Indigenous Studies Graduate Program

The Indigenous Studies master’s degree program provides students with in-depth knowledge of Indigenous peoples’ complex and diverse cultures and histories, as well as their impacts on the global society. Our multidisciplinary program offers students the advantage of studying relevant issues from a wide range of academic perspectives. The expertise of our affiliate faculty members includes Native American history, including medical and legal aspects; indigenous literature; ethnobotany; Indigenous peoples' cultural survival and political activism; American Indian tribal governments; indigenous geographies and cartographic history; Native American religions; and much more.

Empowered by the resources on campus and in our community, we strive to provide unique learning opportunities for our students that go beyond the classroom. The mission of the multidisciplinary Indigenous Studies Program is to educate students and promote scholarship about the complexity and diversity of Indigenous peoples' cultures and histories, and to provide students with the knowledge to understand and assess the U.S. tribes' unique relationships to the U.S. government. Indigenous Studies encourages appreciation of the contributions of Indigenous peoples to the global society, provides students with an understanding of the difficulties confronting tribal nations and offers foundational knowledge to assist them in finding innovative solutions to solve those problems.

Financial Aid

The program may nominate outstanding students for KU graduate fellowships and awards. Consideration requires submission of an application by January 15.

The program offers a few scholarships for excellence in academic work. Consideration requires the submission of all application materials by February 1.

Visit the Graduate Studies website for information about funding opportunities for graduate students at KU.

Financial Aid and Scholarships administers grants, loans, and need-based financial aid.

Courses

ISP HW. Humanities or Non-West Culture. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H.

LEC.

ISP 101. Introduction to Indigenous Nations Studies. 3 Hours NW / S.

An introduction to the study of Indigenous peoples. It surveys the concepts, methods, and content relevant to Applied Indigenous Studies, using case studies drawn from diverse cultures. The course illustrates that the social, political, religious, and economic aspects of American Indian life are interconnected and that tribal histories cannot be understood without an awareness of these fields. Students are introduced to controversies over how to research, write, and interpret American Indians, and will address the foundations of Indigenous Studies, and that is Indigenous concepts of decolonization, empowerment and Nation-building. The course explores how the lives of Indigenous people have been affected by colonization, while exploring the varying definitions of "colonialism", "colonizer" and the "colonized. LEC.

ISP 305. World Indigenous Literatures. 3 Hours NW AE42 / H.

A survey of contemporary world indigenous literatures that includes those from North America, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, the Arctic, and Latin America. Texts are in English (original or translation). Genres studied include the novel, poetry, and drama, supplemented by works from the oral tradition, the visual arts, and film. (Same as ENGL 305/GIST 305.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the KU Core Written Communication requirement. Recommended: Prior completion of one 200-level English course. LEC.

ISP 330. Native American Religions. 3 Hours NW AE41 / H.

A survey of religious traditions among selected Native American peoples. Topics include religious freedom, ritual activity, cultural narrative ("myth"), kinship, healing practices, ecology, government relations, impact of colonization, impact of missionization, contact between cultures, and secularization. Not open to students who have completed GINS 331. (Same as REL 330.) LEC.

ISP 331. Native American Religions, Honors. 3 Hours NW AE41 / H.

A survey of religious traditions among selected Native American peoples. Topics include religious freedom, ritual activity, cultural narrative ("myth"), kinship, healing practices, ecology, government relations, impact of colonization, impact of missionization, contact between cultures, and secularization. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have completed ISP 330. (Same as REL 331.) LEC.

ISP 335. Introduction to Indigenous Studies. 3 Hours NW / H.

This course is an introduction to the study of modern and historic indigenous peoples. It surveys the concepts, methods, and content relevant to Indigenous Studies, using case studies drawn from the diverse indigenous cultures. Special attention is paid to the various ways in which standard academic disciplines--history, anthropology, literature, law, political science, among others--contribute to the study of Indigenous cultures and current issues. The course illustrates that the social, political, religious, and economic aspects of indigenous life are interconnected and tribal histories and cultures cannot be understood without an awareness of these fields. (Same as HWC 335.) LEC.

