons contained within this course include an overview of positive behavioral support, the basics of behavior, an introduction to specific positive behavioral support strategies, and a lesson on preventing problem behavior. LEC.

SPED 762. Functional Assessment Methods for Positive Behavioral Support (PBS). 1 Hour.

This course introduces current functional assessment methods that are used to build effective behavioral support plans. A strong functional assessment is at the heart of Positive Behavioral Support. After completing this course, you will have a better understanding of how to implement functional assessment methods in your classroom. LEC.

SPED 763. Development and Implementation of PBS Plans. 1 Hour.

A positive behavioral support plan (PBS) describes how features of the environment associated with problem behavior will be modified, what and how skills and strategies will be taught, and how individuals supporting a student will respond to both positive and problematic behavior. This course contains lessons on designing PBS plans, implementing PBS plans, and modifying and assessing PBS plans. LEC.

SPED 764. Intervention Strategies for PBS-I. 1 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to introduce interventions that can be used as part of a comprehensive positive behavioral support plan. An effective positive behavioral support plan contains multiple intervention strategies that address the function maintaining a student's problem behavior. This course contains lessons addressing setting events, antecedent interventions, replacing problem behavior, and consequence interventions. LEC.

SPED 765. Intervention Strategies for PBS-II. 1 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to introduce three types of interventions that can be used in positive behavioral support. An effective positive behavioral support plan contains multiple intervention strategies that address the function maintaining a student's problem behavior. This course contains a lesson on social skills education, crisis prevention, and interventions addressing physiological factors that influence a student's problem behavior. LEC.

SPED 766. Redesigning Environmental Systems. 1 Hour.

The purpose of this course is to describe how positive behavioral support can be used to redesign the environment at a systems level. Considering the larger issues within a system including the broader environment, the values and beliefs held by staff, policies and procedures that promote ongoing learning, and collaborative problem solving processes within a school will improve implementation of long-term positive behavioral support efforts. This course contains lessons on classroom management, staff development, and school-wide discipline. LEC.

SPED 767. Creating Positive Lifestyles through PBS. 1 Hour.

One of the most important outcomes of a positive behavioral support plan is an increase in the quality of life for both the student and everyone within the student's social network. The purpose of this course is to introduce topics related to creating positive lifestyles including person-centered planning, self-determination, and quality of life. LEC.

SPED 772. Participation with Children and Youth with Disabilities: _____. 1-3 Hours.

A course designed to provide field experiences with children and youth with disabilities in settings where educational services are provided. Students work directly with professionals such as special education teachers, general education teachers, therapists and other support personnel. Students participate as aides, tutors, and instructors with individual and small groups of children and youth. Ongoing meetings with supervisors are designed to facilitate both reflection and strategic learning. FLD.

SPED 774. Education of Secondary and Post-Secondary Level Exceptional Students: _____. 1-3 Hours.

A course based on the problems and needs of secondary and post-secondary level handicapped students with a focus on curriculum alternatives (academic and vocational), instructional planning options, instructional methods and materials and educational and community resources. The focus is on both mildly and moderately handicapped students. Prerequisite: Appropriate section of SPED 735 which may be taken concurrently. LEC.

SPED 775. Practicum with Children and Youth with Disabilities: _____. 1-10 Hours.

Intensive diverse and direct teaching experiences with children and youth with disabilities in educational settings. This practicum is a requirement for provisional endorsement according to KSDE. Students who have completed SPED 775 cannot enroll in SPED 675 within in same curricular area. Prerequisite: Varies by topic. FLD.

SPED 785. Application of Assessment Information for Exceptional Children and Youth. 3 Hours.

An analysis of information derived from assessment instruments and procedures appropriate to measuring the social and cognitive development of exceptional children and youth. Provides experiences in determining assessment data required in the development of individualized educational programs (IEP). Attention is also given to the design of informal assessment procedures, specific to the needs of exceptional children and youth. Experience is provided in the preparation and presentation of assessment data for use in instructional planning conferences. Prerequisite: An undergraduate or graduate course in educational measurement, and SPED 760. LEC.

SPED 790. Methods for Learners with Higher-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders. 3 Hours.

This is a methods course, with special emphasis on learners with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders. Particular attention is given effective practices and strategies for teaching, managing and promoting social skill and social communication development and proactive social interactions. LEC.

