Minor in Latin American Area Studies

The Undergraduate Minor in Latin American & Caribbean Studies provides students with a solid foundation of instruction on Latin American topics to supplement their primary field. There are two tracks within the minor:  the General Latin American and Caribbean Studies Track and the Indigenous Studies in Latin America (ISLA) Minor Track.  Both tracks require 3 hours of core classes followed by 15 hours of upper-division electives from a wide variety of courses approved by the center. No more than 1 course (3 hours) may be shared with the student's major.  For the General LACS minor track there is no language requirement.  The ISLA track requires two semesters of an indigenous language spoken in Latin America.  For the General Track LAC 100, LAC 300, LAC 332/LAC 333, or LAC 334/ANTH 379 can count as a core course.  For the ISLA Track ISP 101 may also count as a core course.

The General Track is for students from several departments and schools who do not wish to concentrate in language studies, but who are interested in aspects such as the history, culture, geography, anthropology, art history, politics, business or journalism of Latin America. This minor will be a great complement to a degree in, for example, business or architecture. There is great flexibility for students who wish to create their own program in order to acquire knowledge in various disciplines subjects.  The ISLA track is for similar students who are particularly interested in indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere and wish to study an indigenous language.  In particular, the ISLA track allows students to integrate coursework on indigenous population of what is now the United States with coursework on such populations elsewhere in the Western Hemisphere.

The Latin American & Caribbean Studies advisor will be glad to speak with any student who may be interested in obtaining the minor. If you would like to make an appointment with the undergraduate advisor or have any questions about the new minor, please contact the Center of Latin American & Caribbean Studies.