ISP 345. Indian Territory. 3 Hours H.

This course examines the cultural, social, economic, environmental, and political background of Indian Territory in what is now the state of Oklahoma. It surveys the diverse geographical regions, tribal cultures, the impact of the Indian Removal Act, assimilation, acculturation, westward expansion, the Civil war, boarding schools, the Dawes Act, the Curtis Act, and land runs on Territory residents. The course also treats post-Civil War violence, outlaws, and the role of tribal courts along with controversies over removals, Land Run celebrations, allotment scandals, and Osage oil murders. (Same as HIST 318 and HWC 345.) LEC.

ISP 348. American Indian and White Relations to 1865. 3 Hours H.

This course provides an intensive survey of the Indians of North America from Prehistory to 1865, and focuses on ancient indigenous cultures, early European-Indian relations and the impact of European culture upon the indigenous peoples of North America. (Same as HIST 351, HWC 348.) LEC.

ISP 350. American Indians Since 1865. 3 Hours AE41 / H.

This course examines American Indian/White relations from reconstruction to the present. It surveys the impact of westward expansion and cultural changes brought about by the Civil War, forced education, intermarriage, the Dawes Act, the New Deal, the World Wars, termination, relocation and stereotypical literature and movies. The class also addresses the Red Power and AIM movements, as well as indigenous efforts to decolonize and to recover and retain indigenous knowledge. After learning about the past from both Native and non-Native source materials, students will multiple perspectives about historical events and gain understandings of diverse world views, values, and responses to adversity. (Same as HIST 352 and HWC 350.) LEC.

ISP 490. Roots of Federal Indian Policy. 3 Hours H.

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and ideologies surrounding modern United States Federal Indian policy. It will survey the European intellectual trends that were influential in creating policies that were (and still are) applied to the colonized Native peoples. The course will explore the roots of US Indian policy, including removals, "civilization programs," the reservation period, the Dawes (Allotment) Act, the New Deal, termination, relocation, NAGPRA and tribal rights, in addition to the issues surrounding American Indian identity, tribal membership and demographics. This course serves as the foundation for more in-depth study into the complicated and ever-changing field of Federal Indian Law as it pertains to the Indigenous peoples of the United States. (Same as HWC 490.) LEC.

ISP 504. Topics in Indigenous Nations Studies: _____. 3 Hours NW / S.

This course concentrates on selected problems in the interdisciplinary field of Indigenous Nations Studies. Courses in this field utilize methods developed in various disciplines in order to examine issues related to the survival, self-sufficiency, mutual support, empowerment, and decolonization of Indigenous Peoples throughout the world. May be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Recommended for juniors or seniors, or for students who have completed ISP 101/GINS 101/INS 101. LEC.

ISP 510. Indigenous Women and Activism. 3 Hours NW / S.

Examines the roles of activist Indigenous women in politics, social work, academia, business, environmental and health issues. Compares and contrasts the ideology of the predominantly white feminist movement with the goals and concerns of the "Red Power" movement and emphasizes Indigenous socio-cultural values and concerns. Profiles prominent Indigenous female activists, tribal leaders and writers, in addition to topics of serious concern to Indigenous women: violence, racism, loss of culture and language, education, health care and other manifestations of continued colonization. LEC.

ISP 530. Indigenous Food and Health. 3 Hours NW / U.

This course investigates the historic diets of Indigenous peoples, including cultivation of crops, hunting and fishing methods, food preparation and seed preservation. The class traces through history the colonial policies and ideologies that caused the cultures to alter their ways of eating, resulting in unprecedented modern health problems and offers traditional cultural strategies for health recovery. LEC.

ISP 551. Foodways: Native North America. 3 Hours H.