SPED 793. Psychology of Deafness. 2 Hours.

Reviews of the literature pertaining to psychological evaluations of the deaf and hard of hearing. Divergent views of deafness, type and degree of deafness are considered. Prerequisite: SPED 791. LEC.

SPED 798. Special Course: _____. 1-5 Hours.

A special course designed to address topical issues. LEC.

SPED 800. Classroom Intervention for Language Disorders of Handicapped Learners. 3 Hours.

Emphasis is given to milestones in normal language acquisition and variations from norms demonstrated by handicapped learners. Attention is also given to theoretical approaches to language training, formal and informal language assessment techniques, and instructional methods. Students design individualized instructional plans for incorporating language into the daily curriculum for handicapped learners. Prerequisite: SPED 425 or SPED 725. LEC.

SPED 801. Practicum in School Psychology. 4 Hours.

Supervised practice in the application of psychological theory to educational problems. Includes work useful with exceptional children as well as experiences in the application of such areas as mental hygiene and learning theory to problems involving the total school population. (Same as EPSY 910.) Prerequisite: Permission of advisor and instructor. FLD.

SPED 802. Advanced Practicum in School Psychology. 4 Hours.

A continuation of SPED 801 with special emphasis on remedial techniques associated with learning difficulties. (Same as EPSY 911.) Prerequisite: SPED 801 and permission of advisor and instructor. FLD.

SPED 804. Designing Online Instruction for E-Learning Environments. 3 Hours.

The focus of the course is on the status of e-learning at the K-12 and postsecondary levels and the process of designing content for e-learning applications. Attention will be given to design features, content structuring, instructional management, evaluation, and collaboration in the process of working with technicians in the process of developing online curriculum and instruction. Prerequisite: None. A background in education is preferred. LEC.

SPED 805. Practicum in Individual Intelligence Testing. 4 Hours.

Practicum training, by arrangement, in administration and interpretation of test results for school situations with particular emphasis on the Stanford-Binet. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. FLD.

SPED 809. Language Assessment and Instruction II: Learners with Hearing Loss. 3-6 Hours.

This course covers assessment and instruction of speech skills for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. A historical review of the emphasis placed on speech development in deaf students will be provided. Students will learn formal and informal methods of assessment, developmental order and classification systems for English language sounds, and visual, auditory, and tactile facilitation techniques. Auditory training programs and techniques will be emphasized. LEC.

SPED 810. Speech Assessment and Instruction III: Learners with Hearing Loss. 3-6 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to provide effective language assessment and instruction to students who are deaf or hard of hearing. This course focuses on the effect of hearing loss on assessment, language and reading, communication options, and instructional strategies. LEC.

SPED 811. Methods of Teaching Elementary School Subjects to the Deaf. 3 Hours.

Focus is on development of skills in adapting materials and methods of teaching science, math, social studies, spelling, and writing to hearing impaired students. Emphasis is placed on problems, trends and procedures used in career education specifically for the hearing impaired. Prerequisite: SPED 711. LEC.

SPED 812. Instructional Approaches in Inclusive Elementary Settings. 2 Hours.

This advanced method course provides curriculum design and instructional procedures appropriate for students at the elementary and middle school levels, including functional academic, social, and home and community life skills. NOTE: This is a 2 credit course to be offered during the first 8 weeks of a semester. It will precede SPED 814 in the same semester. Prerequisite: SPED 614 or SPED 714: Learning Styles and Instructional Accommodations. LEC.

SPED 814. Instructional Approaches in Inclusive Secondary Settings. 2 Hours.

This advanced method course provides curriculum design and instructional procedures for students at the secondary level, including career preparation and transition from school to adult life in the community. Prerequisite: SPED 614 or SPED 714: Learning Styles and Instructional Accommodations. LEC.

SPED 839. Management Principles and Assessment Procedures for the Young or Severely Handicapped. 2-3 Hours.

Examines basic learning procedures and techniques that are essential to programming efforts with the severely or young handicapped. Includes assessment scales, writing instructional programs, measuring operant behavior and evaluating operant behavior. Task and concept analysis related to treatment programs. Prerequisite: Students in the Early Childhood for the Handicapped program must enroll in one hour of practicum, SPED 775. Students in the Severely Handicapped Program must have completed SPED 726. LEC.

