The Anthropology Department at the University of Kansas

Anthropologists are concerned with the origin, history, and future of the human species. Our mission is to further our understanding of past and present human societies in their cultural, biological, and environmental contexts. As flows of people, ideas, money, and goods are crossing borders at unprecedented speeds, we are encountering human diversity now, more than ever before. The discipline provides students the knowledge and skills they will need to navigate these complex, multicultural, and rapidly changing worlds. Because we study what it is to be human, the field is one of the most wide-ranging of the academic disciplines.

There are four main subdisciplines of anthropology: Archaeology is concerned with studying the human past based on the material culture left behind. Biological or physical anthropology is concerned with human evolution and variation. Linguistic anthropology focuses on the relationship between language and culture, as well as the documentation of the history and evolution of languages over time and across space. Cultural anthropology is concerned with the many ways humans organize themselves to live together, questioning past and present patterns of meaning and power relationships on local and global scales. Anthropologists across all of the subdisciplines apply holistic, comparative, and evolutionary perspectives and a range of methodologies in their research. We are committed to fieldwork and the application of this knowledge to helping people better understand one another.

Why Study Anthropology?

Students have many reasons for wanting to major in anthropology. Some are curious about the origins of the human species. Others are fascinated the diversity of human experiences in ancient and modern periods. Some students intend to pursue international careers, where they will use languages and work in cultural contexts very different from those in which they were raised. Others plan to work in museums collecting and curating human cultural resources. Some wish to pursue graduate training in one of the field’s subdisciplines, while others seek to use their anthropological training as preparation for professional schools, including law, medicine, public health, journalism, business, and engineering. There are many professions where the broad scientific, humanistic, and multicultural knowledge available through the study of anthropology can be useful—in education, healthcare, law, social work, business, human resources, public affairs, cultural resource management, or laboratory research.

Anthropological Research Opportunities at KU

  • Laboratory of Biological Anthropology (LBA): Founded in 1975, the LBA was established as a research center of the University of Kansas. The LBA has supported graduate and undergraduate student research in biological anthropology, human genetics, and genetic epidemiology.
  • Archaeological Research Center: Located in historic Spooner Hall on the main campus, the archaeology laboratory offers research space and support to Anthropology faculty and graduate students, Archaeology staff, Museum Studies interns, affiliate curators and research associates and visiting scholars.
  • Field Schools:  Anthropology faculty offer field schools in archaeology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology. Undergraduates and graduate students have conducted independent and collaborative research in the United States, including Alaska; Mexico, Central, and South America; sub-Saharan Africa; and Asia. 


For specific questions about our program, please contact us:
The University of Kansas
Department of Anthropology
Undergraduate Program
1415 Jayhawk Blvd.,
622 Fraser Hall
Lawrence, KS 66045
E-mail:  kuanthro@ku.edu
Phone: (785) 864-2630
Fax: (785) 864-5224
http://anthropology.ku.edu/overview-ba-anthropology
 

Requirements for the Minor

Students pursuing an anthropology minor must complete one of the following options:

Option I

Students selecting this option must complete 2 of the following:

Biological Anthropology (9-10)
Satisfied by:
Select one of the following fundamentals courses:3-4
Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology
Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology, Honors
Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology
Two courses from ANTH 340-ANTH 359, ANTH 440-ANTH 459, ANTH 503, ANTH 540-ANTH 559, ANTH 640-ANTH 6596
Linguistics (9)
Satisfied by:
Select one of the following introduction courses:3
Introductory Linguistics
Introductory Linguistics, Honors
Language in Culture and Society
Language in Culture and Society, Honors
Two courses from ANTH 322-ANTH 339, ANTH 502, ANTH 420-ANTH 439, ANTH 527-ANTH 539, ANTH 620-ANTH 6396
Sociocultural Anthropology (9-10)
Satisfied by:
Select one of the following:3-4
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, Honors
The Varieties of Human Experience
The Varieties of Human Experience, Honors
Fundamentals of Cultural Anthropology
The Varieties of Human Experience
Two courses from ANTH 361-ANTH 395, ANTH 501, ANTH 460-ANTH 495, ANTH 560-ANTH 595, ANTH 660-ANTH 695.6
Archaeology (9-10)
Satisfied by:
Select one of the following introductory courses:3-4
Introduction to Archaeology
Introduction to Archaeology, Honors
World Prehistory
Fundamentals of Archaeology
Two courses from ANTH 311-ANTH 319, ANTH 500, ANTH 406-ANTH 419, ANTH 504-ANTH 526, ANTH 604-ANTH 6196

Option II

Students selecting this option must complete two of the following areas:

General Anthropology (3)
Satisfied by the following:
ANTH 100General Anthropology3
or ANTH 300 Topics in Anthropology: _____
or ANTH 201 Culture and Health
or ANTH 202 Culture and Health, Honors
Anthropology Required Electives (15)
Satisfied by at least four courses numbered from ANTH 313 to ANTH 695, excluding ANTH 36012
One of the five may be any one of the following:3
Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology
Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology, Honors
Introductory Linguistics
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, Honors
Introduction to Archaeology
Introduction to Archaeology, Honors
The Varieties of Human Experience
The Varieties of Human Experience, Honors
Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology
Fundamentals of Cultural Anthropology
Fundamentals of Archaeology
The Varieties of Human Experience

Minor Hours & GPA

While completing all required courses, majors must also meet each of the following hour and grade point average minimum standards:

Minor Hours
Satisfied by 18 hours of minor courses.

Minor Hours in Residence
Satisfied by a minimum of 9 hours of junior/senior (300+) hours of KU resident credit in the minor. 

Minor Junior/Senior Hours
Satisfied by a minimum of 12 hours from junior/senior courses (300+) in the major.

Minor Graduation GPA
Satisfied by a minimum of a 2.0 GPA in all departmental courses in the minor. GPA calculations include all departmental courses in the field of study including Fs and repeated courses. See the Semester/Cumulative GPA Calculator.