This course surveys the traditional foodways of the indigenous peoples of North America. We survey hunting, gathering and fishing methods, meal preparation, medicinal plants and the cultivation of crops according to tribal seasons. Because modern indigenous peoples are suffering from unprecedented health problems, such as diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and related maladies, the course traces through history the reasons why tribal peoples have become unhealthy and why some have lost the traditional knowledge necessary to plant, cultivate, and save seeds. The course also addresses the destruction of flora and fauna from environmental degradation. (Same as HIST 511 and HWC 551.) Prerequisite: Upper division course on indigenous / American Indian history, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

ISP 552. Foodways: Latin America. 3 Hours H.

This course explores the traditional foods, ways of eating, and cultural significance of food among peoples of Latin America. The course surveys the vast array of flora in Central and South America and the Caribbean, and focuses on issues of environmental protection, bioethics, food security, and the growth of farming and ranching. The class studies the impact that foods such as maize, potatoes and cacao have had globally, and includes African, Asian, and European influences on Latin cuisine, as well as health problems associated with dietary changes. (Same as HIST 512 , HWC 552 and LAA 552.) Prerequisite: Upper division course on Latin America, or permission of the instructor. LEC.

ISP 600. Research Methods and Indigenous Peoples. 1-3 Hours NW / U.

An introduction to the social science methods of investigation and analysis that are used in Indigenous Nations Studies as a discipline. The nature of Indigenous Nations Studies data sources and methods of data collection, the logic of social scientific inquiry, and key methods of data analysis are emphasized. In addition, the social and educational implications of the results are examined. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

ISP 601. Indigenous Peoples of the World. 3 Hours NW / U.

A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of external economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law are used. (Same as GEOG 601 and GIST 601.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

ISP 602. Indigenous Decolonization and Empowerment. 3 Hours NW / U.

An Indigenous focus of the foundation and impact of colonization, decolonization, empowerment and nation-building. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

ISP 603. Introduction to Indigenous Nations Graduate Studies. 3 Hours NW / U.

The goal of this course is two-fold: to introduce students to the academic discipline of Indigenous Nations Studies, its debates and contours, history, methods, and resources; and to develop the skills necessary to proceed successfully through the program. Key words and terms, critical thinking/reading/and writing skills, and research skills are emphasized. Guest lectures from ISP faculty members, librarian, and members of the Writing Center serve to complement and broaden assignments and discussions. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

ISP 611. Applied Indigenous Leadership. 3 Hours NW / U.

Trains students in the skills of grant writing, leadership, conflict resolution, public presentation, organization and program development as applicable to Indigenous peoples. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. LEC.

ISP 612. Native American Oppression, Resistance, and Liberation. 3 Hours NW / U.

An interdisciplinary examination of the effects of historical and contemporary forms of colonialism and postcolonial strategies of resistance practiced by Indigenous peoples within and beyond the borders of the United States. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

ISP 613. Issues Facing Indigenous Peoples. 3 Hours NW / U.

Explores the theories and methods of selected cultural, environmental, legal, political, and socio-economical issues confronting Indigenous societies throughout the world. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

ISP 614. Decolonizing Narratives. 3 Hours NW / U.

With the decolonizing potential of Indigenous literary and cultural productions, this course seeks to both answer and explore such questions as: How can literary and cultural texts such as novels, poetry, music, and film from world Indigenous communities function as decolonizing tools? Can decolonizing methodologies be applied to such texts? How do such texts contribute to and strengthen Indigenous political, intellectual, cultural, visual and rhetorical sovereignty? Includes an overview of Indigenous literature, films and documentaries from North America, the Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

ISP 670. Indigenous Peoples' Health Status, Beliefs, and Behaviors. 3 Hours NW / U.

Explores the health status, beliefs, and behaviors of particular Indigenous cultures. Examines the role of internal and external influences on health, various mainstream and Indigenous models of health behavior, perceptions of illness and curing, health status, and healing practices. Focuses on the groups of the Maori of New Zealand, First Nations in Canada, Palestinian peoples in the Middle East, American Indians, and Indigenous Australians. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

ISP 673. Environmental Justice. 3 Hours NW / U.