SPED 840. Program Planning in Special Education-Early Childhood. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide knowledge and skills to implement federal and state development mandates for special education and related services programs for young children from birth to five. It covers procedures for developing, implementing, and evaluating (a) instructional accountability for these children's participation in the general early childhood curriculum, (b) relationships between general and special early education personnel and programs; (c) roles and responsibilities; (d) interdisciplinary team planning including families; (e) coordinating, educating, and supervising paraeducators; and (f) general management responsibilities associated with instruction of young children with disabilities. Prerequisite: SPED 760 or SPED 860, which may be taken concurrently. LEC.

SPED 841. Advncd Methds&Asmnt:Learng Stratg&Contnt Mastery Struggling Learners&Stdnts High-Incidence Disabilit. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for graduate students enrolled in the Masters of Science Program with an emphasis in school-age populations primarily with high mild disabilities or seeking to obtain a license to teach students needing an adapted curriculum in Kansas. Course experiences focus on how to identify and implement evidenced-based practices designed to increase the success of students with mild disabilities in mathematics, social studies, science, and language arts through their participation in general and special education classrooms primarily in grades 4-12. This course emphasizes practices associated with understanding and evaluating curricular demands, monitoring student progress in content-area courses, providing tiered supports and accommodations in teaching, using assessment and grading alternatives, and incorporating the principles of explicit and strategic instruction to design instruction that will promote and enhance content-area learning. The course is intended for persons working toward the Kansas teaching license in teaching students needing an adapted curriculum. Prerequisite: SPED 730, SPED 741, admittance into the High Incidence Disabilities program in the Department of Special Education, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

SPED 842. Methods in Access and Inclusion in the Core Curriculum. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on foundational skills for setting up an inclusive program that meets the needs of students with low-incidence disabilities in general education settings. The course will emphasize many of the "behind-the-scenes" strategies and activities that must be completed on a regular basis to make inclusive education effective and efficient. Prerequisite: SPED 635 or SPED 735 and SPED 642 or SPED 742. LEC.

SPED 843. Advanced Methods&Assessment:Strategies for Students with Significant Behavior, Social&Emotional Need. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce educators and related service professionals to prevention and intervention related to a broad range of antisocial, aggressive, and behavioral problems. Approaches focus on understanding and addressing the precipitating factors related to inappropriate behavior, short-term approaches for immediate crises, and problem-solving strategies for longer-term change. Course content will include antisocial, aggressive, and violent behavior; options for classroom interventions; school and system-oriented interventions, and ethical and legal issues involved in various prevention and intervention approaches. Class work will focus on literature, research-based intervention approaches, and case work illustrating specific approaches and programs. Prerequisite: SPED 631 or SPED 731, SPED 741, and SPED 743. LEC.

SPED 844. Advanced Methods in Access and Inclusion in the Core Curriculum. 3 Hours.

This course develops critical skills for implementing an inclusive program that meets the needs of students with low-incidence disabilities in general education settings. The course will emphasize many of the day-today strategies and activities that must be completed on a regular basis to make inclusive education effective and efficient for all learners. Prerequisite: SPED 635 or SPED 735 and SPED 642 or SPED 742. LEC.

SPED 850. Curriculum Planning for Exceptional Children and Youth. 3 Hours.

Provides experiences in applying information on identifying learning and behavioral characteristics of exceptional children and youth. Practices in adapting curriculum materials to meet the needs of the handicapped. Prerequisite: SPED 725 and SPED 735. LEC.

SPED 851. Law and Special Education. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on laws that apply to special education, especially "Individuals with Disabilities Education Act" and "No Child Left Behind Act." The American legal system, particularly in respect to special education, the constitutional and statutory provisions of federal and state law, and judicial decisions interpreting those laws are reviewed. The course relates equal protection, procedural due process, and substantive due process doctrines to school practices affecting students with disabilities and examines the six principles of P. L. 94-142 and similar principles in state legislation. (Same as ELPS 856.) LEC.

SPED 852. Citizens with Disabilities, Public Policy, and Policy Analysis. 3 Hours.

Students to analyze public policy that affects citizens with disabilities, various models of analysis are brought to bear on federal policy (e.g., education, transportation, housing, institutionalization, protection and advocacy, medical assistance, employment, vocational rehabilitation, and others). This course is not valid for core requirement in history and/or philosophy of education. Prerequisite: SPED 851 or permission of instructor. LEC.

