The Program

The Department of Military Science administers the Army Reserve Officers Training Corps program at KU. The military science curriculum provides a student with unique leadership and management training, along with practical experience. It develops qualities basic to success in the Army and in the civilian sector. It also offers the student the opportunity to earn an officer’s commission in the Army.

Eligible students enrolled at KU may register for a 100- or 200-level military science course or for ARMY 303 or ARMY 450. These students receive credit if the course they are enrolled in has been approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The credit does not count toward the required 100 hours in the College for students earning a baccalaureate degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Students who want to receive a commission in the Army through the ROTC program must meet the eligibility requirements of Section 2103, Title 10, U.S. Code, and current Department of Defense and Department of the Army guidelines.

Army: Department of Military Science

Military Science Building
1520 Summerfield Hall Drive, Room 203
Lawrence, KS 66045-7554
785-864-3311
goldbar@ku.edu
http://www.armyrotc.ku.edu/

Lieutenant Colonel Tracey A. Olson, Chair
785-864-3311

4-Year Program

The 4-year Army ROTC program is made up of a basic course and an advanced course.

Basic Course

The basic course is taken during the first 2 years of college. It covers subjects such as organizational behavior, leadership, management, ethics, writing, public speaking, military affairs, and tactics. All necessary textbooks, classroom materials, uniforms, and other equipment are furnished at no cost. Students who have completed the basic course; have met academic, physical, and medical standards; and have the potential to serve as officers may enter the advanced course.

The basic course is composed of a total of 4 courses. A student may enter the basic course at one of 3 points (if eligible).

  1. Entering First-Semester First-Year Students
    First semester:
    ARMY 101Introduction to Military Science I1
    Second semester:
    ARMY 102Introduction to Military Science II1
    Third semester:
    ARMY 201Basic Military Science I1
    Fourth semester:
    ARMY 202Basic Military Science II1
  2. Entering Second-Semester First-Year Students
    First semester:
    ARMY 102Introduction to Military Science II1
    Second semester:
    ARMY 101Introduction to Military Science I1
    ARMY 201Basic Military Science I1
    Third semester:
    ARMY 202Basic Military Science II1
  3. Entering Third Semester (Sophomore Year)
    First semester:
    ARMY 101Introduction to Military Science I1
    ARMY 102Introduction to Military Science II1
    Second semester:
    ARMY 201Basic Military Science I1
    ARMY 202Basic Military Science II1

Advanced Course

The advanced course normally is taken during the final 2 years of college. It offers instruction in military organization, tactics, military law, Army administration, and leadership. All necessary books, classroom supplies, uniforms, and other equipment are issued to students at no cost. During the summer between the junior and senior years of college, students must attend the Leadership Development and Assessment Camp, a fully paid, five-week training and evaluation course. LDAC gives each student the chance to practice for an extended period of time what they have learned in the classroom. All students contracted in the advanced course receive stipends from the government of up to $5,000 a year.

The advanced course is composed of a total of 4 courses.

First Year

First semester:
ARMY 301Theory and Dynamics of Tactical Operations I3
Second semester:
ARMY 302Theory and Dynamics of Tactical Operations II3

Second Year

First semester:
ARMY 401Concepts of Military Management3
Second semester:
ARMY 402The Military Profession3

2-Year Program

Students can receive credit for the basic course in 3 ways other than taking the 4 courses associated with the basic course. Students who complete the basic course by 1 of these alternate means can enroll in basic course classes but cannot enroll in the advanced course until they are academic juniors. Any upper-level student, junior through graduate, may earn a commission through the 2-year program. The 3 alternate ways to receive basic course credit are

  1. Successfully completing the basic enlisted training offered by any of the armed services.

  2. Successfully completing the ROTC Leadership Training Course held each summer (prerequisite to ARMY 301).

  3. Successfully completing at least 4 years of high school Junior ROTC.

Professional Military Education Course

The following course is required for commissioning:

Military History. Gain an understanding of the evolution of warfare, military theory, the military profession, and the place of military institutions in American society. The requirement can be met by successfully completing a history course focusing on either a major war or on military history in general. ROTC courses also meet this requirement.

Scholarships and Financial Assistance

Army ROTC offers 2-, 3-, and 4-year scholarships to qualified students. Scholarships are awarded on a competitive basis to students with outstanding academic and leadership abilities. These scholarships pay for all tuition, required fees, $1,200 a year for books and other supplies, and a stipend of up to $5,000 a year. Special consideration is given to students who major in nursing, engineering, or the sciences. The Kansas Army National Guard offers numerous educational benefits such as the Board of Regents Scholarship.