An examination of the impact of environmental justice and security in Indigenous communities throughout the world with a focus on tactics and strategies that incorporate Indigenous perspectives in responses and mitigation schemes. A survey of mining, dumping, and storage of toxic and radioactive waste activities as related to Indigenous peoples. Case study analyses of economic, military and mining interests contrasted with perspectives emerging from cultural traditions and beliefs of Indigenous peoples and communities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC.

ISP 800. Indigenous Issues in the United States. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on contemporary issues relating to Indigenous peoples and nations within the United States, with particular emphasis on such issues as sovereignty, indigeneity, colonialism and decolonization. The course will address varied disciplinary approaches to this range of issues and will consider how this discourse bears upon scholarly conversations regarding broader themes in other selected fields of study. LEC.

ISP 801. Indigenous Peoples of the World. 3 Hours.

A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of externally-dominated economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law will be used. The course is offered at the 600 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. (Same as GEOG 801.) LEC.

ISP 802. Indigenous Decolonization and Empowerment. 3 Hours.

An Indigenous focus of the foundation and impact of colonization, decolonization, empowerment and nation-building. LEC.

ISP 803. Introduction to Indigenous Nations Graduate Studies. 3 Hours.

The goal of this course is two-fold: to introduce students to the academic discipline of Indigenous Nations Studies, its debates and contours, history, methods, and resources; and to develop the skills necessary to proceed successfully through the program. Unpacking key words and terms, critical thinking/reading/and writing skills, and research skills will be emphasized. Guest lectures will serve to complement and broaden assignments and discussions LEC.

ISP 804. Special Topics: _____. 1-3 Hours.

Designed to fulfill program needs of the Indigenous Nations Studies master's program, this course may meet with appropriate professional or graduate courses. Can be repeated for credit when topic differs. LEC.

ISP 805. American Indian Leadership. 3 Hours.

Students will analyze the qualities of American Indian leadership and will examine circumstances and backgrounds of Indian leaders as heroes and role models paying particular attention to how they responded as individuals, leaders, and as community members of their tribes. Besides surveying noted Indian leaders in treaty negotiations, allotment, removal, war, etc., the course will examine leaders in medicine, education, and recent American Indian history including attention to women leaders. Students will learn about the leaders' tribes and cultures in addition to understanding the ethnohistory of Indian-white relations. LEC.

ISP 806. Directed Readings. 1-3 Hours.

An individual readings course with a qualified instructor on a topic in Indigenous Nations Studies. LEC.

ISP 807. Internship in Indigenous Nations Studies. 1-6 Hours.

Internships provide students the opportunity to obtain training and perform professional duties for academic credit at pre-approved indigenous-related agencies, organizations, and communities. Students are required to demonstrate a minimum of 60 contact hours for each one credit hour. To enroll, students must obtain the consent of a ISP faculty member and the Program's Curriculum Committee. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission from instructor. FLD.

ISP 809. Indigenous Women: Gender and Sexuality. 3 Hours.

This course examines gender and sexuality among indigenous communities in the world. Ethnographies about indigenous women are used to explore a variety of gender and sexual identities. Gendered and sexualized identities are analyzed within broader societal contexts such as the division of labor, kinship, marriage household, and the control of resources. Power relationships are examined between sub-altern women and the larger society, nation and globalizing world in which they play a part. LEC.

ISP 810. Indigenous Women and Activism. 3 Hours.

An examination of the roles and ideologies of prominent Indigenous female activists, tribal leaders and writers. LEC.

ISP 811. Applied Indigenous Leadership. 3 Hours.

A preparation to train students in the skills of grant writing, leadership, conflict resolution, public presentation, organization and program development as applicable to Indigenous peoples. LEC.

ISP 812. Native American Oppression, Resistance, and Liberation. 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary examination of the effects of historical and contemporary forms of colonialism and postcolonial strategies of resistance practiced by Indigenous peoples within and beyond the borders of the United States. LEC.

ISP 813. Issues Facing Indigenous Peoples. 3 Hours.

This course explores the theories and methods of selected cultural, environmental, legal, political, and socio-economical issues confronting Indigenous societies throughout the world. LEC.