SPED 853. Professional Ethics, Public Values, and Citizens with Disabilities. 3 Hours.

This course addresses the issues that professionals (e.g., educators, physicians, allied health providers, attorneys, and others) and families of persons with disabilities face in the context of public values, attitudes, and rules of law. The issues include education, treatment and nontreatment. This course is not valid for core requirement in history and/or philosophy of education. Prerequisite: SPED 850, SPED 852 or permission of instructor. LEC.

SPED 854. Family and Interprofessional Collaboration in Special Education. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide knowledge and skills to implement federal and state mandates for special education and related services programs as they relate to building and maintaining relationships with families of students with disabilities, and developing effective school programs. It covers procedures for developing, implementing, and evaluating (a) instructional accountability for special education students' participation in district and state assessment; (b) relationships between general and special education personnel and programs; (c) roles and responsibilities; (d) interdisciplinary team planning including families; (e) coordinating, educating, and supervising paraeducators; and (f) general management responsibilities associated with instruction of children and youth with disabilities. Course topics will include collaboration in schools, community systems and families, historical perspectives of family life and school involvement, effective relationships between home, school, community, communication among professionals and with families, school-based programs, home-based programs, and multicultural considerations. Prerequisite: SPED 631 or SPED 731, or SPED 632 or SPED 732, or SPED 735. LEC.

SPED 856. Transition Education and Services from Childhood through Adulthood. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide a background in career development and transition education for persons with disabilities from middle school through adulthood. Emphasis is placed on IDEA requirements for transition services, career development and transition processes, transition services assessment, secondary special education curricular implications, career development and transition service needs, collaborative services in schools and communities to promote quality transition services, and issues and trends in transition education and services. LEC.

SPED 857. Career Development for Youth. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students in special education and related areas who are specializing in secondary school/transition programs with an overview of career development for youth with disabilities. Emphasis is placed upon theory and practice related to career development, workbased learning, and school and community vocational training models. Prerequisite: SPED 856. LEC.

SPED 858. Assessment for Transition Planning. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a review of psychometric principles and their utility as a foundation for quality assessment in transition assessment and planning for youth with disabilities. Formal and informal assessments across a range of transition planning areas are reviewed and evaluated. Skills in curriculum-based assessment, rating scales, situational assessment, and functional assessment are emphasized. Prerequisite: SPED 856 or permission of instructor. LEC.

SPED 859. Interagency Services for Transition to Adulthood. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of interagency and community services and systems for adolescents and young adults with disabilities. Emphasis is placed on theory and practice related to interagency collaboration; systems change efforts in transition services; and state-of-art practices regarding supporting individuals with disabilities in community employment, living, socialization, community participation, and other areas of adult life. Prerequisite: SPED 856. LEC.

SPED 860. Education of Children and Youth with Disabilities II: _____. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare students to implement specialized alternative strategies for individualized group instruction. Methods for developing and implementing overall treatment/educational programs, planning or selecting curriculum/service models for programs, and developing instructional materials are emphasized. Procedures for managing classroom staff and service resources, coordinating educational programs with families, other service personnel and program support staff, and monitoring overall program effectiveness are addressed. Prerequisite: SPED 760. LEC.

SPED 861. Blending Academics and Transition. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students with research evidence of each of the components of universal design for learning within access to the general academic curriculum: multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement. Prerequisite: SPED 856. LEC.

SPED 862. Work-Based Learning. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students with models and strategies to develop and coordinate meaningful work experiences for youth with disabilities. Emphasis is placed on practical strategies for engaging with community businesses, developing and customizing jobs and supporting youth in the workplace. Prerequisite: SPED 856. LEC.

SPED 863. Student Engagement in School and Community. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students in special education and related areas who are specializing in secondary school/transition programs with an overview of models and issues pertaining to school and community engagement for secondary age youth. Prerequisite: SPED 856. LEC.

SPED 871. Advanced Practicum with Exceptional Children Needing an Autism Spectrum Curriculum. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced practicum experience for the graduate student teaching children and youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The practicum is designed to provide intense, diverse and direct teaching experiences with children and youth who have learning and behavioral needs in the mild through moderate range and who have been identified with ASD including those who may have PDD- NOS, Asperger syndrome, autism and or high functioning autism. Prerequisite: SPED 760, SPED 785, SPED 743 and SPED 775. FLD.