Army National Guard and Army Reserve Students

Students who are members of the Army National Guard or the Army Reserve may enroll in Army ROTC classes and be members of their units at the same time. Once students enter a contractual agreement as early as their sophomore year, they can remain members of their units under the Simultaneous Membership Program. These students are still eligible for all military benefits they have earned under enlisted contract such as Tuition Assistance, GI Bill, and drill pay; additionally, they may compete for guaranteed reserve forces designated ROTC scholarships if they commit to commissioning to the Army Reserve or Army National Guard.

Courses

ARMY 10. Leadership Laboratory. 0 Hours U.

Required of all Army Cadets. A study of Army customs and courtesies, drill and ceremony, career opportunities in the Army, and the life and work of a junior Army officer. Cadets develop leadership potential through practical supervised training. Course must be taken in conjunction with ARMY 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, and 402. Course not approved for credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. LAB.

ARMY 101. Introduction to Military Science I. 1 Hour U.

Required introductory course for the Army military science program. Course is comprised of one hour of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week. Introduces the military science program as an element of the reserve forces and includes an examination of major legislation, the Army organization structure, and military leadership techniques. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. LEC.

ARMY 102. Introduction to Military Science II. 1 Hour U.

Course comprised of one hour of lecture and one hour of leadership laboratory per week. A general study and appreciation of the American military system from colonial times to the present. The course identifies factors present in the American society and national policy in each particular historical period which influenced the development of American military systems. The relationship between the military establishment and the larger American society is examined in each historical period. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 101 or department approval. LEC.

ARMY 201. Basic Military Science I. 1 Hour U.

Course comprised of one hour of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week. Analyzes the principles of war and military leadership at small unit level, and introduces principles of military writing. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 102 or department approval. LEC.

ARMY 202. Basic Military Science II. 1 Hour U.

Course is comprised of one hour of lecture and one hour of leadership laboratory per week. Curriculum consists of the fundamentals of topographic map reading and their application in a field environment. Includes instruction in various types of maps, marginal information, topographic symbols and colors, scale, distance, direction and use of the magnetic compass. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 201 or department approval. LEC.

ARMY 301. Theory and Dynamics of Tactical Operations I. 3 Hours U.

Course is comprised of three hours of lecture and two hours of leadership laboratory per week. A comprehensive study of conventional tactical operations. Emphasizes the fundamentals of land warfare and the qualities necessary to conduct fluid, non-linear operations. Introduces the student to the tenets of Air-Land Battle, the underlying structure of modern warfare, the dynamics of combat power, and the application of classical principles of war to a contemporary battlefield. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 202 or department approval. LEC.

ARMY 302. Theory and Dynamics of Tactical Operations II. 3 Hours U.

Course is comprised of three hours of lecture and two hours of leadership laboratory per week. Expands on the application of conventional tactical operations in the low, medium, and high intensity conflict spectrum. Examines the three-dimensional nature of modern warfare and the unified battlefield. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 301 or department approval. LEC.

ARMY 303. Military Conditioning. 1 Hour U.

Introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of developing physical fitness programs for all Army personnel from the commander or supervisor's perspective. Provides an overview of total fitness, defines physical fitness, outlines the phases of fitness, discusses various types of fitness programs, and presents evaluation criteria. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, to count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. LEC.

ARMY 401. Concepts of Military Management. 3 Hours U.

Course is comprised of three hours of lecture and two hours of leadership laboratory per week. An introduction to the military management system with special attention to the functions, organizations, and operations of military training, logistics and administration. The use of standardized staff formats in the development of plans and orders is emphasized from the standpoint of the leader with limited resources. Extensive use of standard staff procedures is emphasized in problem solving scenarios. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 302 or department approval. LEC.

ARMY 402. The Military Profession. 3 Hours U.

Course is comprised of three hours of lecture and two hours of leadership laboratory per week. A seminar on the military profession as an object of social inquiry. Focus is on the internal structure of the profession, current problems, and interaction with the larger American society. Seminar topics include but are not limited to the following: a historical perspective on the military profession; civil-military relations; social and political impact of military activities; military justice; professionalism versus careerism. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 401 or department approval. LEC.

ARMY 450. Military Analysis. 1 Hour U.

A study of present and future military operations; emphasis placed on analysis of problem. The student will defend his/her analysis through written and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Permission of department chairperson. LEC.