ISP 814. Decolonizing Narratives. 3 Hours.

With the decolonizing potential of Indigenous literary and cultural productions, this course seeks to both answer and explore such questions as: How can literary and cultural texts such as novels, poetry, music, and film from world Indigenous communities function as decolonizing tools? Can decolonizing methodologies be applied to such texts? How do such texts contribute to and strengthen Indigenous political, intellectual, cultural, visual and rhetorical sovereignty? An overview will be presented from Indigenous literature, films and documentaries from North America, the Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand. LEC.

ISP 824. Federal Indian Law. 2.5-3 Hours.

Addresses the law and policy of the United States regarding Indian nations and their members. Issues include the origins and contours of federal plenary power over Indian affairs, the scope of inherent tribal sovereignty, the limits of state power in Indian country, civil and criminal jurisdiction, and gaming. (Same as LAW 914) Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC.

ISP 830. Indigenous Food and Health. 3 Hours.

Investigates the historic diets of Indigenous peoples, including cultivation of crops, hunting and fishing methods, food preparation and seed preservation. Traces through history the colonial policies and ideologies that caused the cultures to alter their ways of eating, resulting in unprecedented modern health problems. Will offer traditional cultural strategies for health recovery. LEC.

ISP 862. Indigenous Archives. 3 Hours.

A discussion of what constitutes an archive, including the theory and methodology of archival collections, and an introduction to archiving as a profession. Includes a discussion of records management, with an emphasis on tribal archives collections and tribal records. Includes instruction on arrangement and description of tribal archival collections, funding, environmentally controlled storage, and disaster recovery planning. The class will specifically address the needs of tribal archives: tribal records, oral history interviews, photographs, litigation records, grant writing, and culturally sensitive materials. Students will learn about primary and secondary sources, different formats of writing professional research papers, and will produce a research paper at the end of the semester. LEC.

ISP 863. Oral History. 3 Hours.

A discussion of the importance of the oral tradition in Indigenous nations and the difference between oral tradition and oral histories and myth. The class will concentrate on the methodologies of tribal oral history projects, from organizational aspects to personnel issues, equipment needed, sources of grant funding, interview methodology, as well as documentation and preservation of the interviews. The course will discuss how to share and make available these interviews and when access to them needs to be restricted. The students will conduct videotaped oral histories as part of the class exercises and get hands-on experience with the preservation, organization, and transcription of oral history projects. LEC.

ISP 864. Exhibiting Culture. 3 Hours.

A discussion of how museums and exhibits can be a vehicle for Indigenous community empowerment and the importance of Indigenous cultures to interpret their stories themselves. The class will also look at how different nations view the display and handling of their belongings and what kinds of belongings can or should be handled and displayed. LEC.

ISP 865. Grant Writing and Fundraising. 3 Hours.

A discussion of how to develop a grant writing and fundraising plan for a tribal project. Includes how to develop an idea or project and how to prepare a funding campaign. The students will produce a fundraising event and work on the various parts of an actual grant as the final class activity that will be designed to bring in funding to support KU Global Indigenous Nations Studies Program. LEC.

ISP 866. Indigenous Museum Management. 3 Hours.

A discussion of the community models of museum management, including museum administration, professional positions within a museum, museum exhibits, public education programs, security, and disaster planning. The course will compare and contrast museum management in European/American museums and tribal museums and how these management styles affect collection policies, exhibit policies, traditional care of collections, sacred and ceremonial item handling and display, NAGPRA and repatriation, and oral histories. LEC.

ISP 867. Indigenous Records Management. 3 Hours.

A discussion of what constitutes a record and how to manage records at the business or government level. Train students in hands-on records management techniques, policies, developing a records retention schedule, and how to plan and design a records management program for records pertaining to Indigenous nations. LEC.

ISP 868. Indigenous Records Management II. 3 Hours.

A discussion of what constitutes a record and how to manage records at the business or government level. This is a second level of records management leading to preparation for taking the certification examination. LEC.

ISP 869. Traditional Care of Collections. 3 Hours.