SPED 874. Planning for Adult Outcomes: _____. 1-3 Hours.

The problems, trends, issues, and procedures used in planning life skills, occupational and vocational skills, and transition from school to adult living for persons with disabilities. Separate sections will be organized by topics pertaining to career/vocational development, assessment, and transition programs and services. These will include: (a) transitions from early childhood to adulthood, (B) application of assessment information, and (c) vocational preparation and employment. Prerequisite: SPED 725 (may be taken concurrently). LEC.

SPED 875. Practicum with Children and Youth with Disabilities: _____. 1-10 Hours.

This course is designed to provide intensive field work and direct teaching experiences with children and youth with disabilities in educational, residential, and clinical settings. Prerequisite: SPED 775. LEC.

SPED 879. Conferencing with Parents of Exceptional Children and Youth: _____. 3 Hours.

A course to develop knowledge and skills in the techniques of interviewing and conferencing, with special application to the professional, legal and ethical problems related to working with parents of exceptional children. Prerequisite: SPED 425 or SPED 725. LEC.

SPED 880. Coordination and Supervision of Services for Exceptional Children. 3 Hours.

An analysis of the role of the special education coordinator and supervisor. Particular attention will be given to: program development; planning, organizing, and delivering inservice training; personnel recruitment, selection, and evaluation; program management; and program evaluation. Students will relate the topical content to their specific area of expertise in special education. Prerequisite: SPED 425 or SPED 725 and six additional semester hours in special education. LEC.

SPED 890. Interdisciplinary Programming for Children and Youth with Disabilities. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students a survey of disciplines which contribute to care and treatment of students with disabilities. Emphasis on professional roles, team participation, case management, and reporting and follow up. Disciplines include medicine, education, audiology, psychology, speech pathology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, music therapy and social work. Prerequisite: SPED 425 or SPED 725. LEC.

SPED 896. Capstone Adaptive Program Seminar. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to be a culminating experience for Adaptive Program students who choose to complete their masters programs with a comprehensive masters examination instead of one of the other program options (i.e., project or thesis). Students will complete this course during the final semester of their programs. Participants will review current issues, evidence-based practices, home-school considerations, state and federal regulations, and Kansas standards regarding appropriate education for students with mild to moderate disabilities (i.e., Adaptive category designation). The course is a prerequisite for the departmental comprehensive examination in the Adaptive area. LEC.

SPED 897. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and instructor. RSH.

SPED 898. Master's Project. 1-4 Hours.

RSH.

SPED 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

THE.

SPED 910. Advanced Application of Behavioral Management Techniques to Exceptional Children and Youth. 3 Hours.

Theory and principles of behavioral analysis. Emphasis will be given to observation, measurement, recording, and visual display techniques. Other topics include maintenance and generalization of behavior change. Students will be provided experience in the design and carrying out of research studies related to exceptional children and youth using principles and methods of behavioral analysis. Prerequisite: SPED 425 or SPED 725 and SPED 839. LEC.

SPED 915. Advanced Curriculum Development for Children and Youth with Disabilities. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide principles of development, needs assessment, evaluation and dissemination applied to curriculum products. Analysis of organizational and conceptual features of major curriculum development projects for students with disabilities are addressed; participants design curriculum procedures. Prerequisite: Twelve semester hours in special education and a general curriculum course. LEC.

SPED 920. Management of Instructional Resources for Exceptional Children and Youth. 3 Hours.

Designed for individuals with responsibilities for the operation of instructional resource centers and educational programs serving exceptional children and youth. Experiences relate to: selection, acquisition, circulation, and management of special education instructional media/materials and the delivery of inservice training specific to their skills. Prerequisite: Professional preparation and/or experience in the Education of Exceptional Children and Youth and C&I 616, Introduction to Educational Communications. LEC.

SPED 925. Medical Aspects of Handicapping Conditions. 3 Hours.

The organization of this course follows the chronology of an individual's total development from genetic origin through fetal development, perinatal, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Emphasis is given to etiology and implications of handicapping conditions on development. Attention is given to prevention, treatment, and habilitation or rehabilitation of various conditions. Prerequisite: SPED 725. LEC.

SPED 930. Praxis Seminar: Scholrship and Writing. 3 Hours.

Course assists first-year doctoral students in (a) developing a scholarly identity and technical skills in the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service, (b) developing a critical understanding of the scholarship informing special education practices and policies through course readings and seminar discussions, and (c) developing the skills to complete a comprehensive, critical review of a topic in the field of special education and disability. Prerequisite: Doctoral student status in Special Education. LEC.

SPED 932. Praxis Seminar: Scholarhip of Teaching. 3 Hours.

Course assists doctoral students in learning (a) what is known about effective teacher education, (b) how that knowledge is translated into practice, and (c) what methodologies can be enlisted to conduct cutting-edge teacher education research. Prerequisite: Doctoral student status in Special Education. LEC.

SPED 936. Cross-Spec I: Conceptual Issues in Special Education. 3 Hours.

The focus of the seminar is current and historically-significant disability-related special education issues and problems (e.g., inclusive education, effective instruction, race and social class bias) that both intersect and implicate the various special education doctoral specializations. Because such problems tend to be intractable, the seminar is designed to build student capacity for conceptualizing and addressing them by exploring forms of disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and specialization scholarship and inquiry applicable to (re)framing and potentially resolving them. Prerequisite: Doctoral student status in Special Education. LEC.

SPED 937. Cross-Specialization Seminar II: Methodological Issues in Special Education. 3 Hours.

Cross-Specialization Seminar II will focus on methodological traditions and emerging issues in special education related to the application of research design and analysis to disability-related special education issues and problems. Thus, the work of the seminar is designed to build students' capacity for conceptualizing research methods and critiquing their application within their area of specialization to enable solutions to our field's wicked or intractable problems by exploring forms of disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and specialization scholarship and inquiry. Prerequisite: SPED 936 Cross Specialization I. SEM.

SPED 949. Specialist Research. 1-4 Hours.

RSH.

SPED 950. Civic Professionalism. 3 Hours.

This course is concerned with the relationship between professions and society in a democracy, and specifically, with the ethics and practices associated with the professions of education, special education, and other disability-related fields. Models of professionalism are compared and advantages of civic professionalism for individuals with disabilities and their families, the professions, and society as a whole are explored. Lessons drawn from disagreements over questions such as the nature and social consequences of the professions are used to broaden understanding of what professionalism could and should be in a democracy. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program. LEC.

SPED 951. Supprtng Early Childhood/Early Childhood Special Education Practitioners in Evidence Based Practice. 3 Hours.

This course will add to the formation of doctoral students as scholars who support practitioners as they strive to be effective consumers of research and implement evidence based practice. The course will address history and current trends, issues/problems and associated methodologies, key leaders, and schools of thought for the fields of Early Education/Early Childhood Special Education with a focus on educator preparation. This course includes active involvement in teaching Early Childhood Unified masters degree students participating in SPED 752, Overview of Early Childhood/Early Childhood Special Education. Doctoral students will help plan and teach SPED 752 course sessions as well as mentor SPED 752 students, who are developing understandings of and writing about evidence based practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Special Education Doctoral program or instructor permission. SEM.

SPED 954. Disability, Justice and Democracy. 3 Hours.

This course is concerned with what justice requires for people with disabilities, and in this regard, with the institutional, political, and cultural barriers to these requirements today and historically. As such, it is an interdisciplinary treatment of the place of disability in theories of justice from Rawls's contractarian theory of justice through Nussbaum's capabilities approach, as well as a critical-theoretic analysis of injustice toward people with disabilities from the Enlightenment to contemporary society. Prerequisite: SPED 950 or permission of the instructor. LEC.

SPED 955. Intersectional Oppression in Special Education Policy and Practice. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to explore the ways in which difference is traditionally perceived and responded to in special education policy and practices in the United States. We will examine how larger systems and individual perceptions about multiple forms of difference and larger social processes, intersectionality, conspire to create particular forms of injustice. Students in the course will analyze the processes of intersectionality to understand how students at the intersections of multiple oppressions experience education within communities of practice that enact, reproduce, and resist policies through their daily activities. We will build an understanding of intersectionality as a "method and a disposition, a heuristic and an analytic tool." Furthermore, we will explore how these students need access to opportunities to dismantle systemic inequities, which will support their engagement with formal learning communities such as schools. Prerequisite: Admittance to the Special Education doctoral program or instructor permission. SEM.