A discussion of on traditional care issues of handling and preserving of Indigenous belongings. The class will compare the methods of traditional care at tribal museums vs. conservation of Native items in mainstream museums. LEC.

ISP 870. Indigenous Peoples' Health Status, Beliefs, and Behaviors. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to explore the health status, beliefs, and behaviors of particular Indigenous cultures. The course examines the role of internal and external influences on health, various mainstream and Indigenous models of health behavior, perceptions of illness and curing, health status, and healing practices. The course will focus on the groups of the Maori of New Zealand, First Nations in Canada, Palestinian peoples in the Middle East, American Indians, and Indigenous Australians. LEC.

ISP 871. Community Health and Development. 3 Hours.

This course extends knowledge and skills for addressing issues in community health and development (e.g., substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, child and youth development, prevention of violence). Students learn core competencies such as analyzing community problems and goals, strategic planning, intervention, and evaluation, and then apply these skills to issues that matter to them and to the communities they serve. (Same as ABSC 710.) LEC.

ISP 873. Environmental Justice. 3 Hours.

An examination of the impact of environmental justice and security in Indigenous communities throughout the world with a focus on tactics and strategies that incorporate Indigenous perspectives in responses and mitigation schemes. A survey of mining, dumping and storage of toxic and radioactive waste activities as related to Indigenous peoples. Case study analyses of economic, military and mining interests contrasted with perspectives emerging from cultural traditions and beliefs of Indigenous peoples and communities. LEC.

ISP 874. Natural Resource Management: Indigenous Perspectives. 3 Hours.

An examination of resource management issues in Indigenous communities throughout the world with a focus on tactics and strategies that incorporate Indigenous perspectives in the management schemes. Case study analyses of management techniques derived from European-based science with Indigenous traditions and beliefs. LEC.

ISP 875. Native and Western Views of Nature. 3 Hours.

A comparison of the attitudes and perspectives towards the natural world developed by different cultural traditions. A review of western attitudes and also the traditional ecological knowledge of Indigenous peoples toward management of natural resources, non-human animals, and the natural world. LEC.

ISP 876. Comparative Law. 2.5-3 Hours.

A general introduction to and comparison of major legal systems of the world, with special emphasis given to how those systems reflect differing cultural values in addressing common legal questions. A major goal of the course is to deepen the students' understanding of law and practice in the United States and to broaden their perspective of law beyond the boundaries of the common law systems. (Same as LAW 879.) Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC.

ISP 877. Public Lands and Natural Resources. 2.5-3 Hours.

Devoted to the law and legal systems that govern the classification and use of one-third of America's land mass. Includes a survey of the acquisition and disposition of the public domain; general federal statutes and doctrines that affect public land law; and different forms of federal lands classifications, including national parks, scenic rivers, and grazing lands. (Same as LAW 975.) Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC.

ISP 879. Water Law. 2.5-3 Hours.

A study of water rights including the riparian and prior appropriation doctrines for surface water, and the various doctrines for groundwater. Private and public water distribution organizations, and special water districts. Water pollution control. Interstate conflicts over water resources. Federal government involvement in water distribution including federal powers and programs. Indian and reserved rights. Kansas water law. (Same as LAW 995.) Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC.

ISP 882. Native American Natural Resources. 2-3 Hours.

This course provides a detailed examination of natural resource law as it applies to Indian Country. Among the topics to be discussed are water law, environmental protection, and subsurface property rights. (Same as LAW 967.) LEC.

ISP 883. Sovereignty, Self-Determination and Indigenous Nations. 2-3 Hours.

Examines legal, governmental, political, social, cultural, and economic issues associated with American Indian tribal sovereignty and self-determination. Includes the source and scope of tribal sovereignty; the threats to tribal sovereignty; and the methods by which tribal sovereignty can be strengthened and revitalized. (Same as LAW 987.) Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC.

ISP 898. Master's Non-Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Course for Indigenous Studies students completing a portfolio Master's exam. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC.

ISP 899. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Course for Global Indigenous Nations Studies students completing Master's thesis projects. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. THE.