SPED 966. Issues Related to Serving Students with Intensive Support Needs. 3 Hours.

Course focuses broadly on current issues and trends in scientifically supported methods for identifying, assessing, and serving students with intensive support needs. Prerequisite: Admittance to the Special Education doctoral program or instructor permission. SEM.

SPED 968. Evidence-Based Practices for Students with Intensive Academic, Behavior, and Social Support Needs. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on preventing the development of academic, behavior, and social challenges and responding effectively when challenges do occur. Course content will include the use of behavior and academic screening tools to detect and support students with and at risk for academic, behavior, and social challenges within comprehensive, integrated, three-tiered (CI3T) models of prevention. In addition, students will learn about evidence-based strategies, practices, and programs for supporting students with and without identified disabilities for whom Tier 1 efforts are insufficient. Students will develop their abilities to analyze, synthesize, and apply research methods related to design, implementation, and evaluation of Tiers 1, 2, and 3. Students will be required to coordinate requirements with research and teaching competencies and outcomes of the special educational doctoral program. Prerequisite: Admission to a doctoral program or permission from the instructor. SEM.

SPED 970. Problems of Exceptionality: _____. 3 Hours.

An extensive analysis of the literature and research pertinent to issues in a given disability. Separate sections are organized for various disabilities. Students may enroll in more than one section as a part of a graduate program. Prerequisite: Three courses in special education or permission of instructor. LEC.

SPED 971. Organization and Administration of Services for Children and Youth with Disabilities. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare administrators and prospective administrators for organizing and administering educational programs for students with disabilities. Major topics include a review of current trends in special education, state and federal guidelines and regulations, legal and financing aspects of special education, program planning, and administration of special services. (Same as ELPS 959.) Prerequisite: Nine hours of education including educational psychology and SPED 725. LEC.

SPED 972. Issues and Trends in Special Education I. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to assist first-year special education doctoral students organize and synthesize a conceptual and substantive map of the field of special education and introduce them to corresponding faculty research interests and resources. Emphasis is placed on the academic writing expectations and resources of the field, university, and department, and on building a cohort of students to address common issues and to provide a foundation for peer support throughout the doctoral program. Prerequisite: Admission to special education doctoral program or permission of instructor. LEC.

SPED 973. Issues and Trends in Special Education II. 2 Hours.

This capstone seminar is designed to assist advanced doctoral students synthesize and evaluate information on a broad range of current and historically significant special education issues and trends in preparation for comprehensive examinations and future professional roles. Substantively, its primary focus is issues and trends that affect the entire field or cut across several areas of study and practice. Its secondary focus is significant issues and trends that affect particular categorical or functional sub-areas of study and practice within the field. Prerequisite: Completion of nine doctoral courses in special education, including 4 of 6 departmental Core courses. LEC.

SPED 974. Issues and Trends: Students with Learning Disabilities. 3 Hours.

This doctoral level course will explore current issues related to characteristics, educational methods and curricula, and questions, problems, concerns and movements connected to the education of children and youth with learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disorders and autism spectrum disorders. Prerequisite: Doctoral program admission or permission of instructor. LEC.

SPED 975. Advanced Practicum with Children and Youth with Disabilities: _____. 1-10 Hours.

Advanced development of conceptual and practical field-based skills. Prerequisite: SPED 775. FLD.

SPED 977. Learning Disabilities/Behavior Disorders Issues II. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to engage in an extensive analysis of the literature and research pertinent to critical issues in the field of learning and behavioral exceptionality. Prerequisite: SPED 970 LD/BD Issues I; SPED 972 Trends and Issues in Special Education I. LEC.

SPED 980. Advanced Topics: _____. 1-3 Hours.

A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for post-master's level students. LEC.

SPED 981. Changing Complex Systems. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of seminal leadership and systems change literature. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program. LEC.

SPED 982. Preparing Future Faculty. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to give students an introduction and overview of academic life and the roles and responsibilities of an academic career. Its primary purpose is to help develop a realistic perspective of the expectations of academic life and the competencies required for a successful start in an academic career. Organized around the broad themes of understanding the academy, faculty life and work, and academic career paths, course content addresses the roles and responsibilities of faculty life in different types of institutions and the issues faculty face as they pursue their academic careers. The course offers an opportunity for students to critically review their doctoral program in the context of preparing them for a successful start in an academic career and to explore options for academic career choices. Prerequisite: Doctoral program admission. LEC.

SPED 983. Research Funding and Proposal Development. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to teach a broad array of strategies associated with the development of successful proposals that will generate funds to support programmatic work. Among the topics covered in this course are sources of funding, strategies for conceptualizing and writing proposals, collaboration strategies, proposal peer-review process, and integrating proposal development activities into other professional responsibilities. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program and EPSY 710. LEC.

SPED 984. School Reform and School Community Partnerships. 3 Hours.

This is an interprofessional course in public policy and school reform that is concerned with current policy and systems transformations in education and child/family services, including educational, social and health service systems and the movement toward school-linked service integration strategies and family partnerships, called the "community school" movement. Issues connected with comprehensive school reform including the role of special education and mental health in this process will be emphasized. Particular emphasis will be placed on urban, multicultural issues affecting community schools. Prerequisite: Doctoral program admission or permission of instructor. LEC.

SPED 985. Naturalistic Research. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to develop skills in naturalistic or constructivist research, while situating it theoretically within the broader framework of modern and postmodern social inquiry, and exploring its social, political and ethical implications. The course develops students' skills in using this form of interpretive qualitative research, provides a theoretical framework for selecting inquiry paradigms, compares and contrasts positivist and constructivist inquiry, and reviews social and political implications of constructivist inquiry. Prerequisite: Six hours of statistics, measurement, and/or large or small group research design. LEC.

SPED 986. Trends and Issues Associated with Online Instruction. 3 Hours.

The course examines the opportunities, challenges, cautions, and demands of web-based instruction in higher education. It explores the policy implications of web-based instruction, development of collaborative teaming skills utilizing telecommunications resources, and the design and technical aspects of online instruction. Particular attention is given to the implications of online instruction for accommodating needs presented by diverse learners through strategies such as universal designs. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program or permission of instructor. LEC.

SPED 990. Small Sample Empirical Research Methods. 3 Hours.

This course provides a detailed examination of research methods for advancing knowledge and validating hypothetically useful treatments in situations in which sufficient sample sizes to conduct formal experiments are lacking, the question of interest is better addressed by multiple observations of treatment effects over time, and/or the question is best addressed by taking a variety of observations of a single unit of interest. Specifically, two small sample research methods will be examined in depth with examples and practical application experience: interrupted time series design for small samples ("single case" design), and Yin's empirical case study method. Prerequisite: Doctoral program admission or permission of instructor. LEC.

SPED 991. Family Outcomes in Special Education. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on analyzing and synthesizing research literature focusing on intermediate outcomes (e.g., family-professional partnerships) and long-term outcomes (e.g., family quality of life) related to families of children, youth, and adults with disabilities. Key family theories are discussed and applied in the development and implementation of interventions that have potential to increase intermediate and long-term family outcomes. Prerequisite: Three courses in special education or permission of instructor. LEC.

SPED 992. Seminar in Early Childhood/Intervention. 3 Hours.

This seminar examines research to support evidence-based practices that currently exist in the areas of early intervention and early childhood special education. The primary objective is to learn how to read and critically analyze studies that form the evidence base for several early intervention and early childhood special education practices. Primary goals of the class include the development of skills for evaluating research studies in early intervention and early childhood special education, and increasing knowledge of evidence-based practices in the early intervention literature. Prerequisite: Three courses in special education or permission of instructor. LEC.

SPED 995. Field Experience in: _____. 1-5 Hours.

Supervised and directed experiences in selected educational settings. Instructors conduct regular observations and conference with students. Written summaries and evaluations of field experiences are prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agency, and the instructor. Open only to advanced students and field experience credit in any one semester may not exceed five hours, and total credit may not exceed eight hours. FLD.

SPED 996. College Teaching Experience. 2 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare students for college teaching. Enrolled students shall engage in semester-long, planned, instruction that includes college classroom teaching under supervision. Planning shall be done with a member of the faculty who will supervise the experience. FLD.

SPED 997. Individual Study. 1-4 Hours.

Prerequisite: Prior graduate course work in the area of study and consent of instructor. RSH.

SPED 998. Seminar in: _____. 1-4 Hours.

LEC.

SPED 999. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-15 Hours.

THE.